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Encyclopedia > Zanzibar
Zanzibar
Official flag of Zanzibar
Flag
Map of Zanzibar's main island
Zanzibar is part of Tanzania
Coordinates: 6°8′S 39°19′E / -6.133, 39.317
Country Tanzania
Islands Unguja and Pemba
Capital Zanzibar City
Settled AD 1000
Government
 - Type semi-autonomous part of Tanzania
 - President Amani Abeid Karume
Area
 - Both Islands  637 sq mi (1,651 km²)
Population (2004)
 - Both Islands 1,070,000

Zanzibar (IPA: /ˈzænzɪbɑː(ɹ)/) is the name for an archipelago in the Indian Ocean 25–50 km off the coast of East Africa, which is part of Tanzania. The archipelago consists of numerous small islands and two large ones: Unguja (the main island, sometimes informally referred to as 'Zanzibar'), and Pemba Island. The archipelago was once the separate state of Zanzibar, which united with Tanganyika to form Tanzania (derived from the two names), and still enjoys a high degree of autonomy within the union. The capital of Zanzibar, located on the island of Unguja, is Zanzibar City. The city's old quarter, known as Stone Town, is a World Heritage Site. Image File history File links Flag_of_Zanzibar. ... Image File history File links Map_of_Zanzibar. ... Image File history File links Spice_Islands_(Zanzibar_highlighted). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Zanzibar. ... Map of Pemba Island Pemba is an island about 50 kilometres to the north of the island of Zanzibar. ... Zanzibar Urban/West is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Dionysius Exiguus invented Anno Domini years to date Easter. ... Amani Abeid Karume Amani Abeid Karume (b. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... The Mergui Archipelago An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... This article is about the island. ... Flag of Tanganyika Tanganyika was an East African republic within the Commonwealth of Nations, named after Lake Tanganyika, which formed its western border. ... Zanzibar Urban/West is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Stone Town or Mji Mkongwe, in Swahili, is the old part of Zanzibar City, the capital of the island of Zanzibar, a part of Tanzania. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...


Zanzibar's main industries are spices (which include cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and pepper), raffia, and tourism. Zanzibar is also the home of the endemic Zanzibar Red Colobus and the elusive Zanzibar Leopard. The word "Zanzibar" probably derives from the Persian زنگبار, Zangi-bar ("coast of the blacks") and it is also known as Zanji-bar in Arabic. "Zanzibar" may also refer to the spice ginger (genus Zingiber). Zanzibar is sometimes referred to as the "Spice Islands," a term that is also associated with the Maluku Islands in Indonesia. Pemba Island is the only island apart from Zanzibar that still produces cloves on a major basis which is the primary source of spice income for the islands. For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... This article is about spices, the word clove is also used to describe a segment of a head of garlic and a clove hitch is a useful kind of knot. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Piper nigrum L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Species About 25-30 species, including: Raphia australis Raphia farinifera Raphia hookeri Raphia regalis Raphia taedigera Raphia vinifera The Raffia palm (Raphia) is a genus of tropical palms, native to tropical regions of Africa, Madagascar, Central America and South America. ... Tourists on Oahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes or the provision of services to support this leisure travel. ... In biology and ecology endemic means exclusively native to a place or biota, in contrast to cosmopolitan or introduced. ... Binomial name Piliocolobus kirkii Gray, 1868 The Zanzibar Red Colobus is a red colobus native to Zanzibar. ... Trinomial name Panthera pardus adersi (Pocock, 1932) The Zanzibar Leopard (Panthera pardus adersi) is an elusive and possibly extinct subspecies of leopard endemic to Unguja Island in the Zanzibar archipelago, part of Tanzania. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Binomial name Zingiber officinale Roscoe Ginger is commonly used as a spice in cuisines throughout the world. ... Binomial name Zingiber officinale Rosc. ... The Maluku Islands (also known as the Moluccas, Moluccan Islands, the Spice Islands or simply Maluku) are an archipelago in Indonesia, and part of the larger Malay Archipelago. ... This article is about the island. ... This article is about spices, the word clove is also used to describe a segment of a head of garlic and a clove hitch is a useful kind of knot. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Flag of the historical Sultanate of Zanzibar.
Flag of the historical Sultanate of Zanzibar.

The first permanent residents of Zanzibar seem to have been the ancestors of the Hadimu and Tumbatu, who began arriving from the East African mainland around AD 1000. They had belonged to various mainland ethnic groups, and on Zanzibar they lived in small villages and did not coalesce to form larger political units. Because they lacked central organization, they were easily subjugated by outsiders. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Sultanate_of_Zanzibar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Sultanate_of_Zanzibar. ...


Ancient pottery demonstrates existing trade routes with Zanzibar as far back as the ancient Assyrians.[citation needed] Traders from Arabia mostly from Yemen, the Persian Gulf region of modern-day Iran (especially Shiraz), and west India probably visited Zanzibar as early as the 1st century. They used the monsoon winds to sail across the Indian Ocean and landed at the sheltered harbor located on the site of present-day Zanzibar Town. Although the islands had few resources of interest to the traders, they offered a good point from which to make contact with the towns of the East African coast. It has been suggested that Assyrian people be merged into this article or section. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... Eram Garden, Shiraz most popular garden. ... A map of West India. ... Monsoon in the Vindhya mountain range, central India A monsoon is a rainy season which lasts for several months and has lasting climatic effects. ...


Traders from the Persian Gulf region and Yemen began to settle in small numbers on Zanzibar in the late 11th or 12th century; they intermarried with the indigenous Africans and eventually a hereditary ruler (known as the Mwenyi Mkuu or Jumbe), emerged among the Hadimu. A similar ruler, called the Sheha, was set up among the Tumbatu. Neither ruler had much power, but they helped solidify the ethnic identity of their respective peoples.


The earliest southern hemisphere mosque was built in Kizimkazi, Unguja's southernmost village by the Yemenis, and a koufic inscription on its mirhab wears the date 500 AH i.e. 1107 AD. (David Else, Guide to Zanzibar, ISBN 1 898323 28 3)


Da Gama's visit in 1499 marks the beginning of European influence. The Portuguese established control over the island in 1503. In August 1505 it became part of the Portuguese Empire when captain John (João) Homere of de Almeida's fleet captured the island and claimed it for Portugal. It was to remain a possession of Portugal until 1698. Dom Vasco da Gama, 1st Count of Vidigueira (IPA: (Sines or Vidigueira, Alentejo, Portugal, ca. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Maximum extent of Portuguese colonial possessions in the 16th century. ... A portrait of Francisco de Almeida in the National Museum of Ancient Art. ...


In 1698, Zanzibar became part of the overseas holdings of Oman, falling under the control of the Sultan of Oman. The Portuguese were expelled and slave traffic under the Sultan thrived along with an expanding economy in clove spice.


Sayyid Said bin Sultan al-Busaid moved his capital from Muscat in Oman to Stone Town in 1840. After his death in 1856, his sons struggled over the succession. On April 6, 1861, Zanzibar and Oman were divided into two separate principalities. Sayyid Majid bin Said Al-Busaid (1834/5–1870), his sixth son, became the Sultan of Zanzibar, while his brother, the third son Sayyid Thuwaini bin Said al-Said became the Sultan of Oman. Said bin Sultan (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1790 - October 19, 1856) was Sultan of Muscat and Oman from November 20, 1804 to June 4, 1856. ... Classification City Sultan Qaboos bin Said al Said Area 3,500 km² [1] Population  - Total (2005)  - Density  - Oman calculated rank 606,024 [2] 184. ... Sayyid Majid bin Said Al-Busaid (1834/1835 - October 7, 1870) was the first Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Thuwaini bin Said al-Said (-1866), (also called Tueni), Sultan of Muscat and Oman, (October 19, 1856 - February 11, 1866), third son of Said bin Sultan, Sultan of Zanzibar, Muscat and Oman. ...


During this period, the Sultan of Zanzibar also controlled a substantial portion of the east African coast, known as Zanj, including Mombasa and Dar es Salaam, and trading routes extended much further into Africa, such as to Kindu on the Congo river. In November 1886, a German-British border commission established the Zanj as a ten-nautical mile (19 km) wide strip along the coast from Cape Delgado (now in Mozambique) to Kipini (now in Kenya) including all offshore islands and several towns in what is now Somalia. However, from 1887 to 1892, all of these mainland possessions were subsequently lost to the colonial powers of Britain, Germany, and Italy although some were not formally sold or ceded until the 20th century (Mogadishu to Italy in 1905 and Mombasa to Britain in 1963). Zanj (Arabic and Persian زنج, Land of the Blacks) was a name used by medieval Arab geographers to refer to a portion of the East African coast. ... bumbasa is the second largest city in Kenya, lying on the Indian Ocean. ... Dar es Salaam (دار السلام), formerly Mzizima, is the largest city (pop. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Kindu is a town in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the capital of Maniema province. ... The Congo River (for a time known as Zaire River) is the largest river in Western Central Africa. ... A nautical mile or sea mile is a unit of length. ... Mogadishu (Somali: Muqdisho, popularly Xamar; Arabic: ; Italian: ), is the largest city in Somalia, and its capital. ... bumbasa is the second largest city in Kenya, lying on the Indian Ocean. ...


Zanzibar carries the distinction of having the first steam locomotive in East Africa, when Sultan Bargash bin Said ordered a tiny 0-4-0 tank engine to haul his regal carriage from town to his summer palace at Chukwani. Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid. ...


The British Empire gradually took over, and Zanzibar and the British position was formalized by the 1890 Helgoland-Zanzibar Treaty, in which Germany pledged not to interfere with British interests in insular Zanzibar. Zanzibar became a protectorate of the United Kingdom that year. The British appointed first Viziers from 1890 to 1913, and then British Residents from 1913 to 1963. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Treaty between Germany in Great Britian, by which the two countries agreed on mutually respected influence spheres in 1890. ... This article is about states protected and/or dominated by a foreign power. ... A Vizier (وزير, sometimes also spelled Wazir) is an Arabic term for a high-ranking religious and political advisor, often to a king or sultan. ... A British Resident or British Resident Minister was a British colonial official who lived and worked in smaller self-governing colonies or protectorates as a political advisor to the leader and as an ambassador of the British Government. ...


The death of Sultan Hamad bin Thuwaini on 25 August 1896, saw the usurper Seyyid Khalid bin Bargash son of Sultan Bargash bin Said take over the palace and declare himself the new ruler. This was contrary to the wishes of the British Government, who favoured Hamoud bin Mohammed. This led to a showdown, later called the Anglo-Zanzibar War, on the morning of 27 August when ships of the Royal Navy destroyed the Beit al Hukum palace having given Khalid an ultimatum to leave. He refused and at 9 am the ships opened fire and despite a substantial return fire from Khalid's rebel troops a cease fire was declared 45 minutes later after Khalid had fled to the German Consulate. The bombardment subsequently became known as The Shortest War in History. Hamoud was declared the new ruler and peace was restored once more[1]. Acquiescing to British demands, Hamoud brought an end to Zanzibar's role as a centre for the eastern slave trade that had begun under Omani rule in 17th Century by banning slavery and freeing the slaves of Zanzibar with compensation in 1897. Sayyid Hamad bin Thuwaini Al-Busaid (1857 - August 25, 1896) (Arabic: حميد بن ثويني البوسعيد) was the fifth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Sayyid Khalid bin Barghash Al-Busaid (1874 - 1927) (Arabic: خالد بن برغش البوسعيد) was the sixth Sultan of Zanzibar and the eldest son of the second Sultan of Zanzibar, Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid. ... Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid. ... Hamoud bin Mohammed (born 1853-July 18, 1902) (ruled August 27, 1896-July 18, 1902) (Arabic: حمود بن محمد) was the British-controlled Omani sultan of the protectorate of Zanzibar, who outlawed slavery on the island. ... Combatants British Empire Zanzibar Strength 900 soldiers of the Zanzibar regular army; a detachment of Royal Marines of unknown strength; HMS Philomel; HMS Thrush; HMS Sparrow; HMS Racoon; HMS St George 2,800; HHS Glasgow Casualties Approximately 100 Approximately 500 killed The Anglo-Zanzibar War was fought between the United... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Slave redirects here. ...


On December 10, 1963, Zanzibar received its independence from the United Kingdom as a constitutional monarchy under the Sultan. This state of affairs was short-lived, as the Sultan was overthrown on January 12, 1964, and on April 26 of that year Zanzibar merged with the mainland state of Tanganyika to form Tanzania, a part of which it remains to this day. December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of Tanganyika Tanganyika was an East African republic within the Commonwealth of Nations, named after Lake Tanganyika, which formed its western border. ...


This period of transition was not without violence:

On January 12, 1964, a violent revolution ousted the ZNP-led coalition...More than 5,000 Arabs were killed, according to reports, and thousands of others were detained and their property either confiscated or destroyed. Yeager, Rodger (1989). Tanzania: An African Experiment. 

The film Africa Addio also documented the massacre of Arabs which was led by a Christian Ugandan John Okello. Africa Addio is an Italian movie documentary made in 1966 about the end of the colonial era in Africa. ... John Gideon Okello (1937, Lango District, Uganda, – 1971?) was one of the most eccentric revolutionaries (and also one of the least known) from Africa. ...


Political status

The new flag of Zanzibar was hoisted for the first time in January 2005.
The new flag of Zanzibar was hoisted for the first time in January 2005.

Although Zanzibar is part of Tanzania, it elects its own president who is head of government for matters internal to the island. Amani Abeid Karume was re-elected to that office on October 30, 2005 under criticism from opposition candidate Seif Shariff Hamad [2]. Earlier, the fairness of his election on October 2000 was queried, and in January 2001 at least 27 protestors were killed by the police. [3] The Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar is the semi-autonomous government of Zanzibar, a part of Tanzania. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zanzibar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zanzibar. ... Although Zanzibar is part of Tanzania, it elects its own president who is head of government for matters internal to the island. ... Amani Abeid Karume Amani Abeid Karume (b. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seif Shariff Hamad (b. ...


Zanzibar also has its own Revolutionary Council and House of Representatives (with 50 seats, directly elected by universal suffrage to serve five-year terms) to make laws especially for it; these make up the semi-autonomous Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar. Revolutionary Council may refer to: Revolutionary council of Islamic revolution of Iran , a group of clerics and experts who chose by Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979 to manage Islamic revolution of Iran and then legislate for The Interim Government of Iran Armed Forces Revolutionary Council, a group of Sierra Leone soldiers... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      House of Representatives is a name used for legislative bodies in many countries. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... The Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar is the semi-autonomous government of Zanzibar, a part of Tanzania. ...


The Island of Zanzibar comprises three administrative regions: Zanzibar Central/South, Zanzibar North and Zanzibar Urban/West. On the Island of Pemba are the two regions Pemba North and Pemba South. Zanzibar Central/South is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Zanzibar North is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Zanzibar Urban/West is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Pemba North is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ... Pemba South is one of the 26 regions of Tanzania. ...


Sultans of Zanzibar

Stone Town
Stone Town
Stone Town with Sultan Palace
Stone Town with Sultan Palace
House of Wonders
House of Wonders
  1. Majid bin Said (1856–1870)
  2. Barghash bin Said (1870–1888)
  3. Khalifah bin Said (1888–1890)
  4. Ali bin Said (1890–1893)
  5. Hamad bin Thuwaini (1893–1896)
  6. Khalid bin Barghash (1896)
  7. Hamud bin Muhammed (1896–1902)
  8. Ali bin Hamud (1902–1911) (abdicated)
  9. Khalifa bin Harub (1911–1960)
  10. Abdullah bin Khalifa (1960–1963)
  11. Jamshid bin Abdullah (1963–1964)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1360 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1360 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 691 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Zanzibar with the Sulan Palace. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 691 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Zanzibar with the Sulan Palace. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 535 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 685 pixel, file size: 521 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 535 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 685 pixel, file size: 521 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This page contains a list of Sultans of Zanzibar, which merged with Tanganyika in 1964 to form Tanzania. ... Sayyid Majid bin Said Al-Busaid (1834/1835 - October 7, 1870) was the first Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid (1837 - March 26, 1888) was the second Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Khalifah bin Said Al-Busaid (1852- February 13, 1890) was the third Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Ali bin Said Al-Busaid (1854 - March 5, 1893) was the fourth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Hamad bin Thuwaini Al-Busaid (1857 - August 25, 1896) was the fifth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Khalid bin Barghash Al-Busaid (1874 - 1927) was the sixth Sultan of Zanzibar and the eldest son of the second Sultan of Zanzibar, Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid. ... Hamoud bin Mohammed (ruled August 27, 1896-July 18, 1902) was the British-controlled Omani sultan of the protectorate of Zanzibar, who outlawed slavery on the island. ... Sayyid Ali bin Hamud Al-Busaid (June 7, 1884 - December 20, 1918) was the eighth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Sayyid Khalifa bin Harub Al-Busaid (August 26, 1879 - October 9, 1960) was the ninth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Abdullah bin Khalifa Al-Busaid (February 12, 1910 - July 1, 1963) was the tenth Sultan of Zanzibar. ... Jamshid bin Abdullah Al-Busaidi (Arabic: جمشيد بن عبد الله) (born September 16, 1929 in Zanzibar) was the last Arab Sultan of Zanzibar. ...

Viziers

  1. Sir Lloyd William Matthews, (1890 to 1901)
  2. A.S. Rogers, (1901 to 1906)
  3. Arthur Raikes, (1906 to 1908)
  4. Francis Barton, (1906 to 1913)

British Residents

  1. Francis Pearce, (1913 to 1922)
  2. John Sinclair, (1922 to 1923)
  3. Alfred Hollis, (1923 to 1929)
  4. Richard Rankine, (1929 to 1937)
  5. John Hall, (1937 to 1940)
  6. Henry Pilling, (1940 to 1946)
  7. Vincent Glenday, 1946 to 1951)
  8. John Sinclair, (1952 to 1954)
  9. Henry Potter, (1954 to 1959)
  10. Arthur Mooring, (1959 to 1963)

Sir Alfred Claud Hollis, GCMG, CBE (1874-1961) was British adminstrator who served as British Resident to the Sultan of Zanzibar between 1923 and 1929 and Governor of Trinidad and Tobago between 1930 and 1936 and author of a historical account of Spanish Trinidad. ... Henry Codman Potter (May 25, 1835 - July 21, 1908), United States Protestant Episcopal bishop, the son of Bishop Alonzo Potter, was born in Schenectady, New York. ... Sir Arthur George Rixson Mooring (born November 23, 1908 – died 1969) was educated at Bedford Modern School and Queens College, Cambridge before entering the Colonial Service in 1931. ...

Education

The island is home to Zanzibar University. ZU Logo Zanzibar University is a university in Zanzibar. ...


Culture

Photograph of woman from Zanzibar by Coutinho brothers, c. 1890
Photograph of woman from Zanzibar by Coutinho brothers, c. 1890

Zanzibar's history was influenced by the Persians, Arabs, Indians, Portuguese, British and the African mainland. Stone Town is a place of winding lanes, circular towers, carved wooden doors, raised terraces and beautiful mosques. Important architectural features are the Livingstone house, the Guliani Bridge, and the House of Wonders, a palace constructed by Sultan Barghash in 1883. The town of Kidichi features the Hammam Persian Baths, built by immigrants from Shiraz, Iran during the reign of Sultan Barghash bin Said. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x901, 107 KB)Photograph of woman from Zanzibar by Coutinho brothers, c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x901, 107 KB)Photograph of woman from Zanzibar by Coutinho brothers, c. ... Motto Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1(Persian) Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic (introduced 1979) Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān 2 Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Establishment  -  Proto-Elamite Period 3200-2700 BCE... Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predominantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Roman Catholicism, Alawite Islam, Druzism, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism Footnotes a Mainly in Antakya. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Stone Town or Mji Mkongwe, in Swahili, is the old part of Zanzibar City, the capital of the island of Zanzibar, a part of Tanzania. ... Livingstone may refer to: David Livingstone - Scottish explorer of Africa Ken Livingstone - Mayor of London Livingstone Falls - waterfalls on the Congo River Livingstone, Zambia - former capital of Northern Rhodesia Livingstone - Amiga game See also Livingston This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share... A hammam in Chefchaouen, Morocco The Turkish hammam (also Turkish bath or hamam) is the Middle Eastern variant of a steam bath, which can be categorized as a wet relative of the sauna. ... Eram Garden, Shiraz most popular garden. ... Sayyid Barghash bin Said Al-Busaid (1837 - March 26, 1888) was the second Sultan of Zanzibar. ...


Trade

Pemba Island is the world's leading clove producer. It also exports spices, seaweed and fine raffia. Zanzibar also has a large fishing and dugout canoe production. This article is about the island. ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Species About 25-30 species, including: Raphia australis Raphia farinifera Raphia hookeri Raphia regalis Raphia taedigera Raphia vinifera The Raffia palm (Raphia) is a genus of tropical palms, native to tropical regions of Africa, Madagascar, Central America and South America. ...


Miscellaneous

  • Zanzibar was the first region in Africa to introduce colour television, in 1973. The current tv-station is called TvZ. The first television service on mainland Tanzania was not introduced until some twenty years later.
  • The musician Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara) of Queen was born in Unguja, Zanzibar on September 5, 1946 to Indian Parsi parents who were employed by the British colonial administration. There is also a restaurant named 'Mercurys' on the beachfront of Stone Town. In September 2006, a radical Islamic group on the archipelago, Uamsho, forced organizers to abandon plans to mark his 60th birthday, saying he violated Islam with his openly gay lifestyle.
  • Zanzibar criminalized gay and lesbian sex in 2004 [4] [5].

Television encoding systems by nation. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Freddie Mercury (born Farrokh Bulsara; 5 September 1946 – 24 November 1991) was a British musician, best known as the lead singer of the English rock band Queen. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... A Parsi (Gujarati: Pārsī, IPA: ), sometimes spelled Parsee, is a member of the close-knit Zoroastrian community based in the Indian subcontinent. ...

References

  • Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar, Emily Ruete, 1888. (Many reprints). Author (1844-1924) was born Princess Salme of Zanzibar and Oman and was a daughter of Sayyid Said.
  • Banani: the Transition from Slavery to Freedom in Zanzibar and Pemba, H. S. Newman, (London, 1898)
  • Travels in the Coastlands of British East Africa, W. W. A. FitzGerald, (London, 1898)
  • Zanzibar in Contemporary Times, R. N. Lyne, (London, 1905)
  • Pemba: The Spice Island of Zanzibar, J. E. E. Craster, (London, 1913)
  • Hatice Uğur, Osmanlı Afrikası'nda Bir Sultanlık: Zengibar (Zanzibar as a Sultanete in the Ottoman Africa), İstanbul: Küre Yayınları, 2005. http://www.kureyayinlari.com/Icindekiler.aspx?KID=23. For its English version see http://seyhan.library.boun.edu.tr:80/record=b1268198

Emily Ruete (1844-1924) was born in Zanzibar as Sayyida Salme, Princess of Zanzibar and Oman. ...

See also

The riyal was the currency of Zanzibar from ca. ... The rupee was the currency of Zanzibar from ca. ...

External links

Wikisource has an original article from the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia about:
  • History and places of Zanzibar
  • Government of Zanzibar
  • Map of Zanzibar and Tanganyika in 1886
  • BBC article about new flag adoption
  • Zanzibar climate, visa and medical advice
  • Zanzibar, The Columbia Encyclopedia
  • Zanzibar without Poverty - A plain language guide to the Revolutionary Government of Zanzibar’s Zanzibar Poverty Reduction Plan (ZPRP) of January 2002
  • Zanzibar images
  • Map of Zanzibar

Coordinates: 6°08′S, 39°19′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zanzibar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2427 words)
Acquiescing to British demands, Hamoud brought an end to Zanzibar's role as a centre for the eastern slave trade that had begun under Omani rule in 17th Century by banning slavery and freeing the slaves of Zanzibar with compensation in 1897.
The loss of the Zanzibar Empire to the Europeans was initiated primarily by the British determination to exterminate the evils of slavery, led by David Livingstone.
Zanzibar's history was influenced by the British, Persians, Arabs, Indians, Portuguese and the African mainland.
Zanzibar  -  Travel Photos by Galen R Frysinger, Sheboygan, Wisconsin (1268 words)
The population of Zanzibar in 1995 was an estimated 456,934.
Zanzibar's rise to importance within the sphere of East Africa and the Indian Ocean began during the reign of Said ibn Sultan, sultan of Oman and Zanzibar from 1806 to 1856.
Zanzibar evolved as a minor territory of the British Empire, a state with an economy that was overly dependent on the export of cloves.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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