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Encyclopedia > Zero Hour (comics)
Zero Hour


Cover to Zero Hour#1, the penultimate issue of the series. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 387 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (400 × 620 pixel, file size: 48 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Cover to Zero Hour #1, by Dan Jurgens. ...

Publisher DC Comics
Schedule weekly
Format limited series
Publication dates September 1994
Number of issues 5
Main character(s) Parallax
Extant
Justice League of America
Justice Society of America
Creative team as of September 1994
Artist(s) Dan Jurgens
Inker(s) Jerry Ordway
Colourist(s) Gregory Wright
Creator(s) Dan Jurgens
Jerry Ordway

Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was a 1994 comic book miniseries and crossover storyline that ran in DC Comics. In it, the one-time hero Hal Jordan, who had until then been a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps, mad with grief after the destruction of his home town of Coast City (during the "Reign of the Supermen" storyline) and having obtained immense power as Parallax, attempted to destroy, and then remake, the DC Universe. The crossover involved almost every DC Universe monthly series published at the time. The issues of the series itself were numbered in reverse order, beginning with issue #4 and ending with #0 (i.e. 'counting down to zero'). The series was written and penciled by Dan Jurgens, with inks by Jerry Ordway. DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Hank Hall is a fictional character in DC Comics who first appeared in Showcase #75 as Hawk of Hawk and Dove. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... A fictional crossover occurs when two or more otherwise separated fictional characters, stories, settings, universes, or media meet and interact with each other. ... DC Comics is one of the largest American companies in comic book and related media publishing. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... The Green Lantern Corps The Green Lantern Corps is a fictional, intergalactic police force of Green Lanterns that existed in the pages of DC Comics, chosen to patrol the vast reaches of the Universe, fighting evil wherever it could be found. ... Coast City was a fictional city that appeared in stories published by DC Comics. ... The cover of Superman #75 The Death of Superman was a comic book storyline leading up to Superman #75 (January 1993) that served as the catalyst for the DC Comics crossover event of 1993, which had the umbrella title The Death and Return of Superman. ... Parallax is a fictional comic book villain from DC Comics. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Dan Jurgens is an American writer and artist of comic books. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ...


This series is noted for its motif of the DC Universe gradually "fading out" as events reached their climax. Look up motif in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Background

Zero Hour: Crisis in Time was intended by DC as a belated follow-up to their landmark limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, and was indeed subtitled "(A) Crisis in Time". It promised to do for the inconsistent future timelines of the DC Universe what Crisis had done for its parallel worlds: unify them into a new one. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...


The event served as an opportunity to reconcile some of the problems left unaddressed by Crisis and other problems that had been unintentionally caused by it. In particular, the revised characters of the post-Crisis universe had been rolled out gradually, with DC continuing to feature the old versions until the new versions were launched, some of them a year or several after the first wave of revised characters were published (i.e. Superman: The Man of Steel, Wonder Woman Vol. 2, Batman: Year One). The character of Hawkman was one of the most problematic, since the revised version didn't first appear until 1989. This raised the question of what version of Hawkman had been seen since 1986. (He had been retconned to be both the Golden Age Hawkman and a Thanagarian spy.) The Legion of Super-Heroes faced similar problems with the eliminations of Superboy and Supergirl from DC continuity. (Valor, aka Mon-El, a character with similar powers, had been recast to take his place as the Legion's inspiration and most powerful member.) These and other retcons were not always well received by readers and often introduced new problems. The Man of Steel was a six-issue comic book limited series released in 1986 by DC Comics, several months after the 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths completed. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... Batman: Year One was the title of a comic book written by Frank Miller, illustrated by David Mazzuchelli and colored/painted by Richmond Lewis, released in 1988 by DC Comics. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Thanagar is a fictional planet in the DC Comics universe. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Kara Zor-El is a fictional DC Comics superhero and the cousin of Superman. ... Lar Gand, known variously as Mon-El, Valor and MOnel, is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who is affiliated with the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superboy, and later Superman. ...


Story

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.
Parallax (Hal Jordan), about to recreate the DC Universe in his image. Also pictured: Metron of the New Gods, Extant, The Spectre, and Superman. Art by George Perez from Green Lantern Gallery #1.
Parallax (Hal Jordan), about to recreate the DC Universe in his image. Also pictured: Metron of the New Gods, Extant, The Spectre, and Superman. Art by George Perez from Green Lantern Gallery #1.

The apparent villain of the story presented in the miniseries was a character named Extant (see also Hawk and Dove), who was using his temporal powers to unravel the DC Universe's timeline. In a confrontation with members of the Justice Society of America, Extant aged several of them (removing the effect that had kept these heroes of the 1940s vital into the 1990s), leaving them either feeble or dead. The true power behind the destruction of the universe - caused by temporal rifts of entropy - turned out to be former Green Lantern Hal Jordan, now calling himself "Parallax." Jordan had previously gone insane, and was now trying to remake the universe, undoing the events which had caused his breakdown and his own murderous actions following it. The collective efforts of the other superheroes managed to stop Jordan/Parallax from imposing his vision of a new universe, and the universe was recreated anew, albeit with subtle differences compared to the previous one. This 'blanking out/recreation' of the DC Universe was reflected in many of the tie-in issues; near the end of several of the tie-ins, the world began to disappear, and the last page of the book (or in some cases, several pages) had been left blank. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x919, 381 KB)Pinup by George Perez. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x919, 381 KB)Pinup by George Perez. ... It has been suggested that Tales of the New Gods be merged into this article or section. ... Monarch is the name of a DC Comics supervillain created by Archie Goodwin, Denny ONeil and Dan Jurgens. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Superman is a comic book superhero, originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Hank Hall is a fictional character in DC Comics who first appeared in Showcase #75 as Hawk of Hawk and Dove. ... Hawk and Dove are the names used by a number of DC Comics superheroes who fight crime together as duos, despite their sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Parallax is a fictional comic book villain from DC Comics. ...


Hal Jordan, whose descent into villainhood outraged some fans, was later exonerated of his crimes in the 2004-2005 miniseries Green Lantern: Rebirth, which revealed that Parallax was a separate entity that had possessed Jordan, and was responsible for his murderous actions. Eventually almost every person seemingly murdered by Hal Jordan/Parallax had returned from the dead or was shown to have somehow survived.


Outcome

Cover to Zero Hour #3 (actually the second issue), by Jurgens & Ordway. Pictured are the Golden and Modern Age Green Lanterns, Superman, Impulse, Hawkman and the Golden Age Flash (holding Hourman).
Cover to Zero Hour #3 (actually the second issue), by Jurgens & Ordway. Pictured are the Golden and Modern Age Green Lanterns, Superman, Impulse, Hawkman and the Golden Age Flash (holding Hourman).

DC published a fold-out timeline inside the back cover of Zero Hour #0 which identified various events and key stories which were part of its newly singular timeline, and when they occurred. Although fixed dates were given for the debut of historical characters such as the JSA, the debut of the post-Crisis Superman was presented as "10 years ago" and subsequent dates were expressed the same way, suggesting that the calendar years of these events were fluid and relative to the present rather than fixed, as a way to keep the characters at roughly their present ages. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (472x695, 209 KB)Scanned copy of the cover of the DC Comics graphic novel titled, Zero Hour - Crisis in Time, issue no. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (472x695, 209 KB)Scanned copy of the cover of the DC Comics graphic novel titled, Zero Hour - Crisis in Time, issue no. ... Alan Scott is a fictional hero from the DC Comics universe and the first superhero to bear the name Green Lantern. ... Kyle Rayner is a fictional character, a superhero from the DC Comics universe, known for most of his publication history as Green Lantern, a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Bartholemew Bart Allen II is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe and the first Flash. ... Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ...


The Legion of Super-Heroes was completely rebooted following Zero Hour, and the various Hawkman characters were merged into one (even though, contrary to the storyline's purpose, this created new sets of contradictions and confusions). Each ongoing series at the time was given an opportunity to retell (or clarify) the origin of its hero(es) to establish the official version in this revised continuity, in a "#0" issue published in the subsequent weeks after Zero Hour. They resumed their previous numbering or went on to #1, for new series, the following month. Several series took new directions following Zero Hour; for example, new teams were formed in the Justice League books, Oliver Queen's son Connor Hawke was introduced in Green Arrow, and Guy "Warrior" Gardner discovered an alien heritage which gave him different powers. Reboot, in series fiction, means to discard all previous continuity in the series and start anew. ... The Justice League, sometimes called the Justice League of America or JLA for short, is a fictional DC Universe superhero team. ... Green Arrow (Connor Hawke) is a DC Comics superhero. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ...


One, and only, major part of Batman's origin was retconned after the events in Zero Hour. In this version, Batman never caught or confronted the killer of his parents (thus rendering Batman: Year Two non-canonical), and more importantly, Batman was thought of as being an urban legend. Also, Catwoman was not a prostitute but rather lived in the low rentals area of Gotham. Finally, contributing to a plot point not fully explored in Batman: Year Three, Dick Grayson was legally adopted by Wayne. Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... Dick Grayson is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


But this "warm reboot" did not solve all continuity matters - "Who is Hawkman?" actually became less clear - and some fans and creators felt that multiple worlds and timelines were an asset (rather than a hindrance) to the DC Universe. For those and other reasons, DC later introduced a variation of the pre-Crisis concept of the Multiverse, in the form of Hypertime. In the end, this more ecumenical solution did not satisfy DC editors either and lead to the Infinite Crisis event in 2005 which revived and brought back several pre-Crisis concepts.[citation needed] The Earths of the Multiverse and the different variations of The Flash inhabiting each one. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...


Zero Hour also served to launch or end several ongoing series. A few of these were dictated by the changes in continuity that came out of the story, but most happened simply because it provided a convenient marketing opportunity to start new series. However, each of the new series (save for Starman) were cancelled after a couple of years, due to poor sales and/or critical reception. Starman led to a revolution in comic book writing, starting a trend of books that both moved the history of the DC Universe forward while respecting the past, such as the current JSA series, which is a successor to Starman. Starman can refer to a number of things: Starman is the name of a number of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ...


Tie-In Issues

Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... The death of Superman and its aftermath ran through a number of issues of the Superman comics in 1992-93. ... Look up anima in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Catwoman is a fictional character associated with DC Comics Batman franchise and created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane. ... Damage is i love sean michael herring physical harm that is caused to something, especially harm that impairs its function or appearance. ... Darkstars Issue 1 A fictional intergalactic squadron of cosmic cops that no one had heard of before 1992 in DC Comics. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... The Flash. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Guy Gardner is a fictional character, a comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... The Justice League of America, featuring the Flash, Superman, Aquaman, Batman, Wonder Woman, the Martian Manhunter, and Green Lantern. ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ... Justice League Task Force is a western Super NES and Sega Genesis tournament fighting game developed by Blizzard Entertainment and published by the now-defunct Acclaim. ... L.E.G.I.O.N. was a DC Comics science fiction comic book. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future. ... The Outsiders can refer to: The Outsiders (novel), by S. E. Hinton Outsiders (comics), a superhero series published by DC Comics Outsider (Known Space), a fictional species of aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series Outsiders, a song by Franz Ferdinand from their second album You Could Have It... Robin is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... -1... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Superman is a comic book superhero, originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The Teen Titans, also known as “The New Teen Titans”, “New Titans”, or “The Titans”, a DC Comics superhero team. ... Look up valor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Series ending with Zero Hour

For the animated television series based on this comic book, see Teen Titans (TV series). ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... L.E.G.I.O.N. was a DC Comics science fiction comic book. ... Lar Gand, known variously as Mon-El, Valor and MOnel, is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who is affiliated with the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superboy, and later Superman. ... Built in the 1987 company-wide crossover limited series, Legends, this new Justice League was given a less America-centric mandate than before, and was dubbed the Justice League International (or JLI for short). ...

Series rebooted during Zero Hour

The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team. ...

Series launched following Zero Hour

Fate, a fictional character of DC Comics. ... L.E.G.I.O.N. was a DC Comics science fiction comic book. ... Secret Origins #22 outlined the history of the Manhunters, as to tie in with Millennium. ... The Leymen are a DC Comics superhero team. ... Starman VII is Jack Knight, a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Xenobrood was a nineties DC Comics superhero team that was launched by the Zero Hour comics event. ...

See also

Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12 part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Emerald Twilight is the name for the story that was detailed in Green Lantern Vol. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ...

External links

  • The Zero Hour FAQ
  • Alternity

  Results from FactBites:
 
Retcon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4918 words)
Retcons are common in comic books, especially those of large publishing houses such as Marvel Comics and DC Comics, because of the lengthy history of many series and the number of independent authors contributing to their development; this is the context in which the term was coined.
Many of the retcons introduced in Crisis on Infinite Earths and DC's later Zero Hour were specifically intended to wipe the slate clean, and permit an entirely new history to be written for the characters.
A second major set of retcons in DC Comics was in a similar event called Zero Hour, which rebooted the Legion of Super-Heroes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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