FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Zoology" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Zoology
Part of a Series on

Zoology


Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 748 KB) Beschreibung Edited by Fir0002 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Wikipedia:Featured pictures visible Talk:Endangered species Amur Tiger Wikipedia:Featured pictures thumbs...

Branches of Zoology

Anthrozoology · Apiology
Arachnology · Cetology
Conchology · Entomology
Ethology · Herpetology
Ichthyology · Malacology
Mammalogy · Myrmecology
Neuroethology · Ornithology
Planktology · Paleozoology
Primatology Anthrozoology is the study of human-animal interaction, also described as the science focusing on all aspects of the human-animal bond. ... Apiology (from Greek: api, bee; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the scientific study of honey bees, a subdiscipline of Melittology, which is itself a branch of entomology. ... Arachnology is the scientific study of spiders and related organisms such as scorpions, pseudoscorpions, harvestmen, collectively called arachnids. ... Cetology (from Greek: κητος, cetus, whale; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of marine mammal science that studies the approximately eighty species of whales, dolphins, and porpoise in the scientific order Cetacea. ... Conchology is the scientific study of shells of mollusks, a branch of malacology. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθυ, ikhthu, fish; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora - Chitons Monoplacophora Bivalvia - Bivalves Scaphopoda - Tusk shells Gastropoda - Snails and Slugs Cephalopoda - Squids, Octopuses, etc. ... In zoology, mammalogy is the study of mammals – a class of vertebrates with characteristics such as homeothermic metabolism, fur, four-chambered hearts, and complex nervous systems. ... Myrmecology is the scientific study of ants, a branch of entomology. ... Neuroethology (from Greek - neuron meaning from nerves, ethos meaning trait or character, and logos meaning words or study) is the scientific study of animal behaviour with its base in neurology. ... This article is about the field of zoology. ... Planktology is the study of plankton, various microorganisms that inhabit bodies of water. ... Paleozoology (Greek: paleon = old and zoon = animal) is the branch of paleontology dealing with the recovery and identification of animal remains from archeological (or even geological) contexts, and their use in the reconstruction of past environments and economies. ... Primatology is the study of non-human primates. ...

Notable Zoologists

Georges Cuvier · Charles Darwin
William Kirby · Carolus Linnaeus
Konrad Lorenz · Thomas Say
Alfred Russel Wallace · more...
Georges Cuvier Baron Georges Léopold Chrétien Frédéric Dagobert Cuvier (August 23, 1769–May 13, 1832) was a French naturalist and zoologist. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... William Kirby. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Lorenz being followed by his imprinted geese Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (November 7, 1903 in Vienna – February 27, 1989 in Vienna) was an Austrian zoologist, animal psychologist, and ornithologist. ... Thomas Say. ... For the Cornish painter, see Alfred Wallis. ... This is a list of notable biologists. ...

History

pre-Darwin This article considers the history of zoology before the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin in 1859. ...


post-Darwin This article considers the history of zoology in the years up to 1912, since the theory of evolution by natural selection proposed by Charles Darwin in 1859. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, "animal"; and λόγος, logos, "knowledge") is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... This is a list of academic disciplines (and academic fields). ... The word Animals when used alone has several possible meanings in the English language. ...

Contents

Name

The pronunciation of "zoology" is /zoʊˈɑləʤɪ/; however, an alternative pronunciation is /zuˈɑləʤɪ/[1]. Traditionally (and more properly), the word was pronounced with the first syllable rhyming with "toe", followed by "-ology". Recently, it has become more common to pronounce the first syllable as "zoo". The word zoology originates from the Greek zoion, meaning animal, and logos, meaning word. For the computer operating system, see Syllable (operating system). ... This article is about logos (logoi) in ancient Greek philosophy, mathematics, rhetoric, Theophilosophy, and Christianity. ...


Subfields of zoology

The study of animal life is, of course, ancient: but as 'zoology' it is relatively modern, for what we call biology was known as 'natural history' at the start of the nineteenth century. During the lifetime of Charles Darwin natural history turned from a gentlemanly pursuit to a modern scientific activity. Zoology as we know it was first established in German and British universities. Originally quite closely connected to medical training, it gradually gained its own identity as Darwin started to answer those fundamental historical questions which had been asked before him without much success. The institution of zoology training in British universities was mainly established by Thomas Henry Huxley. His ideas were centered on the morphology of animals: he was himself the greatest comparative anatomist of the second half of the nineteenth century. His courses were composed of lectures and laboratory practical classes; and his system became widely spread. Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Thomas Henry Huxley PC, FRS (4 May 1825 Ealing – 29 June 1895 Eastbourne, Sussex) was an English biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his advocacy of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ...


There was much left out by Huxley, especially the study of animals in their environment, which had been the main stimulus for both Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace (who both came up with the idea of natural selection). The fact that neither Darwin nor Wallace ever held a university teaching post may have contributed to this rather startling omission. Gradually Huxley's comparative anatomy was supplemented by other much-needed methods. The field of zoology in the twentieth century mainly comprised these approaches: For the Cornish painter, see Alfred Wallis. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ...

  1. Comparative anatomy studies the structure of animals.
  2. The physiology of animals is studied under various fields including anatomy and embryology
  3. The common genetic and developmental mechanisms of animals and plants is studied in molecular biology, molecular genetics and developmental biology
  4. Ethology is the study of animal behavior.
  5. The ecology of animals is covered under behavioral ecology and other fields
  6. Evolutionary biology of both animals and plants is considered in the articles on evolution, population genetics, heredity, variation, Mendelism, reproduction.
  7. Systematics, cladistics, phylogenetics, phylogeography, biogeography and taxonomy classify and group species via common descent and regional associations.
  8. The various taxonomically-oriented disciplines such as mammalogy, herpetology, ornithology identify and classify species, and study the structures and mechanisms specific to those groups. Entomology is the study of insects, by far the largest group of animals.
  9. Palaeontology, including all that may be learnt of ancient environments.

Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Molecular genetics is the field of biology which studies the structure and function of genes at a molecular level. ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Behavioral ecology is the study of the ecological and evolutionary basis for animal behavior, and the roles of behavior in enabling an animal to adapt to its environment (both intrinsic and extrinsic). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Population genetics is the study of the distribution of and change in allele frequencies under the influence of the four evolutionary forces: natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and migration. ... See Heredity (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... In music, variation is a formal technique where material is altered during repetition; reiteration with changes. ... Mendelian inheritance (or Mendelian genetics or Mendelism) is a set of primary tenets that underlie much of genetics developed by Gregor Mendel in the latter part of the 19th century. ... For other uses, see Reproduction (disambiguation) Reproduction is the biological process by which new individual organisms are produced. ... Biological systematics is the study of the diversity of life on the planet earth, both past and present, and the relationships among living things through time. ... It has been suggested that Clade be merged into this article or section. ... Phylogenetic groups, or taxa, can be monophyletic, paraphyletic, or polyphyletic. ... Phylogeography is the attempt to take into account the geographic distribution of species in establishing their phylogeny, and to understand the geographic patterns that may result from divergence, ultimately leading to speciation. ... Biogeography is the science which deals with patterns of species distribution and the processes that result in such patterns. ... For the science of classifying living things, see alpha taxonomy. ... In zoology, mammalogy is the study of mammals – a class of vertebrates with characteristics such as homeothermic metabolism, fur, four-chambered hearts, and complex nervous systems. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... This article is about the field of zoology. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Symphypleona - globular springtails Subclass Archaeognatha (jumping bristletails) Subclass Dicondylia Monura - extinct Thysanura (common bristletails) Subclass Pterygota Diaphanopteroidea - extinct Palaeodictyoptera - extinct Megasecoptera - extinct Archodonata - extinct Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Blattodea (cockroaches) Mantodea (mantids) Isoptera (termites) Zoraptera Grylloblattodea Dermaptera (earwigs) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ...

Systems of classification

Morphography includes the systematic exploration and tabulation of the facts involved in the recognition of all the recent and extinct kinds of animals and their distribution in space and time. (1) The museum-makers of old days and their modern representatives the curators and describers of zoological collections, (2) early explorers and modern naturalist travellers and writers on zoo-geography, and (3) collectors of fossils and palaeontologists are the chief varieties of zoological workers coming under this heading. Gradually, since the time of Hunter and Cuvier, anatomical study has associated itself with the more superficial morphography until today no one considers a study of animal form of any value which does not include internal structure, histology and embryology in its scope. For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... The Palais du Louvre in Paris, which houses the Musée du Louvre, one of the worlds most famous museums, and most certainly the largest. ... Explorer redirects here. ... Collector - in electronics, the amplified terminal on a Bipolar junction transistor (PNP) or (NPN) list of collectors- People with note-worthy collections. ... For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Engraving of John Hunter (1728 – 1793) taken from the original portrait by Sir Joshua Reynolds, which is in the Royal College of Surgeons. ... Georges Cuvier Baron Georges Léopold Chrétien Frédéric Dagobert Cuvier (August 23, 1769–May 13, 1832) was a French naturalist and zoologist. ... Greek anatome, from ana-temnein, to cut up), is the branch of biology that deals with the structure and organization of living things; thus there is animal anatomy (zootomy) and plant anatomy (phytonomy). ... A thin section of lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


The real dawn of zoology after the legendary period of the Middle Ages is connected with the name of an Englishman, Edward Edward Wotton, born at Oxford in 1492, who practised as a physician in London and died in 1555. He published a treatise De differentiis animalium at Paris in 1552. In many respects Wotton was simply an exponent of Aristotle, whose teaching, - with various fanciful additions, constituted the real basis of zoological knowledge throughout the Middle Ages. It was Wotton's merit that he rejected the legendary and fantastic accretions, and returned to Aristotle and the observation of nature. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Official language None; English is de facto Capital London Capitals coordinates 51° 30 N, 0° 10 W Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831... Edward Edward Wotton (1492-1552) English physician created with starting the modern study of zoology, by separating out much of the fanciful and folkloric additions that had been added over time to the body of zoological knowledge. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ...


The most ready means of noting the progress of zoology during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries is to compare Aristotle's classificatory conceptions of successive.


History

Main articles: History of zoology (before Darwin) and History of zoology (since Darwin)

This article considers the history of zoology before the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin in 1859. ... Charles Darwin gave new stimulus and new direction to morphology and physiology, by uniting them as part of a common biological theory: the theory of organic evolution but a part of the wider doctrine of universal evolution based on the laws of physics and chemistry. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Notable zoologists

Main article: List of zoologists

In alphabetical order by surname: This is a list of notable biologists. ...

Louis Agassiz After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, Stanford President David Starr Jordan wrote, Somebody—Dr. Angell, perhaps—remarked that Agassiz was great in the abstract but not in the concrete. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora - Chitons Monoplacophora Bivalvia - Bivalves Scaphopoda - Tusk shells Gastropoda - Snails and Slugs Cephalopoda - Squids, Octopuses, etc. ... Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθυ, ikhthu, fish; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Sir David Frederick Attenborough, OM, CH, CVO, CBE, FRS (born on May 8, 1926 in London, England) is one of the worlds most acclaimed broadcasters and naturalists. ... Henry Walter Bates (February 8, 1825 - February 16, 1892) was an English naturalist and explorer. ... For other uses, see Mimic (disambiguation). ... Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... Abbé Pierre Joseph Bonnaterre (1747 - September 20, 1804) was a French naturalist who contributed sections on birds and fish to the Tableau encyclopédique et méthodique. ... Dr.William H. Cade (Bill Cade) is a biologist specializing in mating systems (especially of the cricket (insect)). His research areas include studying the evolution of mating behavior in crickets and the cricket/fly acoustical research, as well as studying the crickets and grasshoppers of Africa. ... Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist and nature writer whose writings are often credited with launching the global environmental movement. ... Marine biology is the study of animal and plant life within saltwater ecosystems. ... Archie Carr (June 16, 1909–May 21, 1987) was a Professor of Zoology at the University of Florida and a pioneering conservationist. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Archie Carr III, PhD., is an American biologist instrumental in establishing the Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary in the nation of Belize. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Dr. Eugenie Clark, (born May 4, 1922), popularly called the Shark lady, is an American ichthyologist known for her research on poisonous fishes of the tropical seas and on the behaviour of sharks. ... Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθυ, ikhthu, fish; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ... Jeff Corwin Jeffrey Samuel Corwin (born July 11, 1967 in Norwell, Massachusetts), better known as Jeff Corwin, is the host and executive producer of The Jeff Corwin Experience and Corwins Quest, two American television shows about animals airing on the Animal Planet cable channel. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Georges Cuvier Baron Georges Léopold Chrétien Frédéric Dagobert Cuvier (August 23, 1769–May 13, 1832) was a French naturalist and zoologist. ... Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... This article is about biological evolution. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ... Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS (born March 26, 1941) is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and popular science writer who holds the Charles Simonyi Chair for the Public Understanding of Science at the University of Oxford. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In zoology, mammalogy is the study of mammals – a class of vertebrates with characteristics such as homeothermic metabolism, fur, four-chambered hearts, and complex nervous systems. ... Sir William Henry Flower KCB FRCS FRS (November 30, 1831 - July 1, 1899) was an English comparative anatomist and surgeon. ... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... This article is about the British ecological geneticist E.B. Henry Ford. ... Ecological genetics is the study of genetics (itself a field of biology) from an ecological perspective. ... Dian Fossey (January 16, 1932 – December 27, 1985) was an American Zoologist who completed an extended study of several gorilla groups. ... Primatology is the study of non-human primates. ... Dr Biruté Marija Filomena Galdikas, OC Ph. ... Primatology is the study of non-human primates. ... Dame Jane Goodall, DBE, (born April 3, 1934) is an English UN Messenger of Peace, primatologist, ethologist, and anthropologist. ... Primatology is the study of non-human primates. ... Lake Geneva Limnology (from Greek: Λίμνη limne, lake; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of inland waters (both fresh and saline), including their biological, physical, chemical, geological and hydrological aspects. ... Ichthyology (from Greek: ἰχθυ, ikhthu, fish; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology devoted to the study of fish. ... A Korbnetz, one of several inventions by Hensen to collect plankton. ... Planktology is the study of plankton, various microorganisms that inhabit bodies of water. ... Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, FRS (June 22, 1887 – February 14, 1975) was a English biologist, author, Humanist and internationalist, known for his popularisations of science in books and lectures. ... The modern evolutionary synthesis (often referred to simply as the new synthesis, the modern synthesis, the evolutionary synthesis, neo-Darwinian synthesis or neo-Darwinism), generally denotes the integration of Charles Darwins theory of the evolution of species by natural selection, Gregor Mendels theory of genetics as the basis... Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities—particularly rationality. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Thomas Henry Huxley PC, FRS (4 May 1825 Ealing – 29 June 1895 Eastbourne, Sussex) was an English biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his advocacy of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without, and gnosticism or gnosis, meaning knowledge) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality—is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism... Science education is the field concerned with sharing science content and process with individuals not traditionally considered part of the scientific community. ... Libbie Henrietta Hyman (Dec 6, 1888- Aug 3, 1969), zoologist, was born in Des Moines, Iowa, the daughter of Joseph Hyman and Sabina Neumann. ... it ois the study of people who help many animals ... For the rugby league footballer of the same name, see Steve Irwin (rugby league). ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... William Kirby. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Hans-Wilhelm Koepcke (b. ... This article is about the field of zoology. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Sir Edwin Ray Lankester (1847 - 1929) was a British zoologist. ... Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Biological systematics is the study of the diversity of life on the planet earth, both past and present, and the relationships among living things through time. ... Lorenz being followed by his imprinted geese Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (November 7, 1903 in Vienna – February 27, 1989 in Vienna) was an Austrian zoologist, animal psychologist, and ornithologist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David W. Macdonald is a British zoologist. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Professor John Maynard Smith[1], F.R.S. (6 January 1920 – 19 April 2004) was a British evolutionary biologist and geneticist. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Ernst Mayr Ernst Walter Mayr (July 5, 1904, Kempten, Germany – February 3, 2005, Bedford, Massachusetts U.S.), was one of the 20th centurys leading evolutionary biologists. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Uncle Monty redirects here. ... Herpetology (from greek: ἑρπετόν, creeping animal and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the branch of zoology concerned with the study of reptiles and amphibians. ... Johann Friedrich Theodor Müller PhD (March 31, 1821–May 21, 1897), always known as Fritz, was a German biologist who emigrated to Brazil, where he studied the natural history of the Amazon rainforest and was an early advocate of evolutionary theory. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... A mimic is any species that has evolved to appear similar to another successful species in order to dupe predators into avoiding the mimic, or dupe prey into approaching the mimic. ... Dr Desmond Morris (born 24 January 1928 in the village of Purton, UK) is most famous for his work as a zoologist and ethologist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Sir Richard Owen KCB (July 20, 1804–December 18, 1892) was an English biologist, comparative anatomist and palaeontologist. ... Vertebrate paleontology seeks to discover the behavior, reproduction and appearance of extinct spined animals, through the study of their fossilized remains. ... Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... For other similarly-named museums see Museum of Natural History. ... Roger Tory Peterson (August 28, 1908 – July 28, 1996), was an American naturalist, ornithologist, artist, and educator, and held to be one of the founding inspirations for the 20th century environmental movement. ... This article is about the field of zoology. ... William Emerson Ritter, Ph. ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Thomas Say. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Shen Shen Kuo or Shen Kua (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (1031–1095) was a polymathic Chinese scientist and statesman of the Song Dynasty (960–1279). ... Su Song 蘇頌 (1020 – 1101), style Zirong 子容, was a Chinese engineer. ... Jakob von Uexküll (September 8, 1864 - July 25, 1944) was an Estonian biologist who had important achievements in the fields of muscular physiology and the cybernetics of life. ... it ois the study of people who help many animals ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... For the Cornish painter, see Alfred Wallis. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ... Zoogeography is the branch of the science of biogeography that is concerned with the geographic distribution of animal species. ... Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and... E.O. Wilson with Dynastes hercules E. O. Wilson, or Edward Osborne Wilson, (born June 10, 1929) is an entomologist and biologist known for his work on ecology, evolution, and sociobiology. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Image:Broom R.jpg Robert Broom Prof. ...

See also

This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: nonsense If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Zootomy is a contraction of zoological and anatomy and refers to the dissection of animals as opposed to that of plants (phytotomy) See also: Androtomy, zootomical terms for location, Cat anatomy La Anatomía comparada estudia diversas especies. ... Cryptozoology (from Greek: κρυπτός, kryptós, hidden; ζῷον, zôon, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge or study – zoology) is the search for animals hypothesized to exist, but for which conclusive proof is missing. ... A paleontologist carefully chips rock from a column of dinosaur vertebrae. ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Orders Subclass Apterygota Archaeognatha (bristletails) Thysanura (silverfish) Subclass Pterygota Infraclass Paleoptera (Probably paraphyletic) Ephemeroptera (mayflies) Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) Infraclass Neoptera Superorder Exopterygota Grylloblattodea (ice-crawlers) Mantophasmatodea (gladiators) Plecoptera (stoneflies) Embioptera (webspinners) Zoraptera (angel insects) Dermaptera (earwigs) Orthoptera (grasshoppers, etc) Phasmatodea (stick insects) Blattodea (cockroaches) Isoptera (termites) Mantodea (mantids) Psocoptera... Pinguicula grandiflora commonly known as a Butterwort Example of a cross section of a stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... A microtome is a mechanical instrument used to cut very thin slices for microscopic examination. ... This is a list of notable biologists. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Anthrozoology is the study of human-animal interaction, also described as the science focusing on all aspects of the human-animal bond. ... The position and treatment of animals in Buddhism is important for the light it sheds on Buddhists perception of their own relation to the natural world, on Buddhist humanitarian concerns in general, and on the relationship between Buddhist theory and Buddhist practice. ... This article is about the attitudes of Islam regarding animals. ...

Sources and external links

Wikibooks
Wikibooks has more on the topic of
Zoology
Wikiversity
At Wikiversity you can learn more and teach others about Zoology at:


Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Wikiversity logo Wikiversity is a Wikimedia Foundation beta project[1], devoted to learning materials and activities, located at www. ...


References

  1. ^ Zoology. Dictionary.com. Retrieved on 26 April, 2007.

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Dictionary. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The DNA structure might not be the only nucleic acid in the universe capable of supporting life[1] Astrobiology (from Greek: ἀστρο, astro, constellation; βίος, bios, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary study of life in space, combining aspects of astronomy, biology and geology. ... Biochemistry (from Greek: , bios, life and Egyptian kÄ“me, earth[1]) is the study of the chemical processes in living organisms. ... Map of the human X chromosome (from the NCBI website). ... Biostatistics or biometry is the application of statistics to a wide range of topics in biology. ... Pinguicula grandiflora commonly known as a Butterwort Example of a cross section of a stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Cell biology (also called cellular biology or formerly cytology, from the Greek kytos, container) is an academic discipline that studies cells. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... Epidemiology is the study of factors affecting the health and illness of populations, and serves as the foundation and logic of interventions made in the interest of public health and preventive medicine. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Genomics is the study of an organisms entire genome; Rathore et al, . Investigation of single genes, their functions and roles is something very common in todays medical and biological research, and cannot be said to be genomics but rather the most typical feature of molecular biology. ... Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Human biology is an interdisciplinary academic field of biology, biological anthropology, and medicine which focuses on humans; it is closely related to primate biology, and a number of other fields. ... An agar plate streaked with microorganisms Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which are unicellular or cell-cluster microscopic organisms. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... The Nutrition Facts table indicates the amounts of nutrients which experts recommend you limit or consume in adequate amounts. ... For the definition, see Life. ... Paleontology, palaeontology or palæontology (from Greek: paleo, ancient; ontos, being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. ... Parasitology is the study of parasites, their hosts, and the relationship between them. ... A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe type) viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide Pathologist redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Systems biology is a term used very widely in the biosciences, particularly from the year 2000 onwards, and in a variety of contexts. ... Taxonomy, sometimes alpha taxonomy, is the science of finding, describing and naming organisms, thus giving rise to taxa. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zoology - MSN Encarta (1490 words)
Zoology, the branch of biology devoted to the study of the animal kingdom (Animalia).
Vertebrate zoology, the study of animals with backbones, is divided into ichthyology (fish), herpetology (amphibians and reptiles), ornithology (birds), and mammalogy (mammals).
Evolutionary zoology, which draws on all of the fields just mentioned, is concerned with the mechanisms of evolutionary change—speciation and adaptation—and with the evolutionary history of animal groups.
Zoology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (590 words)
Zoology is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals.
The real dawn of zoology after the legendary period of the Middle Ages is connected with the name of an Englishman, Edward Edward Wotton, born at Oxford in 1492, who practised as a physician in London and died in 1555.
The most ready means of noting the progress of zoology during the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries is to compare Aristotle's classificatory conceptions of successive naturalists with those which are to be found in the works of Caldon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

Matt Allen
13th May 2010
Zoology means the study of animals by habitat and

Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m