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Encyclopedia > Zillertal

The Zillertal is a side valley of the Inn in Tyrol, Austria drained by the River Ziller. It is surrounded by the Zillertaler Alpen, Kitzbüheler Alpen and Tuxer Alpen, many of which are strongly glaciated. The largest settlement is Mayrhofen. The Inn is a river in Switzerland, Austria and Germany. ... Tyrol (Tirol in German) is a state or Land, located in the west of Austria. ... The Zillertal Alps (German: Zillertaler Alpen) are a mountain range of the Alps on the border of Austria and Italy. ... Hahnenkamm above Kitzbühel. ... The Tux Alps (German: Tuxer Alpen) are a small mountain range of the Alps in Austria. ... A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity and undergoes internal deformation. ... Mayrhofen from the Penkenbahn Mayrhofen is a town in the Zillertal (Ziller river valley) of Tyrol, Austria. ...


The earliest occupants of the Zillertal were the Illyrians in the 6th Century AD, a tribe from the Balkan Peninsula who were absorbed by the Bavarians (Baiuvarii). Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Bavarii was a large and powerful tribe which emerged late in Teutonic tribal times, in what is now the Czech Republic (Bohemia). ...


889 The earliest written record of the Zillertal, when Arnulf of Carinthia granted land to the Archbishop of Salzburg in the "Cilarestal". Ownership of the valley was divided along the River Ziller. Even today this division is visible, as churches on the right bank of the river have green towers and belong to Salzburg Diocese, while churches on the left bank have red towers and belong to Innsbruck Diocese. Arnulf of Carinthia (German Arnulf von Kärnten, Slovenian Arnulf Koroški) (850 – December 8, 899) was one of the last ruling members of the Carolingian house in the Eastern part of the Frankish Kingdom, which had been split in the Treaty of Verdun in 843. ...


10Century Beginning of the Medieval Warm Period The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) or Medieval Climate Optimum was a time of unusually warm climate in Europe, lasting from about the 10th century to about the 14th century. ...


1248 - Land west of the Ziller acquired by the Counts of Tyrol The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino. ...


1290 to 1380 - Lands east of the Ziller pledged as security to the Counts of Tyrol by the Lords of Rattenberg Rattenberg, Austria is a town near Rat Mountain and Innsbruck. ...


1300s - Locusts, plagues and earthquakes in the Tyrol. 18 October 1356 the Rhine rift moved causing the Basle Earthquake. This is the strongest earthquake to hit the European Continent to this day and its effects were certainly felt in the Zillertal. The Rhine Rift is a striking reminder of the tectonic plates that created Europe. ... Basel (English traditionally: Basle [ba:l], German: Basel [ba:z@l], French Bâle [ba:l], Italian Basilea [bazilE:a]) is Switzerlands third most populous city (188,000 inhabitants in the canton of Basel-City as of 2004; the 690,000 inhabitants in the conurbation stretching across the...


14Century - End of the Medieval Warm Period.


Margarete Maultasch (trans "Mouth-Pocket" due to having a deformed jaw) granted the Tyrol to the Habsburgs Margarete Maultasch (1318 – October 3, 1369 in Vienna) was the last Countess of Tyrol from the Meinhardiner dynasty. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ...


1504 - Zillertal was acquired for the Counts of Tyrol by Emperor Maximilian, in addition to Rattenberg, Kufstein and Kitzbuhel. Emperor Maximilian I Maximilian I of Habsburg (March 22, 1459 - January 12, 1519) was Holy Roman Emperor Life and reign in the Habsburg hereditary lands Maximilian was born in Vienna as the son of the Emperor Frederick III and Eleanore of Portugal. ... Rattenberg, Austria is a town near Rat Mountain and Innsbruck. ... Annual Almabtrieb cow train in Kufstein Kufstein is an old city in Tyrol, Austria. ... Kitzbühel by Night Kitzbühel is a city in Tyrol, Austria, situated along the river Kitzbühler Ache. ...


1512 - Black Death in the Zillertal. Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ...


1650(Approx) - Start of the Little Ice Age The Little Ice Age (LIA) was a period of cooling occurring after a warmer era known as the Medieval climate optimum. ...


1781 - Emperor Joseph II abolished serfdom in Austria, and the Toleranzpatent (Patent of toleration) allowed other religions, but was opposed in the Tyrol. Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II Joseph II (March 13, 1741 - February 20, 1790) was a Holy Roman Emperor (1765 - 1790). ... Patent of toleration was a series of ecclesiastical reforms carried out by the Holy Roman Emperor, Joseph II of Austria (1765-1790). ...


1809 - The "Tyrol Freedom Fight" and Andreas Hofer. Andreas Hofer on an Austrian stamp Andreas Hofer (November 22, 1767 - February 20, 1810) was a Tyrolean innkeeper and patriot. ...

 6 Feb 1809 Bayern troops occupied Zell and Mayrhofen 14 May 1809 Battle of the Zillerbrucke Oct 1809 Treaty of Schoenbrunn, Austria sacrifices the Tyrol to Napoleon 8 Nov 1809 Andreas Hofer capitulates. The entire Ziller Valley was united with the Tyrol under Bavarian (Napoleonic) rule when was abandoned by Austria. 

1815 - The Congress of Vienna restored the Tyrol to Austria, but excluded the Zillertal. The Treaty of Schönbrunn (also known as the Treaty of Vienna) was signed between France and Austria at the Schönbrunn Palace on October 14, 1809. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ...


1837, 427 inhabitants of Zillertal were deported to Erdmannsdorf in Prussian Silesia (Schlessien) (now Myslakowice in western Poland) because of their opposition to the practice of auricular confession. The event is documented in Felix Mitterer's Play, "Verlorene Heimat". While 65 houses were provided for these people, many didn't stay, but moved to other parts of the world. A group subsequently emigrated to the Lake Llanquihue and "Colonia Humán" in Los Ángeles, areas of Chile, where their descendants continue the Alpine traditions. Confession of sins is an integral part of the Christian faith and practice. ... Lake Llanquihue is Chiles largest lake with an area of about 330 square miles (860 km²). It is situated in the southern Los Lagos Region in the Llanquihue and Osorno provinces. ...


1841 - Adolph Kolping as a youth hiked the length of the valley and described the trip in his diaries, dated 6 September 1841. Adolph Kolping ( December 8, 1813 in Kerpen near Cologne; † December 4, 1865 in Cologne) was a German Catholic Priest. ...


1850 Approx - End of the "Little Ice Age"


1902 - The Zillertal Bahn was built and is still in continuous use.


1914 - The Furst von Auersperg built the hunting lodge at Ginzling.


1916 - Visited and mentioned by D.H.Lawrence in his book Twilight in Italy. D. H. Lawrence David Herbert Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was one of the most important, certainly one of the most controversial, English writers of the 20th century, who wrote novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, and letters. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zillertal Alps (860 words)
The Zillertal Alps are a frontier range and part of the main backbone of the Eastern Alps in a section called the High Tauern.
Like all these ranges, the Zillertal section is highly glaciated and its reputation, also commonly associated with the Ötztal and Stubai, as a tame area for alpinists is not wholly deserved.
The Zillertal was virtually ignored by the general influx of mountain walking and mildly ambitious mountaineering parties already weaving their ways across the 0tztal, Stubai and Glockner regions until well into the 1920s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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