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Encyclopedia > Street fighter
Screenshot of Street Fighter (arcade version).
Screenshot of Street Fighter (arcade version).

Street Fighter (commonly abbreviated SF) is a popular series of fighting games in which the players pit combatants from around the world, each with his or her own special moves, against one another. The first game in the series was released by Capcom in 1987. screenshot Street_Fighter by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... screenshot Street_Fighter by me This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Screenshot of Kung Fu Master. ... Capcom (カプコン in Japanese) (TYO: 9697) is a leading Japanese developer and publisher of computer and video games. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


Series synopsis

Street Fighter (1987)

Street Fighter made little impact when it was first released in 1987. However, it had a novel control system which involved a joystick and two large hydraulic buttons, where the force of the button press determined the strength of the punch or kick, with three varying strengths of both punches and kicks. Many of these machines, because of players' tendencies to hit the buttons too hard and damage the controls, were retooled to using more traditional buttons, thus giving way to the six-button layout that would be the standard for Street Fighter games to come. This game also introduced the trademark special moves of the Fireball (Hadouken, 波動拳), Dragon Punch (Shouryuuken, 昇龍拳), and Hurricane Kick (Tatsumaki Senpuu Kyaku, 竜巻旋風脚); Note that Hadouken, Shouryuuken and Tatsumaki Senpuu Kyaku do not translate into the misnomers they are today, thanks to Capcom USA. In fact, they translate literally as Surge Fist (occasionally mistranslated as Wave Motion Fist), Rising Dragon Fist, and Tornado Whirlwind Foot. Also, however, they are notoriously much more difficult to perform at will than in the sequel, because they could easily knock out an opponent in one or three hits, which would seriously disrupt game balance. In this game, only Ryu or Ken were playable characters (depending on which side of the cabinet the player plays), and there were ten enemies to defeat, distributed in five countries: Street Fighter (1987) was the first fighting game in the Street Fighter series. ... For other uses, see Joystick (disambiguation). ... Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the use of liquids to perform mechanical tasks. ... The formula for Pokémon damage is an algebraic formula to compute the range of damage an attack can inflict in the Pokémon series of video games. ... A sequel is a work of fiction in literature, film, and other creative works that is produced after a completed work, and is set in the same universe but at a later time. ... Ryu Ryu (リュウ or 隆 RyÅ«, meaning Prosperity in Japanese) is a video game character created by Capcom, and is the main character of the Street Fighter series. ... Ken Masters Ken Masters (ケン・マスターズ or 拳, his first name, in Japanese, means Fist) is a video game character created by Capcom. ...

Despite its relative obscurity, it had some of the features that were improved on its sequel, and many of these characters appeared in the subsequent games. Retsu Retsu (烈) is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Geki Geki (激) is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Joe Joe is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Mike Mike is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Lee Lee (李) is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Gen Gen (元) is a character in the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Birdie Birdie is a video game character from Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Eagle Eagle is a character from Capcoms fighting game Street Fighter. ... Adon Adon is a character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Sagat Sagat is a boss character in the early editions of Capcoms Street Fighter fighting game series. ...


Street Fighter II (1991)

Screenshot of Street Fighter II (arcade version).
Screenshot of Street Fighter II (arcade version).

Street Fighter II, released on Capcom's CPS-1 arcade board in 1991 was one of the most popular games of the early 1990s, shaping the direction of arcade games for nearly a decade to follow. It is widely acknowledged as the premier fighting game of its era, due to its game balance with regard to the timing of attacks and blocks, which was unparalleled at the time; and due to "special moves" in which experienced players could execute complex fighting moves (special moves) by moving the joystick and tapping the buttons in certain combinations. Of course, this wasn't anything new and exclusive. These complicated fighting moves were given names, such as the Dragon Punch and the Hurricane Kick, which provided a framework for players to have conversations about their games. It also introduced the convention of "cancelling" or "interrupting" moves into other moves, which enabled a player to create sequences of continuous hits. Rumor has it that this ability to "cancel" moves into other moves was the result of a programming bug. Regardless, it gave the game much greater depth than it would have had otherwise. Also, this was the game which introduced to the gaming world the concept of the combo, a sequence of attacks which, when executed with proper timing, did not allow the opponent to interrupt the combination. Mastery of these techniques lead almost directly to the high-level competition which has been a cornerstone of this type of game ever since. The game features eight fighters that players can choose from: Ryu, Ken, Blanka, Zangief, Dhalsim, Guile, E. Honda, and Chun-Li), plus four bosses (Balrog, Vega, Sagat, and M. Bison). The character known as M. Bison in the original Japanese game was considered a legal liability by Capcom USA, his backstory very similar to that of Mike Tyson as, of course, was his name. In order to pre-empt any lawsuits on the part of Tyson, the names of all the bosses except Sagat (who had been around since the original Street Fighter), were re-arranged, something which has since caused no shortage of confusion when attempting description. Screenshot from Street Fighter 2 by User:Tyan23 This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... Screenshot from Street Fighter 2 by User:Tyan23 This is a screenshot of a copyrighted computer game or video game. ... Street Fighter II: The World Warrior (1991) was a highly popular and immensely successful fighting game created by Capcom. ... The CPS-1, or Capcom Play System 1 is an arcade system board by Capcom that debuted in 1988 with Forgotten Worlds. ... The 1990s refers to the years 1990 to 1999; the last decade of the 20th Century, but in an economical sense The Nineties is often considered to span from the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 to the September 11 attacks in 2001. ... Blanka Blanka is a character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Zangief (Зангиев) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Dhalsim Dhalsim is a video game character from the Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Guile Guile is a video game character in Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... E. Honda Edmond Honda (more commonly known as E. Honda) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Chun-Li (春麗) is a video game character created by Capcom. ... Flag Ship from the video game Gorf In video games, a boss (sometimes called a guardian) is a particularly large or difficult computer-controlled character that must be defeated at the end of a segment of a game, whether it be for a level, an episode, or the very end... Balrog Balrog (Mike Bison in Japan) is a character from the Street Fighter fighting game series. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Fighting Game Moves/Capcom/Vega Vega Vega (Balrog in Japan) is one of the bosses of the Street Fighter fighting game series. ... M. Bison M. Bison (sometimes referred to as Major Bison, but officially called Master Bison and known in Japan as Vega) is one of the primary bosses of the Street Fighter fighting game series. ... Michael Gerard Tyson, (born June 30, 1966, Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former American professional boxer and World Heavyweight Champion, and is considered by many to be one of the greatest heavyweight boxers of all time. ...


Street Fighter II was followed by a slew of other games of similar design, some by Capcom, some by other companies. One of the most well-known early competitors to Street Fighter II was Mortal Kombat, followed shortly afterwards by Virtua Fighter. However SNK , developed a reputation for fighting games very soon after Capcom; Art of Fighting, King of Fighters, and Fatal Fury are the three most notable examples, the first Fatal Fury game being released within months of SFII. Fandom between the two companies' games is often extremely divisive. SNK, having continued development of its fighting games such as The King Of Fighters which continues to this day, may be said to hold the upper hand in many countries in terms of popularity, one notable exception being the USA, where Street Fighter is still the better known and remembered fighting series. The reasons for this are many and varied, but SNK's insistence on releasing its games on the prohibitively expensive Neo-Geo home system (an SNK MVS arcade machine in all but name) and the limited distribution and promotion of these games outside of Japan may be one reason. Capcom gained a reputation for fairly rapid and reasonably faithful home conversions of its popular fighting games early on. The last completely new Street Fighter game to be released was Street Fighter III in 1997. The characters from the Street Fighter universe have appeared in numerous other Capcom fighting games, however. Capcom (カプコン in Japanese) (TYO: 9697) is a leading Japanese developer and publisher of computer and video games. ... Mortal Kombat is a 1992 fighting game by Midway. ... Virtua Fighter is a 1993 fighting game developed by the Sega studio AM2, headed by Yu Suzuki. ... SNK (now SNK Playmore) is a Japanese video game hardware and software company. ... Art of Fighting (龍虎の拳: Ryūko no Ken, in Japan and in video game music archives), or AOF (or RnK in video game music archives) for short, is a fighting game series created by SNK. It is one of the many SNK series that ties into The King of Fighters. ... The King of Fighters (or KOF for short) is a fighting game series by SNK that debuted in 1994. ... Fatal Fury (餓狼伝説 or Garou Densetsu in Japan) is a fighting game series developed by SNK for the Neo-Geo system. ... The original Neo-Geo console was greatly advanced for its time. ...


Street Fighter II': Champion Edition (1992)

Capcom created an update to Street Fighter II called Street Fighter II': Champion Edition. In this update, the four bosses were playable and some balance issues between characters were addressed. It also was the first fighting game to have same character matches leading to an extra costume color for each character, a feature that would later become commonplace in fighting games.


First Home Conversions

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System received a home conversion of Street Fighter II at this point, the game being released in mid-1992 in Japan and the USA and late 1992 in other territories. This game was notable for being the first home cartridge to be 16 megabits (2 megabytes) in size, an achivement since this was twice the size of any other game on the market. Nintendo initially had an exclusivity contract with Capcom that did not allow officially sanctioned versions of the game to be ported to other consoles. It would not be until after the release of Turbo Street Fighter II: Hyper Fighting on the SNES that another machine - the Mega Drive - would get its own version. in the meantime, however, several unlicensed conversions would appear on the market, primarily for Japanese home computers. The European SNES design is identical to the Super Famicom. ...


The Japanese and American SNES conversions were not nearly arcade perfect, but for the removal of some graphical detail due to the inferior hardware - frames of animation and sometimes, in order to save on storage space, animations for two different moves were re-used, Ken and Ryu's upward-jumping forward kick being one example. This watering-down of the home conversions due to RAM restraints would become a pet peeve of enthusiasts, who often complained that the home versions were not accurate representations of the games they would compete with in the arcades. Furthermore, due to an unfortunate Nintendo practice of simply reducing the framerate of PAL games from 60 Hz to 50 Hz, like all other PAL SNES games, the original conversion of SFII was 17% slower than it was intended to be. PAL has a slightly lower framerate, but a higher reolution than NTSC and the European conversions furthermore did not utilise the additional scanlines, leading to a squashed picture with black bars above and below it. Though the SNES version was a port from the original Street Fighter II, a code at the beginning of the game would unlock some features from the Champion Edition update, primarily the second colors and same-character matches. Sharma Ram (disambiguation) Ram Sharma is an amazing, talented teenager that lives in Canada His talents include rapping, comedy, and cooking He is bound to success! ... For other meanings of PAL see PAL (disambiguation). ...


Street Fighter II' Turbo: Hyper Fighting (1992)

After Street Fighter II': Champion Edition, many modified bootlegged versions of the game were released by certain distributors, the best known of which was Street Fighter II: Rainbow Edition. Many arcades (even large corporate owned ones) embraced these bootlegs. The bootlegs were widely distributed until Capcom released its reply to these games at the very end of 1992: Street Fighter II' Turbo: Hyper Fighting. Copyright infringement is the unauthorized use of copyrighted material in a manner that violates one of the copyright owners exclusive rights, such as the right to reproduce or perform the copyrighted work, or to make derivative works that build upon it. ... A video arcade (known as an amusement arcade in the United Kingdom) is a place where people play arcade video games. ...


Among the notable features of the bootleg versions were:

  • The added ability for players to change characters partway through a match.
  • The ability for characters to perform special moves in the air as if the character was on the ground.
  • Simplification of certain special moves (ie: no charge for charged moves).
  • Faster game pace.
  • Adding new moves to certain characters (such as Chun-Li's fireball), some of which were incorporated into Turbo.

The main draw of Turbo, upon its release, was the increase in game speed. Most characters also benefited from the addition of new moves and tweaks to the gaming balance to maintain competitive interest in the game. Differentiation between Ken and Ryu grew (Ken now being the character more focused on use of the Dragon Punch whose range and speed was increased, and Ryu receiving an improved Fireball); the bosses were more balanced against the rest of the playing field and 4 new costume colours were added to each character bringing the total to 6. The player was also allowed to choose the color he preferred, whereas previously in the arcade CE, the second color was only available in same-character matches.


Turbo was ported to the SNES and later became the first official conversion of the game on a non-Nintendo system when it appeared on the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis. The Sega version could not be given the full name of the title due to contractual exclusivity obligations between Capcom and Nintendo, and as such was renamed Street Fighter II: Special Champion Edition. These were the first versions of Street Fighter with variable speeds, where the player could himself decide the pace of the game at the option screen. Also, they offered a "Champion Edition mode", the Sega version giving the player the option of this at the start of the game, and the SNES version making it available with a code. In order to accommodate the game's complex 6-button system, Sega actually produced special 6-button gamepads for the originally 3-button Genesis. Original Sega Mega Drive (PAL version) Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) is a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in 1988. ... A contract is any legally-enforceable promise or set of promises made between parties. ...


Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers (1993)

In late 1993, Capcom released another version of the game, Super Street Fighter II: The New Challengers. As the subtitle implies, four new characters were added; Fei Long, Cammy, Dee Jay, and T. Hawk. The Super in the title suggested to gamers the graphical enhancements possible due to the new hardware (CPS-2) the game ran on. Though the game looked superficially similar, every character had in fact been redrawn and animations added to their repertoir, a move which some say lead to the release of the game much too early - the final build was rife with programming errors, bugs and balance issues and several of the team working on the game later publicly stated that the Turbo version was the game originally intended for release. Character balance proved to be the most significant flaw, notably the strength of T. Hawk making competitive play nearly useless. The game was less of a success than would have been desired. 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Fei Long in Super Street Fighter II. Fei Long (フェイロン) is a character from Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Cammy White. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... T. Hawk in Super Street Fighter II. Thunder Hawk (commonly referred to as T. Hawk) is a video game character from the fighting game series Street Fighter. ... The CPS-2, or Capcom Play System 2 is an arcade system board that debuted in 1993 with the game Super Street Fighter 2. ...


Among the positive changes were redrawn character portraits for the returning characters, 8 available colors for each character's costume, and new animations and special moves such as a Red Fireball for Ryu and a Flaming Dragon Punch for Ken, and a new fireball animation for Chun-Li (whose old animation was one of her standing punches with a doubled blue-colored Yoga Fire, but who now had a fan-pleasing pose in which she stuck out her rear as she cast the fireball). New dizzy animations were added (such as angels and reapers), and points incentives for performing the first attack and other achievements were added. This was also the first game in the series to formally incorporate a combo system; the computer would show the number of attacks in a combo and award points bonuses accordingly. Throws could also be cancelled by pressing a button at the moment the throw was initiated; the character would still be thrown, but would land on their feet and receive much less damage. Another improvement from previous games was the reversal, allowing quick recovery into an attack after landing on the ground or blocking, thus negating the opportunity in previous incarnations of "ticking" one's opponent, i.e. hitting an opponent with a light attack and immediately throwing them out of blockstun.


The game was ported to the Super Nintendo and Sega Mega Drive again, though the graphic refinements were largely absent from the returning characters.


Beating the Bootleggers

The aforementioned bootleg copies of previous Street Fighter titles were a prime reason for Capcom's move to the new CPS-2 hardware, a system with such impressive encryption that despite numerous attempts it was not decrypted until the early 2000's by a dedicated team on the internet. Capcom also included a safety battery in the CPS-2 boards, the expiration of which would wipe the volatile memory of the board and render it useless, though a procedure for bypassing this killswitch is now widely available on the Internet. All in all, Capcom effectively succeded in maintaining control of its intellectual property well after the commercial life of the games on the board. In cryptography, encryption is the process of obscuring information to make it unreadable without special knowledge. ... Four double-A (AA) rechargeable batteries In science and technology, a battery is a device that stores energy and makes it available in an electrical form. ... Volatile memory refers to computer memory that must be powered to maintain its data. ... Intellectual property or IP refers to a legal entitlement which sometimes attaches to the expressed form of an idea, or to some other intangible subject matter. ... Commerce is the trading of something of value between two entities. ...


Super Street Fighter II Turbo (1994)

In early 1994 came Super Street Fighter II Turbo, known in Japan as Super Street Fighter II X, originally released in the arcade & later on the 3DO. It featured enhanced speed, difficulty, and a remixed soundtrack. It also featured a new secret character, Akuma, known in Japan as Gouki, who had not only inherited all of Ryu and Ken's special moves, but could also produce a downward fireball in the air, and could perform a very powerful super move called the Shun Goku Satsu (literally means Instant Hell Murder). Akuma was only available through a very specific cheat code, a fact withheld by Capcom until some time after the game's release. This tactic of including hidden characters later became another mainstay of the genre. Due to his superior ability (he was, for example, the only character who had usable juggles), Akuma was collectively outlawed from competition. In later games, Capcom would attempt to redress this balance by burdening Akuma with a large damage handicap. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... 3DO Interactive Multiplayer is the name of a number of video game consoles released in 1993 and 1994 by Panasonic, Sanyo and Goldstar. ... Akuma Akuma (demon in Japanese), known in Japan as Gouki (豪鬼, powerful spirit), is a video game character created by Capcom. ... The aftermath of the Shun Goku Satsu. ...


SSFIIT became the first game in the series to have super moves and perhaps more importantly, introduced air juggles and overheads to the formula. Air juggles were moves where opponents could be held in a combo and attacked numerous times while still in the air, which had not been formally possible in the past, though several glitches in the previous games had allowed limited juggling. Overheads were ground-based attacks which would damage a crouching character, even if they were blocking. Previously, one could only damage such an opponent by attacking them from the air, leaving oneself vulnerable and promoting a strategy known as "turtling", wherein a player would simply crouch and block, waiting for the opponent to present him with an opening. The introduction of the overhead paved the way for what later become known as a high-low game, where overheads could be used to weed out a turtling player, thereby promoting faster, more aggressive play. The balance issues which had plagued the previous installment in the franchise were also mostly smoothed out. Almost all the characters again received numerous new animations and moves. Some, such as Ken, were almost completely overhauled. The short space of time in which all this had been achieved seemed to confirm fans' suspicions that Super Street Fighter II was not the final product and that these enhancements had been in progress even as that game was released. Super (short for super move or super combo) is a term regarding fighting games (video games). ...


Because of its numerous refinements, SSFIIT remains a fan favorite in the series to this day, a mainstay of competitions and considered the crowning achievement of the Street Fighter series by some; it invariably makes the top 3 of "Greatest Fighting Game Ever" lists, and occupies a special place in the hearts of enthusiasts as the final Street Fighter II installment. The game was released in the Street Fighter Collection sets for the Sega Saturn and PlayStation. It was released later for the Sega Dreamcast with an online matching service feature, but only in Japan via Sega's Dreamcast Direct service, and it is said to have been produced in less than 5000 copies for this console, a miniscule number by videogame standards. It is therefore highly prized by collectors. In 2001, a version of the game was released for the Game Boy Advance under the title Super Street Fighter II Turbo: Revival, and 15th Anniversary collections for the XBox and Playstation 2 in 2004 featured the game bundled with the later Street Fighter III :3rd Strike. The Sega Saturn (Japanese: セガサターン, Sega Saturn), is a video game console of the 32-bit era. ... The PlayStation (Japanese: プレイステーション) is a video game console of the 32-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid 1990s. ... The Sega Dreamcast (Japanese: ドリームキャスト; code-named Blackbelt, Dural and Katana during development) was Segas last video game console. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The Game Boy Advance (GBA) is a handheld videogame console developed, manufactured and marketed by Nintendo. ... The Microsoft Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console first released on November 15, 2001 in North America, then released on February 22, 2002 in Japan, and on March 14, 2002 in Europe. ... The PlayStation 2 (PS2) (Japanese: プレイステーション2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ...


Street Fighter Alpha/Zero (1995)

In 1995, a prequel of Street Fighter II and sequel of Street Fighter was introduced, called Street Fighter Alpha (Street Fighter Zero in Japan), again on the CPS-2 arcade board. This featured a completely new graphics engine and an entirely new gameplay system. Street Fighter Alpha represented the first overhaul of the Street Fighter series since its de facto inception 4 years earlier as Street Fighter II. Characters were drawn in an anime style and were meant to look more youthful than in their Street Fighter 2 incarnations. Perhaps most controversially, only 4 of the 10 initially selectable characters were from Street Fighter II: Ryu, Ken, Chun-Li and Sagat. The final boss was yet again Vega/M. Bison, who was selectable as a hidden character, as were Akuma and a new character called Dan, a tongue-in-cheek revision of the Ryu/Ken mold with references to SNK characters. The anime-like design of the characters (as opposed to the earlier attempts at realism) were seen as a direct consequence of Capcom's experiments with the Vampire/Darkstalkers games, which had been introduced a short time before and had been popular. Some of the new characters (Guy and Sodom) were taken from older Capcom games such as Final Fight, while others (Birdie and Adon) where competitors from the original Street Fighter. Others (Charlie and Rose) were original, although Charlie was very much Guile from Street Fighter II in all but name. It should be noted however that Charlie's fate in this game is a central plot point to Guile's in Street Fighter 2. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... The Street Fighter Alpha (in Japan and other parts of Asia, Street Fighter Zero) series of fighting games is part of the Street Fighter series by Capcom. ... This is the current Anime Collaboration of the Week. ...


Several new techniques were introduced, the most significant of which was arguably air blocking. Characters could now, with certain caveats, block when jumping, assuming no previous action had been performed while mid-air. Each character also now had several super combos - as opposed to SSFIIT where the super meter would reset after each round, the meter in SFA would retain charge between rounds. The meter also now had three different levels, and each super combo had three different levels. A super combo could thus inflict different amounts of damage; 1 button was used for a level 1 combo, 2 buttons for a level 2, and 3 for a level 3.


Another change, and a legacy from the Vampire games, was the introduction of chain combos, which were chains of normal attacks that could be interrupted into each other. This would allow for an introductory system of chains not requiring the intricate timing of combos in previous games. However, the flipside to this was the simplicity with which long chains of damaging attacks could be performed, removing some of the strategy element of the series.


Again fans were left with the feeling that this was a game rushed out before its development was completed. The lack of balance and the dearth of refinement were mildly criticized at the time, but this was perhaps outweighed by the interest the game engendered in the franchise with its new visuals and more spectacular gameplay. The arcade scene was booming in the mid-90's, an era when home machines were still significantly less advanced than their arcade counterparts, and Capcom was at the forefront of the industry. Quickly producing promising new product was more important than that time-consuming final layer of polish Capcom had been known for, though this was a trend throughout the industry. Several magazines again reported the producers and programmers as saying upon the release of Street Fighter Alpha 2 that it was the game they had wished the original to be. Alpha did, however, further the story of the characters and add meat to their backgrounds, though this was scarcely the reason the games were played.


It is interesting to note, however, that this was the only game released on Capcom's experimental CPS-changer home system, essentially a modified CPS-1 without the encryption of the newer CPS-2 board. It also, perhaps more importantly, was released on the Sony Playstation and Sega Saturn. the conversions were well-received, but were quite limited due to the smaller amount of RAM in the new-generation 3D machines, this problem particularly affecting the Playstation conversion. At this stage, Nintendo had effectively been abandoned by Capcom, its SNES console now aging and incapable (it was thought) of handling the new games. The Sega conversions were generally considered the best available, though they were not arcade perfect. Later Saturn ports utilised the RAM cartridges that were available for the machine so as to increase the animation quality of the games. A PC version was also made available. The original PlayStation was produced in a light grey colour; the more recent PSOne redesign sports a smaller more rounded case. ... The Sega Saturn (Japanese: セガサターン, Sega Saturn), is a video game console of the 32-bit era. ...


Street Fighter Alpha 2 (1996)

Everyone was expecting Capcom to release a sequel to Street Fighter Alpha. A number of factors conspired against the release of the sequel, however. The CPS-2 board upon which the games had recently been based was essentially little more than a slightly improved CPS-1 board, thus the architecture of the board dated back to Forgotten Worlds in 1988. Capcom was diverting resources to the development of 3D arcade games and the new CPS-3 board, which eventually debuted the following year. As such, sparse resources were devoted to Street Fighter Alpha 2, some reports stating that at times, the team working on it was said to number one person. Despite this context, the game was released in early 1996, 8 months after the original, and garnered immediate praise from the press and public alike. The CPS-3 or Capcom Play System 3 is an arcade system board that was introduced by Capcom in 1996 with the game Red Earth (also known as Warzard). ...


Correcting what had often been the primary complaint about SFA, Alpha 2 was a significantly more polished and balanced game. Primarily, the degree to which each character's set of moves complemented the others was again addressed.


Several new features were introduced in this incarnation: the chain combos were removed to encourage the precise timing the series had been known for; the concept of "Alpha counters" ("Zero counters" in Japan and Asia) were introduced, a set of moves using a bar of super charge which allowed a character to make an immediate counterattack from a blocking position. Also, characters could roll out of situations when thrown or tripped to the ground.


Custom combos, a concept which would be refined in later games, were also first seen in Alpha 2 - the player could press a combination of buttons to initiate a state where all moves could be cancelled into each other at increased speed, thus allowing the player to create their own super combos.


The three hidden characters from SFA were made readily selectable and five new characters were added, among them old SFII faces Dhalsim and Zangief together with later favourite Sakura. This was also the first appearance of 'Shin Akuma' in the home versions, the so-called "real" Akuma, capable of throwing double fireballs mid-air and all-around superior to the normal Akuma. He was a hidden character.


Numerous game magazines at the time voted SFA2 one of the arcade games of the year, the relatively minor changes to the fundamentals of the game and the extensive polishing of the same winning general approval from competitive fans also. The game was again ported to the Saturn and Playstation, the Saturn version again the superior port. A PC version was also available. Interestingly, a conversion of SFA2 was one of the last games on Nintendo's SNES, despite the doubts about it being feasible. Unsurprisingly, the SNES version could not measure up to those on the newer consoles.


A slightly refined version of SFA2 was later released on arcades in Japan and Asia, though not the West, called Street Fighter Zero 2 Alpha, which was later included in the Street Fighter Collection for the Sega Saturn and Sony Playstation. Cammy was included as a hidden character. It is generally opined that the tweaks to the game were detrimental to the balance of play.


Street Fighter III - The New Generation (1997)

Main article Street Fighter III Street Fighter III is a fighting game produced by Capcom, released in 1997 on Capcoms CPS-3 hardware, which is a continuation of the famous Street Fighter series. ...


The development of the sequel to Street Fighter II had reached its conclusion in 1997 together with the production of Capcom's new 2D arcade board, named CPS-3. CPS-3 was an interesting CD-ROM/ROM hybrid system with a large amount of RAM, needed to push the immense number of frames the development team had squeezed into the game. And initially, this was the SFIII marketing ploy, its immense number of frames of animation. In an early demonstration, Capcom showed that while a fireball in Street Fighter Alpha 2 was drawn with 5 frames, Street Fighter III used 14 frames for the same animation. Superlatives abounded about the visual style of the game: the art style was a slightly more mature development of the anime-inspired style of the Alpha games, but in terms of gameplay it was rather a return to the greater simplicity of Street Fighter II. Super combos, now called Super Arts had to be chosen from a selection of three for each character when that character was chosen, and only one Super Art could thus be used in fights. Super meter length and the number of backup charges depended on the Super Art in question, another method employed by Capcom to balance the game. The CPS-3 or Capcom Play System 3 is an arcade system board that was introduced by Capcom in 1996 with the game Red Earth (also known as Warzard). ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... ROM, Rom, or rom may refer to: Roma (people), whose members are called Rom (or Gypsy) Romany language (ISO 639 alpha-2, rom) Royal Ontario Museum Rom (Star Trek), the name of a Ferengi from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Sharma Ram (disambiguation) Ram Sharma is an amazing, talented teenager that lives in Canada His talents include rapping, comedy, and cooking He is bound to success! ...


What SFIII inevitably did do was use these fundamentals in a new way. EX attacks were "sub-super" strikes, where using two buttons while performing a special move would produce a souped-up version of that move but use some of the SA meter; every character now had a leap attack, often referred to as a universal overhead since pressing down, down and any button with any character would produce just that.


Two features of the new game proved contentious from the very beginning: the first was the inclusion of a 'parrying', confusingly called 'blocking' in the Japanese game (the word for blocking being 'guarding' there). This allowed rapid counterattacks after a successful parry, initially turning many high-level games extremely defensive, going against the grain of development of recent games.


Super Cancels were also new; whereas players had previously had to end combos with either a special or super attack, certain special attacks could now be cancelled directly into Super Arts (with adjusted, diminished damage done than if performed individually, however) to create longer, more complex combos.


Secondly, some critics pointed out that the character design and focus of the game had also shifted dramatically. Ryu was no longer the main character, as he had been since the original game, but rather focus was shifted to a new character, an American wrestler named Alex. Furthermore, many of the characters had a slightly surreal design seemingly at odds with the previously realistic theme of the Street Fighter games and more in line with the Vampire series.


Few games have divided their fans the way SFIII did at its release and continues to do today. The game was released just as the arcade market was beginning to decline and gaming was moving ever faster towards a totally 3D landscape. Capcom themselves had most likely realised this and had begun developing games following these trends, among them a 3D Street Fighter game.


Street Fighter III was not ported to a home system until 2000 when it was released in a double pack with it's follow-up SFIII: 2nd Impact for the Dreamcast. This article is about the year 2000. ...


Street Fighter III: 2nd Impact - Giant Attack (1998)

The original Street Fighter III had reverted gameplay to such a rudimentary strategic level that many fans felt the game was actually inferior to those in the Alpha series in light of some of the exclusions that had now become almost taken for granted - for example, Ken and Ryu could no longer perform Hurricane Kicks in the air, something present in the series since SFIIT:HF. Capcom thus reinserted several of these features into the inevitable update of Street Fighter Three, as well as reintroducing fan favourite Akuma as a secret opponent and hidden playable character and adding some new characters.


Akuma was now animated with the same fluency as other SFIII fighters, while Hugo was an enormous wrestler originally from Final Fight, adding to the game a much-needed pure grappler in the vein of Zangief. Though Alex was a wrestler, he was more of a hybrid character with some ranged attacks as well as command throws. Hugo was more in the traditional vein. Urien, another new character was essentially no more than a repainted sprite of the final boss Gill, but with different moves. The characters of Yun and Yang, who had had identical moves previously, were given distinct move sets and separate personalities. Other changes included the addition of more moves for many returning characters (some of which, surprisingly, would later be removed again in 3rd Strike). All-in-all 2nd Impact was much more notable for the new characters than the refinements in gameplay and Capcom would find success with this series still elusive.


Street Fighter Alpha 3 (1998)

Street Fighter Alpha 3 was less of a refinement of the previous games than a complete rethink. It is undoubtedly one of the, if not the, best-loved Street Fighter games released. Initially released on the CPS-2 system, it was ported to every major console and continues to garner conversions on new systems today.
Street Fighter Alpha 3 contained a number of new ideas that were later used in practically every fighting game released. Though the idea of "Ism"s - modes of play for each character that changed the system - may have been attributed to the King of Fighters games of 1996-1999, its implementation in SFA3 was much more radical. A-ism played like previous Alpha games; X-ism was reminiscent of the system in SSF2T, with a single super combo and a single bar; V-ism was a rethinking of the Custom Combos (now renamed Variable Combos) into a separate isms. Alpha 3 also included a much more lenient juggling system, so combos could be continued even after characters had been thrown into the air. It therefore became possible, for example, for Ken to perform a second Dragon Punch on an opponent that had been thrown into the air from a first one. Players could, however, recover from falls mid-air and counter-attack by pressing all three punch buttons simultaneously, or roll away upon landing with all three kicks. All characters also received air throws, an advantage previously only available to the select few. The number of characters was again increased, and further characters were unlocked on the arcade machine after some time had passed. SFA3 is still actively played in tournaments worldwide.
Street Fighter Alpha 3 was notable for being perhaps the first SF game that garnered more attention and fame on home systems than in the arcade. The game was initially ported to the Playstation and the Saturn (one of the last games to be released on that console), then to the Dreamcast in mid-'99 (though it wasn't released in the West until halfway through the next year).
The Dreamcast version (SFA3: Saikyo Dojo) included all the characters that could be unlocked in the Playstation version (notably more than the arcade game) available from the start. This version of SFA3 was then ported to the Naomi arcade board as "SFA3 Upper", including the new characters. The Dreamcast then received a rare conversion, released in Japan through the Dreamcast Direct service, which included online match play (Street Fighter Alpha 3: Saikyo Dojo for Matching Service); this is a very rare release. Later, the Gameboy Advance received a port of the game as well. As of writing (November 2005) a version for the Sony PSP called SFA3 MAX is planned in the near future. The GBA version contains an additional three characters, and the PSP version a further additional character. The Street Fighter Alpha (in Japan and other parts of Asia, Street Fighter Zero) series of fighting games is part of the Street Fighter series developed by Capcom. ... The finished PlayStation Portable, and a variety of accessories. ...


Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike - Fight For the Future (1999)

Capcom introduced its final revision of the Street Fighter III series (and to date, the final Street Fighter game to be released in the regular series) in the Summer of 1999. In terms of gameplay and feel, Third Strike, retained the general features the SFIII series had become known for and was almost as big a leap from its predecessor as SFA3 was from SFA2. Capcom (カプコン in Japanese) (TYO: 9697) is a leading Japanese developer and publisher of computer and video games. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


From Street Fighter 3: 2nd Impact, five new characters were added. Other characters saw Capcom facing the critics of the somewhat surreal character design of the series head on, new additions like Twelve and Q as bizarre as anything Capcom had designed for their Vampire series. Makoto is a young karate practitioner and Remy the almost required Guile clone with a twist. Akuma was also made a regularly playable character, bringing the total to 19. The final boss Gill could be selected secretly only in the console versions of the game (Dreamcast, Playstation 2, and XBOX). Two Karate practitioners engaging in competition style Karate. ... Guile is: GNU Guile Scheme interpreter (computing). ... Sega Dreamcast The Sega Dreamcast (Japanese: ドリームキャスト; code-named Katana during development) was Segas last video game console. ... The PlayStation 2 (PS2) (Japanese: プレイステーション2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... The Microsoft Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console first released on November 15, 2001 in North America, then released on February 22, 2002 in Japan, and on March 14, 2002 in Europe. ...


Third Strike refined the gameplay of the series as well. Whereas 2nd Impact had been fairly true to Street Fighter III: New Generation, 3rd Strike added Red Parries, where a character would not simply guard all the way through a combo: once the first hit had been guarded, but could begin parrying, and thus counterattacking, any attack in a combo while guarding. The skill lay in timing the parry and not leaving oneself open to damage if it missed. Target combos were also new - similar to the chain combos in Darkstalkers and SFA with the exception that each character only had specific chains of moves that could be linked into each-other.


Some of the lessons learned in SFA3 were also carried over to Third Strike, among them combinations of buttons replacing directional commands for actions, a feature arguably first introduced by SNK in its games. Thus, a leap attack was now medium punch + medium kick instead of down, down + any button. Throws were also now performed with a two-button combination, and could be missed if the player was not close enough to the opponent, triggering a short animation during which the player could be attacked.


Third Strike is commonly considered the pinnacle of the SFIII series, with some also considering it the finest Street Fighter of all—an honor once bestowed upon it by gaming magazine Electronic Gaming Monthly. It was far more popular in Japan than the West, where the traditional Street Fighter games had mostly fallen out of favour with consumers in the face of the more spectacular Vs. games and 3D fighters. EGMs December 2005 cover. ... 3-D or 3D abbreviates three dimensional and is often related to a stereoscopic display that exploits binocular vision. ...


Home conversion of the SFIII games were considered near-impossible with any degree of arcade authenticity for a long while given the tremendously powerful 2D hardware of the CPS-3 system the games originally ran on. Capcom did manage conversions for the Sega Dreamcast in 2000, the first two installments being bundled as SFIII: Double Impact (W Impact in Japan) and Third Strike being released separately a few months later. Conversions for the PS2 followed in 2004 as a part of a 15th Anniversary bundle with a special version of Super Street Fighter II Turbo. This bundle was released for the Xbox later in 2004. In Japan, the game was also released independently for the PS2 in April 2004. Some opine that the PS2 conversions are actually superior to the Dreamcast conversions, despite the latter hardware's superior 2D credentials.


Street Fighter EX series

A 3D version of the series, Street Fighter EX, was released in the arcades in 1996 and was developed by the company Arika. It was later followed by two sequels and numerous updates: The rewrite of this article is being devised at Talk:3D computer graphics/Temp. ... The title screen for Street Fighter EX. Street Fighter EX is a series of fighting games. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...

  • Street Fighter EX (Arcade, 1996)
    • Street Fighter EX Plus (Arcade, 1997)
    • Street Fighter EX Plus Alpha (Playstation, 1997)
  • Street Fighter EX 2 (Arcade, 1992)
    • Street Fighter EX 2 Plus (Arcade, 1999/PSX, 2000)
  • Street Fighter EX 3 (PS2, 2000)

The PlayStation (Japanese: プレイステーション) is a video game console of the 32-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid 1990s. ...

Future Street Fighter Games

Prior to Jamma show (officially the Amusement Machine Show) in Tokyo in 2005, rumorus were circulating that Capcom would unveil a new entry in the series, most probably Street Fighter 4. These reports proved erroneous, however. Though Capcom dropped hints that a new "combat game" would be unveiled at the show, this turned out to be War of the Grail, a 3D battlefield game. Several factors would seem to count against the possibility of the series receiving another instalment: 2D games have decreased in popularity dramatically, and 2D fighters are now considered little more than a niche market. This is also coupled to the rising costs of producing video games in the modern industry - Capcom has reused the sprites of some of the characters in its games for over a decade at this point, unable to justify the expense of redrawing them against projected sales of the games. Sprite may be: Sprite (creature), a class of preternatural legendary creatures commonly associated with elves, fairies, pixies, and spirits Sprite (computer graphics), a two-dimensional pre-rendered figure, usually containing some transparency Sprite (soft drink), the brand name of a lemon-lime beverage produced by The Coca-Cola Company Sprite...


Recent 2D Capcom fighters have focused more on the formula of SFA3 and the Vs, series by including as many characters as posisble, often from different fighting series. Examples of this include the Capcom Vs. SNK games and the more recent Capcom Fighting Evolution. Another trend is the near-extinction in arcades of traditional arcade games such as the Street Fighter series in favour of party games (witness Dance Dance Revolution and similar games). Furthermore, current-generation arcade and home hardware have a smaller amount of RAM (into which animation frames are loaded) than a new-generation 2D game would probably require. Capcom Fighting Evolution (Japanese: カプコン ファイティング ジャム or Capcom Fighting Jam outside of North America) is a fighting game from Capcom. ... The main gameplay screen of Dance Dance Revolution. ...


Some have speculated that Capcom may make the move to 3D with Street Fighter 4, but given the existence of the Street Fighter EX series, which combined 3D graphics with essentially 2D fighting mechanics, this again seems unlikely. As of the current time, we are therefore unlikely to see a new instalment in the Street Fighter franchise proper.


Adaptations for other media

Animation and Motion pictures

The series has inspired several movies. Films are produced by recording actual people and objects with cameras, or by creating them using animation techniques and/or special effects. ...

Street Fighter is a 1994 action movie based on the hugely popular fighting game Street Fighter II by Capcom. ... Van Damme (right), with Lorenzo Lamas. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Street Fighter Alpha (Street Fighter Zero: The Animation in Japan) is a movie based on the popular fighting game, Street Fighter Alpha 2. ... Street Fighter is an animated series that was featured on the USA Networks Cartoon Express and Action Extreme Team. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Cover of Manga Entertainments Street Fighter II V DVD set. ... This is the current Anime Collaboration of the Week. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Toyota redirects here. ... Street Fighter Alpha (Street Fighter Zero: The Animation in Japan) is a movie based on the popular fighting game, Street Fighter Alpha 2. ... Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ...

Literature

In terms of literature, there have been various Street Fighter books and comics produced, including Street Fighter II: The Manga, and a role playing game adaptation released by White Wolf in 1994. Look up book in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... A role-playing game (RPG) is a type of game in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create narratives. ... The logo of White Wolf Publishing, one of White Wolf, Inc. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


UDON is currently producing a succesfull Street Fighter comic, after completing the first arc with issue 0-14, they have changed the name of the series from "Street Fighter" towards "Street Fighter II". In 2005, UDON translated Street Fighter: Eternal Challenge. This is the first SF history and art book written in English. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UDON Entertainment Corporation is a studio (or art collective) of Asian-influenced, and mostly Asian American, comic book creators. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Software piracy

This game has been ported illegally to the Famicom in Asia. It has appeared in several multicarts in China. One of the more popular titles was known as Master Fighter, that had several sequels. The copyright infringement of software is often called software piracy by those seeking to reduce its incidence. ... The Nintendo Entertainment System (U.S., Europe, and Australia) NES redirects here. ... Asia is the largest and most populous of the Earths continents. ... In video game parlance, a multicart is a cartridge that contains more than one game. ...


See also

These are video games that are part of the Street Fighter fighting game series. ... This is a list of characters from the Street Fighter fighting game series. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Street Fighter

  Results from FactBites:
 
Street Fighter (series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7213 words)
Street Fighter (commonly abbreviated SF) is a popular series of fighting games in which the players pit combatants from around the world, each with his or her own special moves, against one another.
Street Fighter II, released on Capcom's CPS-1 arcade board in 1991 was one of the most popular games of the early 1990s, shaping the direction of arcade games for nearly a decade to follow.
Street Fighter Alpha 3 was less of a refinement of the previous games than a complete rethink.
Street Fighter II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1742 words)
Street Fighter II, in its first three versions, were ported for the Super NES (Champion Edition was only released in Japan), which were the most popular ports of this game.
Street Fighter II was adapted into two different movies in 1994, an animated movie in Japan (later released as Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie in the U.S.) and an American-produced live-action film, Street Fighter.
Street Fighter II and the other two original versions (Champion Edition and Turbo) are featured in Capcom Classics Collection, a compilation of classic Capcom games from the 80s to the early 90s, available for the Xbox and Playstation 2.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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