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Encyclopedia > Zeus
The Statue of Zeus at OlympiaPhidias created the 40ft (12m) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving
The Statue of Zeus at Olympia
Phidias created the 40ft (12m) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving

Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive: Διός Diós) in Greek mythology is the king of the gods, the ruler of Mount Olympus, and god of the sky and thunder. His symbols are the thunderbolt, eagle, bull and the oak. In addition to his Indo-European inheritance, the classical Zeus also derives certain iconographic traits from the cultures of the ancient Near East, such as the scepter. Zeus is frequently envisaged by Greek artists in one of two poses: standing, striding forward, a thunderbolt leveled in his raised right hand, or seated in majesty. Zeus is the Greek god of the sky and of thunder, and the ruler of Mount Olympus. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van Heemskerck. ... Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC Years: 440 BC 439 BC 438 BC 437 BC 436 BC - 435 BC - 434 BC 433 BC... “Sculptor” redirects here. ... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around nine hundred years. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun, which generally marks the subject of a verb, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Polytheistic peoples of many cultures have postulated a thunder god, a personification of the seemingly magical forces of thunder and lightning. ... Typical cartoon representations of thunderbolts A thunderbolt is a traditional expression for a discharge of lightning or a symbolic representation thereof. ... Genera Several, see below. ... The worship of the Sacred Bull throughout the ancient world is most familiar in the episode of the idol of the Golden Calf made by Aaron and worshipped by the Hebrews in the wilderness of Sinai (Exodus). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... Overview map of the Ancient Near East The term Ancient Near East or Ancient Orient encompasses the early civilizations predating Classical Antiquity in the region roughly corresponding to that described by the modern term Middle East (Egypt, Iraq, Turkey), during the time roughly spanning the Bronze Age from the rise... A sceptre or scepter is an ornamental staff held by a ruling monarch, a prominent item of kingly regalia. ...


The son of Cronus and Rhea, he was the youngest of his siblings. He was married to Hera in most traditions, although at the oracle of Dodona his consort was Dione: according to the Iliad, he is the father of Aphrodite by Dione. Accordingly, he is known for his erotic escapades, including one pederastic relationship with Ganymede. His trysts resulted in many famous offspring, including Athena, Apollo and Artemis, Hermes, Persephone (by Demeter), Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen, Minos, and the Muses (by Mnemosyne); by Hera he is usually said to have sired Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dodona (disambiguation). ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... The Rape of Ganymede, by Rubens In Greek mythology, Ganymede, or closer to the Greek Ganymede the great man that leads (in Greek — Γανυμήδης, Ganumēdēs) was a divine hero whose homeland was the Troad. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) “Alcides” redirects here. ... “Helen of Troy” redirects here. ... Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes confused with Mneme or compared with Memoria) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Hebe by Antonio Canova In Greek mythology, Hêbê (Greek: ) was the goddess of youth (Roman equivalent: Juventas). ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


His Roman counterpart was Jupiter, and his Etruscan counterpart was Tinia. A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... In Etruscan mythology, Tinia was the highest god of the skies, husband to Thalna or Uni. ...

Contents

Cult of Zeus

Panhellenic cults of Zeus

The major center at which all Greeks converged to pay honor to their chief god was Olympia. The quadrennial festival there featured the famous Games. There was also an altar to Zeus made not of stone, but of ash - from the accumulated remains of many centuries' worth of animals sacrificed there. Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ...


Outside of the major inter-polis sanctuaries, there were no exact modes of worshipping Zeus that were shared across the Greek world. Most of the above titles, for instance, could be found at any number of Greek temples from Asia Minor to Sicily. Certain modes of ritual were held in common as well: sacrificing a white animal over a raised altar, for instance. A polis (πόλις, pronunciation pol-is) plural: poleis (πόλεις) is a city, a city-state and also citizenship and body of citizens. ... The Greeks began to build monumental temples in the first half of the 8th century BC. The temples of Hera at Samos and of Poseidon at Isthmia were among the first erected. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...

Colossal seated Marnas from Gaza portrayed in the style of Zeus. Marnas[1][2][3] was the chief divinity of Gaza. Roman period Istanbul Archaeology Museum)
Colossal seated Marnas from Gaza portrayed in the style of Zeus. Marnas[1][2][3] was the chief divinity of Gaza. Roman period Istanbul Archaeology Museum)
Bust of Zeus in the British Museum
Bust of Zeus in the British Museum

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1042 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zeus User:Nevit Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2112x2816, 1042 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zeus User:Nevit Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Dagon was a major northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain and agriculture. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Istanbul Archaeology Museum (Turkish: İstanbul Arkeoloji Müzesi) is an archeological museum, located in the Eminönü district of Istanbul, Turkey, near Gülhane Park and Topkapı Palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (548x640, 34 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (548x640, 34 KB) Summary photo taken by lonpicman Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ...

History

Zeus, poetically referred to by the vocative Zeu pater ("O, father Zeus"), is a continuation of *Di̯ēus, the Proto-Indo-European god of the daytime sky, also called *Dyeus ph2tēr ("Sky Father").[1] The god is known under this name in Sanskrit (cf. Dyaus/Dyaus Pita), Latin (cf. Jupiter, from Iuppiter, deriving from the PIE vocative *dyeu-ph2tēr[2]), deriving from the basic form *dyeu- ("to shine", and in its many derivatives, "sky, heaven, god").[1] And in Germanic and Norse mythology (cf. *Tīwaz > OHG Ziu, ON Týr), together with Latin deus, dīvus and Dis(a variation of dīves[3]), from the related noun *deiwos.[3] To the Greeks and Romans, the god of the sky was also the supreme god, whereas this function was filled out by Odin among the Germanic tribes. Accordingly, they did not identify Zeus/Jupiter with either Tyr or Odin, but with Thor (Þórr). Zeus is the only deity in the Olympic pantheon whose name has such a transparent Indo-European etymology.[4] The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person being addressed, found in Latin among other languages. ... *DyÄ“us is the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. ... Ancient anthropomorphic Ukrainian stone stela (Kernosovka stela), possibly depicting a late Proto-Indo-European god, most likely Dyeus The existence of similarities among the deities and religious practices of the Indo-European peoples allows glimpses of a common Proto-Indo-European religion and mythology. ... The Rig Veda ऋग्वेद (Sanskrit á¹›gveda from á¹›c praise + veda knowledge) is a collection of hymns(each hymn is called a Rucha.) counted among the four Hindu religious scriptures known as the Vedas, and contains the oldest texts preserved in any Indo-Iranian language. ... In the Vedic religion is Akasha, the Sky Father, husband of Prithvi and father of Agni and Indra (RV 4. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... This article is about the baked good, for other uses see Pie (disambiguation). ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The term Old High German (OHG, German: Althochdeutsch) refers to the earliest stage of the German language and it conventionally covers the period from around 500 to 1050. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... The term Germanic tribes (or Teutonic tribes) applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ...


Role and epithets

Zeus played a dominant role, presiding over the Greek Olympian pantheon. He fathered many of the heroes and heroines and was featured in many of their stories. Though the Homeric "cloud collector" was the god of the sky and thunder like his Near-Eastern counterparts, he was also the supreme cultural artifact; in some senses, he was the embodiment of Greek religious beliefs and the archetypal Greek deity. For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ...


The epithets or titles applied to Zeus emphasized different aspects of his wide-ranging authority: An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ...

  • Zeus Olympios emphasized Zeus's kingship over both the gods and the Panhellenic festival at Olympia.
  • A related title was Zeus Panhellenios, ('Zeus of all the Hellenes') to whom Aeacus' famous temple on Aegina was dedicated.
  • As Zeus Xenios, Zeus was the patron of hospitality and guests, ready to avenge any wrong done to a stranger.
  • As Zeus Horkios, he was the keeper of oaths. Liars who were exposed were made to dedicate a statue to Zeus, often at the sanctuary of Olympia.
  • As Zeus Agoraios, Zeus watched over business at the agora, and punished dishonest traders.
  • As Zeus Meilichios, "Easy-to-be-entreated", he subsumed an archaic chthonic daimon propitiated in Athens, Meilichios.

Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... In Greek mythology, Aeacus (Greek: Aiakos, bewailing or earth borne) was king in the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf. ... Aegina (Greek: Αίγινα (Egina)) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 31 miles (50 km) from Athens. ... Stoa of the ancient agora de Thessaloniki An agora (αγορά), translatable as marketplace, was a public space and an essential part of an ancient Greek polis or city-state. ... Look up daimon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Some local Zeus-cults

In addition to the Panhellenic titles and conceptions listed above, local cults maintained their own idiosyncratic ideas about the king of gods and men. A few examples are listed below.


Cretan Zeus

On Crete, Zeus was worshipped at a number of caves at Knossos, Ida and Palaikastro. The stories of Minos and Epimenides suggest that these caves were once used for incubatory divination by kings and priests. The dramatic setting of Plato's Laws is along the pilgrimage-route to one such site, emphasizing archaic Cretan knowledge. On Crete, Zeus was represented in art as a long-haired youth rather than a mature adult, and hymned as ho megas kouros "the great youth". With the Kouretes, a band of ecstatic armed dancers, he presided over the rigorous military-athletic training and secret rites of the Cretan paideia. For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... Ida can mean the following: Ida of Bernicia, King of a British state. ... Palaikastro is a modern village and the archaeological site of an ancient Minoan settlement on the eastern coast of Crete. ... Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... Epimenides of Knossos Epimenides of Knossos (Crete) (Greek: Επιμενίδης) was a semi-mythical 6th century BC Greek seer and philosopher-poet, who is said to have fallen asleep for fifty-seven years in a Cretian cave sacred to Zeus, after which he reportedly awoke with the gift of prophecy. ... The word incubation (from the Latin incubare, to lie upon) can mean the following: In chemistry or biochemistry, incubation refers to maintaining a system under specific conditions in order to promote a particular reaction. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in (Phrygia), are the crested dancers who worship the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ... To the ancient Greeks, Paideia (παιδεία) was the process of educating man into his true form, the real and genuine human nature. ...


The Hellenistic writer Euhemerus apparently proposed a theory that Zeus had actually been a great king of Crete and that posthumously his glory had slowly turned him into a deity. The works of Euhemerism have not survived, but Christian patristic writers took up the suggestion with enthusiasm. Euhemerus (Ευήμερος) (working late 4th century BCE) was a Greek mythographer at the court of Cassander, the king of Macedonia. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...


Zeus Lykaios in Arcadia

For more details on this topic, see Lykaia.

The epithet Lykaios ("wolf-Zeus") is assumed by Zeus only in connection with the archaic festival of the Lykaia on the slopes of Mount Lykaion ("Wolf Mountain"), the tallest peak in rustic Arcadia; Zeus had only a formal connection[5] with the rituals and myths of this primitive rite of passage with an ancient threat of cannibalism and the possibility of a werewolf transformation for the ephebes who were the participants.[6] Near the ancient ash-heap where the sacrifices took place[7] was a forbidden precinct in which, allegedly, no shadows were ever cast.[8] According to Plato (Republic 565d-e), a particular clan would gather on the mountain to make a sacrifice every nine years to Zeus Lykaios, and a single morsel of human entrails would be intermingled with the animal's. Whoever ate the human flesh was said to turn into a wolf, and could only regain human form if he did not eat again of human flesh until the next nine-year cycle had ended. There were games associated with the Lykaia, removed in the fourth century to the first urbanization of Arcadia, Megalopolis; there the major temple was dedicated to Zeus Lykaios. In Ancient Greece, the Lykaia (in Greek: λυκαια) was an archaic festival with a secret ritual on the slopes of Mount Lykaion (Wolf Mountain), the tallest peak in rustic Arcadia. ... In Ancient Greece, the Lykaia (in Greek: λυκαια) was an archaic festival with a secret ritual on the slopes of Mount Lykaion (Wolf Mountain), the tallest peak in rustic Arcadia. ... Lycaeus (Mons Lycaeus, mod. ... Arcadia or Arkadía (Greek Αρκαδία; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a region of Greece in the Peloponnesus. ... For other uses, see Rite of passage (disambiguation). ... “Cannibal” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Werewolf (disambiguation). ... EPHEBE is either the anglicisized form (via the French Éphèbe) of the Greek word Ephebos a location of Discworld ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Megalopolis (Greek: large city, great city) can mean: The town of Megalópoli (Μεγαλοπολη), Megalopolis, Greece. ...


Apollo, too had an archaic wolf-form, Apollo Lycaeus, worshipped in Athens at the Lykeion, or Lyceum, which was made memorable as the site where Aristotle walked and taught. A Lyceum can be an educational institution (often a school of secondary education in Europe), or a public hall used for cultural events like concerts. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ...


Subterranean Zeus

Although etymology indicates that Zeus was originally a sky god, many Greek cities honored a local Zeus, who lived underground. Athenians and Sicilians honored Zeus Meilichios ("kindly" or "honeyed") while other cities had Zeus Chthonios ("earthy"), Katachthonios ("under-the-earth) and Plousios ("wealth-bringing"). These deities might be represented indifferently as snakes or men in visual art. They also received offerings of black animal victims sacrificed into sunken pits, as did chthonic deities like Persephone and Demeter, and also the heroes at their tombs. Olympian gods, by contrast, usually received white victims sacrificed upon raised altars. For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ...


In some cases, cities were not entirely sure whether the daimon to whom they sacrificed was a hero or an underground Zeus. Thus the shrine at Lebadaea in Boeotia might belong to the hero Trophonius or to Zeus Trephonius ("the nurturing"), depending on whether you believe Pausanias or Strabo. The hero Amphiaraus was honored as Zeus Amphiaraus at Oropus outside of Thebes, and the Spartans even had a shrine to Zeus Agamemnon. Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... Trophonius (the Latinate spelling) or Trophonios (in the transliterated Greek spelling) was a Greek hero or daimon or god - it was never certain which one - with a rich mythological tradition and an oracular cult at Lebadaea in Boeotia. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... In Greek mythology, Amphiaraus, or Amphiaraos (doubly-cursed) was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. ... Thebes (Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva; Katharevousa: — Thêbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ...


Oracles of Zeus

Although most oracle sites were usually dedicated to Apollo, the heroes, or various goddesses like Themis, a few oracular sites were dedicated to Zeus. For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ...


The Oracle at Dodona

The cult of Zeus at Dodona in Epirus, where there is evidence of religious activity from the 2nd millennium BC onward, centered around a sacred oak. When the Odyssey was composed (circa 750 BC), divination was done there by barefoot priests called Selloi, who lay on the ground and observed the rustling of the leaves and branches (Odyssey 14.326-7). By the time Herodotus wrote about Dodona, female priestesses called peleiades ("doves") had replaced the male priests. For other uses, see Dodona (disambiguation). ... Epirus, spanning Greece and Albania. ... The 2nd millennium BC marks the transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age. ... This article is about the poem by Homer. ... 756 BC — Founding of Cyzicus. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... In ancient Greece, Peleiades (doves) were the sacred women of Zeus and the Mother Goddess, Dione, at the Oracle at Dodona. ...


Zeus' consort at Dodona was not Hera, but the goddess Dione — whose name is a feminine form of "Zeus". Her status as a titaness suggests to some that she may have been a more powerful pre-Hellenic deity, and perhaps the original occupant of the oracle. For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ...


The Oracle at Siwa

The oracle of Ammon at the oasis of Siwa in the Western Desert of Egypt did not lie within the bounds of the Greek world before Alexander's day, but it already loomed large in the Greek mind during the archaic era: Herodotus mentions consultations with Zeus Ammon in his account of the Persian War. Zeus Ammon was especially favored at Sparta, where a temple to him existed by the time of the Peloponnesian War (Pausanias 3.18). Amun (also spelled Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imen, Greek Ἄμμων Ammon, and Ἅμμων Hammon, Egyptian Yamanu) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities in Ancient Egypt, before fading into obscurity. ... The Siwa Oasis is an oasis in Egypt, located between the Qattara Depression and the Egyptian Sand Sea in the Libyan Desert. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... Persian Wars redirects here. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ...


After Alexander made a trek into the desert to consult the oracle at Siwa, the figure arose of a Libyan Sibyl. Michelangelos rendering of the Libyan Sibyl The Libyan Sibyl, was the prophetic priestess presiding over the Zeus Ammon Oracle (Zeus represented with the horns of Ammon) at Siwa Oasis in the Libyan Desert. ...


Other oracles of Zeus

The chthonic Zeuses (or heroes) Trophonius and Amphiaraus were both said to give oracles at the cult-sites. Trophonius (the Latinate spelling) or Trophonios (in the transliterated Greek spelling) was a Greek hero or daimon or god - it was never certain which one - with a rich mythological tradition and an oracular cult at Lebadaea in Boeotia. ... In Greek mythology, Amphiaraus, or Amphiaraos (doubly-cursed) was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. ...


Zeus and foreign gods

Zeus was equivalent to the Roman god Jupiter and associated in the syncretic classical imagination (see interpretatio graeca) with various other deities, such as the Egyptian Ammon and the Etruscan Tinia. He (along with Dionysus) absorbed the role of the chief Phrygian god Sabazios in the syncretic deity known in Rome as Sabazius. A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... Interpretatio graeca is a Latin term for the common tendency of ancient Greek writers to equate foreign divinities to members of their own pantheon. ... Amun (also spelled Amon, Amoun, Amen, and rarely Imen, Greek Ἄμμων Ammon, and Ἅμμων Hammon, Egyptian Yamanu) was the name of a deity, in Egyptian mythology, who gradually rose to become one of the most important deities in Ancient Egypt, before fading into obscurity. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... In Etruscan mythology, Tinia was the highest god of the skies, husband to Thalna or Uni. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... Sabazios is the nomadic horseman sky and father god of the Phrygians and Thracians. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sabazios is the nomadic horseman sky and father god of the Phrygians. ...


Zeus in myth

The Chariot of Zeus, from an 1879 Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church

The Chariot of Zeus - Project Gutenberg eText 14994. ... The Chariot of Zeus - Project Gutenberg eText 14994. ...

Birth

Cronus sired several children by Rhea: Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Poseidon, but swallowed them all as soon as they were born, since he had learned from Gaia and Uranus that he was destined to be overcome by his own son as he had overthrown his own father— an oracle that Zeus was to hear and avert. But when Zeus was about to be born, Rhea sought Gaia to devise a plan to save him, so that Cronus would get his retribution for his acts against Uranus and his own children. Rhea gave birth to Zeus in Crete, handing Cronus a rock wrapped in swaddling clothes, which he promptly swallowed.


Infancy

Rhea hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Ida in Crete. According to varying versions of the story: Two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida in Greek mythology, equally named Mount of the Goddess. ...

  1. He was then raised by Gaia.
  2. He was raised by a goat named Amalthea, while a company of Kouretes— soldiers, or smaller gods— danced, shouted and clashed their spears against their shields so that Cronus would not hear the baby's cry. (See cornucopia.)
  3. He was raised by a nymph named Adamanthea. Since Cronus ruled over the Earth, the heavens and the sea, she hid him by dangling him on a rope from a tree so he was suspended between earth, sea and sky and thus, invisible to his father.
  4. He was raised by a nymph named Cynosura. In gratitude, Zeus placed her among the stars.
  5. He was raised by Melissa, who nursed him with goat's-milk and honey.
  6. He was raised by a shepherd family under the promise that their sheep would be saved from wolves.

For other uses, see Gaia. ... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Infancy of Zeus by Jacob Jordaens, c. ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in (Phrygia), are the crested dancers who worship the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ... Cornucopia held by the Roman goddess Aequitas on the reverse of this antoninianus struck under Roman Emperor Claudius II. The cornucopia (Latin Cornu Copiae), literally Horn of Plenty and also known as the Harvest Cone, is a symbol of food and abundance dating back to the 5th century BC. In... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... A nymph in Greek mythology, Adamanthea helped raise the infant Zeus to hide him from his father, Cronus. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... This article is about the body of water. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Cynosura was a nymph (an Oread) on Mount Ida, Crete. ... Catasterismi (Greek Katasterismoi, placings among the stars) is an Alexandrian prose retelling of the mythic origins of stars and constellations, as they were interpreted in Hellenistic culture. ... For other uses, see Melissa (disambiguation). ... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ...

Zeus becomes king of the gods

After reaching manhood, Zeus forced Cronus to disgorge first the stone (which was set down at Pytho under the glens of Parnassus to be a sign to mortal men, the Omphalos) then his siblings in reverse order of swallowing. In some versions, Metis gave Cronus an emetic to force him to disgorge the babies, or Zeus cut Cronus' stomach open. Then Zeus released the brothers of Cronus, the Gigantes, the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes, from their dungeon in Tartarus (The Titans; he killed their guard, Campe. As gratitude, the Cyclopes gave him thunder and the thunderbolt, or lightning, which had previously been hidden by Gaia.) Together, Zeus and his brothers and sisters, along with the Gigantes, Hecatonchires and Cyclopes overthrew Cronus and the other Titans, in the combat called the Titanomachy. The defeated Titans were then cast into a shadowy underworld region known as Tartarus. Atlas, one of the titans that fought against Zeus, was punished by having to hold up the sky. In Greek mythology, Python was the oracular serpent of Delphi. ... Mount Parnassus (also Mount Parnassos) is a mountain in central Greece that towers above Delphi. ... The Omphalos in Delphi An omphalos is a religious stone artifact in the ancient world. ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... Vomiting (or emesis) is the forceful expulsion of the contents of ones stomach through the mouth. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... Gigantomachia: Dionysos attacking a Gigante, Attic red-figure pelike, ca. ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... Cyclopes may refer to: Silky Anteater plural of Cyclops is a one-eyed monster in Greek mythology. ... In classic Greek mythology, below Heaven, Earth, and Pontus is Tartarus, or Tartaros (Greek Τάρταρος, deep place). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ... A female monster in Greek mythology, Campe (crooked) guarded the Hecatonchires and Cyclopes in Tartarus after Cronus imprisoned them there; she was killed by Zeus when he rescued his uncles for help in the Titanomachy. ... Thunder is the sound made by lightning. ... For information on lightning precautions, see Lightning safety. ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ...


After the battle with the Titans, Zeus shared the world with his elder brothers, Poseidon and Hades, by drawing lots: Zeus got the sky and air, Poseidon the waters, and Hades the world of the dead (the underworld). The ancient Earth, Gaia, could not be claimed; she was left to all three, each according to their capabilities, which explains why Poseidon was the "earth-shaker" (the god of earthquakes) and Hades claimed the humans that died. (See also: Penthus) Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Penthus was the personification of grief. ...


Gaia resented the way Zeus had treated the Titans, because they were her children. Soon after taking the throne as king of the gods, Zeus had to fight some of Gaia's other children, the monsters Typhon and Echidna. He vanquished Typhon and trapped him under a mountain, but left Echidna and her children alive. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeus darting his lightning at Typhon, Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. ... In the most ancient layers of Greek mythology Echidna (ekhis, meaning she viper) was called the Mother of All Monsters. Echidna was described by Hesiod as a female monster spawned in a cave, who mothered with her mate Typhoeus (or Typhon) every major monster in the Greek myths, (Theogony, 295...


Zeus and Hera

Zeus was brother and consort of Hera. By Hera, Zeus sired Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus, though some accounts say that Hera produced these offspring alone. Some also include Eileithyia as their daughter. The conquests of Zeus among nymphs and the mythic mortal progenitors of Hellenic dynasties are famous. Olympian mythography even credits him with unions with Leto, Demeter, Dione and Maia. For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Hebe by Antonio Canova In Greek mythology, Hêbê (Greek: ) was the goddess of youth (Roman equivalent: Juventas). ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Ilithyia—the Latin spelling—or more usually Eileithyia, was the Cretan goddess whom Greek mythology adapted as the goddess of childbirth and midwiving, and whom the relentlessly patrilineal Hesiod even described as a daughter of Zeus and Hera (Theogony 921)—and Apollodorus and Diodorus Siculus (5. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... For other uses, see Greek (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Leto (disambiguation). ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... Maia, in Greek mythology, is the eldest of the Pleiades, the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ...


Among the mortals: Semele, Io, Europa and Leda. (For more details, see below). Stimula redirects here. ... Hermes, Io (as cow) and Argus, black-figure amphora, 540–530 BC, Staatliche Antikensammlungen (Inv. ... Europa and Zeus, on the Greek €2 coin A commemorative Italian euro coin depicts Europa holding a pen over the text of the Constitution of Europe. ... Leda and the Swan, 16th-century copy after the lost painting by Michelangelo Leda with the Swan, by Correggio In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus, of Sparta. ...


Many myths renders Hera as jealous of his amorous conquests and a consistent enemy of Zeus' mistresses and their children by him. For a time, a nymph named Echo had the job of distracting Hera from his affairs by incessantly talking: when Hera discovered the deception, she cursed Echo to repeat the words of others. In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... Echo and Narcissus, by John William Waterhouse. ...


Consorts and children

*The Greeks variously claimed that the Fates were the daughters of Zeus and the Titaness Themis or of primordial beings like Nyx, Chaos or Ananke. The Pleiade, or Oceanid, Electra of Greek mythology was one of the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... In Greek mythology, Ananke (Greek ) was the personification of destiny, unalterable necessity and fate. ... Fates redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι – the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... In Greek mythology, Atropos was the third of the Moirae. ... In Greek mythology, Clotho or Klotho, the Greek word Κλωθώ for spinner, was the youngest of the Moirae (the Fates). ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, PersephónÄ“) was the Queen of the Underworld of epic literature. ... In Greek mythology, Zagreus was sometimes used as a name for Dionysus. ... Dione in Greek mythology is a vague goddess presence who has her most concrete form in Book V of Homers Iliad as the mother of Aphrodite: Aphrodite journeys to Diones side after she has been wounded in battle while protecting her favorite son Aeneas. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Ilithyia was the Greek goddess of childbirth and midwives, daughter of Zeus and Hera. ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Hebe by Antonio Canova In Greek mythology, Hêbê (Greek: ) was the goddess of youth (Roman equivalent: Juventas). ... Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of... In Greek mythology, Ersa was the goddess of dew and a daughter of Zeus and Selene. ... Eris (ca. ... For other uses, see Leto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... Maia, in Greek mythology, is the eldest of the Pleiades, the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Metis (wisdom or wise counsel) was a Titaness who was the first great spouse of Zeus, indeed his equal (Hesiod, Theogony 896) and the mother of Athena. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes confused with Mneme or compared with Memoria) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Aoide (or Aoede) was one of the three original Muses, though there were later nine. ... In Greek mythology, Melete was one of the three original (Boeotian) Muses, though there were later nine; her sisters were Aoide and Mneme. ... For other uses, see Mneme (disambiguation). ... For other uses see Muse (disambiguation). ... This article is about the muse. ... Clio—detail from The Allegory of Painting by Johannes Vermeer For other uses, see Clio (disambiguation). ... Erato - Oak panel, Simon Vouet Erato (lovely) is a Greek Muse, shown with a wreath of myrtle and roses, holding a lyre, or a small kithara (a musical instrument that she herself invented); at her feet there are 2 turtle-doves eating seeds off of the floor. ... The Muse Euterpe (rejoicing well or delight), in Greek mythology, was one of the Muses, the daughters of Mnemosyne, fathered by Zeus. ... Hesiod and the Muse, 1891 - Oil on canvas, Musee dOrsay, Paris Gustave Moreau Melpomene (to sing) was a Muse in Greek mythology. ... Polyhymnia, section of Roman mosaic, 240 A.D Polyhymnia by Francesco del Cossa, 1455-1460. ... Terpsichore, Muse of Music and Dance, oil on canvas by Jean-Marc Nattier 1739 Terpsichore holding an Aeolian harp. ... For other uses, see Thalia (disambiguation). ... Simon Vouet, The Muses Urania and Calliope, c. ... This article is about the lunar spacecraft. ... In Greek mythology, Ersa was the goddess of dew and a daughter of Zeus and Selene. ... The Nemean Lion (Latin: Leo Nemaeus) was a vicious monster in Greek mythology that lived in Nemea. ... In Greek mythology, the Goddess Pandia (all bright) was the personification of brightness and a daughter of Zeus and Selene. ... In Greek mythology, Thalassa (sea) was a primordial sea goddess. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Astraea (star-maiden) was a daughter of Zeus and Themis or of Eos and Astraeus. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... In Greek mythology, the Horae (hours) were the three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... Horae in Meyers, 1888 In Greek mythology, the Horae were three goddesses controlling orderly life. ... Eunomia may refer to: One of the Horae, goddesses of Greek mythology Eunomia (moth), a moth genus The asteroid 15 Eunomia Categories: | | | ... In Greek mythology, Pherusa was a Nereid sea-nymph, a daughter of Nereus and Doris. ... In Greek mythology, Euporie or Euporia is the godess of abundance. ... Orthosie is a natural satellite of Jupiter. ... Fates redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, the white-robed Moirae or Moerae (Greek Μοίραι – the Apportioners, often called the Fates) were the personifications of destiny (Roman equivalent: Parcae, sparing ones, or Fatae; also equivalent to the Germanic Norns). ... In Greek mythology, Atropos was the third of the Moirae. ... In Greek mythology, Clotho or Klotho, the Greek word Κλωθώ for spinner, was the youngest of the Moirae (the Fates). ... Lachesis can be: One of the Three Fates or Moirae, the personifications of destiny in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Aegina was the daughter of the river-god Asopus and the nymph Metope. ... In Greek mythology, Aeacus (Greek: Aiakos, bewailing or earth borne) was king in the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf. ... In Greek mythology Alcmene, or Alkmênê (might of the moon) was the mother of Heracles. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) “Alcides” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Antiope was the name of the daughter of the Boeotian river-god Asopus, according to Homer (Od. ... There are several characters named Amphion in Greek mythology: Amphion, son of Zeus and Antiope, and twin brother of Zethus (see Amphion and Zethus). ... Amphion (native of two lands) and Zethus, in ancient Greek mythology, were the twin sons of Zeus by Antiope. ... From Greek mythology, Callisto was the daughter of Lycaon, the king of Arcadia (or possibly a nymph). ... Arcas is a character from Greek Mythology, being the son of the God Zeus (The God of Thunder and the lord over all Gods) and Callisto (The Goddess of the Great Bear, also known as Ursa Major). ... Carme was the mother, by Zeus, of Britomartis, a Cretan goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Britomartis (sweet maid, good maiden, sweet virgin) was a nymph (an Oread) also known as Aphaea and Diktynna. ... Danae by Gustav Klimt, 1907. ... For the constellation, see Perseus (constellation); for the Macedonian king, see Perseus of Macedon Perseus with the Head of Medusa Perseus was the son of Danae, the only child of Acrisius king of Argos. ... In Greek mythology, Elara was the daughter of King Orchomenus and mother of Tityos. ... In Greek mythology, Tityas (also spelled Tityus) was a giant, the son of Elara, one of Zeus lovers. ... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Dardanus (burner up) was a son of Zeus by Electra, daughter of Atlas, and founder of the city of Dardania on Mount Ida in the Troad. ... In Greek mythology, Iasion or Iasus was usually the son of Electra and Zeus and brother of Dardanus. ... Europa and Zeus, on the Greek €2 coin A commemorative Italian euro coin depicts Europa holding a pen over the text of the Constitution of Europe. ... Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... Rhadamanthus (also transliterated as Rhadamanthys or Rhadamanthos) in Greek mythology was a son of Zeus and Europa and brother of Minos, king of Crete and Sarpedon. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, there were many women with the name Eurýnomê (far ruling). Wife of Ophion and a daughter of Oceanus (may be the same as the following) An Oceanid who mothered the Charites (may be the same as the following) Daughter of King Nisus of Megara and mother... For the game of graces, see Game of graces. ... The Three Graces, from Sandro Botticellis painting Primavera Uffizi Gallery In Greek mythology, the Charites were the graces. ... Aglaea is the name of five figures in Greek mythology // The youngest of the Charites, Aglaea or Aglaia (splendor, brilliant, shining one) was Hephaestus wife and Asclepius daughter in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Euphrosyne (IPA pronunciation: ) was one of the Charites, known in English also as the Three Graces. Her best remembered representation in English is in Miltons poem of the active, joyful life, LAllegro. She is also the Goddess of Joy. ... For other uses, see Thalia (disambiguation). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... In Greek mythology, Iodame was a Boeotian nymph, mother of Thebe with Zeus. ... In Greek mythology, the name Thebe refers to at least three different people An Amazon A nymph, daughter of Asopus and Metope, wife of Zethus. ... Hermes, Io (as cow) and Argus, black-figure amphora, 540–530 BC, Staatliche Antikensammlungen (Inv. ... In Greek mythology, Epaphus, also called Apis, is the son of Zeus and Io. ... Look up lamia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... Leda and the Swan, 16th-century copy after the lost painting by Michelangelo Leda with the Swan, by Correggio In Greek mythology, Leda (Λήδα) was daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius, and wife of the king Tyndareus, of Sparta. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Pollux was the nickname of Polydeuces, the son of Zeus and Leda and twin brother of Castor. ... In Greek mythology, Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux) were the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... “Helen of Troy” redirects here. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: SpártÄ“) is a city in southern Greece. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, two people bore the name Maera. ... In Greek mythology, Locrus was the son of Maera and Zeus. ... Apollo and Artemis slaying the children of Niobe by Niobid Painter (c. ... There are five figures in Greek mythology named Argus or Argos (Άργος). Argus Panoptes (Argus all eyes) is a giant with a hundred eyes. ... In Greek mythology, Pelasgus referred to several different people. ... This article is about the Macedonian princess. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Ancient Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (Greek ) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordered by the kingdom of Epirus to the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... In Greek mythology, Plouto was a nymph and the mother of Tantalus by Zeus. ... Tantalos, by Goya In Greek mythology Tantalus (Greek Τάνταλος) was a son of Zeus[1] and the nymph Plouto (riches)[2] Thus he was a king in the primordial world, the father of a son Broteas whose very name signifies mortals (brotoi)[3] Other versions name his father as Tmolus wreathed... In Greek mythology, Podarge (fleet-foot) referred to several different beings. ... In Greek mythology, Balius and Xanthus were two immortal horses of Poseidons which he gave to Peleus. ... In Greek mythology, Xanthus (yellow; also Xanthos) is the name of several individuals and creatures. ... Deucalion and Pyrrha throwing rocks that become babies. ... Note: Hellen was not the same person as Helen of Troy, or Helenus, son of King Priam of Troy. ... Stimula redirects here. ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... In Greek mythology, Taygete (Greek: Ταϋγέτη, in Modern Greek Taygeti, Taigeti) was a nymph, one of the Pleiades according to Apollodorus (3. ... Lacedaemon, or Lakedaimon, Grk. ... For other uses, see Thalia (disambiguation). ... The term Palici refers to twin gods in Roman and, to a lesser extent, Greek mythology. ... Litae (ancient Greek meaning Prayers) are personifications in Greek mythology. ... Tyche on the reverse of this coin by Gordian III. In Greek mythology, Tyche (Roman equivalent: Fortuna) was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. ... Ate, a The Griswold Family Christmas, is the action performed by the hero, usually because of his hubris, or great pride, that leads to his death or downfall. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Nyx (, Nox in Roman translation) was the primordial goddess of the night. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Chaos. ... Ananke is a moon of Jupiter. ...


Zeus miscellany

  • Zeus turned Pandareus to stone for stealing the golden dog which had guarded him as an infant in the holy Dictaeon Cave of Crete.
  • Zeus killed Salmoneus with a thunderbolt for attempting to impersonate him, riding around in a bronze chariot and loudly imitating thunder.
  • Zeus turned Periphas into an eagle after his death, as a reward for being righteous and just.
  • At the marriage of Zeus and Hera, a nymph named Chelone refused to attend. Zeus transformed her into a tortoise (chelone in Greek).
  • Zeus, with Hera, turned King Haemus and Queen Rhodope into mountains (the Balkan mountains, or Stara Planina, and Rhodope mountains, respectively) for their vanity.
  • Zeus condemned Tantalus to eternal torture in Tartarus for trying to trick the gods into eating the flesh of his butchered son.
  • Zeus condemned Ixion be tied to a fiery wheel for eternity as punishment for attempting to violate Hera.
  • Zeus sunk the Telchines beneath the sea for blighting the earth with their fell magics.
  • Zeus blinded the seer Phineus and sent the Harpies to plague him as punishment for revealing the secrets of the gods.
  • Zeus rewarded Tiresias with a life three times the norm as reward for ruling in his favour when he and Hera contested which of the sexes gained the most pleasure from the act of love.
  • Zeus punished Hera by having her hung upside down from the sky when she attempted to drown Heracles in a storm.
  • Of all the children Zeus spawned, Heracles was often described as his favorite. Indeed, Heracles was often called by various gods and people as "the favorite son of Zeus", Zeus and Heracles were very close and in one story, where a tribe of earth-born Giants threatened Olympus and the Oracle at Delphi decreed that only the combined efforts of a lone god and mortal could stop the creature, Zeus chose Heracles to fight by his side. They proceeded to defeat the monsters.
  • His sacred bird was the golden eagle, which he kept by his side at all times. Like him, the eagle was a symbol of strength, courage, and justice.
  • His favourite tree was the oak, symbol of strength. Olive trees were also sacred to him.
  • Zelus, Nike, Cratos and Bia were Zeus' retinue.

In Greek mythology, Pandareus was the son of Clymene and Merops. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Salmoneus was the son of Aeolus and Enarete, the brother of Athamas and the father of Tyro. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ... Thunder is the sound made by lightning. ... In Greek mythology, King Periphas of Attica was changed into an eagle after his death, by Zeus, as a reward for being righteous and just. ... Genera Several, see below. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Chelone is a plant genus commonly known as turtlehead. ... In Greek mythology, King Haemus (or Haimos) of Thrace was the son of Boreas. ... In Greek mythology, Queen Rhodope of Thrace was the wife of Haemus. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... Stara Planina, Rhodope, Rila and Pirin Mountains View from Ray Resthouse towards the Central Balkan Mountains. ... Landscape of the Rhodopes near the village of Hvoyna View from the Belintash Rock towards the village of Vrata The Rhodopes (Bulgarian: , Rodopi, usually used with a definite article: Родопите, Rodopite, sometimes also called Родопа, Rodopa or Родопа планина, Rodopa planina; Greek: , Rodopi, red aspect) are a mountain range in Southeastern Europe, with over... Tantalos, by Goya In Greek mythology Tantalus (Greek Τάνταλος) was a son of Zeus[1] and the nymph Plouto (riches)[2] Thus he was a king in the primordial world, the father of a son Broteas whose very name signifies mortals (brotoi)[3] Other versions name his father as Tmolus wreathed... This article is about the Greek myth. ... In Greek mythology, the Telchines were the original inhabitants of the island of Rhodes, and were known in Crete and Cyprus. ... The Boast of Cassiopeia is a story from Greek mythology, associated with Perseus. ... In Greek mythology, Harpies (robbers) were first beautiful winged women: Hesiod (Theogony) calls them as two lovely-haired creatures. ... Everes redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) “Alcides” redirects here. ... This Zelos is the Greek personification. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Greek mythology, Cratos (strength) was a son of Styx and Pallas, brother of Nike, Bia and Zelus. ... In Greek mythology, Bia (force) was the personification of force, daughter of Pallas and Styx. ... A retinue (O. Fr. ...

Spoken-word myths - audio files

Zeus Myths as told by story tellers
1. Zeus and Tantalus, (including Pelops and Poseidon episode), read by Timothy Carter
Bibliography of reconstruction: Homer, Odyssey, 11.567 (7th c. BC); Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1 (476 BC); Euripides, Orestes, 12-16 (408 BC); Apollodorus, Epitomes 2: 1-9 (140 BC); Ovid, Metamorphoses, VI: 213, 458 (AD 8); Hyginus, Fables, 82: Tantalus; 83: Pelops (1st c. AD); Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.22.3 (AD 160 - 176)
2. Zeus and Ganymede, read by Timothy Carter
Bibliography of reconstruction: Homer, Iliad 5.265ff; 20.215-235 (700 BC); Anonymous, Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite 202ff. (7th c. BC); Sophocles, The Colchian Women (after Athenaeus, 602) (b. 495 - d. 406 BC); Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (410 BC); Apollodorus, Library and Epitome iii.12.2 (140 BC); Diodorus Siculus, Histories 4.75.3 (1st c. BC); Virgil, Aeneid 5. 252 - 260 (19 BC); Ovid, Metamorphoses 10.155ff. (AD 1 - 8); Hyginus, Poetica Astronomica

For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Pindar (or Pindarus) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was perhaps the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Orestes Ορεστης is a Greek name, literally he who stands on the mountain, or mountain-dweller. Orestes can refer to: In Greek mythology, the son of Agamemnon. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Hyginus can refer to: Gaius Julius Hyginus (c. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek tragedian. ... Athenaeus (ca. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... Diodorus Siculus (c. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Hyginus can refer to: Gaius Julius Hyginus (c. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iliad. ... The USS Zeus (ARB-4) was one of 12 Aristaeus-class battle damage repair ships built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Zeus (in Greek mythology, the king of the gods, the ruler of Mount Olympus, and god of the sky and thunder), she was... For the planet see Jupiter. ...

In popular culture

  • In the computer game Zeus: Master of Olympus, Zeus is one of the gods to whom the player can build a temple. His temple includes an oracle which may periodically be consulted for advice, and Zeus's presence in the city means that attacks from any other god will be instantly thwarted.
  • Zeus was a recurring character in the series Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and, less frequently, in Xena: Warrior Princess.
  • Like the rest of the Greek pantheon, he appeared in the Disney animated feature Hercules. The storyline took extensive liberties with the Hercules legend, such as making Hercules the son of Zeus and Hera.
  • Zeus appears in both God of War video games. In the first God of War video game, he gives the main character Kratos the ability to fire thunderbolts and also appears as a gravedigger. In God of War II, he offers Kratos the Blade of Olympus in which he kills him after his Godly powers have been drained. It is soon revealed that Kratos is Zeus' son in which Kratos wages war against Zeus by going back in time to bring the Titans to the present time to face the Olympians.
  • In the WarCraft 3 most popular modification DotA Allstars, Zeus is a popular and commonly-used playable hero.

Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Xena. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... This article is for the PlayStation 2 game. ... This article is for the PlayStation 2 game. ... This article is about the main character in the SCEA games God of War and God of War II. For the character in Greek Mythology, see Cratos. ... God of War II is the sequel to the popular God of War video game. ... This article is about the main character in the SCEA games God of War and God of War II. For the character in Greek Mythology, see Cratos. ... Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos, released by Blizzard Entertainment in 2002, is a real-time strategy computer game and the second sequel to Warcraft. ... Modification is the act of applying change to an original. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Defense of the Ancients. ...

References

  1. ^ a b American Heritage® Dictionary: Zeus. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  2. ^ On;ojhjkhoughohghygygyghyghiyugoiugighoipooooooooooooopline Etymology Dictionary: Jupiter. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  3. ^ a b American Heritage® Dictionary: dyeu. Retrieved on 2006-07-03.
  4. ^ Burkert (1985). Greek Religion, 321. 
  5. ^ In the founding myth of Lycaon's banquet for the gods that included the flesh of a human sacrifice, perhaps one of his sons, Nyctimus or ArcasZeus overturned the table and struck the house of Lyceus with a thunderbolt; his patronage at the Lykaia can have been little more than a formula.
  6. ^ A morphological connection to lyke "brightness" may be merely fortuitous.
  7. ^ Modern archaeologists have found no trace of human remains among the sacrificial detritus, Walter Burkert, "Lykaia and Lykaion", Homo Necans, tr. by Peter Bing (University of California) 1983, p. 90.
  8. ^ Pausanias 8.38.
  • Burkert, Walter, (1977) 1985. Greek Religion, especially section III.ii.1 (Harvard University Press)
  • Cook, Arthur Bernard, Zeus: A Study in Ancient Religion, (3 volume set), (1914-1925). New York, Bibilo & Tannen: 1964.
    • Volume 1: Zeus, God of the Bright Sky, Biblo-Moser, June 1, 1964, ISBN 0-8196-0148-9 (reprint)
    • Volume 2: Zeus, God of the Dark Sky (Thunder and Lightning), Biblo-Moser, June 1, 1964, ISBN 0-8196-0156-X
    • Volume 3: Zeus, God of the Dark Sky (earthquakes, clouds, wind, dew, rain, meteorites)
  • Druon, Maurice, The Memoirs of Zeus, 1964, Charles Scribner's and Sons. (tr. Humphrey Hare)
  • Farnell, Lewis Richard, Cults of the Greek States 5 vols. Oxford; Clarendon 1896-1909. Still the standard reference.
  • Farnell, Lewis Richard, Greek Hero Cults and Ideas of Immortality, 1921.
  • Graves, Robert; The Greek Myths, Penguin Books Ltd. (1960 edition)
  • Mitford,William, The History of Greece, 1784. Cf. v.1, Chapter II, Religion of the Early Greeks
  • Moore, Clifford H., The Religious Thought of the Greeks, 1916.
  • Nilsson, Martin P., Greek Popular Religion, 1940.
  • Nilsson, Martin P., History of Greek Religion, 1949.
  • Rohde, Erwin, Psyche: The Cult of Souls and Belief in Immortality among the Greeks, 1925.
  • Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, 1870, [4], William Smith, Dictionary: "Zeus" [5]

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Zeus turning Lycaon into a wolf, engraving by Hendrik Goltzius. ... In Greek mythology, Nyctimus was the son of Lycaon who was killed and served up as part of a feast to Zeus. ... Arcas is a character from Greek Mythology, being the son of the God Zeus (The God of Thunder and the lord over all Gods) and Callisto (The Goddess of the Great Bear, also known as Ursa Major). ... Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Arthur Bernard Cook (1868-1952) was a British classical scholar, known for work in archaeology and the history of religions. ... Maurice Druon (born April 23, 1918) is a French novelist and member of Académie française. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... The Greek Myths (1955) is a comprehensive anthology of Greek mythology, published in two volumes. ... William Mitford (February 10, 1744 - February 10, 1827), English historian, was the elder of the two sons of John Mitford, a barrister, who lived near Beaulieu, at the edge of the New Forest. ... Erwin Rohde (1845 - 1898) was one of the great German classical scholars of the 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Greek deities series
Primordial deities | Titans | Aquatic deities | Chthonic deities
Twelve Olympians
Zeus | Hera | Poseidon | Hestia | Demeter | Aphrodite
Athena | Apollo | Artemis | Ares | Hephaestus | Hermes

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Zeus, the youngest son of Cronus and Rhea, he was the supreme ruler of Mount Olympus and of the Pantheon of gods who resided there.
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Zeus - MSN Encarta (589 words)
Zeus was considered, according to Homer, the father of the gods and of mortals.
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