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Encyclopedia > Zengid dynasty

The Zengid Dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Seljuk Turkish origin, which ruled parts of Northern Iraq and Syria during the 12th and 13th centuries. A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change. ... The Seljuk Turks (Turkish: Selçuk; Arabic: سلجوق Saljūq, السلاجقة al-Salājiqa; Persian: سلجوقيان Saljūqiyān; also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that occupied parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the 11th to 14th centuries. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ...


The dynasty was founded by Imad ed-Din Zengi, who became the Seljuk Atabeg (governor) of Mosul in 1127. He quickly became the chief Turkish potentate in Northern Syria and Iraq, taking Aleppo from the squabbling Ortoqid emirs in 1128, and capturing the County of Edessa from the Crusaders in 1144. This latter feat made Zengi a hero in the Muslim world, but he was assassinated by a slave two years later, in 1146. Imad ad-Din Zengi (also Zangi or Zengui) (1087-1146) was the son of Aq Sunqur al-Hajib, governor of Aleppo under Malik Shah I. He became atabeg of Mosul in 1127, and of Aleppo in 1128, uniting the two cities under his personal rule, and was the founder of... Atabeg is a title of nobility of Turkic origin, indicating a governor of a nation or province who was subordinate to a king or Emperor but senior to a Khan. ... Mosūl (Kurdish: Mûsil, Arabic: موصل, al Mawsil) or Nineveh (Syriac: ܢܝܢܘܐ) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... Events Conrad III establishes the Hohenstaufen dynasty when he is crowned antiking to the Holy Roman Emperor, Lothar II. First coalition of the Norman princes against Roger II of Sicily. ... The Ortoqid dynasty was an Oghuz Turk dynasty that ruled in the Jezirah (northern Iraq) in the 11th and 12th centuries. ... Emir (also sometimes rendered as Amir or Ameer, Arabic commander) is a title of nobility historically used in Islamic nations of the Middle East and North Africa. ... Events Pope Honorius II recognizes and confirms the Order of the Knights Templar. ... The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, based around a city with an ancient history and an early tradition of Christianity (see Edessa). ... Events Louis VII capitulates to Pope Celestine II and so earns the popes absolution Pope Celestine II is succeeded by Pope Lucius II December 24 - Edessa falls to Zengi Montauban, France, is founded First recorded example of an anti-Semitic blood libel in England Normandy comes under Angevin control... Events Saint Bernard of Clairvaux preaches the Second Crusade at Vezelay, Burgundy First written mention of Bryansk. ...


On Zengi's death, his territories were divided, with Mosul and his lands in Iraq going to his eldest son Saif ad-Din Ghazi I, and Aleppo and Edessa falling to his second son, Nur ad-Din Mahmud. Nur ad-Din proved to be as competent as his father. In 1149 he defeated and killed Prince Raymond of Antioch in battle, and the next year conquered the remnants of the County of Edessa west of the Euphrates River. In 1154 he capped off these successes by his capture of Damascus from the Burid Emirs who ruled it. Saif ad-Din Ghazi I was the eldest son of Zengi of Mosul, and the elder brother of Nur ad-Din. ... Nur ad-din Abu al-Qasim Mahmud Ibn Imad ad-Din Zangi (also Nur ed-Din, Nur al-Din, Nour el-Din or Nureddin) (1118 - May 15, 1174) was a member of the Zengid dynasty, and ruled Syria from 1146 to 1174. ... Events Castle of Carimate destroyed. ... Raymond of Poitiers (1099-June 27, 1149) was prince of Antioch between 1136 to 1149. ... The County of Edessa was one of the Crusader states in the 12th century, based around a city with an ancient history and an early tradition of Christianity (see Edessa). ... The Euphrates (the traditional Greek name for the river, which is in Old Persian Ufrat, Aramaic Prâth/Frot, in Arabic الفرات, in Turkish Fırat and in ancient Assyrian language Pu-rat-tu) is the westernmost of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia (Bethnahrin in Aramaic), the other being the... Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Damascus by night, the green spots are minarets Damascus (Arabic officially دمشق Dimashq, colloqially ash-Sham الشام) is the capital city of Syria and one of the worlds oldest cities. ... The Burid Dynasty was a Turkish dynasty which ruled over Damascus in the early 12th century. ...


Now ruling from Damascus, Nur ad-Din's success continued. Another Prince of Antioch, Raynald of Chatillon was captured, and the territories of that Principality greatly reduced. In the 1160s, Nur ad-Din's attention was mostly held by a competition with the King of Jerusalem, Amalric I, for control of the Fatimid Caliphate of Egypt. Ultimately, Nur ed-Din's Kurdish general Shirkuh was successful in conquering Egypt in 1169, but Shirkuh's nephew and successor as Governor of Egypt, Saladin, rejected Nur ad-Din's control. Raynauld de Chatillon (also Reynald or Reginald of Chastillon) (died July 4, 1187) was a knight who served in the Second Crusade and remained in the Holy Land after its defeat. ... The Principality of Antioch, including parts of modern-day Turkey and Syria, was one of the crusader states created during the First Crusade. ... Centuries: 11th century - 12th century - 13th century Decades: 1110s 1120s 1130s 1140s 1150s - 1160s - 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s Years: 1160 1161 1162 1163 1164 1165 1166 1167 1168 1169 Events and Trends Births Genghis Khan born as Temujin. ... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... Amalric I (also Amaury or Aimery) (1136 – 1174) was king of Jerusalem from 1162 to 1174. ... The Fatimid or Fatimid Caliphate is the Ismaili Shiite dynasty that ruled North Africa from A.D. 909 to 1171. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... Kurdish may refer to: The Kurdish people The Kurdish language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Asad al-Din Shirkuh bin Shadhi (died 1169) was an important Muslim military commander, and uncle of Saladin. ... Events Prince Andrey Bogolyubskiy sacks the Kievan Rus capital Kiev. ... Saladin, king of Egypt from a 15th century illuminated manuscript; the globus in his left hand is a European symbol of kingly power. ...


Nur ad-Din was preparing to invade Egypt to bring Saladin under control when he unexpectedly died in 1174. His son and successor As-Salih Ismail al-Malik was only a child, and was forced to flee to Aleppo, which he ruled until 1181, when he was murdered and replaced by his relation, the Atabeg of Mosul. Saladin conquered Aleppo two years later, ending Zengid rule in Syria. Events Vietnam is given the official name of China. ... As-Salih Ismail al-Malik (1163-1181) was the son of Nur ad-Din, and was only eleven years old when his father died in 1174. ... Events Jayavarman VII assumes control of the Khmer kingdom. ...


Zengid princes continued to rule in Northern Iraq well into the 13th Century, ruling Mosul until 1234 and with their rule not coming finally to an end until 1250. Events Canonization of Saint Dominic Collapse of the Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) Deaths Emperor Chukyo of Japan Emperor Go-Horikawa of Japan Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned... Events December 13 - Death of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor Louis IX of France is captured by Muslims and has to ransom himself Mabinogion appears Albertus Magnus isolates the element arsenic Vincent of Beauvais writes proto-encyclopedic The Greater Mirror City of Stockholm founded Alphonso III of Portugal takes Algarve...

Contents

Zengid Atabegs of Mosul

  • Imad ad-Din Zengi I 1127-1146
  • Saif ad-Din Ghazi I 1146-1149
  • Qutb ad-Din Mawdud 1149-1170
  • Saif ad-Din Ghazi II 1170-1180
  • Izz ad-Din Mas'ud I 1180-1193
  • Nur ad-Din Arslan Shah I 1193-1211
  • Izz ad-Din Mas'ud II 1211-1218
  • Nur ad-Din Arslan Shah II 1218-1219
  • Nasir ad-Din Mahmud 1219-1234

Imad ad-Din Zengi (also Zangi or Zengui) (1087-1146) was the son of Aq Sunqur al-Hajib, governor of Aleppo under Malik Shah I. He became atabeg of Mosul in 1127, and of Aleppo in 1128, uniting the two cities under his personal rule, and was the founder of... Saif ad-Din Ghazi I was the eldest son of Zengi of Mosul, and the elder brother of Nur ad-Din. ...

Zengid Atabegs of Aleppo

  • Imad ad-Din Zengi I 1128-1146
  • Nur ad-Din Mahmud 1146-1174
  • As-Salih Ismail al-Malik 1174-1181
  • Imad ad-Din Zengi II 1181-1183

Imad ad-Din Zengi (also Zangi or Zengui) (1087-1146) was the son of Aq Sunqur al-Hajib, governor of Aleppo under Malik Shah I. He became atabeg of Mosul in 1127, and of Aleppo in 1128, uniting the two cities under his personal rule, and was the founder of... Nur ad-din Abu al-Qasim Mahmud Ibn Imad ad-Din Zangi (also Nur ed-Din, Nur al-Din, Nour el-Din or Nureddin) (1118 - May 15, 1174) was a member of the Zengid dynasty, and ruled Syria from 1146 to 1174. ... As-Salih Ismail al-Malik (1163-1181) was the son of Nur ad-Din, and was only eleven years old when his father died in 1174. ...

Zengid Atabegs of Damascus

  • Nur ad-Din Mahmud 1154-1174
  • As-Salih Ismail al-Malik 1174

Nur ad-din Abu al-Qasim Mahmud Ibn Imad ad-Din Zangi (also Nur ed-Din, Nur al-Din, Nour el-Din or Nureddin) (1118 - May 15, 1174) was a member of the Zengid dynasty, and ruled Syria from 1146 to 1174. ... As-Salih Ismail al-Malik (1163-1181) was the son of Nur ad-Din, and was only eleven years old when his father died in 1174. ...

Zengid Atabegs of Sinjar (in Northern Iraq)

  • Imad ad-Din Zengi II 1171-1197
  • Qutb ad-Din Muhammad 1197-1219
  • Imad ad-Din Shahanshah 1219-1220
  • Jalal ad-Din Mahmud 1219-1220
  • Fath ad-Din Umar 1219-1220

Zengid Atabegs of Jazira (in Northern Iraq)

  • Mu'izz ad-Din Sanjar Shah 1180-1208
  • Mu'izz ad-Din Mahmud 1208-1241
  • Mahmud Al-Malik Al-Zahir 1241-1250

  Results from FactBites:
 
Zengid dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (406 words)
The Zengid Dynasty was a Muslim dynasty of Seljuk Turkish origin, which ruled parts of Northern Iraq and Syria during the 12th and 13th centuries.
The dynasty was founded by Imad ed-Din Zengi, who became the Seljuk Atabeg (governor) of Mosul in 1127.
Zengid princes continued to rule in Northern Iraq well into the 13th Century, ruling Mosul until 1234 and with their rule not coming finally to an end until 1250.
Encyclopedia: Zengid dynasty (1717 words)
A dynasty is a family or extended family which retains political power across generations, or more generally, any organization which extends dominance in its field even as its particular members change.
The Ortoqid dynasty was an Oghuz Turk dynasty that ruled in the Jezirah (northern Iraq) in the 11th and 12th centuries.
Events Canonization of Saint Dominic Collapse of the Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) Deaths Emperor Chukyo of Japan Emperor Go-Horikawa of Japan Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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