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Encyclopedia > Zagwe dynasty

The Zagwe Dynasty ruled Ethiopia from the end of the Kingdom of Axum to 1270, when Yekuno Amlak defeated and killed the last Zagwe king in battle. Its best-known king was Gebra Maskal Lalibela, who is responsible for the rock-hewn churches of Lalibela. The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia (Ityopiya, Amharic ኢትዮጵያ) is a country situated in the Horn of Africa. ... The Axumite Kingdom, also known as the Aksum Kingdom, was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from circa the 5th century BC to become an important trading nation by the 1st century AD. It converted to Christianity in 325 or 328 (various sources). ... Events The Eighth Crusade is launched against Tunis, and ends when its leader, Louis IX of France, dies. ... Yekuno Amlak (throne name Tasfa Iyasus) was negus (1270 - 1285) of Ethiopia and founder of the Solomonid dynasty. ... After the city of Aksum, Lalibela is modern Ethiopias holiest city and a center of pilgrimage for much of the country. ...


Unlike the the practice of later rulers of Ethiopia, Taddesse Tamrat argues that under the Zagwe dynasty the order of succession was that of brother succeeding brother as king, based on the Agew laws of inheritance. An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

The Zagwe dynasty came from a Christian princely family of the Agaw people. The number of kings belonging to this dynasty are uncertain: Ethiopian King Lists provide from five to 16 names belonging to this dynasty, who ruled for a total of either 133 or 333 years. All agree that the founding king was Mara Takla Haymanot. However the name of the last king of this dynasty is lost -- the surviving chronicles and oral traditions give his name as Za-Ilmaknun, which is clearly a pseudonym (Taddesse Tamrat translates it as "The Unknown, the hidden one"), employed soon after his reign by the victorious Solomonid dynasty in an act of damnatio memoriae. Taddesse Tamrat believes that this last ruler was actually Yetbarak. This article is about the religious people known as Christians. ... The Solomonid dynasty is the traditional royal house of Ethiopia, claming descent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, who is said to have given birth to the traditional first king Menelik I after her Biblically-described visit to Solomon in Jerusalem. ... Damnatio memoriae (Latin for damnation of memory, in the sense of removed from the remembrance) was a form of dishonor which could be passed by the Roman Senate upon traitors or others who brought discredit to the Roman Empire. ...


The Ethiopian historian Taddesse Tamrat follows the theories of Carlo Conti Rossini concerning this group of rulers. Conti Rossini believed that the shorter length of this dynasty was the more likely one, as it fit his theory that a letter received by the Patriarch of Alexandria John V from an unnamed Ethiopian monarch, requesting a new abuna because the current office holder was too old, was from Mara Takla Haymanot, who wanted the abuna replaced because he would not endorse the new dynasty. The Patriarch of Alexandria is the bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. ...


See Also

Ethiopia is the oldest independent country in Africa and one of the oldest in the world. ... The accuracy of this list is disputed, since it was based on worldstatesmen. ...

Bibliography

  • Taddesse Tamrat. "The Legacy of Aksum and Adafa" in Church and State in Ethiopia. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972

External Links

  • Ethiopian History (http://www.ethiopianhistory.com/zagwe/)
  • Zagwe Genealogy (http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Ethiopia/zagwe.htm)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Zagwe dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (310 words)
The Zagwe dynasty ruled Ethiopia from the end of the Kingdom of Axum to 1270, when Yekuno Amlak defeated and killed the last Zagwe king in battle.
Unlike the practice of later rulers of Ethiopia, Taddesse Tamrat argues that under the Zagwe dynasty the order of succession was that of brother succeeding brother as king, based on the Agaw laws of inheritance.
However the name of the last king of this dynasty is lost -- the surviving chronicles and oral traditions give his name as Za-Ilmaknun, which is clearly a pseudonym (Taddesse Tamrat translates it as "The Unknown, the hidden one"), employed soon after his reign by the victorious Solomonic dynasty in an act of damnatio memoriae.
Solomonic dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (444 words)
The Solomonic dynasty is the traditional royal house of Ethiopia, claiming descent from King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, who is said to have given birth to the traditional first king Menelik I after her Biblically-described visit to Solomon in Jerusalem.
The dynasty, a bastion of Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, came to rule Ethiopia in 1270 when Yekuno Amlak overthrew the last ruler of the Zagwe dynasty.
During much of dynasty's existence, its effective realm was the northwestern quadrant of present-day Ethiopia, the Ethiopian Highlands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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