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Encyclopedia > Canonization
Icon of St. Cyprian of Carthage, who urged diligence in the process of canonization.

Canonization (also spelled Canonisation) is the act by which a Christian Church declares a deceased person to be a saint, inscribing that person in the canon, or list, of recognized saints. Originally, individuals were recognized as saints without any formal process, as happened, for instance, in the case of Saint Peter and the Blessed Virgin Mary. A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... Image File history File links Stcyprian. ... Image File history File links Stcyprian. ... This page is about Cyprian, bishop of Carthage. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saint (disambiguation). ... St Peter redirects here. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...


In the Catholic Church (excepting the Eastern Catholic Churches), the act of canonization is now reserved to the Holy See and occurs at the conclusion of a long process requiring extensive proof that the person proposed for canonization lived, and died, in such an exemplary and holy way that he or she is worthy to be recognized as a saint. The Church's official recognition of sanctity implies that the persons are now in heavenly glory, that they may be publicly invoked and mentioned officially in the Liturgy of the Church, most especially in the Litany of the Saints in the Canon of the Mass. Other Christian Churches still follow the older practice (see, for instance, below on Eastern Orthodox practice). Catholic Church redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... The Litany of the Saints or Litaniae Sanctorum is a sacred prayer of the Roman Catholic Church and its Eastern Rite. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia Canon of the Mass (Canon Missæ, Canon Actionis) is the name used in the Roman Missal of the Tridentine period for the part of the Mass that began after the Sanctus with the words Te igitur. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ...


Canonization, whether formal or informal, does not make someone a saint: it is only a declaration that the person is a saint and was a saint even before canonization. It is generally recognized that there are many more saints in heaven than have been canonized on earth.[1]

Contents

Historical development of the process

The first persons whom Christians honoured as saints were the martyrs. Their death for their faith was considered the supreme and undeniable witness to their faith in Christ. The fame of many of them spread widely, leading to their veneration far outside the area in which they lived and died. For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ...


The Latin Rite Canon of the Mass contains the names only of martyrs, along with that of the Virgin Mary and, since 1962, that of Saint Joseph. The Latin Rite is one of the 23 sui iuris particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ...


By the fourth century, however, "confessors", people who had confessed their faith not by dying but by word and life, began to be venerated publicly. Examples of such people are Saint Hilarion and Saint Ephrem the Syrian in the East, and Saint Martin of Tours and Saint Hilary of Poitiers in the West. Their names were inserted in the diptychs, the lists of saints explicitly venerated in the liturgy, and their tombs were honoured like those of the martyrs. Since the witness of their lives was not as unequivocal as that of the martyrs, they were venerated publicly only with the approval by the local bishop. The title confessor is used in the Christian Church in two separate ways. ... St. ... Ephrem the Syrian (Syriac: , ;Greek: ; Latin: Ephraem Syrus; 306–373) was a deacon, prolific Syriac language hymn writer and theologian of the 4th century. ... Saint Martin of Tours (Latin: Martinus), (316/317 – November 11, 397 in Candes) was a bishop of Tours whose shrine became a famous stopping-point for pilgrims on the road to Santiago de Compostela. ... Hilarius or Hilary (c. ... Ivory consular diptych of Areobindus, Byzantium, 506 AD, Louvre museum A diptych is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article...


This approval was required even for veneration of a reputed martyr. In his history of the Donatist heresy, Saint Optatus recounts that at Carthage a Christian matron, named Lucilla, incurred the censures of the Church for having kissed the relics of a reputed martyr whose claims to martyrdom had not been juridically proved. And Saint Cyprian (died 258) recommended that the utmost diligence be observed in investigating the claims of those who were said to have died for the faith. All the circumstances accompanying the martyrdom were to be inquired into; the faith of those who suffered, and the motives that animated them were to be rigorously examined, in order to prevent the recognition of undeserving persons. Evidence was sought from the court records of the trials or from people who had been present at the trials. Saint Optatus, sometimes anglicized as St. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... This page is about Cyprian, bishop of Carthage. ...


Saint Augustine of Hippo (died 430) tells of the procedure which obtained in his day for the recognition of a martyr. The bishop of the diocese in which the martyrdom took place set up a canonical process for conducting the inquiry with the utmost severity. The acts of the process were sent either to the Metropolitan or Primate, who carefully examined the cause, and, after consultation with the suffragan bishops, declared whether the defunct was worthy of the name of 'martyr' and public veneration. Acts of formal recognition, such as the erection of an altar over the saint's tomb or transferring the saint's relics to a church, were preceded by formal inquiries into the sanctity of the person's life and the miracles attributed to that person's intercession. Such acts of recognition of a saint were authoritative, in the strict sense, only for the diocese or ecclesiastical province for which they were issued, but with the spread of the fame of a saint, were often accepted elsewhere also. Augustinus redirects here. ...


The Holy See began to be asked to intervene, so as to ensure a more authoritative decision. The canonization of Saint Udalric, Bishop of Augsburg, by Pope John XV in 993 is the first undoubted example of a papal canonization of a saint from outside Rome. (Some historians maintain that the first such canonization was that of Saint Swibert by Pope Leo III in 804.) Thereafter recourse was had with greater frequency to the judgement of the Popes; and in 1173 Pope Alexander III, after reprimanding certain bishops for having permitted veneration of a man who was far from being a saint, decreed: "You shall not therefore presume to honour him in the future; for, even if miracles were worked through him, it is not lawful for you to venerate him as a saint without the authority of the Catholic Church."[2] John XV, pope from 984 to 996, generally recognized as the successor of Boniface VII, the pope John who was said to have ruled for four months after John XIV, being now omitted by the best authorities. ... Infobox Pope| English name=Leo III| image= | birth_name=Unknown| term_start=December 27, 795 | term_end=June 12, 816| predecessor=Adrian I| successor=Stephen IV| birth_date=Date of birth unknown| birthplace=Rome, Italy| dead=dead|death_date=June 12, 816| deathplace=Place of death unknown| other=Leo}} Pope Leo III (died June 12... Pope Alexander III (c. ...


The procedure initiated by the text of Alexander III, confirmed by a Bull of Pope Innocent III in the year 1200, issued on the occasion of the canonization of Saint Cunegunde, led to increasingly elaborate inquiries. Pope Innocent III (c. ...


For information on the procedure in use before 1983, see Historical process of beatification and canonization. The process of beatification and canonization has undergone various changes in the history of the Catholic Church. ...


Current procedure in the Roman Catholic Church

Pope John Paul II's apostolic constitution Divinus Perfectionis Magister of 25 January 1983 and the norms issued by the Congregation for the Causes of Saints on 7 February 1983 for its implementation on diocesan level continued the work of simplification already initiated by Pope Paul VI. Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... An Apostolic constitution (Latin constitutio apostolica) is a very solemn decree issued by the Pope of the Roman Catholic Church. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Congregation for the Causes of Saints (Congregatio de Causis Sanctorum) is the congregation of the Roman Curia which oversees the complex process which leads to the canonization of saints, passing through the steps of a declaration of heroic virtues and beatification. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ...


The canonisation begins at the diocesan level, with the bishop giving permission to open an investigation into the virtues of everyone.[3] This investigation may open no sooner than five years after the death of the person being investigated.[4] However, the pope has the authority to waive this waiting period, as was done for Mother Teresa by Pope John Paul II [5] and for John Paul II himself by his immediate successor, Benedict XVI.[6] When sufficient information has been gathered, the subject of the investigation is called "Servant of God", and the process is transferred to the Roman Curia—the Congregation for the Causes of the Saints—where it is assigned a postulator, whose task is to gather all information about the life of the Servant of God. When enough information has been gathered, the congregation will recommend to the pope that he make a proclamation of the Servant of God's heroic virtue, which entitles him or her to receive the title "Venerable". A Venerable has as of yet no feast day, but prayer cards may be printed to encourage the faithful to pray for a miracle wrought by his or her intercession. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Mother Teresa (born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu IPA: ) (August 26, 1910 – September 5, 1997) was a Roman Catholic nun who founded the Missionaries of Charity and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 for her humanitarian work. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... The Roman Curia — usually called the Vatican — is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals. ... Headline text In the Roman Catholic Church, a postulator is a church official who presents a plea for canonization or beatification of a person they think should become a saint. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Heroic virtue is a phrase coined by Augustine of Hippo to describe the virtue of early Christian martyrs. ... A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... A German holy card from around 1910 depicts the Crucifixion. ... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ...


The next step depends on whether the Venerable is a martyr. For a martyr, the pope has only to make a declaration of martyrdom, which then allows beatification, yielding the title "Blessed" (abbreviated "Bl.") and a feast day in the Blessed's home diocese and perhaps some other local calendars. If the Venerable was not a martyr, it must be proven that a miracle has taken place by his or her intercession. Today, these miracles are almost always miraculous cures, as these are the easiest to establish based on the Catholic Church's requirements for a "miracle." (The patient was sick, there was no known cure for the ailment, prayers were directed to the Venerable, the patient was cured, and doctors cannot explain it.) For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ...


To pass from Blessed to "Saint" (abbreviated "St." and "St"), one (more) miracle is necessary. A saint's feast day is considered universal, and may be celebrated anywhere within the Catholic Church, although it may or may not appear on the general calendar.


In the case of persons that common usage has called saints from "time immemorial" (in practice, since before 1500 or so), the Church may carry out a "confirmation of cultus", which is much simpler. For example, Saint Hermann Joseph had his veneration confirmed by Pope John Paul II. In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of...


In the case of the Eastern Catholic Churches, individual churches sui juris retain, in theory, the right to glorify (see next section on Eastern Orthodox practice) saints for their own jurisdictions, though this has rarely happened in practice. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The...


Although a recognition of sainthood by the Pope does not directly concern a fact of divine revelation, it must still be "definitively held" by the faithful as infallible under (at the very least) the Universal Magisterium of the Church since it is a truth connected to revelation by historical necessity.[7][8] The Infallibility of the Church is the belief that the Holy Spirit will not allow the Church to err in its belief or teaching under certain circumstances. ...


Eastern Orthodox practice—Glorification

Tsar Alexis praying before the relics of Metropolitan Philip.

Within the Eastern Orthodox Church, the canonization—or, more properly from the Orthodox perspective, the "Glorification"—of saints differs from the western tradition in both theology and practice. The Glorification of saints is considered to be an act of God, not a declaration of the hierarchy. The official recognition of saints grows from the consensus of the church. Image File history File links Litovchenko. ... Image File history File links Litovchenko. ... Alexey Mikhailovich Romanov (In Russian Алексей Михаилович Романов) (March 9, 1629 (O.S.) - January 29, 1676 (O.S.)) was a Tsar of Russia during some of the most eventful decades of the mid-17th century. ... Malyuta Skuratov approaching Metropolitan Philip in order to kill him (painting from 1898). ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ...


When an individual who has been sanctified by the grace of the Holy Spirit falls asleep in the Lord, God may or may not choose to glorify the individual through the manifestation of miracles. If He does, the devotion to the saint will normally grow from the "grass roots" level. Eventually, as the Holy Spirit manifests more miracles, the devotion to the individual grows. At this point there are no formal prayers by the Church to the individual. Rather, memorial services (Greek: Parastas, Russian: Panikhida) are served at the grave of the individual, praying for him or her—though an individual may pray privately to someone who has not yet been formally Glorified, and even commission Icons, which may be kept in the home but not displayed in the Temple (church building). Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... For other uses, see Miracle (disambiguation). ... A memorial service (Greek: μνημόσυνο, mnemósyno, memorial, or παραστάς, parastás, wake; Church Slavonic: панахіда, panahída, панихїда, panikhída) is a liturgical observance in honor of the departed which is served in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches. ... The Savior Not Made By Hands (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek εικων, eikon, image) is an artistic visual representation or symbol of anything considered holy and divine, such as God, saints or deities. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ...


Eventually, the evidence of their saintliness will have grown to such a degree that a formal Service of Glorification will be scheduled. A Glorification may be performed by any Bishop within his Diocese, though such services are usually performed under the auspices of a Synod of Bishops. Often there will be a formal investigation to be sure that the individual is Orthodox in their faith, has led a life worthy of emulation, and that the reports of miracles attributed to their intercessions are verifiable. The Glorification service does not "make" the individual a saint; rather, the Church is simply making a formal acknowledgement of what God has already manifested. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...

The incorrupt Relics of St. John (Maximovitch) at the time of his Glorification in San Francisco

Sometimes, one of the signs of sanctification is the condition of the Relics of the Saint. Some saints will be incorrupt, meaning that their remains do not decay under conditions when they normally would (natural mummification is not the same as incorruption). Sometimes even when the flesh does decay the bones themselves will manifest signs of sanctity. They may be honey colored or give off a sweet aroma. Some relics will exude myrrh. The absence of such manifestations is not necessarily a sign that the person is not a Saint. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Saint John (Maximovitch) of Shanghai and San Francisco was a noted Eastern Orthodox ascetic and hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia (ROCOR) who was active in the mid-20th century. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Relics can be: Relics: the remains of saints (usually bones), honored in the Catholic and Orthodox churches. ... St. ... For other uses, see Mummy (disambiguation). ... The Odour of Sanctity or Odor of Sanctity, according to the Catholic Church, is commonly understood to mean a specific scent (often compared to flowers) that emanates from the bodies of saints, especially from the wounds of stigmata. ... 100g of Myrrh. ...


In some traditions, an individual who is being considered for Glorification will be referred to as "Blessed," though there is no formal service of "beatification" in the Orthodox Church. It should be noted that some fully-glorified saints are also referred to as "Blessed," such as a Holy Fool for Christ (for instance, "Blessed St. Xenia") or saints who have been given this particular appellation (such as, "Blessed Augustine", "Blessed Jerome", and others). In such cases the title "Blessed" is in no way intended to imply that they are less than fully saints of the Church. The yurodivy (accented on the second syllable, юро́дивый) is the Russian version of the holy fool. ... Icon of St. ... Augustinus redirects here. ... Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a town in Quebec, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. ...


The particulars of the Service of Glorification may differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but normally it involves the formal inscribing of the individual's name into the Calendar of Saints (assigning a special day of the year on which their feast day is to be celebrated annually), the chanting of a service in honor of the Saint (normally using specially commissioned hymns which are chanted for the first time at the Glorification) and the unveiling of an Icon of the new Saint. Before the Glorification itself, there may be a special "Last Panikhida," a solemn Requiem at which, for the last time, the Church prays for the repose of their soul. After the Glorification, the Church will no longer serve a Panikhida for the repose of his soul, but instead a Paraklesis or Moleben will be served to implore their intercessions before the Throne of God. The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Requiem (from the Latin requiés, rest) or Requiem Mass (informally, the funeral Mass), also known formally (in Latin) as the Missa pro defunctis or Missa defunctorum, is a liturgical service of the Roman Catholic Church as well as the Anglican/ Episcopalian High Church and certain Lutheran Churches in... A memorial service (Greek: μνημόσυνο, mnemósyno, memorial, or παραστάς, parastás, wake; Church Slavonic: панахіда, panahída, панихїда, panikhída) is a liturgical observance in honor of the departed which is served in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic Churches. ... Paraklesis in the Orthodox Christian Church, is a service of supplication for the welfare of the living. ... A molében (Slavonic: молебен), also called a molieben, service of intercession, or service of supplication, is a supplicatory prayer service used within the Orthodox Christian Church in honor of Jesus Christ, the Mother of God, a Feast or a particular saint or martyr. ...


Martyrs need no formal Glorification. The witness of their self-sacrifice is sufficient (provided their martyrdom was the result of their faith, and there being no evidence of un-Christian behaviour on their part at the time of their death). Not all saints are known, many will remain hidden by God until the Second Coming of Christ. For this reason, on the Sunday after Pentecost the Orthodox celebrate all the righteous souls together on All Saints Sunday. In some jurisdictions, the Sunday following All Saints Sunday will be a day of general commemoration of all saints (known and unknown) of the local church. For instance, All Saints of the Holy Mountain, All Saints of Russia, All Saints of America, etc. For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ... … The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... This article is about the Christian holiday. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek, Church Slavonic, Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (both liturgical and civil use), Modern Greek (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ...


St. Symeon the New Theologian writes: "The saints in each generation, joined to those who have gone before, and filled like them with light, become a golden chain, in which each saint is a separate link, united to the next by faith, works, and love. So in the One God they form a single chain which cannot quickly be broken." Symeon the New Theologian (949–1022) is one of three saints of the Eastern Orthodox church to have been given the title of Theologian (the others are St. ...


Protestant and Fundamentalist practices

The Protestant Reformers rebuked the Catholic church in regard to the glorification of idols and images. Another dispute was the glorification of Mary who they believed the Catholic Church elevated to a status above Christ in many ways and parallel to Him in the rest. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Anglican practice Since the English Reformation, only King Charles I has been canonized in the Church of England. However, Anglicans do have a calendar of saints. Other more recent persons, while not officially declared saints, may be added to the various Anglican national calendars for veneration. For example, C. S. Lewis (November 22) and Martin Luther King, Jr. (April 4). This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution. ... The Church of England logo since 1996. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... Calendars of saints days in churches throughout the Anglican communion. ... Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ...


Lutheran practice Some Lutherans have a calendar of saints, much of which they inherited from the Catholic Church. Some Lutheran bodies limit the recognition of saints to those persons mentioned in the Gospels and the Book of Acts. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ...


Fundamentalist practice Fundamentalist theologians and denominations[attribution needed], in an attempt to avoid veneration of certain believers above others, reject the notion of an official or recognized list of "saints". Protestants often appeal to the Bible's apparent recognition of all Christian believers as saints, in Acts and in Paul's letters. Also, since most Fundamentalists do not believe in a resurrection until Judgement Day, they[attribution needed] reject prayer supplications to the dead as a necromantic idolatry and superstition,[citation needed] and prayers for the dead as unbiblical and ineffectual. They do not believe in any other Mediator other than Jesus Christ as provided by the the Father to fulfill the righteous requirements of His law. Fundamentalism is a movement to maintain strict adherence to founding principles. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term Judgement Day may refer to: The Last Judgement; the ethical-judicial trial, judgement, and punishment/reward of individual humans (assignment to Heaven or to Hell) by a divine tribunal at the end of time. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In many religions, the supreme God is given the title and attributions of Father. ...


See also

This article is about Christian saints. ... . ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Litany of the Saints or Litaniae Sanctorum is a sacred prayer of the Roman Catholic Church and its Eastern Rite. ...

Bibliography

  • André Vauchez, La sainteté en Occident aux derniers siècles du Moyen Âge (1198-1431) 1, Rome, 1981 (BEFAR, 241) [Engl. transl. : Sainthood in the Later Middle Ages, Cambridge, 1987 and Ital. Transl. : La santità nel Medioevo, Bologne, 1989

References

  1. ^ "There are vast numbers of non-canonized saints in heaven, celebrated all together in the feast of All Saints. These include many people we knew, whose love of God far outweighed their faults" (Communing with the Saints).
  2. ^ Gregory IX, Decretales, III, De reliquiis et veneratione sanctorum
  3. ^ Pope John Paul II, 1983, Divinus Perfectionis Magister, Art I, Sec 1
  4. ^ Pietro Cardinal Palazzini, 1983, Norms to be observed in inquiries made by bishops in the causes of saints, § 9 a
  5. ^ Mother Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), biography, Office of Papal Liturgical Celebrations, Internet Office of the Holy See
  6. ^ José Cardinal Saraiva Martins, C.M.F.; 2005; Response of His Holiness Benedict XVI for the examination of the cause for beatification and canonization of the Servant of God John Paul II
  7. ^ Doctrinal Commentary on the Concluding Formula of the Professio Fidei, by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI), Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.
  8. ^ Beatification and Canonization, The Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 21907, p. 366

Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... His Eminence José Cardinal Saraiva Martins (born 6 January 1932) is a Cardinal Deacon and Prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints in the Roman Catholic Church. ...

External links

Look up Canonization in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Catholic Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

  • Divinus Perfectionis Magister Apostolic Constitution of Pope John Paul II (English)
  • Congregation for the Causes of Saints Vatican Website
  • Historical Sketch of Canonization Friarsminor.org
  • "Beatification and Canonization". Catholic Encyclopedia. (1913). New York: Robert Appleton Company. 

Orthodox This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

  • What does "Glorification" mean? Fr. Alexey Young
  • Glorification of Saints—Russian Orthodox Church Archpriest Georgiy Mitrofanov
  • The blood of martyrs is the life-giving seed of Christianity! Glorification of saints in the 20th century
  • On the Glorification of Saints Protopresbyter Michael Pomazansky
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Stages of Canonization in the Roman Catholic Church
  Servant of God   →   Venerable   →   Blessed   →   Saint  
Catholic Church redirects here. ... Servant of God is the title given to a person of the Roman Catholic Church upon whom a pope has opened a cause of sainthood. ... A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Saint (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Beatification and Canonization (5558 words)
Canonization, generally speaking, is a decree regarding the public ecclesiastical veneration of an
canonized until 439 years after his death, and the honour came to him sooner than to any of the others mentioned.
Canonization in which he not only permits, but commands, the public cultus, or veneration, of the saint.
CANONIZATION - LoveToKnow Article on CANONIZATION (1145 words)
Gradually the canonization of saints came to be included in the centralizing movement which reserved to the pope the most important acts of ecclesiastical power.
The earliest acknowledged instance of canonization by the pope is that of Ulric of Augsburg, who was declared a saint by John XV.
Canonization is~ the solemn and definitive act by which the pope decrees tile plenitude of public honors.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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