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Government Statistics > Gun Laws > Prohibited persons (most recent) by state

DEFINITION: Legislation regarding restrictions on a persons ability to legally purchase firearms.
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States (A to Z) Description
Alabama State law prohibits ownership, possession, or control of a handgun by a person who has been convicted in Alabama or elsewhere of committing or attempting to commit a crime of violence or is a drug addict or habitual drunkard. It is illegal to deliver a handgun to any person under the age of 18 or to one who the seller has reasonable cause to believe has been convicted of a crime of violence or is a drug addict, a habitual drunkard, or of unsound mind.
Alaska law prohibits handgun possession by or sale to a person who was convicted of a felony or adjudicated a delinquent minor for conduct that would constitute a felony if committed by an adult. It is illegal for a firearm to be possessed by or sold to a person whose physical or mental condition is substantially impaired by intoxicating liquor or controlled substances. An unemancipated minor under 16 years of age cannot possess a firearm without the consent of a parent or guardian.
American Samoa The Territory of American Samoa does not allow handguns on the island. Police officers are not required to carry firearms in the performance of their normal duties. However, police officers are authorized by statute to carry firearms, providing they have completed firearms training and are certified by a competent authority. A person's baggage is checked for firearms upon arrival. Shotguns of various gauges and .22-caliber rifles are allowed. It is unlawful to transfer a firearm to a person who is prohibited from possession, less than 18 years old (except in limited circumstances) or intoxicated. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who has been convicted of or confined for a dangerous felony in the territory or elsewhere during the preceding 5 years, or who is a fugitive from justice, a habitual drunkard, a drug addict, or currently adjudged mentally incompetent.
Arizona law makes it illegal to sell or transfer a firearm to a prohibited possessor, defined as any person who has been found to be mentally ill by a court, convicted of a felony, adjudicated delinquent, imprisoned, or serving a term of probation, parole, community supervision, work furlough, home arrest, or release on any other basis because of a domestic violence or felony offense. It is illegal to knowingly transfer a firearm to a person who intends to use the firearm in the commission of any felony. A firearm cannot be transferred to or possessed by a minor under the age of 18 except in limited circumstances.
Arkansas law provides that no person shall possess or own any firearm who has been convicted of a felony, adjudicated mentally ill, or committed involuntarily to any mental institution. No person under the age of 18 shall possess a handgun except in limited circumstances. It is illegal to furnish a firearm or other deadly weapon to a minor (under 18) without the consent of a parent or guardian, or to furnish a handgun or prohibited weapon to a felon, or to knowingly sell, rent, or transfer a firearm to a person prohibited by State or Federal law.
California prohibits possession of firearms by certain persons who were convicted of felonies or misdemeanors specified in State law; are addicted to any narcotic drug; are prohibited as a condition of probation; are subject to restraining orders; were adjudged wards of the juvenile court (until age 30); or are mentally ill as defined in State law. A firearm cannot be transferred to a minor (under 21 for handguns; under 18 for long guns) except in limited circumstances. Handgun owners must pass a safety course or show proof of exemption.
Colorado law forbids transfer of a firearm to any person who is prohibited by Federal or State law; arrested for or charged with a crime for which the person, if convicted, would be prohibited by Federal or State law; or the subject of an indictment, information, or felony complaint alleging a crime punishable by imprisonment exceeding 1 year. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who is a previous felony offender or was adjudicated for an act that would be a felony if committed by an adult. A firearm cannot be possessed by or transferred to a person who has not attained the age of 18 years, except in limited circumstances. It is illegal to knowingly obtain a firearm on behalf of a prohibited person.
Connecticut An eligibility certificate or pistol permit for a handgun cannot be issued to a person who did not complete a firearm safety course, or was convicted of a felony or any of 11 specified misdemeanors; convicted as delinquent for commission of a serious juvenile offense; discharged from custody within the preceding 20 years after being found not guilty of a crime by reason of mental disease; confined to a hospital for psychiatric disabilities within the preceding 12 months by court order; or is subject to a restraining, protective, or firearm seizure order, or is an illegal alien or under age 21. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who was convicted of a felony or a serious juvenile offense, or is subject to a restraining, protective, or firearm seizure order.
Delaware law prohibits purchaseor possession of a firearm by any person who is convicted of a felony or crime of violence involving physical injury to another; committed for a mental disorder to any hospital, mental institution, or sanitarium; convicted for unlawful use, possession, or sale of a narcotic, dangerous drug, central nervous system depressant or stimulant, or controlled substance; adjudicated delinquent for conduct which if committed by an adult would constitute a felony; subject to a protection from abuse order; or convicted of any misdemeanor crime of domestic violence as defined by statute. A juvenile cannot possess a handgun without adult supervision. It is illegal to transfer a firearm to a child under 18 years of age (without parental consent), a person who intends to commit certain crimes, or a prohibited person. A handgun cannot be sold to a person under the age of 21 or to an intoxicated person.
District of Columbia A registration certificate for a legal firearm cannot be issued to a person who is under 18 years of age (those between the ages of 18 and 21 need anotarized statement from a parent or guardian); convicted of or under indictment for a crime of violence or weapons offense; convicted of an offense involving drugs, assaults, or threats; acquitted by reason of insanity; adjudicated a chronic alcoholic; committed to a mental hospital; suffering from a physical defect and unable to use a firearm safely; adjudicated negligent in a firearm mishap causing death or serious injury; or otherwise ineligible under District law Registration applicants are required to demonstrate adequate vision and pass a written test evidencing satisfactory knowledge of District firearm laws.
Florida law prohibits the transfer of a firearm to a person who has been convicted of a felony, a delinquent act that would be a felony if committed by an adult, or a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence; had adjudication of guilt withheld or imposition of sentence suspended on a felony charge and 3 years have not elapsed since the completion date of any court provisions; has been indicted for a felony; is subject to a protective order; has been arrested for a "dangerous crime," or other offenses enumerated in State law; or is a minor under the age of 18 and lacks permission of a parent or guardian. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who is a felon, a delinquent, restrained by a domestic violence injunction, a violent career criminal, or mentally incompetent.
Georgia State law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who is on probation as a first offender or has been convicted of a felony in Georgia or elsewhere. A person under the age of 18 may only possess a handgun in certain circumstances, unless the person has been convicted of a forcible offense or adjudicated delinquent. A handgun cannot be sold to a person who is prohibited by State or Federal law, or has been involuntarily hospitalized within the preceding 5 years.
Guam law prohibits issuing a Firearms Identification Card to a person who is convicted of a felony; an alien; charged with a felony; adjudicated incompetent or committed to a mental institution; under the age of 18; convicted of a drug offense or a misdemeanor where personal injury or use of firearms was an element or factor of the offense; or who appears to suffer from a physical or mental disease which would adversely affect the safe use of the firearm applied for.
Hawaii State law prohibits ownership, possession, or control of a firearm by a person who is a fugitive from justice; indicted or bound over for or convicted in Hawaii or elsewhere of a felony, a crime of violence, or an illegal drug sale; addicted to drugs or alcohol; acquitted of a crime on grounds of mental disease; diagnosed as having significant behavioral, emotional, or mental disorders; under 25 years old and adjudicated to have committed certain crimes; or subject to a restraining order that prohibits firearm possession. A U.S. citizen must be 21 or more years of age to apply for a permit to acquire. Handgun permit applicants must complete a hunter education or firearm safety course. A long gun cannot be transferred to a person under the age of 18.
Idaho law does not allow persons convicted of certain felonies to ship, transport, possess, or receive firearms. It is unlawful for persons who were previously convicted of these felonies (or comparable offenses in other U.S. jurisdictions) to purchase, own, possess, or have custody or control of any firearm. A firearm cannot be sold to or possessed by a minor under the age of 18 without the consent of a parent or guardian.
Illinois Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) cards cannot be issued to persons who are prohibited by any Illinois statute or Federal law. State law prohibits firearm possession by persons who are under 21 years of age and have been convicted of misdemeanors other than a traffic offense, or adjudged delinquent; under 21 and lack parental consent to possess firearms; convicted felons; narcotic addicts; mentally ill or retarded; illegal aliens; subject to protective orders; or convicted of firearm or domestic violence offenses. It is illegal to make a straw purchase for a prohibited person.
Indiana law prohibits a sale, gift, or other transfer of a handgun or an assault weapon to a person under 18 years of age, except in limited circumstances. Further, it is unlawful to sell, give, or in any manner transfer a handgun to a person who is convicted of a felony, adjudicated a delinquent child for an act that would be a felony if committed by an adult, a drug abuser, an alcohol abuser, or mentally incompetent. A firearm cannot be possessed by a serious violent felon or a person less than 18 years of age, except in limited circumstances.
Iowa Applicants for permits to acquire pistols and revolvers must meet all Federal requirements for possessing firearms. Additionally, Iowa law prohibits issuing a permit to a person who is less than 21 years of age, has been convicted of a felony, is addicted to the use of alcohol or a controlled substance, has a history of repeated acts of violence, has been convicted of certain misdemeanor crimes of assault, or has been adjudged mentally incompetent. A person who is convicted of a felony or adjudicated delinquent for conduct that would constitute a felony if committed by an adult cannot possess or receive a firearm. It is illegal to sell, loan, give, or make available a long gun to a person below the age of 18 or a handgun to a person below the age of 21, except in limited circumstances.
Kansas It is illegal to knowingly transfer a firearm with a barrel less than 12 inches to a person under 18 years of age, or to knowingly transfer a firearm to a person who is both addicted to and an unlawful user of a controlled substance, or has been convicted of a felony described in the criminal disposal of firearms statute. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who is both addicted to and an unlawful user of a controlled substance, or has been convicted of a felony or adjudicated as a juvenile offender, under circumstances described in the criminal possession of a firearm statute. A person less than 18 years of age cannot knowingly possess a firearm with a barrel less than 12 inches except in limited circumstances.
Kentucky law prohibits the possession, manufacture, or transport of a firearm by a person who has been convicted of a felony in any State or Federal court, and by any youthful offender convicted of a felony offense under the laws of Kentucky. No person shall knowingly sell or transfer a firearm to any person prohibited from possessing the firearm. A handgun cannot be possessed, manufactured, or transported by a person under the age of 18 except in limited circumstances. It is unlawful in certain circumstances to provide a handgun to a person under the age of 18.
Louisiana law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who has been convicted of certain State felonies (or a similar offense in another jurisdiction), unless the person has not been convicted of a felony for a period of 10 years from the date of completion of sentence, probation, parole, or suspension of sentence. A firearm cannot be sold or otherwise delivered to a person under the age of 18. It is unlawful for a person who has not attained the age of 17 years to possess a handgun except in limited circumstances.
Maine law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who committed a crime punishable by imprisonment for 1 year or more; committed a firearms offense; engaged in conduct as a juvenile that if committed by an adult would have been a disqualifying offense; or is subject to a domestic violence restraining order. It is unlawful to transfer a firearm to a person under the age of 16, except for a parent or guardian of the minor.
Maryland A "regulated firearm" (handgun or assault weapon) cannot be transferred to or possessed by a person who is convicted of a crime of violence, a felony, or any common law offense or misdemeanor that carries more than a 2-year term of imprisonment; a fugitive; a habitual drunkard; addicted to a controlled substance; mentally disordered as defined in State law; under 21 years of age; less than 30 years of age and was adjudicated delinquent; or subject to a protective order. In addition, it is illegal to transfer a regulated firearm to a person who is visibly under the influence of alcohol or drugs or a participant in a straw purchase. A regulated firearms buyer is required to complete a safety training course. A person under the age of 18 cannot purchase a long gun.
Massachusetts A firearm identification card or license to carry will not be issued to a person who is convicted or adjudicated a youthful offender or delinquent child in Massachusetts, another State, or a federal jurisdiction for commission of a felony, a misdemeanor punishable by more than 2 years imprisonment, a violent crime, or a weapon or drug offense, or who is mentally ill, a drug or alcohol addict, under age, subject to a protection order, or a wanted person. A permit to purchase may be issued with restrictions to a person who is not a minor if it appears that the purchase is for a proper purpose. Temporary licenses and permits may be issued to non-residents and aliens, with certain restrictions.
Michigan prohibits issuing licenses to purchase handguns to persons who the licensing agency has probable cause to believe will use the gun to harm themselves or others, or to violate the law. Further, licenses cannot be issued to persons who are subject to various orders and dispositions; under the age of 18; not legal residents of the State; charged with or convicted of felonies; adjudged legally insane or incapacitated; or involuntarily committed due to mental illness. Firearms cannot be possessed by convicted felons or by persons under the age of 18 who are not supervised by an adult.
Minnesota law prohibits firearm possession by certain persons who are under the age of 18, convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for or charged with committing crimes of violence, mentally ill, drug addicts, domestic violence offenders, convicted of a crime punishable by imprisonment for more than 1 year, fugitives, or illegal aliens, or those who have been dishonorably discharged from the military or have renounced U.S. citizenship.
Mississippi law makes it unlawful to sell, give, or lend a firearm to a person whom the transferor knows to be a minor under 18 years of age, or intoxicated. A person convicted of a felony under the laws of Mississippi, any other State, or the United States cannot possess any firearm. It is an act of delinquency for a person under the age of 18 years to knowingly possess a handgun, except in limited circumstances.
Missouri law requires that an applicant for a permit to acquire a handgun be at least 21 years of age, a U.S. citizen, and a State resident for at least 6 months. A permit cannot be issued to a person who has pled guilty to or been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor as specified in State law; is a fugitive from justice or someone charged with a specified crime; has been dishonorably discharged from U.S. armed forces; is publicly known to be habitually intoxicated or drugged; is currently adjudged mentally incompetent; has been committed to a mental health facility; or has rendered a false statement on the application. It is unlawful to recklessly transfer a firearm to a person less than 18 years old (without consent of the child's parent or guardian) or to a person who is intoxicated. It is unlawful to receive a handgun without obtaining a valid permit or to deliver a handgun to a person without a valid permit.
Montana law prohibits purchase or possession of a firearm by a person who has been convicted of certain felonies or an equivalent offense in another jurisdiction. A minor child under the age of 14 years cannot carry or use firearms in public without adult supervision.
Nebraska A handgun transfer certificate cannot be issued to a person who is under 21 years of age or whose purchase or possession of a handgun would be in violation of applicable Federal, State, or local law. Nebraska law makes it unlawful for a handgun to be possessed by or transferred to a person under the age of 18, except in limited circumstances. A person who has previously been convicted of a felony in any United States jurisdiction or is a fugitive from justice cannot possess a firearm.
Nevada prohibits possession or control of a firearm by a person who is under 18 years of age (except in limited circumstances) or has been convicted of a felony under the laws of Nevada, another State, or the United States. It is illegal to recklessly or knowingly sell or barter a handgun to a child who is under the age of 18.
New Hampshire A firearm cannot be owned, possessed, or controlled by a person who has been convicted of certain felonies in any United States jurisdiction. No person shall sell, deliver, or otherwise transfer a firearm to a person who has been convicted in any jurisdiction of a felony. It is illegal to sell, barter, hire, lend, or give a handgun to a minor (under age 18) except in limited circumstances. A licensed dealer shall not sell handguns to nonresidents who are prohibited in their States of residence. It is illegal to knowingly attempt to purchase a firearm while subject to a protective order.
New Jersey A handgun permit or firearm identification card cannot be issued to a person who is convicted of a crime, drug dependent, confined for a mental disorder, a habitual drunkard, physically unable to handle firearms, found to have submitted false information, under age 18 (for an identification card) or 21 (for a permit), barred from firearm possession by court order, or adjudicated delinquent for a firearm offense. Issuance of a permit must not contravene the interest of public health, safety, or welfare.
New Mexico makes it unlawful for a person under the age of 19 to knowingly possess or transport a handgun, except in limited circumstances. It is unlawful for a firearm to be received, transported, or possessed by a felon, defined as a person convicted of a felony offense by a court of the United States or of any State or political subdivision thereof and less than ten years have passed since the person completed a sentence or period of probation (whichever is later) and the person has not been pardoned or received a deferred sentence.
New York law prohibits issuing a license to carry or possess a handgun to any person who is under 21, is not of good moral character, has been convicted of a felony or "serious offense," suffers from mental illness or has been confined to any hospital or institution for mental illness, has had a license revoked, is under a suspension or ineligibility order, or did not complete a safety course and test (Westchester County only), or concerning whom good cause exists for denial. A long gun cannot be possessed by a person who has been convicted of a felony or serious offense, or certified not suitable to possess a rifle or shotgun. A person under 16 cannot possess a firearm except in limited circumstances. It is unlawful to knowingly purchase a firearm on behalf of a prohibited person.
North Carolina law requires that an applicant for a handgun purchase permit be of good moral character and desire possession of the weapon for protection, target shooting, collecting, or hunting. A permit may not be issued to a person who is under indictment for or convicted of certain felonies; a fugitive; an unlawful user of drugs or a drug addict; adjudicated mentally incompetent or committed to a mental institution; an illegal alien; dishonorably discharged from the armed forces; subject to a domestic violence restraining order; or who has renounced U.S. citizenship. It is illegal for a minor under the age of 18 to possess a handgun and for a minor under the age of 12 to possess any firearm, except in limited circumstances. A firearm cannot be purchased by a person who has been restrained by a domestic violence order, convicted of a felony, acquitted by reason of insanity, or determined to lack the capacity to stand trial.
North Dakota law prohibits ownership, possession, or control of a firearm for a period of 10 years by a person who has been convicted anywhere of a felony involving violence or intimidation, or for a period of 5 years by a person convicted of any other felony or a misdemeanor involving violence or intimidation committed while using a firearm or dangerous weapon. A person who was diagnosed and confined or committed to a hospital or institution in North Dakota or elsewhere as mentally ill or mentally deficient is prohibited from purchasing, possessing, or controlling a firearm except when the person has not suffered from the disability for the previous three years. It is illegal for a handgun or other firearm to be transferred if the transferor knows or has reasonable cause to believe that the transferee is a prohibited person. A handgun cannot be possessed by or transferred to a person under the age of 18, except in limited circumstances.
Ohio law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who is a fugitive from justice; under indictment for or convicted of any felony offense of violence; adjudicated as a delinquent child for an offense that if committed by an adult would have been a felony offense of violence; under indictment for or convicted of any offense involving possession or sale of drugs; adjudicated as a delinquent child for an offense that if committed by an adult would have been an offense involving possession or sale of drugs; drug dependent; a chronic alcoholic; or under adjudication of mental incompetence. It is illegal to transfer a firearm to a prohibited person. A handgun cannot be transferred to or purchased by a person under 21 years of age and a firearm cannot be transferred to or purchased by a person under 18 years of age, except in limited circumstances.
Oklahoma law prohibits transfer of a firearm to a person who is under 18 years of age (except in limited circumstances), to any convicted felon or adjudicated delinquent, or to any individual who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs or is mentally or emotionally unbalanced or disturbed. It is unlawful for a firearm to be possessed or controlled by a person who is a convicted felon, adjudicated as a delinquent child or a youthful offender, or subject to Department of Corrections supervision, probation, parole, or inmate status.
Oregon law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who is under 18 years of age, a juvenile offender, a felon, or mentally ill. It is illegal to transfer a firearm to a person who is under 18 years of age, convicted of a felony, named in a felony warrant, free on felony pretrial release, found to be mentally ill, or convicted within the previous 4 years of a misdemeanor for assault 4th degree, menacing, reckless endangering, or intimidation 2nd degree.
Pennsylvania State law prohibits firearm possession by a person who is convicted of an "enumerated offense" or an equivalent offense in another jurisdiction; a fugitive from justice; convicted of certain drug offenses or equivalent offenses in other jurisdictions; convicted of three alcohol- related driving offenses in a 5-year period; adjudicated incompetent or involuntarily committed to a mental institution; an illegal alien; subject to an active protection from abuse order; adjudicated delinquent for certain offenses; or under 18 (with limited exceptions). Pennsylvania criminal history records that are prohibiting under Federal law include all convictions for a felony, a misdemeanor 1, or an ungraded misdemeanor for which a person could have been sentenced to more than 2 years in prison.
Puerto Rico The Superintendent of Police of Puerto Rico shall not issue a license to have or possess firearms to any person who has been convicted of any of the following offenses or of the attempt to commit the same, in or outside Puerto Rico: murder in any degree, manslaughter, kidnaping, rape, mayhem, intent to commit any felony, aggravated assault and battery with a weapon, robbery, burglary, misappropriation, aggravated misappropriation, arson, aggravated arson, or incest. In addition, a license cannot be issued to any person who is mentally unbalanced, a habitual drunkard, addicted to a controlled substance, or an alien, or who has been a citizen of the United States and renounced such citizenship, or has been adjudicated as a mental defective by a court or discharged from the armed forces under dishonorable conditions, or is under a court order prohibiting stalking, spying, threatening, or approaching an intimate partner or children of an intimate partner, or has a history of violence.
Rhode Island law prohibits purchase or possession of firearms by persons who are convicted of a crime of violence; fugitives from justice; convicted of certain felonies; subject to electronic surveillance or monitoring; mentally incompetent; drug addicts; habitual drunkards; or illegal aliens. It is unlawful to sell, transfer, give, or convey a firearm to a person under 18 years of age without consent of a parent or guardian. A person under 18 years of age cannot possess a firearm except in limited circumstances. Handgun purchasers must be 21 years of age and complete a firearm safety course. It is unlawful to sell a handgun to a person under the age of 21 or to a person otherwise prohibited.
South Carolina law prohibits handgun sales to or possession by any person who is convicted of a crime of violence in any U.S. jurisdiction; a fugitive from justice; a habitual drunkard or drug addict; adjudicated mentally incompetent; a member of a subversive organization; under 21 years of age (with limited exceptions); or adjudged unfit to carry or possess a pistol.
South Dakota law prohibits possession or control of a firearm by a person who has been convicted in the State or elsewhere of a crime of violence or a felony controlled substance/marijuana violation, or who has a prior conviction for drug possession. A person under the age of 18 cannot knowingly possess a handgun except in limited circumstances. It is illegal to transfer a firearm to a known prohibited person or to a person under the age of 18 if the transferor knows or reasonably believes that the minor recipient intends to use the firearm to commit a crime of violence.
Tennessee law prohibits the intentional, knowing, or reckless sale, loan, or gift of a firearm to a person who is a minor or intoxicated. A licensed dealer cannot sell a firearm to a person who is addicted to alcohol or ineligible to receive a firearm under 18 U.S.C. 922. A firearm transfer is denied if the buyer was charged with a crime for which a conviction would cause a prohibition under State or Federal law, and the final disposition of the case has not occurred or is not recorded. A handgun cannot be possessed by a person who is convicted of a felony involving the use of force, violence, or a deadly weapon, convicted of a felony drug offense, less than 18 (with limited exceptions), or under the influence of alcohol or any controlled substance.
Texas law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who has been convicted of any felony or a Class A misdemeanor involving a member of the person’s family or household, and five years have not elapsed since the person’s release from confinement or supervision. A firearm cannot be possessed by a person who is subject to certain family violence orders. It is unlawful to knowingly transfer a handgun to a person who intends to use it unlawfully or in the commission of an unlawful act, or is subject to an active protective order. A firearm cannot be knowingly transferred to a person who is younger than 18 years (without parental consent), intoxicated, or a convicted felon.
US Virgin Islands law provides that a license to have and possess a firearm cannot be issued to a person who has been convicted in or outside the territory of a crime of violence, a drug law violation, or a firearms law violation, or is mentally incompetent, a habitual drunkard, a drug addict, or deemed to be an improper person by the police. A firearm cannot be sold or furnished to a minor except in limited circumstances.
Utah A firearm cannot be purchased, transferred, or possessed by a Category 1 or Category 2 restricted person. A Category 1 restricted person has been convicted of a violent felony, is on parole or probation for a felony, is on parole from a secure facility, or has been adjudicated delinquent within the past 10 years for an offense which if committed by an adult would have been a violent felony. A Category 2 restricted person has been convicted of or is under indictment for a felony, has been adjudicated delinquent within the past 7 years for an offense which if committed by an adult would have been a felony, is an unlawful user of a controlled substance, is in possession of a dangerous weapon and a controlled substance, has been found not guilty by reason of insanity or found mentally incompetent to stand trial for a felony, has been adjudicated mentally defective or committed to a mental institution, is an illegal alien, has been dishonorably discharged from the armed forces, or has renounced U.S. citizenship. A minor under 18 cannot possess a handgun, sawed-off rifle or shotgun, or automatic weapon except as provided by Federal law. It is illegal to provide a firearm to a minor who is prohibited or lacks parental consent.
Vermont law prohibits a person, firm, or corporation, other than a parent or guardian, from selling or furnishing a firearm to a child under the age of 16 years. A handgun cannot be possessed by a child under the age of 16 years without the consent of a parent or guardian.
Virginia law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who is acquitted by reason of insanity; adjudicated incompetent or incapacitated; involuntarily committed; subject to a protective order; convicted of a felony; or found guilty as a juvenile of a delinquent act which would be a felony if committed by an adult. It is unlawful for an alien to possess an assault firearm, or for a person under 18 years of age to possess a handgun or assault firearm. Handguns cannot be purchased by certain persons who have been convicted of two misdemeanor drug offenses within 36 months.
Washington State law prohibits ownership, possession, or control of a firearm by a person who is convicted of a serious offense, felony, or misdemeanor as specified by statute; involuntarily committed for mental health treatment; under 18 years of age; or free on bond or personal recognizance pending trial, appeal or sentencing for a serious offense. Offenders under the supervision of the department of corrections shall not own, use, or possess firearms. A person at least 18 but less than 21 may possess a handgun only in certain places. State law does allow permissible firearms for children under 18 years of age for events such as hunting or trapping under a valid license, target shooting or practicing at an established range, or an organized competition.
West Virginia law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who is convicted in any court of a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding 1 year; addicted to alcohol; an unlawful user of or addicted to any controlled substance; adjudicated as a mental defective or committed involuntarily to a mental institution; an illegal alien; dishonorably discharged from the armed forces; subject to a domestic violence protective order; convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence; or a minor under the age of 18 (except in limited circumstances). It is illegal to sell, rent, give, or lend a firearm to a prohibited person.
Wisconsin State law prohibits firearm possession by or transfer to a person who has been convicted of a felony in Wisconsin or a similar crime elsewhere, adjudicated delinquent for an act that would be a felony if committed by an adult, found not guilty of a felony in Wisconsin or a similar offense in another jurisdiction by reason of mental disease or defect, committed for treatment and ordered not to possess a firearm, enjoined or ordered not to possess a firearm under a domestic violence injunction, or is under 18 years of age (except in limited circumstances).
Wyoming law prohibits possession of a firearm by a person who has previously pleaded guilty to or been convicted of committing or attempting to commit a violent felony or a felony of causing bodily injury to a peace officer, and has not been pardoned.
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CITATION

"Gun Laws > Prohibited persons by state", Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2003. Retrieved from http://www.StateMaster.com/graph/gov_gun_law_pro_per-government-gun-laws-prohibited-persons

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COMMENTARY     

gary owen
8th February 2012
Under SD state law and many others(state law) your right to own a firearm/civil rights
are revoked for 15yrs from the date of your release from prison or parole and is automatically restored after the 15yr period.
(SDCL 22-14-15).Under SDCL 22-14-15.1 the right to own a firearm following a felony drug conviction (and I believe a nonviolent felony)is revoked for 5yrs
after release from prison or completion of parole at which time the individuals civil rights including the right to own a firearm are restored.
Finally under SDCL 22-14-15.2 a conviction for a crime of misdemeanor violence. Which usually carrys a lifetime revocation of the right to own a firearm under federal law unless the state specifically restores those rights
after a revocation(a technicality of the "lautenburg amendment" designed to make it impossible to regain firearms rights, as few states if any revoked firearms rights as a result of a domestic violence conviction,a prerequisite for a state to restore rights is to lose them to begin with!)SDCL 22-14-15.2 does just that.Beginning july 1 2005 anyone convicted of a crime of misdemeanor violence loses thier right to own a firearm under state law.If that conviction was prior to july 1 '05' the individuals right to own a firearm are restored one yr later, july 1 '06'.Therafter anyone convicted under this staute for DV loses his civil rights including firearms rights for one yr after which his/her rights are restored including the right to own a firearm.See federal Law ,18 USC 921(9) (33)(B)(11)

I have done a considerable amount of research in this regard but it behooves you to do your own "due diligence" researching your own state laws
Merfe O. Bailey
3rd October 2010
If a person who has been cleared or served his term in jail and was disharge by parole officer and cleared from any offense for more than 18 years is she/he be allowed to own an air riffle for hunting ?
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