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Encyclopedia > Zagreb
City of Zagreb
Grad Zagreb
King Tomislav square
King Tomislav square

Flag
Location of Zagreb within Croatia
Coordinates: 45°49′0″N 15°59′0″E / 45.81667, 15.98333
Country Croatia
RC diocese 1094
Free royal city 1242
Unified 1850
Government
 - Mayor Milan Bandić
Area [1]
 - Total 641.29 km² (247.6 sq mi)
Population (2001)[1]
 - Total 801,554
 - Density 1,214.9/km² (3,146.6/sq mi)
 - Metro 1.1 million
 - 2005 estimate 973,667
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Postal code 10000
Area code(s) 01
Licence plate ZG
Lowest point 122 m
Highest point 1,035 m
Website: zagreb.hr

Zagreb (German: Agram , pronounced /ˈzɑːgrɛb/) is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. Zagreb is the cultural, scientific, economic and governmental center of the Republic of Croatia. The city's population in 2001 was 779,145[1] (1.1 million in the metropolitan area). It is situated between the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain and both northern and southern bank of the Sava river at an elevation of approximately 122 m above sea level. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 667 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Zagreb_zastava. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 613 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2201 × 2151 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/gif)re-edited version of Thewanderers file - http://en. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... // May - El Cid completes his conquest of Valencia, Spain, and begins his rule of Valencia. ... // Events April 5 - During a battle on the ice of Chudskoye Lake, Russian forces rebuff an invasion attempt by the Teutonic Knights. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Milan Bandić Milan Bandić (b. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... Standard Croatian license plate used on both private and commercial vehicles. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Medvednica is a mountain in central Croatia, just north of Zagreb and marking the southern border of the tradition region of Zagorje. ... For other uses of this word, see Sava (disambiguation). ...


Its favourable geographic position in the southwestern part of the Pannonian Basin, which extends to the Alpine, Dinaric, Adriatic and Pannonic regions, provides an excellent connection for traffic between Central Europe and the Adriatic Sea. The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mt Orjen at the Bay of Kotor is the heaviest karstified range of the dinarids View of the central part of the Dinaric Alps (north=down) Valbona pass, northern Albania. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... The Pannonian Plain is a large plain in Central Europe that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea (see below) dried out. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ...


The transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific and research institutions and industrial tradition underlie its leading economic position in Croatia. Zagreb is the seat of the central government, administrative bodies and almost all government ministries. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... The Government of the Republic of Croatia (Vlada Republike Hrvatske), commonly abbreviated to Croatian Government (hrvatska Vlada), is the main element of the executive branch of government in Croatia. ...

Contents

Demographics

Tkalčićeva street in the historical part of Zagreb
See also: Demographics of Zagreb

Zagreb is the largest city in Croatia, and is the only Croatian city whose metropolitan population exceeds one million people. Most people live in the city proper. There are 1,088,841 people in the Zagreb metropolitan area, which includes the smaller cities of Samobor, Velika Gorica and Zaprešić. The official census states that the population of Zagreb itself is 779,145. The majority of its citizens are Croats making up 91.94% of the city's population (2001 census). The same census records 40,066 residents belonging to ethnic minorities. Such ethnic minorities comprise: 18,811 Serbs (2.41%), 6,204 Bosniaks (0.80%), 4,030 Muslims by nationality (0.52%), 3,389 Albanians (0.43%), 3,225 Slovenians (0.41%), 1,946 Roma (0.25%), 1,131 Montenegrins (0.17%), 1,315 Macedonians (0.17%), together with other smaller minor ethnic communities.[2]

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Zagreb is the largest city in Croatia and the only whose metropolitan exceeds one million people. ... Samobor is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... Velika Gorica is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 63,517 (2001). ... Zaprešić is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 23,125 (2001). ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Language(s) Bosnian Religion(s) Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups Slavs (South Slavs) The Bosniaks or Bosniacs[1] (Bosnian: Bošnjaci, IPA: ) are a South Slavic people, living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia) and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present... Languages Serbo-Croat(Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian) Macedonian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups South Slavs Muslims by nationality (Muslimani, Муслимани) was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe mainly native Slavic Muslims. ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Roma (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ...


Climate

The climate of Zagreb is continental, with four separate seasons. Summers are hot and dry, and winters are cold. The average temperature in winter is 1°C (34°F) and the average temperature in summer is 20°C (68°F). The end of May, particularly, gets very warm, with temperatures rising above 30°C (86°F). Snowfall is common in the winter months, from December to March, and rain and fog are common in autumn (October to December).[3] Regions containing a continental climate exist in portions of Northern Hemisphere continents, and also at higher elevations in certain other parts of the world. ... This article is about divisions of a year. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

Climate Table
  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rainfall (mm) 52 48 56 68 83 95 79 79 79 93 86 67
Rainfall (Inches) 2.1 1.9 2.2 2.7 3.3 3.7 3.1 3.1 3.1 3.7 3.4 2.6
Average low (°C) -3 -3 1 5 9 13 14 14 11 6 2 -1
Average high (°C) 3 5 11 15 20 23 25 25 22 15 8 3
Average low (°F) 25 27 34 41 48 55 58 57 51 43 35 29
Average high (°F) 37 41 52 58 68 74 78 77 71 59 47 38

A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial unit of length. ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

Origin of name

See also: Names of European cities in different languages

The modern name Zagreb likely comes from the Croatian word "zagrabiti", which cannot exactly be translated into English directly; its meaning could best be expressed by saying, "to scoop up" or "scoop out". There are several legends about the origins of the name of Zagreb. According to one legend, a lady was thirsty and she took water from a lake (now the fountain) Manduševac in Zagreb. While she was taking the water, other people shouted, "Zagrebi Mando, zagrebi!" which means, "Take it, Manda, take it!". Another legend says that a Croatian ban (viceroy) was moving with his army through a deserted region and the soldiers were struck by thirst. In his anger, the ban thrust his sabre into the ground, at which point water began to pour out, and he ordered the soldiers to scrape the soil, or zagreb in Croatian, in order to get to the water. Image File history File linksMetadata Marko_1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Marko_1. ... St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Ban is a title of either Avar or Illyrian origin, the title was used in some states in central and south-eastern Europe between the 7th century and the 20th century. ...


The verb zagreb in the sense of digging is also believed to have something to do with the name of the city as the city lay behind a water-filled hole (graba). This theory is supported by some scientists.


There is also an interesting theory that Zagreb may mean a place behind a hill ("za breg"), i.e. behind the Sava river's bank, and then the name just changed into Zagreb. This theory is supported by the fact that Sava had once flowed nearer to the centre of the city. At today's Ban Jelačić square in the very centre of Zagreb, pieces of what was once a wooden boat have been unearthed. Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... The square seen from southwest. ...


Some scientists believe that the name Zagreb is not of Slavic origin, just as the name Croat is believed not to be of that origin. However, if the name does derive from Slavic origins, then possibly the most acceptable explanation is the city za grebom, i.e. "behind the tomb". The tomb could be the one in Držićeva Avenue or one of many other still undiscovered tombs near Grič or Kaptol. Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... Marin Držić Marin Držić (1508-1567) is considered the finest Croatian Renaissance playwright and prose writer. ... Kaptol coat of arms Kaptol is a part of Zagreb, Croatia in the upper town and it is the seat of the Roman Catholic archbishop of Zagreb. ...


The name used in Austria is Agram, while Germany sticks to the Croatian name.


History

Plan of Gradec and Kaptol in 12th century
Burza square in 1930s
Burza square in 1930s
Main article: History of Zagreb
See also: History of Croatia

Image File history File linksMetadata Zgplan12. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Zgplan12. ... Gradec may refer to: Dobrova-Polhov Gradec Slovenj Gradec Category: ... Kaptol is small village near Pozega city, located on edge of Papuk mountain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Staritrgburze. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Staritrgburze. ... Zagreb Coat of Arms Stone Gate // It is very difficult to decide which period in the citys history should be placed under the heading of Old Zagreb, which was made popular by Đuro Szabo, the admirer of the Zagreb antiquities and the promoter of their conservation. ... This is the history of Croatia. ...

Early Zagreb

The history of Zagreb dates as far back as 1094 when the Hungarian King Ladislaus founded a diocese. Alongside the bishop's see the canonical settlement Kaptol developed north of the Cathedral, as did the fortified settlement Gradec on the neighbouring hill. Today the latter is Zagreb's Upper Town (Gornji Grad) and is one of the best preserved urban nuclei in Croatia. Both settlements came under Tatar attack in 1242. As a sign of gratitude for offering him a safe haven from the Tatar the Croatian and Hungarian King Bela IV bestowed Gradec with a Golden Bull, which offered its citizens exemption from county rule and autonomy, as well as its own judicial system. According to legend, Bela left Gradec a cannon, under the condition that it be fired every day so that it did not rust. Since 1 January 1877 the cannon is fired from the Lotrščak Tower on Grič to mark midday. For other monarchs with similar names, please see Ladislaus I (disambiguation). ... Kaptol coat of arms Kaptol is a part of Zagreb, Croatia in the upper town and it is the seat of the Roman Catholic archbishop of Zagreb. ... Zagreb cathedral Zagreb cathedral on Kaptol is probably the most famous building in Zagreb, as its spires can be seen from many locations in the city. ... Gradec Stone Gate Gradec Gradec is a part of the Zagreb, Croatia nucleus and its situated on the Upper Town hill. ... Gornji Grad - Medveščak as a part of Zagreb Gornji Grad - Medveščak is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ... Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ... Béla IV c. ... Gradec Stone Gate Gradec Gradec is a part of the Zagreb, Croatia nucleus and its situated on the Upper Town hill. ... The Golden Bull of 1356 issued by Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV. A Golden Bull or chrysobull was a golden ornament representing a seal (a bulla aurea or golden seal in Latin), attached to a decree issued by monarchs in Europe and the Byzantine Empire during the Middle Ages and... Gradec Stone Gate Gradec Gradec is a part of the Zagreb, Croatia nucleus and its situated on the Upper Town hill. ...


The main square of the Gornji Grad is dominated by the Gothic church of St. Mark's. It was built at the end of the 14th and the beginning of the 15th century and a late Baroque bell tower was added later. Gornji Grad - Medveščak as a part of Zagreb Gornji Grad - Medveščak is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... St. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ...


Fighting ensued between the Zagreb diocese and the free sovereign town of Gradec for land and mills. Sometimes also for political reasons. The term Zagreb was used for these two separate boroughs in the 16th century. Zagreb was then seen as the political centre and the capital of Croatia and Slavonia. In 1850 the town was united under its first mayor - Josip Kaufman.[4] Gradec Stone Gate Gradec Gradec is a part of the Zagreb, Croatia nucleus and its situated on the Upper Town hill. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


17th and 18th century

Ban Jelačić Square in 1880.
Ban Jelačić Square in 1880.

It was not until the 17th century and Nikola Frankopan that Zagreb was chosen as the seat of the Croatian viceroys in 1621. At the invitation of the Croatian Parliament the Jesuits came to Zagreb and built the first grammar school, the St. Catherine's Church and monastery. In 1669 they founded an academy where philosophy, theology and law were taught. Image File history File links Trg1880. ... Image File history File links Trg1880. ... The square seen from southwest. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... The parliament of Croatia is called Hrvatski Sabor in Croatian - the word sabor means an assembly, a gathering, a congress. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Universitys emblem The University of Zagreb (Croatian Sveučilište u Zagrebu) is the oldest Croatian university in continuous operation and also the oldest university in southeastern Europe. ...


During the 17th and 18th centuries Zagreb was badly devastated by fire and the plague. In 1776 the royal council (government) moved from Varaždin to Zagreb and during the reign of Joseph II Zagreb became the headquarters of the Varaždin and Karlovac general command.[5] (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Varaždin on the map of Croatia Varaždin (German: Warasdin, Hungarian: Varasd, Latin: Varasdinum) is a city in northwestern Croatia, 81 km north of Zagreb on the highway A4. ... Joseph II (full name: Joseph Benedikt August Johannes Anton Michel Adam; March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790 and ruler of the Habsburg lands from 1780 to 1790. ... Varaždin on the map of Croatia Varaždin (German: Warasdin, Hungarian: Varasd, Latin: Varasdinum) is a city in northwestern Croatia, 81 km north of Zagreb on the highway A4. ... Karlovac (Croatia) Karlovac municipality within Karlovac county Karlovac Karlovac (German: Karlstadt or Carlstadt, Hungarian: Károlyváros and sometimes in Croatian, Marinograd) is a city and municipality in central Croatia. ...


19th to early 20th century

In the 19th century Zagreb was the centre of the Croatian National Revival and saw the erection of important cultural and historic institutions. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (536x800, 143 KB)Zagreb cathedral. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (536x800, 143 KB)Zagreb cathedral. ... Zagreb cathedral Zagreb cathedral on Kaptol is probably the most famous building in Zagreb, as its spires can be seen from many locations in the city. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vlaho Bukovac: Hrvatski narodni preporod, Zastor u HNK Zagreb Illyrian movement (Croatian/Serbian: Ilirski pokret), also Croatian national revival (Hrvatski narodni preporod), was a nationalistic campaign initiated by a group of young Croatian intellectuals during the first half of 19th century, around the years of 1835-1849 (there is some...


The first railway line to connect Zagreb with Zidani Most and Sisak was opened in 1862 and in 1863 Zagreb received a gasworks. The Zagreb waterworks was opened in 1878 and the first horse-drawn tramcar was used in 1891. The construction of the railway lines enabled the old suburbs to merge gradually into Donji Grad, characterized by a regular block pattern that prevails in Central European cities. This bustling core hosts many imposing buildings, monuments, and parks as well as a multitude of museums, theatres and cinemas. An electric power plant was erected in 1907 and development flourished 1880-1914 after the earthquake in Zagreb when the town received the characteristic layout it has today. Zidani Most is a town in Slovenia and an important railway junction. ... Sisak on the map of Croatia Sisak (German: Sissek, Hungarian: Sziszek, Italian: Siscia) is a city in central Croatia. ... Gasification is a process that converts carbonaceous materials, such as coal or biomass, into carbon monoxide and hydrogen. ... Sewage is domestic, municipal, or industrial liquid waste products. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Donji Grad as a part of Zagreb Donji Grad is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Historical lands and provinces in Central Europe Central Europe is the central region of Europe. ... For other uses, see Power station (disambiguation). ...


Working class quarters emerged between the railway and the Sava, whereas the construction of residential quarters on the hills of the southern slopes of Medvednica was completed between the two World Wars. Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Medvednica is a mountain in central Croatia, just north of Zagreb and marking the southern border of the tradition region of Zagorje. ... There have been two World Wars, now more commonly known as World War I or First World War (from 1914 to 1918), and World War II or Second World War (from 1939 to 1945). ...


From 1921 - 1931 the population of Zagreb went up by 70 percent — the largest demographic boom in the history of Zagreb. In 1926 the first radio station in the region began broadcasting out of Zagreb, and in 1947 the Zagreb Fair was opened.[6] A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ...


Modern Zagreb

The area between the railway and the Sava river witnessed a new construction boom after World War II. After the mid-1950s, construction of new residential areas south of the Sava river began, resulting in Novi Zagreb (New Zagreb). The city also expanded westward and eastward, incorporating Dubrava, Podsused, Jarun, Blato, and other settlements. Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... the first thing that was invented was the automatic DILDO. Education grew explosively because of a very strong demand for high school and college education. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Novi Zagreb (literally New Zagreb) is the part of the city of Zagreb that is located to the south of the Sava river. ... Dubrava is one of the largest neighbourhoods of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Map of Jarun Jarun is a neighbourhood in the southwestern part of Zagreb, Croatia. ...


The cargo railway hub and the international airport Pleso were built south of the Sava river. The largest industrial zone (Žitnjak) in the southeast represents an extension of the industrial zones on the eastern outskirts of the city, between the river Sava and Prigorje region. Pleso is a small village near the Zagreb International airport. ... Sava also Save (German Save, Hungarian Száva) is a river in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Industrial district was initially introduced as a term to describe an area where workers of a monolithic heavy industry (ship-building, coal mining, steel, ceramics, etc) live within walking-distance of their places of work. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ...


In 1987 Zagreb hosted the Universiade.[7] The Universiade is an International multi-sport event, organized for university athletes by the International University Sports Federation (FISU). ...


In 1991, it became the capital of the country following secession from Second Yugoslavia. During the 1991-1995 Croatian War of Independence, it was a scene of some sporadic fighting surrounding its JNA army barracks, but escaped major damage. In May 1995, it was targeted by Serb rocket artillery in the Zagreb rocket attack that killed seven civilians. Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian and languages of other minority groups. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants Croatian Army Paramilitary organisations Republic of Serb Krajina Army Yugoslav Peoples Army Bosnian Serb Army Republic of Serbia Paramilitary organisations Commanders Franjo Tuđman (President of Croatia) Anton Tus (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1991-1992) Janko Bobetko (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1992-1995) Atif... The Yugoslav Peoples Army (Jugoslavenska/Jugoslovenska narodna armija, JNA, Slovene Jugoslovanska ljudska armada, JLA) was the army of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia prior to its dissolution. ... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ... The Zagreb rocket attack was a war crime conducted by Serb armed forces that fired ground-to-ground missiles on the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ...


Urbanized lines of settlements connect Zagreb with the centres in its surroundings: Sesvete, Zaprešić, Samobor, Dugo Selo and Velika Gorica. Sesvete is the closest one to become a part of the conurbation and is in fact already included in the City of Zagreb. Sesvete as a part of Zagreb Sesvete is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... ZapreÅ¡ić is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 23,125 (2001). ... Samobor is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... Dugo Selo is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... Velika Gorica is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 63,517 (2001). ... Sesvete as a part of Zagreb Sesvete is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ...


Economy

HOTO Tower and Zagrepčanka in the background

Zagreb is the most developed and the most prosperous city in South-Eastern Europe reaching almost 95% GDP per capita of EU. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (505x750, 40 KB) HOTO This photo is a public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (505x750, 40 KB) HOTO This photo is a public domain. ... HOTO Buisiness Tower was the first skyscraper built in Zagreb after the war. ... Zagrepcanka tower by night Zagrepčanka is a business tower located in Zagreb, Croatia. ...


Quality land, favourable transit location and total municipal infrastructure, qualified labour force, scientific, expert, educational, health, financial, banking and other institutions, tradition in performing various services, size and quality of economy present essential potentials in Zagreb developing strategy. In economics the labor force is the group of people who have a potential for being employed. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Look up expert in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... FINANCIAL is the weekly English-language newspaper with offices in Tbilisi, Georgia and Kiev, Ukraine. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ...


Most important branches of industry are: production of electric machines and devices, chemical, pharmaceutical, textile, food and drink processing, tobacco production and processing. Zagreb is an important international trade and business center, and the transport crossroad of Central and East Europe.[8] The chemical industry comprises the companies that produce industrial chemicals. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... The food industry is the complex, global collective of diverse businesses that together supply much of the food energy consumed by the world population. ... The tobacco industry comprises those persons and companies engaged in the growth, preparation for sale, shipment, advertisement, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Eastern Europe is, by convention, that part of Europe from the Ural and Caucasus mountains in the East to an arbitrarily chosen boundary in the West. ...


The city of Zagreb has the highest GDP per capita in Croatia of 25,850 USD in 2006[9] (the EU average was 28,114 USD)[10]. However, average income and prices are still somewhat lower than in Western Europe. A current understanding of Western Europe. ...


As of July 2007, the average monthly net salary in Zagreb was 5839 kuna (about $1,128).[11] In 2005 the average unemployment rate in Zagreb was around 8%, half of the national average.[12] July 2007 is the seventh month of that year. ... Kuna is the name of the currency used in Croatia. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Zagreb, being a relatively large city situated on the fastest route that connects Central with Southeastern Europe, has great potential for investment and development. Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ...


High-rise buildings

There are many future and present high-rise construction projects in the city of Zagreb. The most important recent constructions are: High-rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. ...

  • Almeria Tower (near completion)
  • Center Črnomerec (construction starts in 2007)
  • Neboder (under reconstruction)
  • Sky Office Tower (construction starts in 2007)
  • Tower 123 (construction starts in 2007-2008)

Almeria Tower is located in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Sky Office Tower business tower, located in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Tower 123 business tower, located in Zagreb, Croatia, will be the tallest building in Croatia and one of the tallest buildings in the whole region. ...

See also

Cibona Tower The Cibona Tower in Zagreb, Croatia is a business tower. ... Eurotower is the newest Zagreb skyscraper. ... HOTO Buisiness Tower was the first skyscraper built in Zagreb after the war. ... Mamut Mamutica (Mammoth), sometimes known as Mamut is the largest building (by volume) in Zagreb and Croatia, as well as one of the largest apartment blocks in Europe. ... Zagrepcanka tower by night Zagrepčanka is a business tower located in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Zagreb TV Tower is a 169 metre tall TV tower built of reinforced concrete on the 1035 metre tall Mount Sljeme near Zagreb, Croatia. ... Zagrebtower is another skyscraper in Zagreb, Croatia. ...

Metropolitan administration

Croatian National Bank (HNB)
Croatian National Bank (HNB)

According to the Constitution, the city of Zagreb, as the capital of Croatia, has special status. As such, Zagreb performs self-governing public affairs of both city and county. Image File history File linksMetadata HNB2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata HNB2. ... The Croatian National Bank (or HNB for Croatian Hrvatska Narodna Banka) is the central bank of the Republic of Croatia. ... Coat of arms Zagreb county - Zagrebačka županija is a county in central Croatia. ...


City administration bodies: city assembly as representative body, mayor and city government as executive body. A deliberative assembly is an organization, comprised of members, that uses a parliamentary procedure for making decisions. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... As a general term, Municipal government refers to local government operating at the level of a city, town, or village. ...


Members of the city assembly are elected at direct elections. Members of the city assembly elect the mayor and members of the city government by majority vote.


City government has 11 members elected on mayor’s proposal by the city assembly by majority vote. The mayor is the head of city government and has two deputies.


Organization of city administrative bodies is composed of 12 city offices, 3 city bureaus and 3 city services. They are responsible to the mayor and the city government.


Local self-government is organized in 17 city districts represented by City District Councils. Residents of districts elect members of Councils.[13] Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ...


City districts

The major city districts ("gradske četvrti" in Croatian):[14] Districts are a form of local government in several countries. ...

Map: Zagreb and its districts
No. District Area (km²) Population (2001) Population density
1. Donji Grad 3 45,108 14956.2
2. Gornji Grad - Medveščak 10 36,384 3593.5
3. Trnje 7 45,267 6146.2
4. Maksimir 14 49,750 3467.1
5. Peščenica - Žitnjak 35 58,283 1651.3
6. Novi Zagreb - istok 17 65,301 3947.1
7. Novi Zagreb - zapad 63 48,981 782.5
8. Trešnjevka - sjever 6 55,358 9498.6
9. Trešnjevka - jug 10 67,162 6828.1
10. Črnomerec 24 38,762 1593.4
11. Gornja Dubrava 40 61,388 1524.1
12. Donja Dubrava 11 35,944 3321.1
13. Stenjevec 12 41,257 3387.3
14. Podsused - Vrapče 36 42,360 1175.1
15. Podsljeme 60 17,744 295.2
16. Sesvete 165 59,212 358.3
17. Brezovica 127 10,884 85.4
TOTAL 641 779,145 1214.9


Image File history File linksMetadata Zagreb_Districts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Zagreb_Districts. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Donji Grad as a part of Zagreb Donji Grad is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Gornji Grad - Medveščak as a part of Zagreb Gornji Grad - Medveščak is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Trnje has the status of četvrt (quarter, neighbourhood) in the city of Zagreb, and as such has an elected council. ... Stadion Maksimir (Maksimir Stadium) is a football stadium in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ... Peščenica - Žitnjak as a part of Zagreb Peščenica is a neighbourhood in the southeastern part of the city of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Novi Zagreb - istok as a part of Zagreb Novi Zagreb - istok (New Zagreb - east) contains Mamut (Mammoth) which was built to be the largest communal housing block in southeast Europe. ... Novi Zagreb - zapad as a part of Zagreb Novi Zagreb - zapad (New Zagreb - West) has the status of četvrt (quarter, neighbourhood) and as such has an elected council. ... Trešnjevka - sjever as a part of Zagreb Trešnjevka - sjever is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Trešnjevka - jug as a part of Zagreb Trešnjevka - jug is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Črnomerec as a part of Zagreb Črnomerec is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Gornja Dubrava as a part of Zagreb Gornja Dubrava is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Donja Dubrava as a part of Zagreb Donja Dubrava is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Stenjevec as a part of Zagreb Stenjevec is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Podsused - Vrapče as a part of Zagreb Podsused - Vrapče is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Podsljeme is in the foothills of Zagrebs mountain Medvednica and its name means under Sljeme (Sljeme is the peak of the Medvednica mountain). ... Sesvete as a part of Zagreb Sesvete is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Brezovica as a part of Zagreb Brezovica is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ...


City government

The current mayor of Zagreb is Milan Bandić (SDP). A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Milan Bandić Milan Bandić (b. ... The Social Democratic Party of Croatia (Croatian: Socijaldemokratska Partija Hrvatske) is the main social democratic political party in Croatia. ...


The city assembly is composed of 51 representatives, presided by Tatjana Holjevac (ind. rep.), coming from the following political parties: A deliberative assembly is an organization, comprised of members, that uses a parliamentary procedure for making decisions. ...

Based on the results of elections held in 2005.[15] The Social Democratic Party of Croatia (Croatian: Socijaldemokratska Partija Hrvatske) is the main social democratic political party in Croatia. ... The Croatian Democratic Union (Croatian: Hrvatska demokratska zajednica, HDZ), is a major Croatian political party. ... The Croatian Party of Rights (Croatian Hrvatska Stranka Prava, HSP) is a right-wing political party in Croatia, the oldest in the country. ... The Croatian Peoples Party - Liberal Democrats (Croatian Hrvatska narodna stranka - Liberalni Demokrati; HNS) a liberal party in Croatia. ... The Croatian Party of Pensioners (Croatian: Hrvatska Stranka Umirovljenika) is a Croatian political party. ... The Croatian Peasant Party (Croatian: Hrvatska seljačka stranka, HSS) was formed in 1905 by Stjepan Radić, a leading Croatian politician. ... Croatian Social Liberal Party (Croatian: Hrvatska socijalno liberalna stranka, HSLS) is a liberal party in Croatia. ... The Democratic Centre (Croatian: Demokratski centar, DC) is a Croatian political party. ...


Transport

"Glavni Kolodvor" - Central railway station on King Tomislav Square.

Zagreb is the hub of five major Croatian highways. Until a few years ago all Croatian highways either started or ended in Zagreb. Image File history File links HZ_1. ... Image File history File links HZ_1. ...


The highways A1 and A6 start at Lučko interchange and concur until the Bosiljevo interchange. The former leads to Rijeka and forms a part of the Corridor Vb while the latter connects Zagreb and Split (as of September 2007 Šestanovac). Further extension of A1 up to Dubrovnik is in construction. Both highways are tolled. A1 near the Sveti Rok Tunnel Motorway A1 (Croatian: ), is a motorway in Croatia. ... The Motorway A6 (Croatian: ) is a motorway in northern Croatia. ... Lučko is a neighborhood in Novi Zagreb - Zapad district of Zagreb, Croatia. ... A multiplex or concurrency on a road network occurs where a single physical road carries two or more different highway, motorway or other road numbers. ... Bosiljevo is a municipality in Karlovac county, Croatia. ... Rijeka (in local Croatian dialects Rika and Reka; Fiume in Italian and Hungarian. ... The ten Pan-European transport corridors were defined at the second Pan-European transport Conference in Crete, March 1994, as routes in Central and Eastern Europe that required major investment over the next ten to fifteen years. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... September 2007 is the ninth month of that year. ... Å estanovac on the map of Croatia Å estanovac is a municipality in Croatia in the Split-Dalmatia county. ... A1 near the Sveti Rok Tunnel Motorway A1 (Croatian: ), is a motorway in Croatia. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country County Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ...


Highway A3 (formerly named Bratstvo i jedinstvo) was the showpiece of Croatia in the SFRJ. It is the first Croatian highway. A3 forms a part of the Corridor X. The highway starts at the Bregana border crossing, bypasses Zagreb forming a big part of the Zagreb bypass and ends at Lipovac near the Bajakovo border crossing. It continues in Southeast Europe in the direction of Near East. This highway is tolled except for a stretch between Bobovica and Ivanja Reka interchanges. The Motorway A3 (Croatian: ) is a motorway in northern Croatia. ... Brotherhood and unity (in Serbo-Croatian: Bratstvo i jedinstvo (cyrillic form: Братство и јединство), in Macedonian: Братство и единство, in Slovenian: Bratstvo in enotnost, in Albanian: Vëllazërim dhe bashkim) was the catch phrase for the official policy of inter-ethnic relations in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... The ten Pan-European transport corridors were defined at the second Pan-European transport Conference in Crete, March 1994, as routes in Central and Eastern Europe that required major investment over the next ten to fifteen years. ... Border control Border control is a term that describes how a country polices its borders. ... The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe southeastern Europe (see the Definitions and boundaries section below). ... The Near East is a term commonly used by archaeologists, geographers and historians, less commonly by journalists and commentators, to refer to the region encompassing Anatolia (the Asian portion of modern Turkey), the Levant (modern Israel/Palestine, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon), Georgia, Armenia, and...


Highway A2 is a branch of the Corridor X. It connects Zagreb and the frequently congested Macelj border crossing forming a continuous highway-level link between Zagreb and Western Europe except for the Slovenian part, which is still just a primary route. The Motorway A2 (Croatian: ) is a motorway in northern Croatia, in the Zagorje region. ... The ten Pan-European transport corridors were defined at the second Pan-European transport Conference in Crete, March 1994, as routes in Central and Eastern Europe that required major investment over the next ten to fifteen years. ... Macelj is the name of a forest in northern Croatia bordering on Slovenia. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... The colour scheme used to denote a primary route. ...


Forming a part of the Corridor Vb, highway A4 starts in Zagreb forming the northeastern wing of the Zagreb bypass and leads to Hungary until the Goričan broder crossing. It is the least used highway around Zagreb. The ten Pan-European transport corridors were defined at the second Pan-European transport Conference in Crete, March 1994, as routes in Central and Eastern Europe that required major investment over the next ten to fifteen years. ... The Motorway A4 (Croatian: ) is a motorway in northern Croatia northeast from Zagreb towards the border with Hungary. ... Goričan on the map of Croatia Belica is a municipality in MeÄ‘imurje County, Croatia. ...



A northern branch of the Zagreb bypass (Sjeverna tangenta) going through the Medvednica Mountain in the northern parts of Zagreb is in planning stages. Due to steep hills, if constructed, this route would make many overpasses and tunnels a necessity thus being very costly. Because of its high constroversy and very strong local NIMBY opposition the success of the project is doubtful. Medvednica is a mountain in central Croatia, just north of Zagreb and marking the southern border of the tradition region of Zagorje. ... An airport is a typical example of a NIMBY complex: it benefits a city economically, but no-one wants it near them because of the noise, pollution and traffic it generates. ...


The railway running along the Sutla river and the Zagorje main road (Zagreb - Maribor - Vienna), as well as traffic connections with the Pannonian region and Hungary (the Zagorje railroad, the roads and railway to Varaždin - Čakovec and Koprivnica) are linked with truck routes. The river Sotla (Slovenian) or Sutla (Croatian) is a European river flowing through Slovenia and Croatia, mostly forming their border. ... Categories: Geography stubs | Counties of Croatia ... Area: 147. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Krapina-Zagorje county - Krapinsko-zagorska županija is a county in northern Croatia. ... Varaždin on the map of Croatia Varaždin (German: Warasdin, Hungarian: Varasd, Latin: Varasdinum) is a city in northwestern Croatia, 81 km north of Zagreb on the highway A4. ... ÄŒakovec [] is a city located in northern part of Croatia and the second northernmost city of the country. ... Koprivnica is a city in northern Croatia with a population of 30,994 (2001), the capital of the Koprivnica-Križevci county. ...


The southern railway connection to Split operates on a line via the Lika region (renovated in 2004 to allow for a five-hour journey); a faster line along the Una river valley is currently in use only up to the border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Lika is a mountainous region in central Croatia, roughly bound by the Velebit mountain from the southwest and the Plješevica mountain from the northeast. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Una can mean: Una, a river in Bosnia and Croatia, tributary to Sava Una, a city in Bahia, Brazil Una, a district of Himachal Pradesh, India Una-, a purported SI prefix. ...


The railway and the highway A3 along the Sava river that extends to Slavonia (towards Slavonski Brod, Vinkovci, Osijek and Vukovar) are some of the busiest traffic corridors in the country.[16] A3 can refer to: A3, a paper size defined by ISO 216. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... Slavonski Brod is the sixth largest city in Croatia, with a population of 64,612 in 2001. ... [[Image: Vinkovci (Croatia) |250px|none|]] Coordinates: Country  Croatia County Vukovar-Srijem Government  - Mayor Mladen Karlić (HDZ) Elevation 90 m (295. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... Vukovars main street Vukovar Vukovar is a city and municipality in eastern Croatia, and the biggest river port in Croatia located at the confluence of the Vuka river into the Danube. ...


Roads

Zagrebačka Avenue
Zagrebačka Avenue

The city has a well developed road network with several main arteries up to six lanes wide and Zagreb bypass, a full-profile highway encircling most of the city. There is congestion in the city centre at rush hour and parking is also a problem there. The parking problem is supposed to be somewhat alleviated by the construction of new underground multi-storey parking lots (Importanne Centre, Importanne Gallery, Lang Square, Tuškanac, Kvaternik Square, Klaić Street and many more). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (850x567, 343 KB) Summary One of the most congested avenues in Zagreb. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (850x567, 343 KB) Summary One of the most congested avenues in Zagreb. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Congestion is a state of excessive accumulation or overfilling or overcrowding. ... For other uses, see Rush hour (disambiguation). ...


Bridges

As of 2007, Zagreb has seven road traffic bridges across the river Sava. In downstream order, these are: Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ...

  • Podsused bridge (Podsusedski most) (1982): a not widely known two-lane bridge connecting Zagreb to its close exurbs by old road to Samobor, and the fastest route to Bestovje and Strmec. It carries Franjo Tuđman street. It is also designed to carry Zagreb-Samobor commuter train (not yet constructed).
  • Jankomir bridge (Jankomirski most) (1958, 2006): a modern, recently upgraded four-lane bridge connecting Ljubljanska Avenue to Jankomir interchange and Zagreb bypass. It carries Ljubljanska avenue
  • Adriatic bridge (Jadranski most) (1981): being the most widely known bridge in Zagreb, it's a six-lane bridge connecting parts of Western Zagreb north and south of Sava. The bridge spans from Savska street in the north to Western traffic circle in the south. It also carries tram tracks
  • Sava bridge (Savski most) (1938): Anecdotically, the official name is New Sava bridge, but it is the oldest existing bridge over Sava; closed for motor vehicles upon construction of Adriatic bridge. Known between experts due to some construction details[17].
  • Freedom bridge (Most slobode) (1959): a four-lane bridge. It carries Većeslav Holjevac avenue
  • Youth bridge (Most mladosti) (1974): a six-lane bridge with tram tracks, connects east Novi Zagreb to districts Peščenica, Donja Dubrava and Maksimir. It carries Marin Držić avenue
  • Homeland bridge (Domovinski most): built in spring 2007, this bridge is the last bridge built on Sava to date; it links Peščenica to Pleso and Velika Gorica. It is four-lane brige with two bicycle and two pedestrian lanes and space for tram tracks. It carries Radnička street and state route D38 spanning from the intersection with Petruševec quay to the Kosnica highway interchange. Implemention of tram tracks is in the planning stage.

Two additional bridges across the river Sava are planned in 2008: Jarun Bridge and Bundek Bridge (which will most likely be named in honor of John Paul II).[18] The expression exurb (for extra-urban) was coined in the 1950s to describe the ring of prosperous rural communities beyond the suburbs that, due to availability via the new high-speed limited-access highways, were becoming dormitory communities for an urban area. ... Samobor is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Većeslav Holjevac (August 22nd, 1917 - July 11th, 1970) is Croatian and Yugoslav soldier and politician. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... Novi Zagreb (literally New Zagreb) is the part of the city of Zagreb that is located to the south of the Sava river. ... ... Donja Dubrava as a part of Zagreb Donja Dubrava is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Stadion Maksimir (Maksimir Stadium) is a football stadium in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ... Marin Držić Marin Držić (1508-1567) is considered the finest Croatian Renaissance playwright and prose writer. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... ... Pleso is a small village near the Zagreb International airport. ... Velika Gorica is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 63,517 (2001). ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


There are also two rail traffic bridges across Sava, near Sava bridge and near Mičevec.


Public transportation

Public transportation in the city is organized in two layers: the inner parts of the city are mostly covered by trams and the outer suburbs are linked with buses. The public transportation company, ZET (Zagrebački Električni Tramvaj, Zagreb Electric Tram), operating trams all inner bus lines and the most of the suburban lines, is subsidized by the city council. A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... “Autobus” redirects here. ... The Zagrebački Električni Tramvaj (ZET) (lit. ...


The funicular (uspinjača) in the historic part of the city is a tourist attraction. Taxis are readily available, but are very expensive. Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of... For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ...


As of 1992., the state rail operator HŽ (Hrvatske željeznice, Croatian Railways) has been developing a network of suburban trains in metropolitan Zagreb area. Upgrade of network is in progress.


Tram network

Main article: ZET
ZET 100% low floor tram on line 6

Zagreb has an extensive tram network with 15 day and 4 night lines covering much of the inner- and middle-suburbs of the city. Trams commenced on September 5, 1891 and have been in continual service since. Trams usually travel at speeds of 25-50 km/h (15-30 mph), but slow considerably during rush hour. The network is unique as it operates mostly at the kerb, and despite limited priority given to vehicles is efficient and well-patronised. The Zagrebački Električni Tramvaj (ZET) (lit. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Zagrebački Električni Tramvaj (ZET) (lit. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... For other uses, see Rush hour (disambiguation). ... A Kerb ITS Curb lozl may be: the side of a road; see curb (road). ...


Trams connect almost all parts of the city, and a number of new lines have been recently proposed, including to "Arena", handball stadium in construction, to Vrapce, and Zagreb Airport, the main airport in Zagreb located in the suburb of Pleso. Zagreb Arena is an indoor sporting arena located in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Zagreb Airport (IATA: ZAG, ICAO: LDZA), also known as Pleso Airport after the nearby suburb of Pleso, is the main international airport of Croatia. ... Pleso is a small village near the Zagreb International airport. ...


An ambitious program is currently underway to replace old trams with the new and modern ones built mostly in Zagreb by companies Končar elektroindustrija and, to a lesser extent, by TŽV Gredelj. Dubbed "TMK 2200", 70 trams have been ordered and are mostly in operation, with the final tram expected to be delivered by December 2007,[19] and a deal securing an additional 70 trams is forthcoming. New 100% low-floor tram by CroTram ZET 2200 (another name, NT 2200, is also used) is a 100% low-floor tram made by the Croatian consortium CroTram led by Končar. ...


A second light-rail or metro system was proposed in January 2007. The system was envisioned with five lines; three running west-east, and two running north-south converging on the city centre. All lines were planned to go underground in the city center. It is currently unknown whether it will be built or not. A Citadis tram of the Luas system in Dublin, Ireland Changchun LRT, China Shanghai Metro transit station, China A METRORail train approaching Preston Station in downtown Houston, Texas, USA. A LYNX light rail train from Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. The Guadalajara urban L-train system (SITEUR), at first a trolleybus... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... January 2007 is the first month of that year. ...


Suburban rail network

See also: Croatian Railways

In 2005, suburban rail services were increased to a 15-minute frequency serving the middle and outer suburbs of Zagreb, primarily in the east-west direction and to the southern districts. This has greatly enhanced commuter opportunities and is well-patronised. Connections are being revitalized and enhanced, the intent to purchase new trains to expand the network and frequencies, and renovation of older stations/construction of new stations has all contributed to the success. Croatian Railways, (Croatian Hrvatske Željeznice (HŽ)) is the national railway company of Croatia, formed after the dissolution of Yugoslavia. ...


A new link to the nearby town of Samobor has been announced and is due to start operations in 2009. This link will be standard-gauge and tie in with normal Croatian Railways operations (the previous narrow-gauge line to Samobor was closed in the 1970s). Samobor is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the inner sides of the rails) that should be used. ... Comparison of standard gauge (blue) and one common narrow gauge (red) width. ...


Air traffic

Main article: Zagreb Airport

Zagreb Airport (IATA: ZAG, ICAO: LDZA), known as 'Pleso Airport' is the main Croatian international airport, situated 14 km south-west from Zagreb in the suburb of Pleso. The airport is also a main Croatian airbase featuring helicopters, as well as military and freight transport aircraft. As traffic figures rise, the airport is becoming increasingly congested. A new terminal is planned for 2011 to replace the current inadequate building, with construction commencing in 2008.[20] Zagreb Airport (IATA: ZAG, ICAO: LDZA), also known as Pleso Airport after the nearby suburb of Pleso, is the main international airport of Croatia. ... The International Air Transport Association is an international trade organization of airlines headquarted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... Pleso is a small village near the Zagreb International airport. ... An airport terminal is a building at an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to the facilities that allow them to board airplanes. ...


Zagreb Airport is main hub for Croatia Airlines, the national carrier of Croatia, and the airport is served by many European carriers to numerous national and international destinations. Croatia Airlines Airbus A319-100 near a Nippon Cargo Airways 747, at Amsterdam (Schiphol) Airport, the Netherlands. ...


Zagreb has a second, smaller airport, Lučko (ICAO: LDZL). It is home to sports airplanes and the Croatian special police, as well as a military helicopter airbase. Lučko was once the main airport for Zagreb. Lučko is a neighborhood in Novi Zagreb - Zapad district of Zagreb, Croatia. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, develops the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ...


A third, small grass airfield, Buševec, is located just outside Velika Gorica. It is primarily used for sports purposes. Velika Gorica is a town in Zagreb county, Croatia, population 63,517 (2001). ...


Education

There are 136 primary schools and 100 secondary schools including 30 gymnasiums. [21][22] There are 5 public higher education institution and 9 private professional higher education schools.[23] A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Gymnasium can have following meanings: Gymnasium (ancient Greece)—an educational and sporting institution in Ancient Greece Gymnasium—a school of secondary education found in several European countries (approx. ...


Zagreb Classical Gymnasium

Zagreb is the home of the oldest secondary school in Croatia and the southeastern part of Europe - the Zagreb Classical Gymnasium (Klasična gimnazija). It was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1607 and has operated continuously ever since. Image File history File links Klasicnagimnazija. ... Image File history File links Klasicnagimnazija. ... The Classical Gymnasium in Zagreb is the home of the oldest high schools (a gymnasium, to be precise) in Croatia and souteastern Europe. ... The Classical Gymnasium in Zagreb is the home of the oldest high schools (a gymnasium, to be precise) in Croatia and souteastern Europe. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


The school was hit by cluster bomb on the May 2, 1995 during the terrorist rocket attack on Zagreb in the Croatian war of independence. May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants Croatian Army Paramilitary organisations Republic of Serb Krajina Army Yugoslav Peoples Army Bosnian Serb Army Republic of Serbia Paramilitary organisations Commanders Franjo Tuđman (President of Croatia) Anton Tus (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1991-1992) Janko Bobetko (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1992-1995) Atif...


University

Main article: Zagreb University
Zagreb University (Rectorate and Law school building).

The University of Zagreb (1669) is the oldest and one of the largest universities in South-Eastern Europe. Ever since its foundation, the University has been continually growing and developing and now consists of 29 faculties, three art academies and the Centre for Croatian Studies. With its comprehensive programmes and over 50,000 full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students the University is the strongest teaching institution in Croatia. It offers a wide range of academic degree courses leading to bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in the following fields: arts, biomedicine, biotechnology, engineering, humanities, natural and social sciences. It is also a strongly research-oriented institution, contributing over 50 percent of the total research output of the country.[24] Universitys emblem The University of Zagreb (Croatian Sveučilište u Zagrebu) is the oldest Croatian university in continuous operation and also the oldest university in southeastern Europe. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ...


Museums

Zagreb's numerous museums reflect the history, art and culture not only of Zagreb and Croatia, but also of Europe and the world. Around thirty collections in museums and galleries comprise more than 3.6 million various exhibits, excluding church and private collections. The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...


Archeological Museum

The Archaeological Museum (19 Nikola Šubić Zrinski Square) collections, today consisting of nearly 400,000 varied artifacts and monuments, have been gathered over the years from many different sources. These holdings include evidence of Croatian presence in the area as well as rare samples which have made the museum world renowned.[25] The most famous are the Egyptian collection, the Zagreb mummy and bandages with the oldest Etruscan inscription in the world (Liber Linteus Zagrabiensis), as well as the numismatic collection. A part of the museum is set aside for the collection of stone monuments dating back predominantly to the Roman period. For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... Nikola Šubić Zrinski or Miklós Zrínyi, (1508-1566), Croatian and Hungarian hero, member of the Zrinski noble family. ... http://www. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... The Liber Linteus (Zagrabiensis) (also rarely known as Liber Agramensis) (Latin: Linen Book (of Zagreb) or Book of Agram) is the longest Etruscan text and the only extant linen book. ... This article is about a hobby. ...


Croatian Natural History Museum

The Croatian Natural History Museum (1 Demetrova Street) holds the world's most extensive collection of Neanderthal remains found at one site.[26] These are the remains, stone weapons and tools of prehistoric Krapina man. The holdings of the Croatian History Museum comprise more than 250,000 specimens distributed among various different collections. Also this museum publishes the scientific journal "Natura Croatica". For other uses, see Neanderthal (disambiguation). ... Krapina is a town in northern Croatia, center of the Krapina-Zagorje county, population 12,950 (2001). ...


Technical Museum

The Technical Museum (18 Savska Street) was founded in 1954 and it maintains the oldest preserved machine in the area, dating from 1830, which is still operational. The museum exhibits numerous historic aircraft, cars, machinery and equipment. There are some distinct sections in the museum: the Planetarium, the Apisarium, the Mine (model of mines for coal, iron and non-ferrous metals, about 300 m long), and the Nikola Tesla study.[27] The Museum organises educational, study, informative and occasional exhibitions, lectures and panel discussions on popular science, as well as playrooms and workshops. Sava also Save (German Save, Hungarian Száva) is a river in Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ...


Museum of the City of Zagreb

The Museum of the City of Zagreb (20 Opatička Street) was established in 1907 by the Association of the Braća Hrvatskog Zmaja. It is located in a restored monumental complex (Popov toranj, the Observatory, Zakmardi Granary) of the former Convent of the Poor Clares, of 1650.[28] The Museum deals with topics from the cultural, artistic, economic and political history of the city spanning from Roman finds to the modern period. The holdings comprise 75,000 items arranged systematically into collections of artistic and mundane objects characteristic of the city and its history.


Arts and Crafts Museum

The Arts and Crafts Museum (10 Marshal Tito Square) was founded in 1880 with the intention of preserving the works of art and craft against the new predominance of industrial products. With its 160,000 exhibits, the Arts and Crafts Museum is a national-level museum for artistic production and the history of material culture in Croatia.[29] The holdings are classified into 19 diverse museum collections: furnishing, metal, painting, sculpture, clocks, photography and photographic equipment, musical instruments, graphic design, ivory, printing and bookbinding, printed and painted leather, devotional items, smoking accessories and toys. Josip Broz Tito (May 7, 1892 - May 4, 1980) was the ruler of Yugoslavia between the end of World War II and his death in 1980. ...


Ethnographic Museum

The Ethnographic Museum (14 Ivan Mažuranić Square) was founded in 1919. It lies in the fine Secession building of the one-time Trades Hall of 1903. The ample holdings of about 80,000 items cover the ethnographic heritage of Croatia, classified in the three cultural zones: the Pannonian, Dinaric and Adriatic.[30] In the non-European section there are items from the traditional cultures of Africa, Latin America, Asia, Australia and Oceania. Ethnography ( ethnos = people and graphein = writing) is the genre of writing that presents varying degrees of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of human social phenomena, based on fieldwork. ... Ivan Mažuranić (1814-1890) was a Croatian poet, linguist and politician—probably the most important figure in Croatias cultural life in the mid-19th century. ...


Mimara Museum

Main article: Mimara Museum

The museum called the "Art Collection of Ante and Wiltrud Topic Mimara" or, for short, the Mimara Museum (5 Roosevelt Square), was founded with a donation from Ante "Mimara" Topic and opened to the public in 1987. It is located in a neo-Renaissance palace from the end of the 19th century.[31] The holdings comprise 3,750 works of art of various techniques and materials, and different cultures and civilisations. Image File history File links Mimara2. ... Image File history File links Mimara2. ... Mimara Museum with Westin and Cibona Tower Mimara Museum is situated in (5 Roosevelt Platz), housing the donation by Wiltrud and Ante Topić Mimara, very attractive. ... Mimara Museum with Westin and Cibona Tower Mimara Museum is situated in (5 Roosevelt Platz), housing the donation by Wiltrud and Ante Topić Mimara, very attractive. ... Mimara Museum is situated in (5 Roosevelt Platz), housing the donation by Wiltrud and Ante Topić Mimara, very attractive. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ...


Croatian Naive Art Museum

The Croatian Naive Art Museum (3 ĆiriloMetodska Street) is considered to be the first museum of naive art in the world. The museum keeps works of Croatian naive expression of the 20th century. It is located in the 18th century Raffay Palace in the Upper City (Gornji Grad). The museum holdings consist of 1500 works of art - paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints, mainly by Croatians but also by other well-known world artists.[32] From time to time, the museum organises topics and retrospective exhibitions by naive artists, expert meetings and educational workshops and playrooms. Saint Cyril (Greek: Κύριλλος , Church Slavonic: Кирилъ) (827 - February 14, 869) was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, theologian, and linguist. ... Saint Methodius (Greek: Μεθόδιος; Church Slavonic Мефодии) (b. ... Gornji Grad - Medveščak as a part of Zagreb Gornji Grad - Medveščak is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ...


Museum of Contemporary Art

The Museum of Contemporary Art was founded in 1954 and a rich collection of Croatian and foreign contemporary visual art has been collected throughout the decades. The Museum (2 Catherine's Square) is located in a space within the Kulmer Palace in the Upper City (Gornji Grad). A new Museum building in Novi Zagreb has been under construction since 2003.[33] The Museum's permanent art collection will be presented to the public when it moves into its new building planned for 2007. Look up Catherine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Catherine is a womans given name, derived from a Greek word (katharos) meaning pure. It is one of the most common names given. ... Gornji Grad - Medveščak as a part of Zagreb Gornji Grad - Medveščak is one of the districts of Zagreb, Croatia. ...


Other museums and galleries

Valuable historical collections are also found in the Croatian School Museum, the Croatian Hunting Museum, the Croatian Sports Museum, the Croatian Post and Telecommunications Museum, the HAZU (Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts) Glyptotheque (collection of monuments), and the HAZU Graphics Cabinet. Students in Rome, Italy. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ... The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Latin Academia Scientiarum et Artium Croatica, Croatian Hrvatska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti) is the national academy of Croatia. ...


The Strossmayer's Old Masters Gallery (11 Zrinski Square) offers permanent holdings presenting European paintings from the 14th to 19th centuries,[34] and the Ivan Meštrović Studio, (8 Mletačka Street) with sculptures, drawings, lithography portfolios and other items, was a donation of this great artist to his homeland The Museum and Gallery Centre (4 Jesuit Square) introduces on various occasions the Croatian and foreign cultural and artistic heritage. The Art Pavilion (22 King Tomislav Square) by Viennese architects Hellmer and Fellmer who were the most famous designers of theatres in Central Europe is a neo-classical exhibition complex and one of the landmarks of the city centre. The exhibitions are also held in the impressive Meštrović building on Hrvatskih Velikana Square — the Home of Croatian Fine Artists. The World Centre "Wonder of Croatian Naïve Art" (12 Ban Jelačić Square) exhibits masterpieces of Croatian naive art as well as the works of a new generation of artists. The Modern Gallery (1 Hebrangova Street) comprises all relevant fine artists of the 19th and 20th centuries. Josip Juraj Strossmayer (also Joseph Georg Strossmayer; February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a notable bishop, benefactor and a politician from Croatia. ... Nikola Šubić Zrinski or Miklós Zrínyi, (1508-1566), Croatian and Hungarian hero, member of the Zrinski noble family. ... Ivan Meštrović (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Art Pavilion The Art Pavilion in Zagreb (Croatian: Umjetnički paviljon u Zagrebu) is one of the largest and most important art galleries in Croatia. ... King Tomislav by Josip Horvat - MeÄ‘imurec Tomislav (died in 928), was one of the greatest rulers of Croatia in Middle Ages. ... Ivan Meštrović (August 15, 1883 – January 16, 1962) was a Croatian sculptor. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... The square seen from southwest. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


Other cultural sites and events

The city offers rich cultural and artistic enjoyment. There are about 20 permanent or seasonal theaters and stages. The Croatian National Theater, built in 1895, is the most impressive building among them. The most renowned concert hall is named "Vatroslav Lisinski", after the composer of the first Croatian opera. It was built in 1973 and is visited by 760,000 people each year. The great hall has 1847 seats over 2,360 m², while the smaller one can seat 304 people on 360 m². Image File history File linksMetadata HNK3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata HNK3. ... The Croatian National Theatre (Croatian: Hrvatsko narodno kazaliÅ¡te) is located in Zagreb the capital of Croatia. ... The Croatian National Theatre (Croatian: Hrvatsko narodno kazaliÅ¡te) is located in Zagreb the capital of Croatia. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... Vatroslav Lisinski (Christened Ignaz Fuchs July 8, 1819 in Zagreb; † May 31, 1854 Zagreb) was a Croatian composer. ...


Zagreb hosts many domestic and international events. Animafest, the World Festival of Animated Films, takes place every even-numbered year, and the Music Bienniale, the international festival of avant-garde music, every odd-numbered year. The Festival of the Zagreb Philharmonic and the famous flowers exhibition Floraart (end of May or beginning of June), the Old-timer Rally, the Week of Contemporary Dance, as well as Eurokaz, the international festival of contemporary theater (in June) represent annual events. In the summer, theater performances and concerts, mostly in the Upper Town, are organized either indoors or outdoors. The stage on Opatovina hosts the Zagreb Histrionic Summer. Animation refers to the process in which each frame of a film or movie is produced individually, whether generated as a computer graphic, or by photographing a drawn image, or by repeatedly making small changes to a model (see claymation and stop motion), and then photographing the result. ... Look up Biennial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Biennial is a term referring to a period of two years, much in the same way centennial refers to 100 years. ... Experimental music is any music that challenges the commonly accepted notions of what music is. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ... A vintage car is commonly defined as a car built between the start of 1919 and the end of 1930. ... Petter Solberg driving on gravel at the 2006 Cyprus Rally, a World Rally Championship event. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Zagreb is also the host of Zagrebfest, the oldest Croatian pop-music festival, as well as of several traditional international sports events and tournaments. The Day of the City of Zagreb on the (16th of November) is celebrated every year with special festivities, especially on the Jarun lake near the southwestern part of the city. Entertainment can be found in many discotheques, night clubs, and casinos. For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... A music festival is a festival oriented towards music that is sometimes presented with a theme such as musical genre, nationality or locality of musicians, or holiday. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Jarun Jarun is a neighbourhood in the southwestern part of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


On Mount Medvednica there is also the 169 m TV Tower with a restaurant planned for the 75 m high pod. Zagreb TV Tower is a 169 metre tall TV tower built of reinforced concrete on the 1035 metre tall Mount Sljeme near Zagreb, Croatia. ...


The Archdiocese of Zagreb is the metropolitan see of the Catholic Church in Croatia, serving as its religious center. The current Archbishop is Josip Bozanić. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zagreb (Croatian: , Latin: ) is the central archdiocese of the Catholic Church in Croatia, centered in the capital city Zagreb. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the bishop of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... The Roman Catholic Church in Croatia is part of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope and curia in Rome. ... Josip Bozanić (born 20 March 1949) is a Cardinal Priest and Archbishop of Zagreb in the Roman Catholic Church. ...


Zagreb is also the Episcopal see of the Metropolitan of Zagreb, Ljubljana and all of Italy of Serbian Orthodox Church. The current Metropolitan is Jovan. A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church Unknown flag, seen offten in public. ...


Surroundings

The wider Zagreb area has been continuously inhabited since the prehistoric period, as witnessed by archaeological findings in the Veternica cave from the Paleolithic and excavation of the remains of the destroyed Roman town of Andautonia near the present village of Ščitarjevo. // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ...


The picturesque former villages on the slopes of Medvednica, Šestine, Gračani and Remete, maintain their rich traditions, including folk costumes, Šestine umbrellas, and gingerbread products. For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... This article is about the umbrella or parasol. ... Gingerbread cookies Lebkuchen Gingerbread in cake form A gingerbread house Traditional Polish gingerbread Gingerbread is a sweet that can take the form of a cake or a cookie in which the predominant flavor is ginger. ...


The Medvednica Mountain (Zagrebačka gora), with its highest peak Sljeme (1,033 m), provides a panoramic view of metropolitan Zagreb, the Sava and the Kupa valleys, and the region of Hrvatsko Zagorje. In mid-January 2005, Sljeme held its first World Ski Championship tournament. Medvednica is a mountain in central Croatia, just north of Zagreb and marking the southern border of the tradition region of Zagorje. ... Medvednica is a mountain in central Croatia, just north of Zagreb and marking the southern border of the tradition region of Zagorje. ... Kupa (Slovenian Kolpa) is a river in Croatia and on the border with Slovenia. ... Krapina-Zagorje county - Krapinsko-zagorska županija is a county in northern Croatia. ...


From the summit, weather permitting, the vista reaches as far as Velebit Range along Croatia's rocky northern coast, as well as the snow-capped peaks of the towering Julian Alps in neighbouring Slovenia. There are several lodging villages, offering accommodation and restaurants for hikers. Skiers visit Sljeme, which has four ski-runs, three ski-lifts and a chairlift. The middle part of Velebit Velebit is the largest though not the highest mountain range in Croatia. ... Edelweiss, Julian Alps, Slovenia The Julian Alps is part of the Alps that stretch from north-eastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2864 metres at Triglav. ...


Old Medvedgrad, the recently restored medieval burg built in the 13th century, represents a special attraction of Medvednica hill. It overlooks the western part of the city and also has the Shrine of the Homeland, a memorial with an eternal flame, where Croatia pays reverence to all its heroes fallen for homeland in its history, customarily on national holidays. Travel agencies organize guided excursions to the surroundings as well as sightseeing in Zagreb itself. Medvedgrad is a medieval castle on the south slopes of Medvednica mountain, roughly on the halfway from the Croatian capital Zagreb to the mountain top Sljeme. ... Burg is the German and Dutch word for castle. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... A homeland is the concept of the territory to which one belongs; usually, the country in which a particular nationality was born. ...


Tourism

Hotel Esplanade/Regent
Hotel Esplanade/Regent

Zagreb is an important tourist center, not only in terms of passengers travelling from Western and Central Europe to the Adriatic Sea, but also as a travel destination itself. Since the end of the war, it has attracted around half a million visitors annually, mainly from Austria, Germany and Italy. However, the city has even greater potential as many tourists that visit Croatia skip Zagreb in order to visit the beaches along the Croatian Adriatic coast and old historic Renaissance cities such as Dubrovnik, Split, and Zadar. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (807x605, 140 KB)Photo taken by long foot, permition to publish granted. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (807x605, 140 KB)Photo taken by long foot, permition to publish granted. ... The modern period in Croatian history begins in 1990 with the countrys change of political and economic system as well as achieving independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. ... The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Nickname: 1995 map of Dubrovnik The location of Dubrovnik within Croatia Coordinates: , Country County Government  - Mayor Dubravka Å uica (HDZ) Area  - City 143. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ...


Zagreb celebrated its 900th birthday in 1994 not only as a city with numerous cultural and historical monuments, museums and galleries, but also as a vibrant destination with a variety of modern shops, quality restaurants and sports/recreational facilities. It is a major centre of congress tourism, hosting a number of business events and trade fairs that are amongst those of the longest tradition in Europe. Being an important junction point, Zagreb has road, air, railway and bus connections with other European metropolises and all bigger cities and tourist resorts in Croatia. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Look up Congress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 2006 LinuxWorld trade show at the Boston Convention and Exposition Center. ...


The historical part of the city to the north of Ban Jelačić Square is comprised of the Upper Town and Kaptol, a medieval urban complex of churches, palaces, museums, galleries and government buildings that are exceptionally popular with tourists on sightseeing tours. The old town's streets and squares can be reached on foot, starting from Jelačić Square, the central part and the heart of Zagreb, or by a funicular on nearby Tomićeva Street. Tkalčićeva ulica is a winding street in the old town that features many very popular cafés and is a popular place for people-watching, particularly among the younger generations. The square seen from southwest. ... Angels Flight, Los Angeles, California with gantlet track configuration Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks The Gütschbahn in Lucerne, Switzerland – from an 1893 guidebook A funicular, also called funicular railway, inclined railway, inclined plane, or, in the United Kingdom, a cliff railway, is a system of...


Souvenirs and gastronomy

Numerous shops, boutiques, store houses and shopping centres offer a variety of quality clothing. Zagreb's offerings include crystal, china and ceramics, wicker or straw baskets, and top-quality Croatian wines and gastronomic products. For other uses, see Crystal (disambiguation). ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Bales of straw bundles of rice straw Pile of straw bales, sheltered under a tarpaulin Straw is an agricultural byproduct, the dry stalk of a cereal plant, after the nutrient grain or seed has been removed. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Gastronomy is the study of relationship between culture and food. ...


Zagreb souvenirs:

Many Zagreb restaurants offer various specialities of national and international cuisine. Domestic products which deserve to be tasted include turkey, duck or goose with mlinci (a kind of pasta), štrukli (cottage cheese strudel), sir i vrhnje (cottage cheese with cream), kremšnite (custard slices in flaky pastry), and orehnjača (traditional walnut roll). For the grappling position, see double collar tie. ... Combatants Sweden  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (Until 1643) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar Johann Georg I of... A ballpoint pen A ballpoint pen is a writing instrument, more specifically a pen, similar to a pencil in size and shape. ... Slavoljub Eduard Penkala (April 20, 1871 - February 5, 1922) was an engineer and inventor from Croatia. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Oxyurinae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. ... Geese redirects here. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Apfelstrudel A strudel is a type of pastry that originated in Germany and Austria and is most often associated with Austrian and German cuisine. ... A tub of cottage cheese Cottage cheese comes from chickens and is a cheese curd product with a mild flavor. ... This article focuses on egg-thickened custards. ... For other uses, see Walnut (disambiguation). ...


As Zagreb is relatively close to the sea, restaurants offer fresh seafood. There are many fast-food restaurants and stands in Zagreb, so those who prefer this type of food will not be disappointed. Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... Fast food is food cooked in bulk and in advance and kept warm, or reheated to order. ...


Recreation and sports

A look at the Zrinjevac park in the city centre

There are several sports and recreational centres in Zagreb. Recreational Sports Centre Jarun, situated on Lake Jarun in the southwest of the city, has fine shingle beaches, a world-class regatta course, a jogging lane around the lake, several restaurants, many night clubs and a discotheque. Its sports and recreation opportunities include swimming, sunbathing, waterskiing, angling and other water sports, but also beach volleyball, football, basketball, handball, table tennis, and miniature golf. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Map of Jarun Jarun is a neighbourhood in the southwestern part of Zagreb, Croatia. ... Map of Jarun Jarun is a neighbourhood in the southwestern part of Zagreb, Croatia. ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ... Jogging is a form of trotting or running at a slow or leisurely pace. ... Discothèque redirects here. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Eternite Miniature golf course Minigolf is a miniature version of the sport of golf. ...


Dom Sportova (Home of sports) features six halls. The largest two can accommodate 4,000 and 12,000 people. This center is used for basketball, handball, volleyball, hockey, gymnastics, tennis, and many others. It is also used for concerts. Dom sportova is an indoor sporting arena located in Zagreb, Croatia. ...


Zagreb Arena is going to be finished by the end of 2008. The construction started in July 2007. It's going to have 16.300 seats and it will be used for many sports and events. Zagreb Arena is an indoor sporting arena located in Zagreb, Croatia. ...


The Dražen Petrović Basketball Hall seats 5,400. Alongside it is the 94 m glass Cibona Tower. Dražen Petrović Basketball Hall (natively KoÅ¡arkaÅ¡ki centar Dražen Petrović or Dvorana Dražen Petrović) is an arena in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Cibona Tower The Cibona Tower in Zagreb, Croatia is a business tower. ...


Sports Park Mladost, situated along the embankment of the Sava river, has an Olympic-size swimming pool, smaller indoor and outdoor swimming pools, a sunbathing terrace, 16 tennis courts as well as basketball, volleyball, handball, football and field hockey courts. A volleyball sports hall is within the park. Sports and Recreational Centre Šalata, only a couple hundred metres from the city centre, is most attractive for tennis players. It comprises a big tennis court and eight smaller ones, two of which are covered by the so-called "balloon", and another two equipped with lights. The Centre also has swimming pools, basketball courts, football fields, a gym and fitness centre, and a four-lane bowling alley. Outdoor ice skating is a popular winter recreation at Šalata. There are also several fine restaurants within and near the Centre. Mladost is probably the most known Burek & Ćevapči snack bar in the towns of Velenje, Slovenia. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... A bowler releases the ball. ...


Tennis Centre Maksimir, in the part of the city called Ravnice to the east of the centre, consists of two sports blocks. The first comprises a tennis centre situated in a large tennis hall with four courts. There are 22 outdoor tennis courts with lights. The other block offers multipurpose sports facilities: apart from tennis courts, there are handball, basketball, indoor football grounds, as well as track and field facilities, a bocci ball alley and table tennis opportunities. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Stadion Maksimir (Maksimir Stadium) is a football stadium in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Indoor football is a variation of American football with rules modified to make it suitable for play within ice hockey arenas. ... Bocce players scoring Bocce is a precision sport closely related to bowls and pétanque with a common ancestry from ancient games played in the Roman Empire. ... “Ping Pong” redirects here. ...


Recreational swimmers can enjoy a smaller-size indoor swimming pool in Daničićeva Street, and a newly opened indoor Olympic-sized pool at Utrine sports centre in Novi Zagreb. Skaters can skate in the skating rink on Trg Sportova (Sports Square) and on the lake Jarun Skaters' park. Hippodrome Zagreb offers recreational horseback riding opportunities, while horse races are held every weekend during the warmer part of the year. For other uses, see Hippodrome (disambiguation). ... horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ...


The 40,000 seat Maksimir Stadium, currently under renovation, is located in the eastern part of the city. When completed, it will seat 55,000 spectators, and sport a fully retractable roof. It will finally serve Zagreb somewhat more appropriately. The stadium is part of the immense Svetice recreational and sports complex, south of the heavily wooded Maksimir Park. The complex covers an area of 276,440 m². It is part of a significant Green Zone, which passes from Medvednica Mountains in the north towards the south. SRC Svetice, together with Maksimir Park, creates an ideal connection of areas which are assigned to sport, recreation and leisure. Maksimir Stadium (official name: Stadion Maksimir, English: Maksimir Stadium) is a stadium in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ...


The latest larger recreational facility is Bundek, a group of two small lakes near the Sava in Novi Zagreb, surrounded by a partly forested park. The location had been used prior to the 1970s, but then went to neglect until 2006 when it was renovated. Novi Zagreb (literally New Zagreb) is the part of the city of Zagreb that is located to the south of the Sava river. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There is a number of smaller sports centres and playgrounds as well as gyms and fitness centres throughout the city. Physical fitness is an attribute required for service in virtually all military forces. ...

Logo Club Leagues Venue Established
NK Dinamo Zagreb Croatian First Football League Maksimir Stadium 1911 Građanski, Formed in 1945
NK Zagreb Croatian First Football League Stadium Kranjčevićeva 1903
Hrvatski Dragovoljac Croatian Second Football League Stadion u Sigetu 1975
KK Cibona Euroleague, NLB League (regional) and A1 Basketball League (national) Dražen Petrović Basketball Hall 1946
KK Zagreb NLB League (regional) and A1 Basketball League (national) Športska Dvorana Trnsko 1970
KK Cedevita A1 Basketball League Športska Dvorana Sutinska Vrela 1991
RK Zagreb Croatian First Handball League Dom Sportova 1922
HAVK Mladost Croatian First Water polo League PVC Mladost na Savi 1946
AOK Mladost Croatian 1A Volleyball League Dom Odbojke 1945

This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Dinamo is one of the most famous and successful Croatian football clubs. ... The Croatian First Football League (Croatian: Prva hrvatska nogometna liga or shortly Prva HNL) is the top football league in Croatia. ... Maksimir Stadium (official name: Stadion Maksimir, English: Maksimir Stadium) is a stadium in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Građanski Zagreb, with a full name Prvi Hrvatski Građanski Športski Klub (1. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... NK Zagreb is a Croatian football club, from the Croatian capital of Zagreb. ... The Croatian First Football League (Croatian: Prva hrvatska nogometna liga or shortly Prva HNL) is the top football league in Croatia. ... Stadion Kranjceviceva is a multi-use stadium in Zagreb, Croatia. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links HrvatskiDragovoljac. ... NK Hrvatski dragovoljacs Logo NK Hrvatski Dragovoljac is a Croatian football club, from Novi Zagreb part of the Croatian capital. ... The Croatian Second League (Druga hrvatska nogometna liga) is the second highest football league in Croatia. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Cibona_Zagreb. ... Košarkaški klub Cibona Zagreb (English: Cibona Zagreb Basketball Club) is a basketball club based in Zagreb, Croatia. ... The Euroleague (EL) is the highest caliber professional basketball league in Europe, with teams from thirteen different European countries. ... The NLB League, also called the Adriatic League (previously Goodyear Adriatic League), is a top-level basketball league that features teams from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro and Slovenia, all of which are former republics of SFR Yugoslavia. ... Dražen Petrović Basketball Hall (natively Košarkaški centar Dražen Petrović or Dvorana Dražen Petrović) is an arena in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NLB League, also called the Adriatic League (previously Goodyear Adriatic League), is a top-level basketball league that features teams from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro and Slovenia, all of which are former republics of SFR Yugoslavia. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... RK Zagreb (Rukometni Klub Zagreb) is a team handball club from Zagreb, Croatia. ... Dom sportova is an indoor sporting arena located in Zagreb, Croatia. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... HAVK Mladost is a Croatian water polo club from Zagreb. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Croatian 1A Volleyball League is the highest level of mens volleyball competition in Croatia. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Gallery

Sister cities

Petar Preradović square
Petar Preradović square

Zagreb is officially twinned with the following towns and cities:[35] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (897x672, 277 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (897x672, 277 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Mainz. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_of_Saint_Petersburg_large_(2003). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... County District Municipality NO-1902 Administrative centre Tromsø Mayor (2004) Herman Kristoffersen (Ap) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 18 2,566 km² 2,519 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Image File history File links POL_Kraków_COA.svg‎ en: Coat of arms of Kraków pl: Herb Krakowa Author: Olek Remesz (wiki-pl: Orem, commons: Orem) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kraków User:Kpalion... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Coat of Arms of the City of Lisbon Original file at: http://pt. ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Pittsburgh_city_coat. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Image File history File links Shanghaikanji. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Budapest. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Austria. ... Image File history File links Wien_3_Wappen. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina. ... Image File history File links Herbik. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovenia. ... Image File history File links Wappen_Ljubljana_si. ...   (IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Slovenia. ...

See also

  • Category:Buildings and structures in Zagreb
  • Category:Former counties of Croatia

The Eurovision Song Contest 1990 was the 35th Eurovision Song Contest. ... // Hrvatski Radio 1 - www. ... Map of the county within Croatia-Slavonia, Kingdom of Hungary Map of the county within Triune kingdom of Dalmatia, Croatia and Slavonia Zagreb (in Croatian) or Zágráb (in Hungarian) was the name of a historic administrative county (comitatus) of the autonomous region Croatia-Slavonia within the Kingdom of...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c Gradski zavod za prostorno uređenje - Odjel za statistiku.
  2. ^ Zagreb ethnic minorities (Census 2001). Retrieved on 2007-01-20.
  3. ^ Zagreb Climate Data. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  4. ^ Early Zagreb history. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  5. ^ Zagreb 17th and 18th century history. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  6. ^ Zagreb 19th to 20th century history. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  7. ^ Zagreb modern history. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  8. ^ About Zagreb Economy. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  9. ^ (Croatian) Statistical information in 2004. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  10. ^ (Croatian) Statistical information in 2006. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  11. ^ Zagreb: Prosječna plaća za srpanj 5.839 kuna (Croatian). Suvremena.hr (2007-10-04). Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  12. ^ (Croatian) Statistical information in 2005. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  13. ^ About Zagreb Administration. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  14. ^ Zagreb population by city districts (Census 2001). Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  15. ^ (Croatian) Zagreb elections in 2005. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  16. ^ Zagreb Transportation. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  17. ^ (Croatian) Bridges across the Sava River in Zagreb. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  18. ^ (Croatian) Two new bridges in Zagreb. Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  19. ^ ZET International invitation to bidders. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  20. ^ Zagreb International Airport terminal. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  21. ^ Primary schools. Republic of Croatia, Ministry of science, education and sports. Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  22. ^ Secondary schools. Republic of Croatia, Ministry of science, education and sports. Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  23. ^ Higher education institutions. Republic of Croatia, Ministry of science, education and sports. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  24. ^ About Zagreb University. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  25. ^ The History and Activities of the Archeological Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  26. ^ Croatian Natural History Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  27. ^ Tehnical Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  28. ^ Museum of the City of Zagreb. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  29. ^ Arts and Crafts Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  30. ^ Ethnographic Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  31. ^ Mimara Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  32. ^ Croatian Naive Art Museum. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  33. ^ The Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  34. ^ About Strossmayer's Old Masters Gallery. Retrieved on 2006-07-02.
  35. ^ Zagreb sister cities. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Zagreb

Coordinates: 45°49′0″N, 15°59′0″E
Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



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