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Encyclopedia > Zakat

Part of a series on the Islamic creed:
Aqidah
For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... For other uses, see Creed (disambiguation). ... Aqidah (sometimes spelled as Aqeeda, Aqida or Aqeedah) (Arabic: عقيدة) is an Islamic term meaning creed. ...


Five Pillars of Islam

Shahādah - Profession of faith
Salah - Prayer
Zakâh - Paying of alms (giving to the poor)
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Image File history File links Mosque02. ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ... White flag featuring the Shahada text as used by the Taliban. ... Salat redirects here. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... This article is about religious observances during the month of Ramadan. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ...

Sunni Six articles of belief

Tawhīd - Oneness
Nabi and Rusul - Prophets and Messengers
Kutub - Divinely Revealed Books.
Malā'ikah - Angels
Qiyâmah - Judgment Day
Qadr (Predestination) Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Six articles of belief is a set of beliefs enumerated by the Sunnis: The six Sunni articles of belief are: Belief in God (Allah), the one and only one worthy of all worship (tawhid). ... TawhÄ«d (also Tawhid or Tauhid or Tawheed; Arabic توحيد) is the Islamic concept of monotheism, derived from Ahad. ... Nabi can refer to the Arabic and Hebrew word for Prophet the Korean word for butterfly one of the Nabis, a group of artists in Paris in the 1890s the 2005 Typhoon Nabi North American Bus Industries, a major transit bus manufacturing company Nabi Biopharmaceuticals, a Biopharmaceutical company based in... The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... The Islamic holy books are the records believed from Muslims that were dictated by God to prophets. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ... Qadr as an Islamic term is parallel to the western doctrines of Predestination. ...

Shi'a Twelvers
Principles of the Religion (Usul al-Din)

Tawhīd - Oneness
Adalah - Justice
Nubuwwah - Prophethood
Imamah - Leadership
Qiyâmah - Judgment Day
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Twelvers ( Ithnāˤashariyyah) are those Shiˤa Muslims who believe there were twelve Imāms, as distinct from Ismaili & Zaidi Shiite Muslims, who believe in a different number of Imams or in a different path of succession. ... In Shia Islam, Theology of Shia (UsÅ«l al-DÄ«n) is the five main beliefs that Shia Muslims must possess. ... TawhÄ«d (also Tawhid or Tauhid or Tawheed; Arabic توحيد) is the Islamic concept of monotheism, derived from Ahad. ... Adalah means Justice and denotes The Justice of God The Shias consider Justice of God as part of Usool-e-Deen (Roots of Religion). ... Nubuwwah means Prophethood and denotes that God has appointed perfect Prophets and Messengers to teach mankind Gods religion. ... This is a sub-article to Imamah (Shia doctrine) and is specifically about the Shia twelver conception of the term. ... Yawm al-QÄ«yāmah (Arabic: literally: Day of the Resurrection) is the Last Judgement in Islam. ...

Shi'a Twelvers
Practices of the Religion (Furu al-Din)

Salah - Prayer
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Zakâh - Poor-rate
Khums - One-fifth tax
Jihad - Struggle
Amr-Bil-Ma'rūf - Commanding good
Nahi-Anil-Munkar - Forbidding evil
Tawalla - Loving the Ahl al-Bayt
Tabarra - Disassociating Ahl al-Bayt's enemies
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Twelvers ( Ithnāˤashariyyah) are those Shiˤa Muslims who believe there were twelve Imāms, as distinct from Ismaili & Zaidi Shiite Muslims, who believe in a different number of Imams or in a different path of succession. ... In Shia Islam, the ten Branches of Religion (FurÅ« al-DÄ«n) are the ten practices that Shia Muslims must perform. ... Salat redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... This article is about religious observances during the month of Ramadan. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... Khums (خمس) is the Arabic word for One Fifth (1/5). ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... Amr-Bil-MarÅ«f - Commanding the good, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and means to encourage people to do the necesary good in life, when they forget to do so; for example forgeting Salah. ... Nahi-Anil-Munkar - Forbiding evil, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and means for example to oppose injustice. ... Tawalla - Loving the Ahl al-Bayt, is a part of the Shia Branches of Religion and is derived from a Quranic verse. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ... AS SALAM AU ALIKUM, not to mistaken, this salam was not for shias its only for muslims. ... Ahl al-Bayt (Arabic: ) is a phrase meaning People of the House, or family. ...

Shi'a Ismaili 7 pillars

Walayah - Guardianship
Taharah - Purity & cleanliness
Salah - Prayers
Zakâh - Purifying religious dues
Sawm - Fasting during Ramadan
Hajj - Pilgrimage to Mecca
Jihad - Struggle
Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... Shia Ismaili Seven Pillars of Islam have three doctrines that are not included in the Sunni Five Pillars of Islam: Walayah, Taharah and Jihad. ... Guardianship is a Ismaili and Druze pillar of Islam. ... This article is about Hygiene in Islam. ... Salat redirects here. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ramadan. ... This article is about religious observances during the month of Ramadan. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ...

Others

Kharijite Sixth pillar of Islam. Kharijites were members of an Islamic sect in late 7th and early 8th century AD, concentrated in todays southern Iraq. ... The term Sixth pillar of Islam refers to an addition to the Five Pillars of Islam; the five pillars of Islam explain the basic tenets of the Sunni Islam faith, Shia Islam uses other concepts. ...

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Part of a series on the
Islamic Jurisprudence

– a discipline of Islamic studies This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of academic disciplines (and academic fields). ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ...

Fields
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This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence.

Zakāt (Arabic: زكاة) is the Islamic concept of tithing and alms. It is an obligation on Muslims to pay 2.5% of their wealth to specified categories in society when their annual wealth exceeds a minimum level (nisab). Zakāt is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. This is a sub-article of fiqh and Law and economics. ... In states ruled by Islamic law, jizya or jizyah (Arabic: جزْية; Ottoman Turkish: cizye) is a per capita tax imposed on able bodied non-Muslim men of military age. ... In Sharia (Islamic Jurisprudence) from the arabic نصاب is the amount which savings or capital or product must exceed in order for the muslim owner to be obliged to give Zakat (Charity). ... Khums (خمس) is the Arabic word for One Fifth (1/5). ... This is a sub-article of Zakat, Infaq and Mustahabb. ... This article is about the religious endowment. ... Bayt al-mal is an Arabic term that is translated as House of money. ... Islamic banking refers to a system of banking or banking activity that is consistent with Islamic law (Sharia) principles and guided by Islamic economics. ... Riba is the (Arabic: ربا ) term for intrest, the charging of which is forbidden by the Quran here, among other places: And that which you give in gift (loan) (to others), in order that it may increase (your wealth by expecting to get a better one in return) from other... Murabaha is defined as a particular kind of sale, compliant with shariah, where the seller expressly mentions the cost he has incurred on the commodities to be sold and sells it to another person by adding some profit or mark-up thereon which is known to the buyer. ... // Takaful is an Islamic insurance concept which is grounded in Islamic muamalat (banking transactions), observing the rules and regulations of Islamic law. ... Sukuk is the Arabic name for a financial certificate but can be seen as an Islamic equivalent of bond. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic economical jurisprudence and inheritance. ... Islamic politics is the profession of Muslim politicians. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic jurisprudence and Marriage. ... Islamic criminal jurisprudence is the Islamic criminal law. ... This is a sub-article to Islamic jurisprudence and etiquette. ... Islamic theological jurisprudence is the filed of Islamic jurisprudence specialized in theological issues. ... This is a sub-article to fiqh and Hygiene Hygiene in Islam is a prominent topic but one which non-Muslims are not very familiar with. ... This is a sub-article of fiqh and Law and economics. ... Arabic redirects here. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A tithe (from Old English teogoþa tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a (usually) voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... In Sharia (Islamic Jurisprudence) from the arabic نصاب is the amount which savings or capital or product must exceed in order for the muslim owner to be obliged to give Zakat (Charity). ... The Five Pillars of Islam (Arabic: أركان الإسلام) is the term given to the five duties incumbent on every Muslim. ...

Contents

Etymology

Zakātclassical Arabic: زكوة; modern Arabic: زكاة; Turkish: Zekât; also transliterated zakaat or zakah; "to grow" (in goodness), "increase," "purifying," "foster," "making pure." To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Due to the fact that the Arabic language has a number of phonemes that have no equivalent in English or other European languages, a number of different transliteration methods have been invented to represent certain Arabic characters, due to various conflicting goals: A desire to stay consistent with traditional usage...


Aims

There are eight categories of people who may receive the collected Zakat:[1]

  • Poor people (if they do not have enough to cover their basic needs)
  • The Destitute (those with no property or income at all)
  • The Collectors
  • People Whose Hearts are to be Reconciled (Normally new Muslims or those close to becoming Muslim. Even non-muslims could be included)
  • Freeing Slaves
  • Debtors (to help those heavily indebted with paying their debts)
  • Travellers (who find themselves in difficult circumstances)


It is one of the basic principles of Muslim economy, based on social welfare and fair distribution of wealth.


There have been cases where you can't pay zakat for

  • Traditional zakat laws generally do not cover trade.
  • It is not permissible to pay zakat to some members of the family (i.e. grandparents, parents, spouses, children), for if they were needy or poor, they are under the custody of the eligible man while Zakat is considered a sort of Public Charity.
  • Zakat doesn't become obligatory on a Muslim if he doesn't have a minimum amount in his possession that has remained unchanged for a whole lunar year; any increase in that money during the year waits for the following year and any decrease as long as the total amount is still above the minimum amount is exempted.

In all the four recognised madhabs the fiqh of Zakat (http://wwww.zakatpages.com/about) is very much the same with the key elements that make Zakat compulsory for an individual being: Islam, Freedom, the Nisab, Ownership and a Year's Possession. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


Shi'ite interpretation of Zakat

According to the Shi'ite interpretation, also based on the Qur'an and reported speeches of the prophet Muhammad and his Household, there are two major forms of almsgiving: Khoms ("the fifth"), and Zakat. The Shi'ite consider both types to be a personal obligation, meaning that every Muslim has the full responsibility of purifying his own money, but the governor should have no force upon any individual to give up Zakat or Khoms. Khoms ("the fifth") is taken from war loots, metals, treasures, divings (pearls and so), and the money that is a mix between halal (pure) and haram (taboo). In modern days, the most common type of khoms that is extracted is of the last type mentioned before. Khoms for money is done by taking the fifth of the increment or the increase in the income stored after one lunar year, and this is done after paying debts or bills (if any).


An example calculation of the Khoms tithe: A man starts with $5000 in his bank account; on the same day after one lunar year passes, he has $5600 in his bank account (having already paid his bills and debts), and so must take the fifth of his $600 earnings, that is $120. What remains after the fifth (that is $5600-$120=$5480) is recorded; if after one lunar year the man has more than $5480, then he finds the new difference and extracts a fifth from it as before. If instead he has less than $5480, then he has no earnings on which to pay Khoms. The Khoms is paid specifically for: [Qur'an 8:41] The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...

  • (1) Allah
  • (2) the Messenger of Allah
  • (3) the near relative of the Messenger (Ahl ul-Bayt)
  • (4) the orphans
  • (5) needy
  • (6) stranded traveler

Zakat on the other hand, according to the Shiite teachings, is assigned to specific goods. There are nine types of goods from which Zakat is paid out: gold, silver, camels, cows, sheep, wheat, barley, dates, and raisins. Each type has its own "nisab," or a limit under which Zakat need not be paid. Zakat is paid to the people mentioned in the overview of this article, although never to a Hashimite. Charity money or Sadaqah is never to be paid to a Hashimite since it is a taboo for a Hashimite to take such money, if it is not Khoms or a gift. Notice in that in both concepts, they are obligatory on the individual but should not be forced by the governor. Hashemite is the Anglicised version of the Arabic: هاشمي (transliteration: Hashemi) and traditionally refers to those belonging to the Banu Hashim, or clan of Hashem, a clan within the larger Quraish tribe. ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck // The word charity entered the English language through the O.Fr word charite which was derived from the Latin caritas.[1] In Christian theology charity, or love (agapē), is the greatest of the three theological virtues...


In modern days, Shi'ite muslims are concerned with Khoms more than Zakat mainly because few of them are farmers and own the goods by which Zakat is paid out. On the other hand, Khoms is given by many people starting from the middle class and above that, and especially by employees.


Bibliography

  • Contemporary Zakat, by Mahmoud Abu-Saud, Zakat and Research Foundation, Ohio, 1988
  • Zakat - Raising a Fallen Pillar, by Abdalhaqq Bewley & Amal Abdalhakim-Douglas, Black Stone Press, 2001 http://www.black-stone.net/books

Mahmoud Abu-Saud; (1911- April 24, 1993), was an economist, author, religious scholar and activist. ...

References

  1. ^ Ta'leemul Haq. Compiled by Shabbir Ahmed E. Desai.

See also

Islamic economics is economics in accordance with Islamic law. ... Islamic banking refers to a system of banking or banking activity that is consistent with Islamic law (Sharia) principles and guided by Islamic economics. ... In Islamic law, kharaj is a tax on land, specifically agricultural land. ... OIC Member States; Full members in blue/Observers in pink The 57 Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC) countries have a combined GDP (at PPP) of $5,540 billions. ... The following list consists of concepts that are derived from both Islamic and Arab tradition, which are expressed as words in the Arabic language. ... This list of ethics topics puts articles relevant to well-known ethical (right and wrong, good and bad) debates and decisions in one place - including practical problems long known in philosophy, and the more abstract subjects in law, politics, and some professions and sciences. ... A tithe (from Old English teogoþa tenth) is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a (usually) voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a Jewish or Christian religious organization. ... Tzedakah (Hebrew: צדקה) in Judaism, is the Hebrew term most commonly translated as charity, though it is based on a root meaning justice .(צדק). Judaism is very tied to the concept of tzedakah, or charity, and the nature of Jewish giving has created a North American Jewish community that is very philanthropic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
IslamiCity.com - Zakat (0 words)
Zakat is the amount of money that every adult, mentally stable, free, and financially able Muslim, male and female, has to pay to support specific categories people.
The obligatory nature of Zakat is firmly established in the Qur'an, the Sunnah (or hadith), and the consensus of the companions and the Muslim scholars.
Zakat is obligatory after a time span of one lunar year passes with the money in the control of it's owner.
Zakat Foundation - Welcome to the Zakat Foundation (242 words)
The Zakat Foundation of America and its partner distributed over 50,000 shares of Udhiya/Qurbani meat for the 2006/2007 Eid al-Adha.
Every Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr The Zakat Foundation distributes money to orphans and destitute children and then provides them all with a day of fun with a trip to the city markets so they can use the money as they choose.
Udhiya / Qurbani is one of the fundamental rituals of Islam performed on the occasion of 'Eid ul-Adha, and is prescribed not only for the pilgrims performing Hajj, but for all able Muslims.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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