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Encyclopedia > Zealandia (continent)
Topography of Zealandia. The linear ridges running NNE and SW away from New Zealand are not considered part of the continent, nor are Australia (upper left), Fiji or Vanuatu (top centre).
Topography of Zealandia. The linear ridges running NNE and SW away from New Zealand are not considered part of the continent, nor are Australia (upper left), Fiji or Vanuatu (top centre).[1]

Zealandia is not a continent. Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America are. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 507 × 599 pixels Full resolution (573 × 677 pixel, file size: 143 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portal:New Zealand Portal:New... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 507 × 599 pixels Full resolution (573 × 677 pixel, file size: 143 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portal:New Zealand Portal:New... Zealandia also known as S.S. Zealandia and nicknamed Z (or Zed) was a historically-significant 6,683 ton multi-decked single-funnelled Australian cargo and passenger ship. ...


Zealandia, also known as the New Zealand continent, is a nearly submerged continent that sank after breaking away from Australia 60-85 million years ago[2] and from Antarctica between 130 and 85 million years ago. Most of it (93%) is now submerged under the Pacific Ocean. Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ...


Zealandia is 3,500,000 km² in area; this is larger than Greenland or India, and almost half the size of Australia. It is unusually long and narrow, stretching from New Caledonia in the north to beyond New Zealand's sub-antarctic islands in the south (from latitude 19° south to 56° south,[2] analogous to ranging from Haiti to Hudson Bay or from Sudan to Sweden in the northern hemisphere). New Zealand is the largest part of Zealandia that is above sea level, followed by New Caledonia. To help compare orders of magnitude of different surface areas  here is a list of areas between 1 million km² and 10 million km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Five groups of islands form the New Zealand sub-antarctic islands. ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


The major submerged parts of Zealandia are the Lord Howe Rise, Challenger Plateau, Campbell Plateau, Norfolk Ridge, Hikurangi Plateau and the Chatham Rise. Smaller provinces include the Louisiade Plateau, Mellish Rise, Kenn Plateau, Chesterfield Plateau, and Dampier Ridge.[3] The seemingly separate Gilbert Seamount (northwest of Fiordland) is also part of the New Zealand continent.[4] The Lord Howe Rise is a underwater plateau that lies 800 kilometres offshore from mainland Australia. ... The Campbell Plateau is a large submarine plateau, located north-east of New Zealand and south of the Lord Howe Rise. ... The Campbell Plateau is a largest submarine plateau to the south of New Zealand. ... The Chatham Rise is an area of ocean to the east of New Zealand. ... The Kenn Plateau is a large piece of submerged continental crust off northeastern Australia that rifted from northeastern Australia about 63-52 mya, along with other nearby parts of the Zealandia continent. ... Fiordland is a region of New Zealand that is situated on the south-western corner of the South Island. ...


About 25 million years ago, the southern part of Zealandia (on the Pacific Plate) began to shift relative to the northern part (on the Indo-Australian Plate). The resulting displacement by approximately 500 kilometres (300 mi) along the Alpine Fault is evident in geological maps.[5] Compression across the plate boundary has uplifted the Southern Alps.  The Pacific plate, shown in pale yellow The Pacific Plate is an oceanic tectonic plate beneath the Pacific Ocean. ...  The Indo-Australian plate, shown in dull orange The Indo-Australian Plate is an overarching name for two tectonic plates that include the continent of Australia and surrounding ocean extending northwest to include the Indian subcontinent and adjacent waters. ... The Alpine Fault is easily visible from space, running along the western edge of the Southern Alps from the south-western coast towards the north-eastern corner of the South Island. ... The Southern Alps is a mountain range which runs along the western side of the South Island of New Zealand. ...


Zealandia supports substantial inshore fisheries and contains New Zealand's largest gas field. Some parts of it may be mined in the future. A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... The Maui gas field is located in the Tasman Sea off the coast of Taranaki, New Zealand. ...


References

  1. ^ Figure 8.1: New Zealand in relation to the Indo-Australian and Pacific Plates. The State of New Zealand’s Environment 1997 (1997). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  2. ^ a b Keith Lewis; Scott D. Nodder and Lionel Carter (2007-01-11). Zealandia: the New Zealand continent. Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved on 2007-02-22.
  3. ^ Mortimer, Nick (2006), "Zealandia", Australian Earth Sciences Convention, Melbourne, Australia .
  4. ^ Wood, Ray; Vaughan Stagpoole, Ian Wright, Bryan Davy and Phil Barnes (2003). New Zealand's Continental Shelf and UNCLOS Article 76 (PDF), Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences series 56; NIWA technical report 123, Wellington, New Zealand: Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences Limited; National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, 16. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. “The continuous rifted basement structure, thickness of the crust, and lack of seafloor spreading anomalies are evidence of prolongation of the New Zealand land mass to Gilbert Seamount.” 
  5. ^ Figure 4. Basement rocks of New Zealand. UNCLOS Article 76: The Land mass, continental shelf, and deep ocean floor: Accretion and suturing. Retrieved on 2007-04-21.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ...

External links

  • The coast and beyond, including map of the New Zealand continent, from GNS Science

 
 

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