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Encyclopedia > Call for help
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Distress call. (Discuss)
This article is about methods of calling for help. For information on the computer-themed television show, see Call for Help (television program).

One should call for help any time life, property, or the public order is in danger. This includes emergencies such as but not limited to: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that Call for help be merged into this article or section. ... A computer is a machine capable of undergoing complex calculations. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Call for Help is a computer and technology help television program that first aired exclusively on TechTV, a cable and satellite television network focused on technology. ... An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate threat to human life or serious damage to property. ...

  • medical emergencies
  • fire
  • crime, especially violent crimes, crimes in progress, or which can be averted by swift response
  • any danger to life or property

An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate threat to human life or property. Intentional false reports of an emergency are usually prosecuted as a crime. These can put lives at risk due to the unnecessary redirection of emergency services. A medical emergency is an injury or illness that poses an immediate threat to a persons health or life which requires help from a doctor or hospital. ... It has been suggested that flame be merged into this article or section. ...


The call for help in first aid is only a step of the emergency action principles, typically made after assessing the scene. Current U.S. practice is to call for help after assessing the scene, and if it is safe to approach then supplementing the call with information on the state of victims. First aid is a series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or layman can be trained to perform. ... In first aid, emergency action principles seek to describe what to do when encountering an emergency situation. ...


It may also be used a last resort, for instance when trapped in a building collapse.


In first aid this is used to summon bystanders if not already present, for instance to direct them to call for help by telephone, control bleeding with direct pressure, or other tasks. First aid is a series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or layman can be trained to perform. ...


Below are ways to call for help in an emergency. An emergency is a situation that poses an immediate threat to human life or serious damage to property. ...

Contents


Telephone

With any telephone, wired or wireless, anywhere in the world, one can call an emergency telephone number for emergency assistance. These numbers include: Many countries public telephone networks have a single emergency telephone number, sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or occasionally the emergency services number, that allows a caller to contact local emergency services for assistance. ...

If the local emergency number is unknown, it is recommended to try the four most popular variations, 999, 911, 112 and 119, as even if these are not official emergency numbers in the country, they may still have been assigned such a status by the telecommunications company due to their popularity elsewhere. Failing this, one may dial the operator (often by dialing “0”) and state clearly that it is an emergency. 000 (Triple O) is the primary national emergency number in Australia. ... 0-6-0 is also the emergency telephone number in Mexico, similar to the United Statess 9-1-1. ... -1... 111 has been the emergency telephone number in New Zealand since September 1958. ... 1-1-9 is the emergency phone number in parts of Asia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Emergency telephone number. ... Not to be confused with Get Some Mates The Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) is the most popular standard for mobile phones in the world. ... 1-1-9 is the emergency phone number in parts of Asia. ... See also: Asian and Eurasian World map showing Asia. ... Most emergency vehicles in the US and Canada display Emergency 911 9-1-1 (nine-one-one) is the emergency telephone number for the North American Numbering Plan (NANP). ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... 999 is the United Kingdoms emergency telephone number along with the EU standard 112. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... A telephone operator at work on a private switchboard A telephone operator is either a person who provides assistance to a telephone caller, usually in the placing of operator assisted telephone calls such as calls from a pay phone, collect calls (called reversed-charge calls in the UK), calls which...


When possible, it is recommended to use a wired, or landline, telephone: the quality of the communication is better, and the call can be easily located (a call for help is useless when the rescue team does not know where to go).


If both of these services are unavailable, then one should call anyone that they can reach.


When one is connected to the emergency service, the proper procedure is for that person to:

  1. Identify themselves.
  2. Give the phone number from which they are calling, if they are asked for it. This will allow a call-back in case the communication is interrupted. In some cases the operator will know the number from which the call originates, as it may passed on automatically by the telephone network. A phone number can also physically locate the caller in some cases as in Enhanced 911 in the USA, although this should never be relied on.
  3. Give the exact location of the event, including the name of the city, the name of the building, or on the road the number of the road, and the direction of the lane. If the address is not known, give the nearest intersection or "cross streets" i.e. Main and 5th.
  4. Describe the situation: illness or accident, and in the latter case, specific danger, number of casualties.
  5. When there are only a few casualties, the description of their general state (alert or unalert, breathing or not) and of the affliction (physical trauma, disease, other).
  6. The first aid actions already performed.
  7. Answer the question, listen to the information given; the caller should never hang up first.

An emergency number should never be used except in an emergency. In some countries, misuse of an emergency number may result in a fine or charge by the phone company. Being lost or stranded is generally not an emergency and one should dial an operator (often by dialing “0”) for help instead. In medicine, a trauma patient has suffered serious and life-threatening physical injury resulting in secondary complications such as shock, respiratory failure and death. ... A disease is any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. ... First aid is a series of simple, life-saving medical techniques that a non-doctor or layman can be trained to perform. ... A telephone operator at work on a private switchboard A telephone operator is either a person who provides assistance to a telephone caller, usually in the placing of operator assisted telephone calls such as calls from a pay phone, collect calls (called reversed-charge calls in the UK), calls which...


Emergency call boxes

Some places, such as train stations, college campuses, or highways, are equipped with emergency call boxes. When available, the use of these call boxes is the best solution: the call can be easily located, the person who answers the call knows the environment and will be able to guide the emergency services. Highway in Pennsylvania, USA For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... Emergency telephone on a beach at Trefor in North Wales An Emergency telephone is a phone specifically provided for making calls to emergency services and are most often found in places of special danger or where it is likely that there will only be a need to make emergency calls. ...


This can be particularly true on the road: a call on a cell phone without the location of the accident is of limited value. It is more efficient for a bystander to drive a few minutes to find an emergency call box.


Radio

If the caller has access to a two-way radio of any sort, then the caller may transmit the words “EMERGENCY EMERGENCY EMERGENCY” followed by the location and the nature of the emergency. Then, the caller should pause between transmissions to listen for answers. There is often a transmit button on the microphone that must be pressed to talk and released to listen. Inside a condenser microphone. ...


If the caller is using a marine VHF radio, the caller should set the channel to “16” (≡ 156.8 MHz). If the caller is using a CB radio, the caller should try setting the channel to either “9” (≡ 27.065 MHz, designated as an emergency channel) or “19” (≡ 27.185 MHz, used by truckers). If the caller has an aircraft radio, set the selector dial to “121.5 ” (MHz) or “243.0” (MHz). If the caller is using a type of radio that the caller are unfamiliar with, then the caller should first try using the currently set channel or frequency. If there is no response after several attempts, the caller should write down the current frequency and try others that appear to be in use, returning to the original frequency periodically. Portable VHF radio set Marine VHF radio is installed on all large ships and most motorized small craft. ... Citizens band radio (CB) is, in the United States, a system of short distance radio communication between individuals on a selection of 40 channels within the single 27 MHz (11 meter) band. ...


The emergency code wordMAYDAY” should only be used aboard a vessel or aircraft where there may be imminent loss of life. Using it otherwise can endanger the lives of emergency responders tens or hundreds of miles or kilometers away, because helicopters and aircraft will respond to a mayday call with limited fuel supplies and risk crashing in order to pinpoint the caller's location. This has caused fatal crashes several times in open-ocean and in the Canadian and Alaskan wilderness. A Code word may refer any of several concepts: For telecommunications senses, see Code word (telecommunication). ... Mayday is an emergency code word used internationally as a distress signal in voice procedure communications, derived from the French maider (the infinitive form of the reflexive verb to help me) or maidez (the second-person imperative form, ie. ...


In an emergency, the caller should remember the mnemonic “Why PATSI”: A mnemonic (pronounced in American English, in British English) is a memory aid. ...

  • Why the caller is calling
  • Position (as best known)
  • Altitude (if the caller is in an aircraft, on a mountain, etc.)
  • Track (what direction is the caller headed in, or is the caller stationary)
  • Speed (how fast is the caller going)
  • Intentions (what the caller is going to do, and what kind of help the caller needs)

See also: Global Maritime Distress Safety System The Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS) is an internationally-agreed set of safety procedures, types of equipment, and communication protocols used to increase safety and make it easier to rescue distressed ships, boats and aircraft. ...


Making contact

One may contact a person hundreds of miles or kilometers away who is not familiar with the caller's area. It may be necessary for the caller to give their location. In an urban area, a street address, nearby business or cross streets should be given. In a rural area, the following information may be given: a highway number and exit, a map or GPS coordinates if there is time, or the route from the caller's location to the nearest landmark. GPS satellite in orbit, image courtesy of NASA GPS redirects here. ...


The caller will have to state the nature of their emergency. They will be asked many questions, some of which may seem irrelevant. The caller should answer and stay on the line until they are released. They may be given advice on how to proceed depending on the capabilities of the person or dispatch center they are speaking to. A dispatch can be: A report sent to a newspaper by a correspondent. ...


Wilderness emergency signals

Other distress signals are primarily for use in rural or isolated areas, or in the wilderness. These include “SOS” or anything in groups or triangles of three — markers, gunshots, fires, etc. Survival training includes ground to air signals that can be used to signal passing aircraft with flares, mirrors or marks made on the ground or snow. Again, these signals should only be used in an actual emergency and destroyed when the person or group using them is rescued. Pilots will take extreme risks to locate and report what they believe to be an emergency signal from the ground. A distress signal is an internationally recognized means of obtaining help by using a radio, displaying a visual object or making noise from a distance. ... SOS is the commonly used description for the International Morse code distress signal (· Â· Â· - - - Â· Â· Â· ). This distress signal was first adopted by the German government in radio regulations effective April 1, 1905, and became the worldwide standard when it was included in the second International Radiotelegraphic Convention, which was signed on November...


When in mountainous areas the international distress signal is 6 blasts of a whistle or flashes from a torch, followed by a one minute silence, followed by the signals again. The answering call will be three whistle blasts or flashes, usually indicating that mountain rescue teams have been informed. Even after receiving an answering call, emission of the distress signal should not be stopped as it will help rescuers locate the place.


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In first aid this is used to summon bystanders if not already present, for instance to direct them to call for help by telephone, control bleeding with direct pressure, or other tasks.
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