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Encyclopedia > Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Beta Tau
(ZBT)
Image:zbt crest.jpg
Founded December 29, 1898
City College of New York, New York, NY
Type Social
Scope National
Motto "A Powerhouse of Excellence"
Colors Medium blue and white with gold trim
Flower Gold Carnation (adopted 2004)
Chapters 80
Free label "My Brother, Here's My Hand"
Headquarters 3905 Vincennes Rd. Suite 300
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Homepage ZBT Website

Zeta Beta Tau (ZBT, brothers of which are nicknamed Zebes or Zeebs) is a historically Jewish, presently nonsectarian international fraternity. Today the merged Zeta Beta Tau Brotherhood numbers over 130,000 initiated Brothers, and over 80 student chapter locations. The first verse of the fraternity song is "Here's to our fraternity..." Static random access memory (SRAM) is a type of semiconductor memory. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... “City College” redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

Contents

History

Founding

The Zeta Beta Tau fraternity was inspired by Dr. Richard J. H. Gottheil, a professor of languages at Columbia University and a Zionist. On December 29, 1898, he formed a Zionist youth society with a group of Jewish students from several New York City universities. For other persons named Richard James, see Richard James (disambiguation). ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The society was called Z.B.T., the meaning of which is revealed in the fraternity's ritual. In 1998, the meaning of Z.B.T. was announced to the world. The society Z.B.T., referred to the first letters in the Hebrew phrase "Zion Bemishpat Tipadeh", which translated means "Zion shall be redeemed with justice". This is taken from Isaiah 1:27 - "Zion shall be redeemed with justice, and her converts with righteousness." ZBT has interpreted Isaiah's prophecy to mean in its ritual that "All Men Are Brothers". At the time Jews were not allowed to join other fraternities due to anti-semitism, thus there was a need for an exclusively Jewish Greek letter fraternity. In 1903 Z.B.T. formally became Zeta Beta Tau and its purpose shifted away from that of a Zionist youth organization as other Zionist organizations grew in prominence. The original Hebrew meaning of Z.B.T. is not esoteric. It was publicly revealed in the official written history of Zeta Beta Tau, Here's to Our Fraternity: One Hundred Years of Zeta Beta Tau, 1898-1998, by Marianne Rachel Sanua.[1] The word "judgment" is sometimes translated as "justice". [2] The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see ritual (disambiguation). ... Look up Esotericism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Zeta Beta Tau expanded rapidly. By 1909, it had established 13 Chapters throughout the Northeast and a 14th at Tulane University at New Orleans, thereby taking on a truly national dimension. In 1913, it established its first Canadian Chapter at McGill University in Montreal. Five years later, it founded its first West Coast Chapter at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. At the 1954 National Convention, the delegates amended Zeta Beta Tau's Constitution, ritual and internal procedures both in theory and in practice to eliminate sectarianism as a qualification for membership.[3] Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... McGill University is a public co-educational research university located in Montréal, Québec, Canada. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...


Today, the merged Zeta Beta Tau Brotherhood is some 130,000 Brothers strong, and ZBT Chapters and Colonies are established at over 80 campus locations. Through good times and bad, ZBT has been in the forefront in pioneering new concepts - as evidenced by its very founding, its elimination of sectarian membership practices, its acceptance of mergers, its elimination of pledging, and its ability to solve enormous problems when others abandoned the effort.


Merging with other fraternities

The Zeta Beta Tau of today is the result of a merger with four other national fraternities, more than any other North-American Interfraternity Conference fraternity. In 1959, Phi Alpha merged into Phi Sigma Delta. In 1961 Kappa Nu merged into Phi Epsilon Pi. In 1969-70, Phi Sigma Delta and Phi Epsilon Pi merged into Zeta Beta Tau. The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...


Pledging abolished

Zeta Beta Tau was also one of the first National fraternities to abolish the institution of pledging in 1989 as a way to combat and eliminate hazing.[4] This change was not new to the world of fraternities, as in 1971 Lambda Chi Alpha became the first North-American Interfraternity Conference (NAIC) fraternity to eliminate pledging, by replacing the process with an "Associated Membership" process. Lambda Chi Alpha paved the way for Zeta Beta Tau in taking the first steps to offer a completely equal brotherhood experience. Zeta Beta Tau's decision to get rid of pledging did not involve an associate membership process however. Once a brother joins the fraternity he will receive all rights and responsibilities as the rest of the chapter, and shall be eligible for any position within the chapter regardless of how long he has been a brother. Sigma Phi Epsilon would soon follow with a somewhat similar plan in 1991. Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America having initiated more than 235,000 members[1] and held chapters at more than 190 universities[2]. It was founded by Warren A. Cole, while he was a student at Boston... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ...


Semi-Annual Brotherhood Review Vote

In conjunction with the 1989 abolishment of pledging, ZBT National instituted a very progressive concept in fraternities then and now, the S.B.R.V. (Semi-Annual Brotherhood Review Vote). ZBT National mandates that all Chapters, twice a year (once a semester) have a vote to see who, if anyone, should be removed from membership within a Chapter. All brothers participate in, and are subject to, the anonymous vote, which are tallied by the Brotherhood Development Director. [5] If a brother does not receive a simple majority of supportive votes, he is kicked out of the fraternity. What makes this policy so different from all other NAIC fraternities is that ZBT does not consider you to be a brother for life once initiated, as any brother has the possibility of being voted out during his college career. Also unique to Zeta Beta Tau is the fact that a former ZBT brother who has been voted out by the Semi-Annual Brotherhood Review Vote may request an unconditional release from ZBT National, and if granted, may join another NAIC fraternity. Voting is a method of decision making wherein a group such as a meeting or an electorate attempts to gauge its opinion—usually as a final step following discussions or debates. ... A simple majority is the most common requirement in voting for a measure to pass, especially in deliberative bodies and small organizations. ...


Notable Alumni

Academia

Lawrence S. Bacow, an environmental economist, has been president of Tufts University since September 1, 2001. ... Tufts redirects here. ... Stephen Joel Trachtenberg is a former President of The George Washington University and currently holds the title of President Emeritus and University Professor of Public Service. ... The George Washington University (GW) is a private, coeducational university located in Washington, D.C., United States. ...

Business/Philanthropy

Walter H. Annenberg Walter H. Annenberg KBE (March 13, 1908 – October 1, 2002) was an American billionaire publisher, philanthropist, and diplomat. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A scoop of Mint Chocolate Chip, a popular flavor Baskin-Robbins is a chain of ice cream parlors founded by Burton Baskin and Irving Robbins in 1945 in Glendale, California. ... Baskin-Robbins is a global chain of ice cream parlors founded by Burt Baskin and Irv Robbins in 1945 in Glendale, California. ... Henry W. Bloch (b. ... H&R Block (NYSE: HRB) is a tax preparation and personal finance management company founded by brothers Henry W. and Richard Bloch in Kansas City in 1955. ... Richard, and brother Henry, started H&R Block in 1955. ... H&R Block (NYSE: HRB) is a tax preparation and personal finance management company founded by brothers Henry W. and Richard Bloch in Kansas City in 1955. ... Aramark Corporation (NYSE: RMK) is a professional services organization, providing food services, facilities management, hospitality services, and uniforms and career apparel to health care institutions, universities and school districts, stadiums and arenas, businesses, prisons, senior living facilities, parks and resorts, correctional institutions, conference centers, convention centers, and public safety professionals... Aramark Corporation (NYSE: RMK) is a professional services organization, providing food services, facilities management, hospitality services, and uniforms and career apparel to health care institutions, universities and school districts, stadiums and arenas, businesses, prisons, senior living facilities, parks and resorts, correctional institutions, conference centers, convention centers, and public safety professionals... The cosmetic firm Max Factor was named after Max Factor, Sr (b. ... William Maxwell Gaines (March 1, 1922 – June 3, 1992) (more frequently referred to as Bill Gaines), was the publisher and co-editor of EC Comics, and publisher of Mad for over 40 years. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Gimbels was a major American department store corporation from 1887 through the late 20th century. ... Samuel Goldwyn (July 1882 (some sources say 17 August 1882, others 1879 [1]) – 31 January 1974) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning producer, also a well-known Hollywood motion picture producer and founding contributor of several motion picture studios. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Andrew Goodman Andrew Goodman (November 23, 1943 – June 21, 1964) was an American civil rights activist who was murdered by gunshot in 1964 by members of the Ku Klux Klan. ... Roots Canada Ltd. ... Armand Hammer Armand Hammer (May 21, 1898 – December 10, 1990) was an American industrialist and art collector. ... Oxy headquarters in Westwood, CA Occidental Petroleum Corporation (Oxy) NYSE: OXY is an international oil and gas exploration and production company with operations in the United States, Middle East/North Africa and Latin America regions. ... Stanley Marcus (April 20, 1905 – January 22, 2002) was an early president (1950–1972) and later chairman of the board (1972–1976) of the luxury retailer Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas. ... Categories: Stub | Retail companies of the United States ... William S. Paley (1901-1990) This article is about the broadcast executive. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Corporate logo. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Warner Bros. ...

Civil service

Rudolph Ely Rudy Boschwitz (b. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Steve Cooley Stephen Lawrence (Steve) Cooley (born May 1, 1947 in Los Angeles, California) is a veteran prosecutor who was elected as Los Angeles Countys 36th District Attorney on November 7, 2000. ... Kenneth M. Duberstein (born April 21, 1944) served as U.S. President Ronald Reagans White House Chief of Staff from 1988 to 1989. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Congressman Martin Frost Jonas Martin Frost III (born January 1, 1942) is an American politician, who was the Democratic representative to the U.S. House of Representatives for the Texas 24th Congressional District from 1979 to 2005. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For specific national Supreme Courts, see Category:National supreme courts. ... This article is about the American politician. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Sam Massell (born August 26, 1927) is an American politician and served eight years as Atlantas vice mayor under Ivan Allen until being elected as that citys first Jewish mayor in the October 1969 election. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Newton Norman Minow (born January 17, 1926) is best known for his Wasteland Speech, given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961. ... The abbreviation FCC can refer to: Face-centered cubic (usually fcc), a crystallographic structure Federal Communications Commission, a US government organization Farm Credit Corporation/Farm Credit Canada, a Canadian government organization Families with Children from China, an adoption support organization Florida Christian College, a college in central Florida Fresno City... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Abraham Ribicoff Abraham Alexander Ribicoff (April 9, 1910–February 22, 1998) was an American politician. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Robert Leslie Shapiro (born September 2, 1942 in Plainfield, New Jersey), is a high-profiled attorney who is most notable for being part of the defense team which successfully defended O. J. Simpson from the charges that he murdered his ex-wife Nicole and Ronald Goldman in 1994 (the trial... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ...

Arts/Entertainment

Army Archerd, columist, Variety. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Benjy Bronk (born Benjamin Ron Bronk) is a comedian, radio producer and head writer for the The Howard Stern Show. ... This article is about the radio show hosted by Howard Stern. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... The Cyrkle was a 1960s American rock and roll band. ... This article is about the former RCA Corporation. ... Aaron Karo was originally a New York City-based (now residing in Los Angeles) stand-up comedian and author of Ruminations on College Life (ISBN 0743232933) and the e-mail based column Ruminations. This column started in 1997 when Karo was a freshman in the University of Pennsylvania. ... Michael Ovitz (born December 14, 1946), talent agent and Hollywood powerhouse, served as the head of the Creative Artists Agency from 1975 to 1995. ... Jerry Herman Jerry Herman (born Gerald Herman on July 10, 1933 in New York City) is an American composer/lyricist of the Broadway musical theater. ... Hello, Dolly! is a musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilders 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. ... La Cage aux Folles is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Harvey Fierstein and lyrics and music by Jerry Herman. ... Robert Klein (born February 8, 1942) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Harold Ramis (born November 21, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor, director, and writer. ... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ... Stripes is a 1981 American comedy film starring Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, and Warren Oates. ... For other uses, see Ghostbusters (disambiguation). ... Ari Sandel is the director of the short film, West Bank Story, which won the 2007 Academy Award in the category Best Short Film (Live Action). ... West Bank Story is a 2005 comedy short, directed by Ari Sandel, co-written by Sandel and Kim Ray, and featuring choreography by Ramon Del Barrio. ... Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. ... The trio Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) is a musical group from the United States; they were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ...

Media/Literature

Mel Allen (1955) Mel Allen (February 14, 1913 – June 16, 1996) was an American sportscaster, best known for his long tenure as the primary play-by-play announcer for the New York Yankees. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Martin Marty Glickman (August 14, 1917 - January 3, 2001), was an American track and field athlete and sports announcer, born in The Bronx, New York. ... For the ex-NFL fullback, see Jim Nance. ... Richard J. Schaap (September 27, 1934 – December 21, 2001) was a 20th century American sportswriter, broadcaster, and the author or co-author of 33 books. ... Mike Wallace (born Myron Leon Wallace on May 9, 1918) is a former American game show host, television personality, and journalist. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... ABC World News Tonight (often abbreviated as WNT) is the ABC television networks flagship evening news program. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ...

Sports

Knicks redirects here. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... Donnie Edwards, Jr. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC West (1970-present) Current uniform Team colors Red, White and Gold Mascot K. C. Wolf (1985-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) Personnel Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt... Sidney Sid Gillman (October 26, 1911 - January 3, 2003) was an American football coach and innovator. ... Robert Kraft Robert K. Kraft, (born June 5, 1941 in Brookline, Massachusetts) is the owner of National Football Leagues New England Patriots and Major League Soccers New England Revolution, as well as the stadium where they play, Gillette Stadium. ... The Kraft Group is a group of privately held companies in the professional sports, manufacturing, and real-estate development industries doing business in 82 countries[1]. Founded in 1998 by Robert Kraft as a holding group, it is comprised of the following companies: Kraft Sports Group New England Patriots, LP... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Revolution, Revs Stadium Gillette Stadium Foxborough, MA Coach Steve Nicol, 2002— Owner Robert Kraft First Game Tampa Bay Mutiny 3–2 New England Revolution (Tampa Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win New England Revolution 6–1 Colorado Rapids (Gillette Stadium; September 18... Gillette Stadium is the home stadium for the New England Patriots football team and the New England Revolution soccer team. ... Sid Luckman (November 21, 1916 - July 5, 1998) was an American football quarterback for the Chicago Bears from 1939 to 1950 leading the team to 4 NFL championships during that period. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Jerry L. Owens (born on February 16, 1981 in Hollywood, California) is a minor league center fielder currently with the Charlotte Knights (Chicago White Sox affiliation), in the International League. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) (Chicago) White Stockings (1901-1903 *From 1900 to 1903, the official name did not contain the city name of Chicago... Abe Pollin (born December 3, 1923 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is the current owner of the NBAs Washington Wizards, and former owner of the NHLs Washington Capitals and WNBAs Washington Mystics. ... Washington Bullets redirects here. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American...

Chapters

See main article List of Zeta Beta Tau chapters and colonies.

Zeta Beta Tau currently recognizes 80 chapters and colonies across the United States. The state with the most chapters is New York. The following is a list of campuses with chapters and colonies currently recognized by the Zeta Beta Tau national fraternity. ... This article is about the state. ...


References

  1. ^ ZBT Centennial History Book. Retrieved on March 4, 2008.
  2. ^ Bible Isaiah 1:27. Retrieved on March 4, 2008.
  3. ^ ZBT Bax Chapter. Retrieved on November 19, 2007.
  4. ^ ZBT History. Retrieved on August 11, 2006.
  5. ^ Chapter Officers Responsibilities. Retrieved on March 4, 2008.
  6. ^ Stanley Marcus. Minding the Store: A Memoir (1974), p. 24

is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zeta Beta Tau of Columbia University (609 words)
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity was inspired by Richard J. Gottheil, a professor of languages at Columbia University and a leader in the early American Zionist movement.
The society was called Z.B.T. During this brief period, the society came to serve as a kind of fraternal body for college students who, as Jews, were excluded from joining existing fraternities because of the sectarian practices which prevailed at the end of the nineteenth century in the United States.
ZBT concluded that all efforts to reform the institution of pledging had failed; pledging was the problem.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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