FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Zoot suit
A soldier inspecting zoot suits in Washington D.C. in 1942.
A soldier inspecting zoot suits in Washington D.C. in 1942.
Men wearing zoot suits.
Men wearing zoot suits.

Zoot suit (also spelled Zuit Suit) was a style of clothing popularized by Hispanics, blacks and Italian Americans during the 1930s and 1940s.[1][2][3] Image File history File links Zootsuit2. ... Image File history File links Zootsuit2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 589 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 589 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... Look up black in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent. ...

Contents

Creation

Harold C. Fox, the Chicago clothier and big-band trumpeter claimed credit for creating and naming the zoot suit. Its creation has also been attributed to Beale Street tailor, Louis Lettes; and Detroit retailer Nathan (Toddy) Elkus. [4] For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from the early 1930s until the late 1940s, although there are many big-bands around nowadays. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... Beale Street is a street in Memphis, Tennessee and a significant location in African-American history and the history of the blues. ...


Characteristics

A zoot suit has high-waisted, wide-legged, tight-cuffed pegged trousers (called tramas) and a long coat (called the carlango) with wide lapels and wide padded shoulders. Often zoot suiters wear a felt hat with a long feather (called a tapa or tanda) and pointy, French-style shoes (called calcos). A young Malcolm X described the zoot suit as: "a killer-diller coat with a drape shape, reet pleats and shoulders padded like a lunatic's cell." Zoot suits usually featured a key chain dangling from the belt to the knee or below, then back to a side pocket. Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ...


Zoot suits were for special occasions – such as a dance or a birthday party. The amount of material and tailoring required made them luxury items. Many young people wore a more moderate version of the "extra-bagged" pants or styled their hair in the signature "duck tail." Note the curled feathers The Ducks Ass was a haircut style popular during the 1950s. ...


The oversized suit was an extravagant personal style and a declaration of freedom and auto-determination; although many people still consider it a "rebellious garment to the era."[citation needed]


History

The Zoot Suit first gained popularity in Harlem jazz culture in the late 1930s where they were initially called "drapes". [1] For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ...


The word "zoot", according to the Oxford English Dictionary, probably comes from a reduplication of the word 'suit'. It was probably first coined by Mexican American pachucos as part of their slang, "Caló", evolving from the Mexican Spanish pronunciation of the English word "suit" with the "s" taking on the sound of a "z". In any case, the zoot suit became very popular among young Mexican Americans, especially among those in Los Angeles who styled themselves as "pachucos" The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... Reduplication, in linguistics, is a morphological process in which the root or stem of a word, or only part of it, is repeated. ... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ... This article is about the Mexican American subculture. ... This article is about the Chicano idiom. ... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the Mexican American subculture. ...


Anti-Latino race riots in Los Angeles during World War II are known as the Zoot Suit Riots. Despite restrictions and discrimination, Zoot Suit culture prevailed.[citation needed] Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who...


In popular culture

A 1943 drawing of Li'l Abner wearing a Zoot Suit.
A 1943 drawing of Li'l Abner wearing a Zoot Suit.

Bandleader Cab Calloway wore a zoot suit in one of his 1930s short films. Image File history File links Zoot_suit_yokum. ... Image File history File links Zoot_suit_yokum. ... Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... Cab Calloway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Cab Calloway (December 25, 1907–November 18, 1994) was a famous American jazz singer and bandleader. ...


Zoot suits were satirized by Al Capp in 1943 in the comic strip Li'l Abner, in which Abner Yokum appeared as "Zoot Suit Yokum", a gullible but near-indestructible man chosen by a clothing manufacturer to serve as role model for white youth through dangerous, staged heroic feats. The story ended with mainstream businessmen also taking to the zoot suit, whereupon it suddenly went out of style. The Li'l Abner character "Evil Eye Fleegle" also wore a zoot suit. I do Lil Abner!!, a self-portrait by Al Capp, excerpted from the April 16-17 1951 Lil Abner strips. ... Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ...


In a Tom & Jerry 1944 short, The Zoot Cat, Tom tries to win the affections of a female cat, but is rejected for being "corny". Sitting on the front porch, he hears an ad on the radio telling Tom that to be a "hep cat" he needs to wear a zoot suit. Tom immediately makes one out of a hammock and re-appears by the female cat, impressing her with his new "hep" clothes. However, when Jerry interferes, the suit gets wet and shrinks so much that the suit winds up fitting Jerry perfectly. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Zoot Cat (also referred to as simply Zoot Cat, as the quotation marks in the main titles suggest) is an animated cartoon short subject, starring Tom & Jerry. ...


As with other contemporary fads and topics, zoot suits were frequently portrayed or mentioned in Warner Bros. cartoons. One example occurs in The Big Snooze (1946), in which a group of literal "wolves" howl at Elmer Fudd, who has been "disguised" in drag by Bugs Bunny. In another example, Daffy Duck dons a zoot suit in Book Revue (also 1946). “WB” redirects here. ... The Big Snooze is a 1946 Warner Bros. ... Elmer J. Fudd is a fictional cartoon character and one of the most famous Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies characters. ... Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit/hare who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Daffy Duck is an animated cartoon character in the Warner Brothers Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. ... Book Revue (alternate title: Book Review) was a 1946 Looney Tunes cartoon short featuring Daffy Duck. ...


Zoot Suit is the name of a musical play by Luis Valdez, featuring music from Daniel Valdez and Lalo Guerrero, the "father of Chicano music." When it debuted in 1979, Zoot Suit was the first Chicano play on Broadway. In 1981, Luis Valdez also directed a filmed version of the play. Zoot Suit is a musical play by written by Luis Valdez, featuring music from Daniel Valdez and Lalo Guerrero, the father of Chicano music. ... Luis Valdez (born June 26, 1940) is an American playwright, writer and film director. ... Eduardo Lalo Guerrero (December 24, 1916 – March 17, 2005), credited as being the father of Chicano music, was a Mexican-American guitarist, singer and farm labor activist best known for his strong influence on todays Latin artists. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... Zoot Suit is a 1981 filmed version of the Broadway play Zoot Suit (play). ...


Before they found success in the UK in 1965 as the look and voice of the London mod youth culture, British rock group The Who had tried to break into the record market in 1964 as The High Numbers, with a song called "Zoot Suit". The lyrics, written by their manager and leading mod Peter Meaden, include "I got a zoot suit jacket with side vents five inches long." In mod use, the term zoot suit jacket meant a hip short box jacket with narrow lapels, three buttons and side vents, perhaps in white or ice blue color. In 1973, The Who released their rock opus, Quadrophenia, dedicated to the mods of the 1960s. A song called "Cut My Hair" contains the same lyrics about a zoot suit mentioned above. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... The High Numbers was the name used by The Who for two of their early releases in the early 1960s They were at the time managed by Peter Meaden. ... Zoot Suit b/w Im the Face was the first single of the British rock and roll The Who, when they were known as The High Numbers. ... Peter Meaden was a 1960s Mod and short time manager of the band The Who during their early days. ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ...

Michael Jackson in his video for 'Smooth Criminal'

Zoot suits and the Zoot Suit riots are also referenced in the novel Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who... Gravitys Rainbow is an epic postmodern novel written by Thomas Pynchon and first published on February 28, 1973. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ...


The prologue in James Ellroy's novel The Black Dahlia is centered around the Zoot Suit riots. The Black Dahlia in common usage may refer to: Black Dahlia - Pertaining to 1940s Hollywood murder victim Elizabeth Short The Black Dahlia (novel) - The novel by James Ellroy, based on the murder The Black Dahlia (film) - The film by Brian De Palma based upon James Ellroys novel The... Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who...


A zoot suit is the name of the powered armor in the Starfire novels by David Weber and Steve White. Starfire can refer to a number of things: The F-94 Starfire is an American jet fighter plane A science-fiction novel by Charles Sheffield Starfire, the DC Comics superhero An office of the future prototype by Sun Microsystems A science fiction strategy game called Starfire, it is owned by... Honor Harrington from Honor Among Enemies cover, by David Mattingly. ... Steve White (born on 31 May 1965 in Bermondsey, London) is an English drummer, who has worked extensively with Paul Weller, The Style Council and other British musicians. ...


In "Trick or Treatment," a 1982 episode of M*A*S*H, Maxwell Klinger wears a zoot suit as a Halloween costume, and Hawkeye Pierce, dressed in a makeshift Superman costume, asks him, "Klinger, do you know how many zoots had to be killed to make that suit?" Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel M*A*S*H: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the... Maxwell Q. Klinger is a fictional character from the M*A*S*H television series played by American actor Jamie Farr. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Captain Benjamin Franklin Hawkeye Pierce is the lead fictional character in the M*A*S*H novels, film, and television series. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


In the mid-1970s TV series The Ghost Busters, Larry Storch's character wears a zoot suit in every episode. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The Ghost Busters was a live-action childrens television series that ran from 1975 to 1976 and was not affiliated with the similarly-titled 1984 movie (it must be noted, however, that this shows producers, Filmation, got paid by Columbia Pictures for the title of the movie). ... Larry Storch (born January 8, 1923) is an American actor best known for his comedic television roles, including voiceover work for cartoons, and his live-action role the bumbling Corporal Randolph Agarn on F Troop. ...


Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) uses the term zoot suit in the film Back to the Future. This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ...


Comedian Bill Saluga's character "Ray J. Johnson" wears a zoot suit. Bill Saluga is an American comedian. ... Raymond J. Johnson, Jr. ...


Jim Carrey wore a bright yellow ostentatious zoot suit when playing the title character in the 1994 film The Mask. The Mask is an Oscar-nominated action comedy film based on a series of comic books published by Dark Horse Comics. ...


In the Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "Once More, with Feeling," Sweet wears a zoot suit (the color of which he can change at will). For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... List of Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes Once More, With Feeling is a musical episode of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, in which a mysterious force compels Sunnydale residents into songs that reveal their deep secrets. ... The following are minor fictional characters in the U.S. television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ...


In "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?", two of Judge Doom's weasels wore zoot suits. Who Framed Roger Rabbit is a 1988 film produced by Amblin Entertainment and The Walt Disney Company (released on its Touchstone Pictures banner), which blends traditional animation and live action. ... Judge Doom throttles Roger Rabbit. ...


The early scenes of Spike Lee's film Malcolm X show the famous African-American activist in his younger days. Calling himself Detroit Red, he and his best friend Shorty (played by Spike Lee) are seen dressed as zoot suit kids. Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... Malcolm X is a 1992 dramatic movie directed by Spike Lee about the African-American activist and Black nationalist Malcolm X. The story is based on The Autobiography of Malcolm X as told to Alex Haley. ...


In the comic books and cartoons of Blue Falcon the Zoot Suit Brutes were recurring villains.


The Cherry Poppin' Daddies sang a song called "Zoot Suit Riot" and produced an album with that name. Zoot Suit Riot is a compilation album by American band Cherry Poppin Daddies, released in 1997. ...


In UK cannabis culture, the term "zoot" has come to mean a spliff (marijuana cigarette) due to the narrow bottoms and wide shoulder resembling how a spliff is commonly rolled.


See also

The 38th Street Gang also known as the Vatos Locos, is a Chicano/Mexican-American street gang, originally from South Central Los Angeles. ... This article is about the Mexican American subculture. ... The Zazous were a fashion in France after World War II. They were young people expressing their individuality by wearing big or garish clothing (similar to the zoot suit fashion in America a few years before) and dancing wildly to swing jazz and bebop. ... Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who...

References

  1. ^ Zooting up / Brighten prom night with flash, dash - and panache
  2. ^ Civilization.ca - Scholars - The Montreal and Verdun Zoot-Suit disturbances of June 1944
  3. ^ *http://www.pww.org/past-weeks-2000/Zoot%20Suit%20review.htm
  4. ^ ROBERT MCG. THOMAS JR.. "Harold Fox, Who Took Credit For the Zoot Suit, Dies at 86", New York Times, August 1, 1996. Retrieved on 2008-01-08. "Harold C. Fox, the Chicago clothier and sometime big-band trumpeter who claimed credit for creating and naming the zoot suit with the reet pleat, the reave sleeve, the ripe stripe, the stuff cuff and the drape shape that was the stage rage during the boogie-woogie rhyme time of the early 1940's, died on Sunday at his home in Siesta Key, Florida. He was 86. ... Never mind that the zoot suit has been variously attributed to a Beale Street tailor named Louis Lettes and a Detroit retailer known as Nathan (Toddy) Elkus. Anyone who doubts that a fashion that became widely associated with black and Hispanic swells, World War II drugstore cowboys and Harvest Moon jitterbuggers was actually created by one man, even a trumpet-playing Chicago clothier who once took his own integrated band to the Apollo Theater in Harlem, wouldn't get much of an argument from Mr. Fox." 

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Siesta Key is a census-designated place located in Sarasota County, Florida. ... Apollo Theater marquee, c. ...

External links

For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... Mexican Americans are citizens of the United States of Mexican ancestry. ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... La Raza is a Spanish-language term (literally meaning the race, but also connoting el pueblo or la gente, both of which mean the people), which refers generally to the people of Latin America who share the cultural and political legacies of Spanish colonialism, including the Spanish language and culture... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... Mexican Americans are citizens of the United States of Mexican ancestry. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... The history of Mexican-Americans is wide-ranging, spanning more than four hundred years and varying from region to region within the United States. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Sleepy Lagoon murder was a 1942 Los Angeles, California criminal trial of 22 Latino young men; the convictions were reversed on appeal in 1944. ... The Mexican Cession (red) and the Gadsden Purchase (orange). ... Zoot Suit riots, June 1943 For the swing album by Cherry Poppin Daddies, see Zoot Suit Riot (album) The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youths, who... The Chicano Movement, also called the Chicano Civil Rights Movement, the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement, and El Movimiento, is the part of the American Civil Rights Movement that searched for social liberation and power for Mexican Americans. ... For other uses, see Aztlán (disambiguation). ... Catolicos Por La Raza is a political association organized by Ricardo Cruz in the later 1960s in Los Angeles, California. ... Chicanismo is a cultural movement by Mexican Americans to recapture their Mexican, Native American culture, which began in the 1930s in the Southwest United States. ... The East Los Angeles Walkouts or Chicano Blowouts were a series of 1968 protests against unequal conditions in Los Angeles Unified School District high schools. ... The Chicano Moratorium, formally known as the National Chicano Moratorium Committee, was a movement of Chicano anti-war activists that built a broad-based but fragile coalition of Mexican-American groups to organize opposition to the Vietnam War. ... The Plan Espiritual de Aztlán (Spanish: Spiritual Plan of Aztlán) is a manifesto advocating Chicano nationalism and self-determination for Mexican Americans. ... Plan de Santa Barbara is the founding document of the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan MEChA. It was adopted in April 1969, one month after Plan Espiritual de Aztlan. ... The United Farm Workers of America (UFW) is a labor union that evolved from unions founded in 1962 by César Chávez, Philip Vera Cruz, Dolores Huerta, and Larry Itliong. ... Alianza Federal de Mercedes, led by Reies Tijerina, was a group based in New Mexico in the 1960s that fought for the land rights of Hispanic New Mexicans, primarily in northern New Mexico. ... A silkscreen poster by Daniel Desiga promoting Colegio César Chávez, ca. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Hernandez v. ... Plyler v. ... Mendez v. ... Holding Reliance on property taxes to fund public schools does not violate the Equal Protection Clause even if it causes inter-district expenditure disparities. ... Chicano Park is a 7. ... Chicano rap is a subgenre of hip hop music, latin rap and gangsta rap that embodies aspects of West Coast and Southwest Mexican American (Chicano) culture and is typically performed by American rap singers and musicians of Mexican descent. ... Los Lobos Chicano rock or Latin rock is rock music performed by Mexican American groups or music with themes derived from Chicano culture. ... For the Choloa language, see Emberá languages. ... Estrada Courts is a low-income housing project in the Boyle Heights area of East Los Angeles, California, located in the vicinity of 3200 and 3300 Olympic Boulevard, near Lorena Street. ... 1948 Chevrolet Fleetline Bomb from the Viejitos Car Club Orange County A lowrider is a car or truck which has had its suspension system modified (sometimes with hydraulic suspension) so that it rides as low to the ground as possible. ... This article is about the Mexican American subculture. ... Poster for Teatro Campesino performing at a strike benefit with Quicksilver Messenger Service July 1966 at the Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco. ... Tortilla art refers to fine art that uses tortillas as a canvas. ... The following is a list of Chicano slang words and expressions, known as Caló, also spelled Calo and Kalo by modern Chicano youth. ... This is a list of Chicano writers and poets: Alurista Oscar Zeta Acosta Rudolfo A. Anaya Gloria E. Anzaldúa Jimmy Santiago Baca Jose Antonio Burciaga Ana Castillo Lorna Dee Cervantes Viviana Aparicio Chamberlain Sandra Cisneros Juan A. Contreras Alicia Gaspar de Alba Guillermo Gómez-Peña Rodolfo Corky... The following is a partial list of United States cities, towns, and census-designated places in which a majority (over 50%) of the population is Hispanic or Latino, according to data from the 2000 Census. ... This is a list of notable Mexican-Americans. ... Famous Hispanic Americans // Silvana Arias, actress Adrian Bellani, actor Jessica Alba, actress Nadine Velazquez, actress Desi Arnaz, actor Alexis Bledel, actress Benjamin Bratt, actor Julissa Bermudez, actress and VJ Lynda Carter, actress Ricardo Chavira, actor from Desperate Housewives Sammy Davis, Jr. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Zoot suit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (676 words)
Zoot suits first gained popularity in Harlem jazz culture in the late 1930s where they were called "drapes".
Zoot Suits were satirized by Al Capp in 1943 in the comic strip Li'l Abner, in which Abner Yokum appeared as "Zoot Suit Yokum," a gullible but near-indestructible man chosen by a clothing manufacturer to serve as role model for white youth through dangerous, staged heroic feats.
Zoot Suit is also the name of a musical play by written by Luis Valdez, featuring music from Daniel Valdez and Lalo Guerrero, the "father of Chicano music." When it debuted in 1979, Zoot Suit was the first Chicano play on Broadway.
Zoot Suit Riots - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (606 words)
The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of riots that erupted in Los Angeles, California during World War II, between sailors and soldiers stationed in the city and Mexican American youth gangs headed by pachucos, recognized because of the zoot suits they favored.
In response to the riots Eleanor Roosevelt wrote in her weekly column about the problems faced by the Mexican American community as a result of racism in the United States.
A murder mystery novel, The Zoot Suit Murders by Thomas Sanchez, employed the riots as a backdrop to the main mystery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m