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Encyclopedia > Zumwalt class destroyer
Class overview
Builders: Northrop Grumman
General Dynamics
Operators: United States Navy Ensign United States Navy
Preceded by: Arleigh Burke class destroyer
Succeeded by: N/A (latest destroyer class authorized)
Planned: USS Zumwalt, six others planned
General characteristics
Displacement: 14,564 tons[1]
Length: 600 ft (183 m)
Beam: 79.1 ft (24.1 m)
Draft: 27.6 ft (8.4 m)
Propulsion: 2 Rolls-Royce Marine Trent-30 gas turbines and emergency diesel generators, 78 MW
Speed: 30.3 kn (56 km/h)
Complement: 140
Sensors and
processing systems:
AN/SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar (MFR) (X-band, scanned array)
Volume Search Radar (VSR) (S-band, scanned array)
Armament: 20 × MK 57 VLS modules, comprising a total of 80 missiles
Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM)
Tactical Tomahawk Block IV
Standard Missile 2 Block III (SM-2MR)
Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rocket (ASROC)
2 × 155 mm Advanced Gun System
920 × 155 mm total; 600 in automated store + Auxiliary store room with up to 320 rounds (non-automatic) as of April 2005
70-100 LRLAP rounds planned as of 2005 of total
2 × Mk 110 57 mm gun (CIWS)
Aircraft carried: 2 SH-60 LAMPS helicopters or 1 MH-60R helicopter
3 MQ-8 Fire Scout VTUAV

The Zumwalt-class destroyer (also known either as the DD(X) or DDG-1000) is a planned class of United States Navy destroyers, designed as multi-mission ship with a focus on land attack. The class, originally called the DD(X), is a scaled-back project that emerged after funding cuts to the larger DD-21 vessel program. Image File history File links DD(X)_No_Text. ... The Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) is an aerospace and defense conglomerate that is the result of a 1994 merger between Northrop and Grumman. ... General Dynamics Corporation (NYSE: GD) is a defense conglomerate formed by mergers and divestitures, and as of 2006 it is the sixth largest defense contractor in the world[2]. The company has changed markedly in the post-Cold War era of defense consolidation. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... USN redirects here. ... The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ... USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is scheduled to be the lead ship of the U.S. Navys DD(X) guided missile destroyer program and the first ship to be named for Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. ... A long ton is the name used in the US for the unit called the ton in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements, as used (alongside the metric system) in the United Kingdom and to some extent in other Commonwealth countries. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the aircraft engine company. ... Rolls-Royce MT30 The Rolls-Royce MT (Marine Trent) is a marine gas turbine based on Rolls-Royces Trent 800 aero engine. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... Categories: Stub ... Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile The Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM) is a development of the Sea Sparrow missile used to protect ships from attacking missiles and aircraft. ... The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ... The RIM-66 Standard MR (SM-1MR/SM-2MR) is a medium range surface-to-air missile (SAM) originally developed for the United States Navy (USN). ... The RUM-139 VL-Asroc is a rocket designed and built by Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Navy. ... Artists impression of the Advanced Gun System aboard a DD(X) Destroyer The Advanced Gun System is a naval gun system under development by British company BAE Systems Armaments Systems Division (formerly United Defense) for the United States Navy as part of the DD(X) destroyer program. ... The Mk 110 57 mm gun is a muti purpose, medium caliber gun. ... The Sikorsky SH-60 Seahawk (or Sea Hawk) is a twin-engine anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopter, based on the airframe of the UH-60 Black Hawk. ... Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS) is the US Navys program that developed manned helicopters used to assist the surface fleet in anti-submarine warfare. ... The Sikorsky SH-60/MH-60 Seahawk (or Sea Hawk) is a twin turboshaft engine, multi-mission United States Navy helicopter based on the airframe of the United States Army/Air Force UH-60 Black Hawk. ... The MQ-8 Fire Scout is an unmanned, robotic helicopter under development in Rancho Bernardo, California for use by the United States armed forces. ... The £124 million Taranis UAV built by BAE Systems An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is an aircraft with no onboard pilot. ... USN redirects here. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Future class of United States Navy destroyer. ...


The lead ship is named Zumwalt for Admiral Elmo Zumwalt; following U.S. Navy tradition, it and its sister ships will be known as Zumwalt-class ships. The lead ship or class leader is the first of a series or class of ships all constructed according to the same general design. ... USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is scheduled to be the lead ship of the U.S. Navys DD(X) guided missile destroyer program and the first ship to be named for Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. ... Elmo R. Zumwalt Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr. ...

Contents

Proposal

Originally, the Navy had hoped to build 32 of these destroyers. That number was later reduced to 24, then to 7, due to the high cost of new and experimental technologies to be incorporated in the destroyer.[2] The U.S. House of Representatives remains skeptical of the DDG-1000 destroyer program for financial reasons and has therefore allotted the Navy only enough money to begin construction on one DDG-1000 destroyer as a "technology demonstrator." The initial funding allocation for the DDG-1000 destroyer was included in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007.[2]


However, the 2007 appropriations bill passed on September 26, 2006 by the House, and later by the Senate, allotted 2.6 billion USD for the funding and building of two Zumwalt-class destroyers. Under this current plan, Bath Iron Works in Maine and Northrop Grumman's Ingalls Shipbuilding in Mississippi will build one ship each.[3] is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bath Iron Works from NAS Brunswick photo gallery Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine. ...


Among U. S. warships in development, the DDG-1000 is to be preceded by the Littoral Combat Ship and followed possibly by the CG(X) cruiser, concurrent with the CVN-21 aircraft carrier. The DDG-1000 program resulted from a large re-organization of the DD21 program when Congress cut its budget by over 50% as part of the SC21 program of the 1990s. The Littoral Combat Ship is the first of the U.S. Navys next-generation surface combatants. ... The CG(X) is a cruiser, the descendant of the DD(X) will replace the Ticonderoga-class AEGIS cruisers, with improved Missile Defense and Air Warfare capability. ... USS Port Royal (CG-73), a Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser (really an uprated guided missile destroyer), launched in 1992. ... It has been proposed below that CVN-21 be renamed and moved to United States Navy CVN-21 program. ... Future class of United States Navy destroyer. ... SC21 was a United States Navy program of the 1990s for new ship designs. ...


The Zumwalt-class destroyers are multi-role and designed for surface warfare, anti-aircraft, and naval fire support. They take the place of the battleships in filling the former congressional mandate for naval fire support, though the requirement was reduced to allow them to fill this role. The most numerous Navy main surface warfare combatants are, and will remain for the foreseeable future, the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and Ticonderoga-class cruisers. All are part of the Aegis system. The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ... Ticonderoga class cruiser is a class of warships in the US Navy, first ordered and authorized in FY 1978. ... USS Lake Champlain, a Ticonderoga-class Aegis guided missile cruiser, launched in 1987 The Aegis combat system is an integrated missile guidance system used by the United States Navy. ...


Design and development

The DDG-1000 will feature the following: a low radar profile; an integrated power system, which can send electricity to the electric drive motors or weapons, which may someday include railguns; a total ship computing environment infrastructure (TSCE-I), serving as the ship's primary LAN and as the hardware-independent platform for all of the ship's software ensembles; automated fire-fighting systems and automated piping rupture isolation. The destroyer is being designed to require a smaller crew and be less expensive to operate than comparable warships. It will have a wave-piercing "tumblehome" hull form whose sides slope inward above the waterline. This will reduce the radar cross-section, returning much less energy than a more hard-angled hull form. A railgun is a form of gun that converts electrical energy (rather than the more conventional chemical energy from an explosive propellant) into projectile kinetic energy. ... A wave-piercing boat hull has a very fine bow, with reduced buoyancy in the forward portions. ... Broadside of a French 74-gun wooden ship from 1755. ...


In late 2005, the program entered the detail design and integration phase, for which Raytheon is the Mission Systems Integrator. Both Northrop Grumman Ship Systems and General Dynamics Bath Iron Works share dual-lead for the hull, mechanical, and electrical detail design. BAE Systems Inc. (a US subsidiary of BAE Systems) has the advanced gun system and the MK57 VLS. Almost every major defense contractor (including Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine, L-3 Communications) and subcontractors from nearly every state in the U.S. are involved to some extent in this project, which is the largest single line item in the Navy's budget. During the previous contract, development and testing of 11 Engineering Development Models (EDMs) took place; Advanced Gun System, Autonomic Fire Suppression System, Dual Band Radar [X-band and L-band], Infrared, Integrated Deckhouse & Apertures, Integrated Power System, Integrated Undersea Warfare, Peripheral Vertical Launch System, Total Ship Computing Environment, Tumblehome Hull Form, Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... The Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC) is an aerospace and defense conglomerate that is the result of a 1994 merger between Northrop and Grumman. ... BAE Systems Inc. ... Categories: Stub ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Artists impression of the Advanced Gun System aboard a DD(X) Destroyer The Advanced Gun System is a naval gun system under development by British company BAE Systems Armaments Systems Division (formerly United Defense) for the United States Navy as part of the DD(X) destroyer program. ...


Many of the ship's features were originally developed under the DD-21 program ("21st Century Destroyer"). In 2001, Congress cut the DD-21 program by half; to save it, the acquisition program was renamed and heavily reworked. According to a Government Accountability Office report,[4] milestones include: General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ...

  • Formal program launch, April 2002
  • Preliminary design review, March 2004
  • Lead ship authorized, March 2005
  • Critical design review, August 2005
  • Start fabrication, June 2007
  • First ship launched, June 2012

USS Hayler (DD-997) (1982) was the last Spruance-class destroyer, and DDG-112 (2010) is to be the last Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. The Zumwalt's hull number will be DDG-1000. USS Hayler (DD-997), a Spruance-class destroyer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Vice Admiral Robert W. Hayler (1891–?). Hayler was laid down on 20 October 1980 by Ingalls Shipbuilding, in Pascagoula, Miss. ... The Spruance-class destroyer was developed to replace a large number of World War II-built - and Gearing-class destroyers, and was the primary destroyer built for the U.S. Navy during the 1970s. ... The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ...


Design elements

The DDG-1000 with planned features.
The DDG-1000 with planned features.

Image File history File links DD(X). ... Image File history File links DD(X). ...

Advanced Gun System (AGS)

The Advanced Gun System is a 155 mm naval gun, two of which would be installed in the proposed class. This system consists of an advanced 155 mm gun and the Long Range Land-Attack Projectile. This projectile is in fact a rocket with a warhead fired from the AGS gun. The warhead weighs 11 kg / 24 lb and has a circular error of probability of 50 meters. This weapon system has been tested to 110 km / 59 nmi but ultimately a range of 185 km / 100 nmi is envisioned. The system will be provided with a magazine of 600 rounds or more per weapon and offers a rate of fire of 10 rounds per minute per gun. The barrel is water cooled to prevent over-heating issues. The combined firepower from a pair of turrets gives Zumwalt-class destroyers firepower equivalent to 18 conventional M-198 field guns.[5][6] USS Iowa (BB-61) fires a full broadside of nine 16/50 and six 5/38 guns during a target exercise near Vieques Island, Puerto Rico, 1 July 1984. ... The Long Range Land Attack Projectile (LRLAP) is a developmental program to produce a precision guided 155 mm naval artillery shell for the U.S. Navy. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In the military science of ballistics, Circular Error Probability or circular error probable (CEP) is a simple measure of a weapon systems precision. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... The M198 Howitzer during the Persian Gulf War The M198 howitzer is a medium-sized, towed artillery piece. ...


Peripheral Vertical Launch System (PVLS)

The Peripheral Vertical Launch System is an attempt to reclaim the prized center space of the hull while increasing the safety of the ship from the loss of the entire missile battery and the loss of the ship in the case of a magazine explosion. The system scatters pods of VLS around the outer shell of the ship having a thin steel outer shell and a thick inner shell. The design of the PVLS would be directing the force of the explosion outward rather than ripping the ship in half. Additionally this design keeps the loss of missile capacity down to just the pod being hit.[5][7]


Dual-band radar

The radar will send and receive S-band (high altitude large airspace) and X-band (high altitude near airspace) signals with a common-phase conformal array on the deckhouse. Each band will have its own signal processors, with the returns combined by the display sensor manager. This system is thought to provide high detection and excellent anti-jamming capabilities. But at least one report by Congress' investigative arm, the GAO, raises concerns that it is too much of a technology leap.[5][8][9][10] For other uses, see Gao (disambiguation). ...


Sonar

A dual-band sonar controlled by a highly automated computer system will be used to find mines and submarines.


Total Computer Environment

The ship's systems are slated to be controlled by GE Fanuc's LynxOS RTOS [11] The LynxOS RTOS is a Unix-like real-time operating system from LynuxWorks (formerly Lynx Real-Time Systems). Sometimes known as the Lynx Operating System, LynxOS features POSIX compliance and, more recently, Linux compatibility. ... A Real Time Operating System or RTOS is an operating system that has been developed for real-time applications. ...


Propulsion

The DDX proposed to use a Permanent Magnet Motor (PMM) within the hull. An alternate twin pod arrangement being rejected as the ramifications of pod drives would require too much development and validation cost to the vessel. The PMM is considered to be another technology leap and is the cause of some concern along with the radar system from Congress.[5] As part of the design phase, Northrop Grumman had built the world's largest permanent magnet motor, designed and fabricated by DRS Technologies. This proposal was dropped when the PMM motor failed to demonstrate that it was ready to be installed in time.


Zumwalt will have Converteam's Advanced Induction Motors (AIM), rather than DRS Technologies' Permanent Magnet-Synchronous Motors (PMM). Converteam is the power conversion company that formerly traded as Alstom Power Conversion. ...


"...The exact choice of engine systems remains somewhat controversial at this point. The concept was originally for an integrated power system (IPS) based on in-hull permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMMs), with Advanced Induction Motors (AIM) as a possible backup solution. The design was shifted to the AIM system in February 2005 in order to meet scheduled milestones; PMM technical issues were subsequently fixed, but the program has moved on. The downside is that AIM technology has a heavier motor, requires more space, requires a "separate controller" to be developed to meet noise requirements, and produces one-third the amount of voltage. On the other hand, these very differences will force time and cost penalties from design and construction changes if the program wishes to "design AIM out"..."[12]


Integrated Power System (IPS)

The Integrated Power System (IPS) is a step both forward and backwards. In some ways similar to the old turbo-electric drive, the addition of PMMs and integration of all electrical power systems gives ten times the power available on current destroyers. It also impacts the ship's thermal and sound signature. The IPS has added to weight growth in the Zumwalt-class destroyer as noted by the GAO.[5][13][10] For other uses, see Gao (disambiguation). ...


Stealth

Despite being 40% larger than an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer the radar signature is more akin to a fishing boat and sound levels are compared to the Los Angeles-class submarine. The tumblehome hull reduces radar return and the inclusion of composite materials reducing it still further. Water sleeting along the sides, along with passive cool air induction in the mack reduces thermal emissions.[5] Admiral Arleigh Burke in 1951 Arleigh Albert Burke (October 19, 1901 _ January 1, 1996), an Admiral of the United States Navy during World War II and the Korean War, was born far from the sea in Boulder, Colorado. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Los Angeles class submarines The Los Angeles class is a class of nuclear-powered fast attack submarines (SSN) that forms the backbone of the United States submarine fleet, and is the most numerous class of nuclear powered submarine in the world. ... Broadside of a French 74-gun wooden ship from 1755. ...


Tumblehome wave piercing hull

A return to a hull form not used in combat since the Battle of Tsushima in 1905, the Zumwalt-class destroyer reintroduces the tumblehome hull form. In this hull form the hull widens from the deck to the waterline instead of flaring from the waterline up to the deck. This was done to reduce the radar return of the hull. The bow is designed to cut through waves rather than ride over them. This hull form has been the center of arguments given in the Naval Architecture community over stability in high sea states.[5][14] Combatants Empire of Japan Russian Empire Commanders Heihachiro Togo Zinovi Rozhdestvenski # Nikolai Nebogatov Strength 4 battleships 27 cruisers destroyers and auxiliary vessels 8 battleships 3 coastal battleships 8 cruisers Casualties 117 dead 583 injured 3 torpedo boats sunk 4,380 dead 5,917 captured 21 ships sunk 7 captured 6...


Automated fire suppression system

Water spray or mist systems are proposed for deployment in the Zumwalt-class destroyer but the electronic spaces continue to provide a challenge to the designers. Halon/Nitrogen dump systems are preferred but do not work when the space has been compromised (hull breach). Again this system has been pointed out by the GAO as being a potential problem yet to be addressed.[5][15][10] Halon 1211 and Halon 1301 are special-purpose fire extiguishing agents that were banned by the Montreal Protocol. ... For other uses, see Gao (disambiguation). ...


Boat and Helo arrangements

Two spots will be available on a large aviation deck while boat handling is to be dealt with in a stern mounted boat hangar with ramp, the boat hangar’s stern location meeting high sea state requirements for boat operations.[5]


Automated replenishment

AGS rounds, food, and other stores, are all mounted in containers able to be struck below to magazine/storage areas by an automated cargo handling system.[5]


Manning reductions

Automation of the AGS magazines, Fire suppression, and replenishment operations, are all designed to reduce crew on Zumwalt-class destroyers. One of the major contributors to life cycle costs are staffing requirement on a warship.[5]


Development history

The House of Representatives opposes the DDG-1000 and has cut some funding, preferring to build another Arleigh Burke class destroyer and the new littoral combat ships. The Senate supports the DDG-1000 and continues to approve more funding. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ... The Littoral Combat Ship is the first of the U.S. Navys next-generation surface combatants. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


It was reported on October 17, 2005, that an October 5 Pentagon report recommended "canceling the DD(X) destroyer being developed by Northrop Grumman Corp." [16] is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ...


On November 23, 2005, the Defense Acquisition Board approved a plan for simultaneous construction of the first two DDG-1000 ships at Northrop’s Ingalls yard in Pascagoula, MS and General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Works in Bath, ME. However, as of that date, funding had yet to be authorized by Congress. is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pascagoula is a city located in Jackson County, Mississippi. ... Bath Iron Works from NAS Brunswick photo gallery Bath Iron Works (BIW) is a shipyard located on the Kennebec River in Bath, Maine. ... View uphill towards City Hall in Bath Bath is a city located in Sagadahoc County, Maine. ...


In late December 2005, the House and Senate agreed to continue funding the DDG-1000 program; however, only seven of these ships will be built under the 2005 authorization instead of the originally planned 23 to 30.


In April 2006, the first of the class was announced and will be named the Zumwalt and carry the designator DDG-1000. The ship will be named to honor the former Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Elmo R. “Bud” Zumwalt Jr. In so doing, the Navy will eschew the guided missile destroyer sequence begun with DDG-1 Gyatt and continue in the previous "gun destroyer" sequence left off with DD-997 Hayler. USS Gyatt (DD-712/DDG-1), was a Gearing class destroyer in the U.S. Navy, named for U.S. Marine Corps Private Edward E. Gyatt. ... USS Hayler (DD-997), a Spruance-class destroyer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Vice Admiral Robert W. Hayler (1891–?). Hayler was laid down on 20 October 1980 by Ingalls Shipbuilding, in Pascagoula, Miss. ...


The Associated Press reported on November 13, 2007 that the U.S. Navy had awarded a $90 million contract to Northrop Grumman to prepare construction materials for the DDG-1000 order.


Debates and controversy

Cost and technology

Lawmakers and others have questioned whether the Zumwalt class costs too much and whether it provides the capabilities the U.S. military needs. Navy leaders have responded to the criticism by reducing the planned class from 32 ships to seven, and introducing incremental funding to pay for them. Congress has allotted enough money for just two ships so far, describing them as "technology demonstrators," and has expressed mixed feelings about incremental funding for ships.[17]


Tumblehome design stability

In early 2007 a controversy developed around stability issues with the DDG-1000 hull design in heavy seas.[18] A Press article notes, "....Brower explained: "The trouble is that as a ship pitches and heaves at sea, if you have tumblehome instead of flare, you have no righting energy to make the ship come back up. On the DDG 1000, with the waves coming at you from behind, when a ship pitches down, it can lose transverse stability as the stern comes out of the water - and basically roll over."[18]


Naval fire support role

A controversial point of the DD(X) destroyer(s) is their planned naval surface fire support role. The original DD21 and the Arsenal Ship had more serious NFS capabilities, which would meet a Congress-mandated requirement related to the Iowa-class battleships. The requirement was eventually relaxed, the battleships stricken from the registry, and the Navy left with small tonnage ships for NFS or alternative methods such as air support. An arsenal ship is a ship which was proposed by the US Navy in 1996. ...

Artist's impression of the Advanced Gun System aboard a DD(X) Destroyer
Artist's impression of the Advanced Gun System aboard a DD(X) Destroyer

The DD21 was to have been designed around an advanced "vertical gun" system, which would only have been compatible with guided projectiles, but the project ran into serious technology/cost problems and was radically scaled back to a more conventional 6.1 inch Advanced Gun System (AGS). Image File history File links DD(X)_Advanced_Gun_System. ... Image File history File links DD(X)_Advanced_Gun_System. ... Artists impression of the Advanced Gun System aboard a DD(X) Destroyer The Advanced Gun System is a naval gun system under development by British company BAE Systems Armaments Systems Division (formerly United Defense) for the United States Navy as part of the DD(X) destroyer program. ...


The Zumwalt-class will have two 6.1 inch (155 mm) guns with limited ammunition. While smaller caliber guns (and missiles) have been used for centuries in naval fire support, very large guns have special capabilities beyond that of mid-range calibres. US battleships were re-activated three times after WWII specifically for NFS, and their 16 inch gunfire was used in every major engagement of the U. S. from WWII to the Gulf War.


Up to 2006, the remaining Iowa-class battleships were kept on the Naval registry, in part to fill a naval fire support role. The Zumwalt-class is noted to be able to fire a specially designed "guided" artillery shell some 63 nautical miles inland.[19] However, this shell has a reduced warhead size and uses new technology, so most of the shells carried on the DDG would have vastly shorter range. A sub-calibre sabot round had already been partially developed for a battleship gun; an 11 inch sub-calibre saboted long-range round for the 16"/50 Mark 7 was tested in the 1960s[20] while another, even longer range one was proposed and evaluated in the late 1980s. The studies for this formed the basis for the original (not current) long range AGS gun in the DD21 (but not DDG-1000).[20] The Iowa-class battleships were six battleships ordered by the United States Navy in 1939 and 1940 for use as escorts for the Fast Carrier Task Forces operating in the Pacific Theatre of World War II. Four were completed in the early to mid-1940s; two more were laid down... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ...


Missiles: 80 MK57 VLS Cells

The original DD21 design, displacing around 16,000 tons, would have accommodated between 117 and 128 VLS cells. However, the final DDG-1000 design was considerably smaller than that of the DD21, resulting in room for only 80 VLS cells.[21] Given the vessel's size and expected role, the Zumwalt class destroyers will likely carry many more Tomahawk missiles than either the Ticonderoga or Arleigh Burke class ships. The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) is a long-range, all-weather, subsonic cruise missile. ...


USN position and political debate

"In summary, the committee is concerned that the Navy has foregone the long range fire support capability of the battleship, has given little cause for optimism with regard to meeting near-term developmental objectives, and appears unrealistic in planning to support expeditionary warfare in the mid term. The committee views the Navy's strategy for providing naval surface fire support as 'high risk', and will continue to monitor progress accordingly."

The official position of the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Navy is that the Zumwalt-class destroyer(s) will be adequate as naval surface gunfire support ships, although there are dissenters.[22] In March 2006, the Iowa and Wisconsin were struck from the Naval Vessel Register. However, Congress remains "deeply concerned" over the loss of naval surface gunfire support they could provide and noted that "navy efforts to improve upon, much less replace, this capability have been highly problematic."[23] The U.S. House of Representatives asked that the battleships be kept in a state of readiness should they ever be needed again[24] and directed the Navy to increase the number of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers that are currently being modernized.[24] The modernization includes extending the range of the 5-inch guns on the Flight 1 ships with extended range guided munitions (ERGMs) that would enable the ships to fire projectiles about forty nautical miles inland;[25][23][26] However the ERGM has now been canceled, leaving the nature of future DDG NGFS up in the air.[27] The Naval Vessel Register (NVR), official inventory of ships and service craft in custody or titled by the United States Navy, traces its origin back to the 1880s. ... The Arleigh Burke class of guided missile destroyers, one of the destroyer classes of the United States Navy, is built around the Aegis combat system and the SPY-1D multi-function phased array radar. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ...


In 2007, a thesis report submitted to the Joint Forces Staff College/Joint Advanced Warfighting School by Shawn A. Welch, a Colonel in the Army National Guard's Corps of Engineers analyzed the current capacity for naval gunfire support (NGS)and makes several conclusion based on the progress made since the retirement of the last two Iowa-class battleships. In particular, Welch estimates that the full force of DD(X) destoyers needed to replace the decomissioned Iowas will not arrive until 2020-2025, and alleges that the USN has not accurately assessed the capabilities of its large calibure guns since 1990. The report alleges that the Navy has consistantly scaled back or outright cancelled programs intended to replace naval surface fire support (NSFS) capacity, in the process making no signifigant gains for offshore fire support since the retirement of Missouri in 1992. This failure from the navy to meet Congressional mandates to improve NSFS has caused a rift with the United States Marine Corps and to a lesser extent the United States Army; in the case of the former, the concern is great enough that several three and four star generals in the Marine Corps have openly admitted to the press their concern over the absence of any effective ship based gunfire support, and two seperate Commendants of the Marine Corps have testified before the Senate Armed Service Committee on the risks faced by the Marines in the absence of any effective NSFS.[28] United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... Naval gunfire support (NGFS) comprises the use of naval artillery to provide fire support support for amphibious assault troops. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ...


Separately from the above, there is an active civilian campaign to persuade the Secretary of the Navy to name DDG-1001 the USS Robert A. Heinlein. [2] In times of armed conflict a civilian is any person who is not a combatant. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ...


References

  1. ^ Program Executive Office Ships - DDG1000
  2. ^ a b Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, pages 69 and 70
  3. ^ House OKs $70B for Iraq, Afghanistan
  4. ^ Government Accountability Office Report
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k DDG-1000 Zumwalt / DD(X) Multi-Mission Surface Combatant
  6. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Advanced Gun System (AGS)
  7. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Peripheral Vertical Launch System (PVLS) Advanced VLS
  8. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Dual Band Radar (DBR)
  9. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Integrated Composite Deckhouse & Apertures (IDHA)
  10. ^ a b c GAO-05-752R Progress of the DD(X) Destroyer Program
  11. ^ GE Fanuc Embedded Systems Selected By Raytheon For Zumwalt Class Destroyer Program
  12. ^ Dead Aim, Or Dead End? The USA’s DDG-1000 Zumwalt Class Program - Defense Industry Daily
  13. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Integrated Power System (IPS)
  14. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Wave Piercing Tumblehome Hull
  15. ^ Raytheon Company: Products & Services: Autonomic Fire Supression System (AFSS)
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, page 68-70
  18. ^ a b Defense News: Will DDG-1000 Destroyers Be Unstable?
  19. ^ Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, page 194
  20. ^ a b USA 16"/50 (40.6 cm) Mark 7
  21. ^ globalsecurity.org: DD-21 Specs
  22. ^ cnn.com Losing the Battleships
  23. ^ a b Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, page 193
  24. ^ a b Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, page 68
  25. ^ Taken from the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007, pages 67-68
  26. ^ Federation of American Scientists report on the MK 45 5-inch gun and ammunition payload for the U.S. Arleigh Burke-class destroyers
  27. ^ Navy ends ERGM funding - Navy Times
  28. ^ Welch, Shawn A. (2007-05-17). Joint and Interdependent Requirements: A Case Study in Solving the Naval Surface Fire Support Capabilities Gap. United States Army. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

companies involved in the DD(X) Destroyer program
Government reports regarding the DD(X) Destroyer program
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is scheduled to be the lead ship of the U.S. Navys DD(X) guided missile destroyer program and the first ship to be named for Admiral Elmo Zumwalt. ... This is a list of destroyers of the United States Navy, sorted by hull number. ... This is a list of destroyer classes of the United States Navy. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Destroyer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2421 words)
At the end of the war the state of the art was represented by the British V and W class destroyer.
Destroyers (with a DD hull classification symbol) primarily perform anti-submarine warfare duty while guided missile destroyers (DDGs) are multi-mission (anti-submarine, anti-aircraft, and anti-surface warfare) surface combatants.
The destroyers (as well as frigates) are, as always, the workhorses of the fleet, the former optimised for air defence and the latter for surface and subsurface warfare.
Destroyer - Free Encyclopedia (785 words)
In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast and maneuverable yet long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet or battle group and defend them against smaller, short-range attackers.
Destroyers (with a DD hull classification symbol) primarily perform anti-submarine warfare duty while guided missile destroyers (DDGs) are multi-mission (anti-submarine, anti-air, and anti-surface warfare) surface combatants.
Two classes of destroyers are currently in use by the US Navy: the Spruance-class and the Arleigh Burke-class.
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