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Encyclopedia > Zadar
City of Zadar
Grad Zadar
View of the city
City of Zadar (Croatia)
City of Zadar
Location of Zadar in Croatia
Coordinates: 44°6′51″N 15°13′40″E / 44.11417, 15.22778
Country Croatia
County Zadar
Government
 - Mayor Dr. Živko Kolega (HDZ)
Area
 - Total 194 km² (74.9 sq mi)
Population (2001)
 - Total 90,916
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)

Zadar (Liburnian Iadera?, Greek: Idassa, Ίδασσα, Iàdeira, Ιαδειρα, Latin: Iader, Dalmatian: Jadra, Jadera, Italian: Zara) is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea, with a population of 90,916 (2006). It is the fifth largest Croatian city. 93% of its citizens are ethnic Croats (2001 census).
It is the centre of modern Croatia's Zadar county and the wider northern Dalmatian region. Zadar is located opposite the islands of Ugljan and Pašman, from which it is separated by the narrow Zadar Strait.
The promontory on which the old city stands used to be separated from the mainland by a deep moat which has since become a landfill. The harbor, to the north-east of the town, is safe and spacious.
Zadar is the seat of a Catholic archbishop. Zadar can refer to: Zadar, a Croatian city. ... Picture of Zadar, tekn by myself File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2631x2170, 462 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Osijek Slavonski Brod Slatina, Croatia Virovitica Split Rijeka ÄŒakovec Solin Gospić Bjelovar Bilje User:Elephantus/Test... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The counties are primary territorial subdivisions of the Republic of Croatia. ... Zadar county - Zadarska županija is a county in Croatia, it encompasses northern Dalmatia and southeastern Lika. ... The Croatian Democratic Union (Croatian: Hrvatska Demokratska Zajednica, HDZ), is a Croatian political party. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Eastern European Time Central Africa Time Israel Standard Time South Africa Standard Time Central European Summer Time West Africa Summer Time Category: ... The Liburnian language is now an extinct language which was spoken by the ancient Liburnians, who occupied Liburnia in classical and early medieval times. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... An inhabited settlement in the Republic of Croatia has the status of city (grad; can also be translated as town) if it: is the center of a county (županija), or has more than 10,000 residents, or is defined by an exception Since 2006, there are a total of 127... A satellite image of the Adriatic Sea. ... Zadar county - Zadarska županija is a county in Croatia, it encompasses northern Dalmatia and southeastern Lika. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... Ugljan is an Adriatic Sea island in the Zadar Archipelago, northwest of the island of PaÅ¡man and southeast of the islands of Rivanj and Sestrunj; area 50. ... View of PaÅ¡man and Ugljan from the highest point of PaÅ¡man PaÅ¡man is an Adriatic Sea island off the coast of Croatia, located to the south of Zadar, surrounded by the islands Ugljan, Iž, Dugi otok and Kornati. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ...

Contents

Name

In the Antique names of the city Iadera and Iader much older roots were hidden, of a name the most probably related to a hydrographical term. It was coined by an ancient Mediterranean people and their Pre-Indo-European language. They transmitted it to the later settlers, Liburnians. The name of Liburnian city was first mentioned by a Greek inscription from Pharos (Starigrad) on the island of Hvar in 384 BC, where the citizens of Zadar were noted as Ίαδασινοί (Iadasinoi). In Greek source Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax the city was Ίδασσα (Idassa), probably vulgar Greek form of the original Liburnian name. Some archaeologists and ethnographers use the term Old Europe to characterize the autochthonous (aboriginal) peoples who were living in Neolithic southeastern Europe before the immigration of Indo-European peoples (for this reason also called Pre-Indo-European). ... Liburnians (or Liburni, Gk. ... Hvar (Croatia) For the acronym, see HVAR. Hvar (Lesina in Italian) is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea, located off the Dalmatian coast. ... The Periplus of Pseudo-Scylax is a 4th or 3rd Century BCE Greek periplus. ...


During Antiquity the name was oftenly recorded in the sources in Latin language in two forms: Iader in the inscriptions and in the writings of the classic writers, Iadera predominantly among the late Antiquity writers, while usual ethnonyms were Iadestines and Iadertines. Accent was on the first syllable in both forms Iader and Iadera, which influenced the early-Medieval Dalmatian language forms Jadra, Jadera and Jadertina, where accent kept its original place. Antiquity means different things: Generally it means ancient history, and may be used of any period before the Middle Ages. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ...


In Dalmatian language Jadra (Jadera) was pronounced Zadra (Zad(e)ra), due to phonetic transformation Ja- to Za-. That early change was also reflected in Croatian name Zadar, there was compensation with half-vocal and translation to male gender, so Zadъrъ became Zadar. The ethnonym graphy Jaderani from the legend of St. Krševan in 9th century, was identical to initial old-Slavic form Zadъrane, or Renaissance Croatian Zadrani. Old Church Slavonic (also called Old Slavic[1]) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Thessalonica (modern Thessaloniki) by the 9th century Byzantine Greek missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...


Dalmatian names Jadra, Jadera were transferred to other languages, in Venetian language Jatara (hyper urbanism in 9th century) and Zara, Tuscan Giara, Latin Diadora (Constantine VII in DAI, 10th century), Old French Jadres (Geoffroy de Villehardouinin in the chronicles of the Fourth Crusade in 1202), Arabic Jadora (Al-Idrisi, 12th century), Iadora (Guido, 12th century), Spanish Jazara, Jara, Sarra (14th century) and the others. A sign in Venetian reading Here we also speak Venetian Venetian or Venetan is a Romance language spoken by over five million people,[1] mostly in the Veneto region of Italy. ... The Tuscan dialect is a dialect spoken in Tuscany, Italy. ... Constantine and his mother Zoë. Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos or Porphyrogenitus, the Purple-born (Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Ζ΄ Πορφυρογέννητος, Kōnstantinos VII Porphyrogennētos), (Constantinople, September 905 – November 9, 959 in Constantinople) was the son of the Byzantine emperor Leo VI and his fourth wife Zoe Karbonopsina. ... De Administrando Imperio is the commonly used Latin title of a scholarly work written in Greek by the 10th-century Byzantine emperor Constantine VII. Constantine was a scholar-emperor, who sought to revive learning and education in the Byzantine Empire. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... Belligerents Crusaders Holy Roman Empire Republic of Venice Montferret Champagne Blois Amiens Île-de-France Saint-Pol Burgundy Flanders Balkans Byzantine Empire Kingdom of Hungary Croatia Dalmatia Commanders Otto IV Boniface I Theobald I Lois I Alexios V Doukas Isaac II Angelos Alexios III Angelos Emeric I The Fourth Crusade... Arabic redirects here. ...


Jadera became officially Zara when it fell under authority of the Republic of Venice in 15th century, remained the same in the Austrian Empire in 19th century, it was changed to Zadar provisionally from 1910 to 1920 and finally in 1945.[1] [2] Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded...


History

Prehistory

The entire district of present day Zadar was populated since prehistoric times. The earliest evidence of human life comes from the Late Stone Age, while numerous settlements have been dated as early as the Neolithic. Before the Illyrians, the area was inhabited by an ancient Mediterranean people of Pre-Indo-European culture. They were assimilated with the Indo-Europeans, who were settling between 4th and 2nd millenium BC, into a new ethnical unity, that of the Liburnians, who were outlined materially in 9th century BC. Stone Age fishing hook. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Some archaeologists and ethnographers use the term Old Europe to characterize the autochthonous (aboriginal) peoples who were living in Neolithic southeastern Europe before the immigration of Indo-European peoples (for this reason also called Pre-Indo-European). ... Indo-Europeans are speakers of Indo-European languages. ... Liburnians (or Liburni, Gk. ...


Antiquity

In the 9th century BC Iadera was settled by the Liburnians, a tribe of Illyrians, who were known as great sailors and merchants. By the 7th Century BC it had become an important centre for their trading activities with the Greeks and the Romans. Its population at that time is estimated at 2,000. The people of Iadera, the Iadasinoi were first mentioned in a Greek inscription (384 BC) as the leading enemies of the Greek colonists in the Adriatic in the period of Greek colonization (6th – 4th centuries BC). In the middle of the 2nd century BC, the Romans began to gradually invade the region. After 59 BC, Iadera became a Roman municipium, and in 48 BC a Roman colony. In the early days of the Roman domination, Iadera was a flourishing Roman colony. It lasted for several hundred years, until waves of marauding tribes battered the region. By some estimations, in the 4th century it had probably between 20 and 25 thousand citizens, an admixture of Romans and indigenous Liburnians.[3] In 441 and 447 Dalmatia was ravaged by the Huns. (10th century BC - 9th century BC - 8th century BC - other centuries) (900s BC - 890s BC - 880s BC - 870s BC - 860s BC - 850s BC - 840s BC - 830s BC - 820s BC - 810s BC - 800s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Kingdom of Kush (900 BC... The Liburnians were the ancient inhabitants of Liburnia. ... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 2nd century BC started on January 1, 200 BC and ended on December 31, 101 BC. // Coin of Antiochus IV. Reverse shows Apollo seated on an omphalos. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61 BC 60 BC 59 BC 58 BC 57 BC 56... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... A municipium was the second highest class of a Roman city, and was inferior in status to the colonia. ... Consuls: Gaius Julius Caesar, Publius Servilius Vatia Isauricus. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ...


The Medieval Period

After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, in 481 Dalmatia was added to the Ostrogothic kingdom, which already included the more northerly parts of Illyricum, i.e. Pannonia and Noricum. In 536 the Byzantine emperor Justinian the Great, started a military campaign to reconquer the territories of the former Western Empire (see Gothic War), Zadar became consequently part of the Byzantine Empire.[4] The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). ... The Ostrogothic Kingdom was the kingdom built by the Ostrogoths. ... This article is about an ancient civilization in southeastern Europe; see also Illyria (software), Illyria (character in the TV series Angel). ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Justinian may refer to: Justinian I, a Roman Emperor; Justinian II, a Byzantine Emperor; Justinian, a storeship sent to the convict settlement at New South Wales in 1790. ... Combatants Byzantine Empire Ostrogoths Franks Visigoths Commanders Belisarius Narses Mundalias Germanus Justinus Liberius Theodoric the Great Witigis Totila The Gothic War, was a war fought in Italy in 535-552. ... Byzantine redirects here. ...


In 568 Dalmatia was devastated by the Avars invasion, and throughout the century Slavs (i.e. early Croatian and Serbian tribes), its modern occupants, gradually established themselves in Illyria, where, unlike the earlier barbarian conquerors, they formed permanent settlements. Between 600 and 650 the main body of the immigrants occupied Illyria.[4] Late Avar period Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ...


In other parts of the Balkan Peninsula, Serbs and Croats quickly absorbed the native population. However, the coastal cities managed to resist immediate cultural assimilation (mostly thanks to Byzantine influence). This sociologic process was instead to take many centuries to reach completion. Consequently, The rural aereas were settled by Croats and Serbs, while the native population, mostly consisting of romanized Illyrians, was either eventually assimilated or migrated to the cities (such as Spalatum, Iader and Ragusa. This gradual, long process took place in the 7th and 8th centuries. Dalmatia was, thus, a region culturally divided between the Romanic Byzantine cities and the Slavic hinterland (though the Slavs did establish coastal cities of their own, such as Šibenik). These two communities were known to harbor dislike for one another, a grievous circumstance which sometimes resulted in disputes.[4][5] Other Romanic natives (later called Morlachs) took refuge in the mountainous interior of Dalmatia, where they preserved their culture for several centuries.[4] For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Look up Dubrovnik in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... Morlachs (in Greek: Mavrovlachi or Mauro-Vlachs, meaning Black Vlachs; in Latin sources: Nigri Latini) were a population of Vlach shepherds that lived in the Dinaric Alps (western Balkans in modern use), constantly migrating in search for better pastures for their sheep flocks. ...


Zadar survived the turbulent times, due its strategic position and its strong defensive system and managed to maintain its Roman heritage (such as its dialect of the independent Dalmatian language).
Because of the destruction of Dalmatia's capital Salona and the relocation of its people to nearby Spalatum (Split), Zadar in time became the capital of the Byzantine Theme (administrative unit) of Dalmatia, and was the seat of the imperial Governor. Byzantium, as the protector of Dalmatia enjoyed a strong military and political presence there, due to the persistent threat of invasion by the new Venetian Republic. Dalmatian is an extinct Romance language formerly spoken in the Dalmatia region of Croatia, and as far south as Kotor (Cattaro) in Montenegro. ... Solin (It. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ...


However, the geographical position of Zadar, suffices to explain the relatively small influence exercised by Byzantine culture throughout the six centuries (535-1102) of Byzantine rule.[5] It maintained a large degree of autonomy throughout this time. Along with other Dalmatian cities it soon came to resemble a typical medieval commune. In 806 Dalmatia was briefly occupied by the Holy Roman empire under Pepin, but this was quickly reversed and the cities were given back to Byzantium in 812, by the Treaty of Aachen.[5] This article is about the medieval empire. ... Pepin (April 773 – 8 July 810) was the son of Charlemagne and king of Italy (781-810) under the authority of his father. ... There were two Treaties of Aix-la-Chapelle. ...


Meanwhile, the Croatian state formed inland, and trade and political links with Zadar began to develop. Croatian settlers began to arrive, becoming commonplace by the 10th century. In 925, the Duke of Croatian Dalmatia Tomislav, united Croatian Dalmatia and Pannonia establishing the Croatian Kingdom. He also was granted the position of protector of Dalmatia (the cities) by the Byzantine Emperor. He thus politically united the Dalmatian cities with their hinterland for the first time. In 998 Zadar sought Venetian protection against the Neretvian pirates, who had settled near the mouth of the Neretva river.[6][5] Events Alfonso IV the Monk becomes king of Leon Ha-Mim proclaims himself a prophet among the Ghomara of Morocco Tomislav, duke of the Croatian duchies of Pannonia and Dalmatia, is crowned King of Croatia at Duvno field. ... King Tomislav by Josip Horvat - Međimurec Tomislav (died in 928), was one of the greatest rulers of Croatia in Middle Ages. ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... For other uses, see Pannonia (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Croatia was an independent state from circa 925 until 1102 covering most of what is today Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Balkans. ... Pagania in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio. ... River Neretva in Mostar, 2004 Neretva is a river in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia. ...


The Venetians were quick to fully exploit this opportunity: in 998 a fleet commanded by Doge Pietro Orseolo II, after defeating the pirates, landed in Korčula and Lastovo. Dalmatia was quickly captured by surprise and offered little serious resistance. Trogir was the exception and was subjected to Venetian rule only after a bloody struggle, whereas the Republic of Dubrovnik was forced to pay tribute. Pietro self-proclaimed himself Dux Dalmatianorum (Duke of the Dalmatians), associating it with his son (carefully agreeing to Byzantine suzerainty).[4][5] Grand Procession of the Doge, 16th century For about a thousand years, the chief magistrate and leader of the Most Serene Republic of Venice was styled the Doge, a rare but not unique Italian title derived from the Latin Dux, as the major Italian parallel Duce and the English Duke. ... Pietro II Orseolo was the Doge of Venice from 991 to 1009. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 279 km² (entire island) Location Mayor Mirko Duhović (SDP) Population 3,232 (town); 16,138 (island) Korčula (Italian Curzola, Latin Corcyra Nigra, Greek Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic: Krkar) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia. ... Map showing the location of Lastovo in Croatia Lastovo (Italian: Lagosta, Latin: Augusta Insula, Greek: Ladestanos, Illyrian: Ladest) is an island, town and municipality in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county in Croatia. ... Coat of arms Trogir (Italian Traù, Latin Tragurium, Greek Tragurion, Hungarian Tengerfehérvár) is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia county, Croatia, with a population of 10,907 (2001) and a total municipality population of 13,322 (2001). ... The Republic of Dubrovnik, also known as the Republic of Ragusa, was a maritime city-state that was based in the city of Dubrovnik from the 14th century until 1808. ...


The Croatian kings meanwhile established their own maritime cities, such as Nin and Biograd na Moru (also later Šibenik).[5] The Church, on its part, was involved in general confusion; in 1059 on the church synod in Split it forbade the use of any language but liturgies in Greek or Latin, and so had accentuated the differences between Romanic and Slavic population.[5] In the 10th century the cities came back under Crotian administration and Zadar sought independence from Byzantium. In 1069 the city was joined with Croatia by a treaty for the second time, by the Croatian King Petar Krešimir IV the Great. Nin may refer to: Look up nin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coat of arms Biograd na Moru is a town in northern Dalmatia, Croatia. ... Å ibenik Å ibenik (German: Sibenning, Italian: Sebenico) is an historic town in Croatia, population 51,553 (2001). ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Events Harrying of the North- King William of England (William the Conqueror) reacts to rebellions made by his people against him. ... Petar KreÅ¡imir IV of Croatia was a notably energetic Croatian king under whose rule the medieval Croatian state probably reached its peak. ...


Rivalry of Venice and Croatia-Hungary in Dalmatia

In 1099, the Kingdom of Croatia was invaded and forced into a personal union with the Hungarian king Coloman. In 1105 Zadar recognized his rule.
The Croatian Kingdom existed between 925 and 1102 and was ruled mostly by native Croats Trpimirović dynasty. ... It has been suggested that Dynastic union be merged into this article or section. ... Coloman (Hungarian:Könyves Kálmán, Slovak and Croatian: Koloman) (1070 - February 3, 1116) was King of Hungary from 1095 to 1116. ...


Zadar was repeatedly invaded by Venice between 1111 and 1154 and then once more between 1160 and 1183.


In 1183 it finally rebelled, pleading to the Pope and to the Croato-Hungarian throne for protection, but it the year 1202 the Fourth Crusade began forming in Europe. The crusaders were, however, dependent upon Venice for transportation to Egypt and they were 34,000 marks short of amount required by them. Ever the opportunist, Doge Enrico Dandolo instructed the crusader army, that for late payment (they were to pay the Venetians out the first spoils they gained in the crusade) they should lay siege to the troublesome Dalmatian capitol. Forced by their lack of money the Crusaders agreed and besieged Zadar. The overwhelmed city soon fell back under Venetian rule. Belligerents Crusaders Holy Roman Empire Republic of Venice Montferret Champagne Blois Amiens ÃŽle-de-France Saint-Pol Burgundy Flanders Balkans Byzantine Empire Kingdom of Hungary Croatia Dalmatia Commanders Otto IV Boniface I Theobald I Lois I Alexios V Doukas Isaac II Angelos Alexios III Angelos Emeric I The Fourth Crusade... The Crusaders (formerly the Canterbury Crusaders) are a New Zealand Rugby Union team based in Christchurch, New Zealand that competes in the Super 14 (formerly the Super 12). ... Dandolo Preaching the Crusade, by Gustav Dore Tomb of Enrico Dandolo Enrico Dandolo (1107?-1205) was the Doge (1192-1205) of Venice during the Fourth Crusade. ... The Siege of Zara (November 10-November 23, 1203) was the first major action of the Fourth Crusade. ...


This did not break the spirit of the city, however. Its commerce was suffering due to lack of autonomy under Venice. They enjoyed considerable autonomy under the distant, much more feudal Croatian-Hungarian kings. A number of insurrections followed (1242-1243, 1320s, 1345-1346) which resulted finally in Zadar coming back under the crown of the Croatian-Hungarian king Louis I by the Treaty of Zadar, in 1358. After the death of Louis, Zadar recognized the rule of king Sigismund, and after him, that of Ladislas Anjou. During his reign Croatia-Hungary was enveloped in a bloody civil war. In 1409, Venice, seeing that Ladislas was about to be the loser, and eager to exploit the situation despite its relative military weakness, offered to buy his "rights" on Dalmatia for a mere 100, 000 ducats. Knowing he lost the region in any case, Ladislas accepted. Zadar was, thus, sold back to the Venetians for a poultry sum. Louis the Great. ... The Treaty of Zara was the peace treaty signed in Zara, Croatia in 1358 in which the Venetian Republic lost influence over its Dalmatian holdings. ... Sigismund, aged approximately 50, depicted by unknown artist in the 1420s — the only contemporary portrait. ... Coat of Arms of Ladislas, as titular King of Hungary, titular King of Jerusalem, and King of Naples. ...

Zadar's "Kopnena Vrata"
Zadar's "Kopnena Vrata"

Image File history File linksMetadata Zadar_PortaTerraferma. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Zadar_PortaTerraferma. ...

Venetian Republic (1409-1797)

The Adriatic in 1560, with Dalmatia and Zadar
The Adriatic in 1560, with Dalmatia and Zadar

In the early 16th century the Ottoman Turks conquered Dalmatia's hinterland, and the city became, in essence, a military stronghold protecting Venetian trade in the Adriatic, as well as the administrative centre for the Venetian conquests in Dalmatia.
From 1726-1733 a part of its territory was settled by Catholic Albanian refugees. That Albanian settlement is called "Arbanasi". Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320...


Napoleonic era (1797-1813)

After the fall of Venice (1797) with the Treaty of Campo Formio, Zadar come under the Austrian crown and once again became united with the rest of Croatia. In 1806 it was briefly given to the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy, until in 1809 it was added to the French Illyrian Provinces. In 1813 all Dalmatia was reconquered and brought back under the control of the Austrian Empire. The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on October 17, 1797 (26 Vendémiaire, Year VI of the French Republic) by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Ludwig von Cobenzl as representatives of France and Austria. ... The flag of the Kingdom of Italy was a rectangular version of the flag of the Italian Republic, with Napoleons emblem on the green field. ... Illyrian Provinces (French Provinces illyriennes) were formed in 1809 when Austria ceded with the Treaty of Schoenbrunn its lands Carinthia, Carniola, Croatia southwest of the river Sava, Gorizia and Trieste to France after the defeat at the Battle of Wagram. ...


During this time, it maintained its position as the capital of Dalmatia.
During the Napoleonic era, the first Dalmatian newspaper, "Kraglski Dalmatin - Il Regio Dalmata" ("The Royal Dalmatian"), was printed in the city.


Austrian Empire (1815-1918): the age of nationalism

After 1815 Dalmatia (including Dubrovnik) came under the Austrian crown. After 1848, Italian and Slavic nationalism became accentuated and the city became divided between the Croats and the Italians, both of whom founded their respective political parties. There are conflicting sources for both sides claiming to have formed the majority in this period; in general the era saw Slavs grow more than Italians throughout Dalmatians, fostering a neatly distinct national spirit.
April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...


Italy (1920-1945)

In November 1918 Zadar was occupied by the Italian Army, like most of coastal Dalmatia, under the 1915 Treaty of London. Being the city with most Italians in Dalmatia, it was annexed to Italy in 1920, under the Treaty of Rapallo (1920), with the official name of "Zara".
The Italian enclave included Zadar/Zara and the localities of Arbanasi/Borgo Erizzo, Crno/Cerno, Bokanjac/Boccagnazzo, Puntamika/Puntamica and the island Lastovo/Làgosta.
According to the census of 1921, this area included 18.623 people. After the advent of the fascism many Croats left the city because of the repressive assimilationist policies of the Italian fascist regime. Their place was mainly taken by ethnic Italians. Treaty of London may refer to: Treaty of London, 1359 ceding western France to England, repudiated by the Estates-General in Paris, 19 May 1359 Treaty of London, 1604 between England and Spain Treaty of London, 1700, also known as the Second Partition Treaty. ... The Treaty of Rapallo was a treaty between Italy and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes by which the latter was forced to give up parts of its Slovenian and Croatian territory. ... Arbanasi (Bulgarian: Арбанаси, also transliterated as Arbanassi) is a village in Veliko Tarnovo Province of Northern Bulgaria, set on a high plateau between the larger towns of Veliko Tarnovo (4 km away) and Gorna Oryahovitsa. ... Map showing the location of Lastovo in Croatia Lastovo (Italian: Lagosta, Latin: Augusta Insula, Greek: Ladestanos, Illyrian: Ladest) is an island, town and municipality in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county in Croatia. ...


World War II

Germany (with limited Italian assistance) invaded the Kingdom of Yugoslavia on April 6, 1941. On April 17, the Yugoslav government surrendered, faced with the Wehrmacht's undivided attention. Zadar held a force of 9,000 that after limited fighting reached Šibenik and Split on April 15, a mere 2 days from surrender. Occupying Mostar and Dubrovnik, on April 17 they met invading troops that had started out from Italian-occupied Albania. The civilians had previously been evacuated to Ancona and Pula. Within a few weeks, Mussolini forced the newly formed Nazi puppet-state, the so-called Independent State of Croatia (NDH) to hand over almost all of Dalmatia (including Split and even Knin) to fascist Italy. This is known as the Treaty of Rome.
The city became the center of a new Italian province. This treaty was, of course, recognized only by the Axis and was, thus, considered void. For the rest of the world, and, indeed, the local populace, Dalmatia was under Italian occupation.
Under fascist reign the Slavic population was subjected to a policy of forced assimilation (ethnocide). This created immense resentment among the Yugoslav people and the Yugoslav Partisan movement (which was already successfully spreading in the rest of Yugoslavia) particularly took wing here. The Italians employed concentration camps (among others the Rab and Gonars camps), political repression aginst anti-Fascists, torture, reprisals at times against whole villages after partisan actions, forceful italianization and national repression of Slavs.
After Mussolini was removed from power, the government of Pietro Badoglio surrendered to the Allies, and on September 8, 1943, the Italian army collapsed and was quickly disarmed. "Il Duce" was rescued, however, and formed the Nazi-puppet Italian Social Republic in the north of the country. The NDH proclaimed the Treaty of Rome to be void and occupied Dalmatia with German support. The Germans entered Zadar first, and on September 10 the German 114th Jäger Division took over. This avoided a temporary liberation by Partisans, as was the case in Split and Šibenik where several Italian fascist government officials were killed by an angry crowd. The Partisans enjoyed massive support from the locals, and before the reoccupation by German forces, nearly a third of Split's population (including the entire local football team HNK Hajduk) joined the Partisan movement.
The city was prevented from joining the NDH on the grounds that Zadar itself was not subject to the conditions of the Treaty of Rome. Despite this, the NDH's leader Ante Pavelić designated Zadar as the capital of the Sidraga-Ravni Kotari County, although its administrator was prevented from entering the city. Zadar remained under the local administration of the Italian Social Republic.
Zadar was bombed by the Allies, with serious civilian casualties. Italian sources often claim that this was made in order to "ethnically cleanse" the ancient town and avoid subsequent troubles for the victorious Titoist army. Thousands died in the militarily pointless Allied carpet bombings, and many landmarks and centuries old works of art crumbled in dust. Many civilians fled to safety in Italy.
In 1944 the partisans entered the town, soon massacring hundreds of Italians, soldiers and civilians alike, often by drowning them in the Adriatic with a stone attached to their necks (a maritime variant to the foibe system). In the following years most of the Italians, now a minority, left the city, deeming it healthier to live in Italy. The city, resettled by Croatians, successfully recovered and became once more an important regional city in the newly established Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. “April War” redirects here. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The straight-armed Balkenkreuz, a stylized version of the Iron Cross, the emblem of the Wehrmacht. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mostar (Мостар) is a city and municipality in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the center of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of the Federation. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of central Italy, population 101,909 (2005). ... Pula (Latin Colonia Pietas Iulia Pola; Italian Pola (the city has an official Croatian-Italian bilingualism [1]); Istriot Pula, German Polei) is the largest city in Istria, situated at the southern tip of the peninsula, with a population of 62,080 (2006). ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Capital Zagreb Language(s) Croatian Religion Roman Catholicism Political structure Puppet-state King  - 1941-1943 Tomislav II Poglavnik  - 1941-1945 Ante Pavelić Legislature None Historical era World War II  - Established April 10, 1941  - Disestablished May 8, 1945 Population  - 1941 est. ... Knin Knin (Croatia) Knin (Serbian: Книн, Latin and medieval Hungarian: Tinin) is a historical town in the Å ibenik-Knin county of Croatia, located near the source of the river Krka at , in the Dalmatian hinterland, on the railroad Zagreb–Split. ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... Ethnocide is a concept related to genocide; unlike genocide, which has entered into international law, ethnocide remains primarily the province of ethnologists, who have not yet settled on a single cohesive meaning for the term. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Partisans (lat. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... The Rab concentration camp was established during World War II in July 1942, when the Italians established a concentration camp near the village of Kampor on the island of Rab. ... Gonars is a town and commune near Palmanova in the province of Udine, Friuli, northeastern Italy. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Pietro Badoglio (September 28, 1871 - November 1, 1956) was an Italian soldier and politician. ... The Armistice with Italy is an armistice that occurred on September 8, 1943, during World War II. It was signed by Italy and the Allied armed forces, who were occupying the southern half of the country at the time. ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Duce is an Italian word meaning leader, derived from Latin word dux of the same meaning, of which Duke is a derivation. ... Anthem Giovinezza (The Youth)¹ Capital Salò Language(s) Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Head of State Benito Mussolini Historical era World War II  - Established September 23, 1943  - Disestablished April 25, 1945 ¹ External link The Italian Social Republic (Repubblica Sociale Italiana or RSI) was a Nazi puppet state led by... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hajduk is the largest and the most accomplished football club from Split, Croatia. ... Ante Pavelić (July 14, 1889 – December 28, 1959) was the leader (Poglavnik) and founding member of the Croatian national socialist/fascist UstaÅ¡e movement in the 1930s and later the leader of the Independent State of Croatia, a puppet state[1] [2] of Nazi Germany during World War II. // Paveli... The bombing of Zadar by the Allied Forces lasted from November 1943 to October 1944 during the Second World War. ... Yugoslav Partisan Flag The Partisans (lat. ... Location of some foibe Foiba (plural foibe) is the name adopted to define deep natural sinkholes common in Carso, a karstic district located between Italy and Slovenia. ... Motto Brotherhood and Unity Anthem Hey, Slavs Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian (spoken throughout the territory), Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian (all official), and languages of other nationalities. ...

Coat of Arms of Zadar.
Coat of Arms of Zadar.

Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_Zara. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arms_Zara. ...

SFR Yugoslavia (1945-1991)

During this period Zadar underwent intensive reconstruction and revitalisation, followed by a large increase in both population and economic power. The Federal government sponsored numerous public works to this end, including the Adriatic highway (Jadranska magistrala) which created a modern road connection to the rest of the country. Besides the local infrastructure, the SFRY government initiated the industrialization of the city and nearly all its factories were either built or significantly revitalized and modernized in this period. In the 1970s Zadar particularly enjoyed a high standard of living as international tourism came to Dalmatia. Tourism in Croatia is a well-developed industry as Croatia is an attractive tourist destination, particularly because of its extensive coastline and well-preserved coastal Renaissance towns. ...


However, during this period the city lost its status as the capital of the region, with Split overwhelmingly surpassing Zadar in population numbers, which, though increasing throughout the 20th century, boomed in the new, post-WWII, Yugoslavia. For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ...


All in all, by the 1990s the city was not only rebuilt from the Second World War, but emerged as a modern and completely industrialized regional center, with as yet unsurpassed tourist numbers, GDP and employment rates, which were, surprisingly, significantly higher than the present day's.


Recent history

After the death of Tito Yugoslavia rapidly began to destabilize. In the early 1990s the tragic Yugoslav wars began to devastate the country. Zadar became a part of the new Republic of Croatia. Its economy suffered greatly in the period, not so much because of the war itself, but due to the shadowy and controversial privatization process, which caused most of its prosperous companies to go under. During the Croatian War of Independence, Krajina rebels with the protection of the serbianized Yugoslav People's Army (JNA) under Slobodan Milošević's control, converged on the city and subjected it to artillery bombardment, in what is now known as the Battle of Dalmatia. Their aim was to cut off Dalmatia from Croatia and give the remnants of the Yugoslav Navy (JRM) a port on the mainland. Along with other Croatian towns in the area, Zadar was sporadically shelled for several years, which damaged buildings and homes as well as UNESCO protected sites. Attacks in nearby cities and villages occurred, the most brutal being the Škabrnja massacre, where 86 people were murdered. Connections with Zagreb were severed for over a year, the only link between the north and south of the country was via the island of Pag. The siege of the city lasted from 1991 until January 1993 when Zadar and the surrounding area came under the control of Croatian forces in Operation Maslenica. Attacks on the city continued until the end of the war in 1995. Tito redirects here. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants Croatian military Paramilitary organisations Republic of Serb Krajina Army Yugoslav Peoples Army Bosnian Serb Army Republic of Serbia Paramilitary organisations Commanders Franjo TuÄ‘man (President of Croatia) Anton Tus (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1991-1992) Janko Bobetko (Chief of Staff of Croatian Army 1992-1995) Atif... Self-proclaimed Serbian entity in Croatia Republic of Serbian Krajina show in red Capital Knin Government Republic Governors (1990-1995) Milan Babić Goran Hadžić  - Serbian zone of Croatia Milan Martić Historical era Yugoslav wars  - Breakup of Yugoslavia 1990-June 25, 1991  - Creation of SAO Krajina December 21, 1990  - Secession... The Yugoslav Peoples Army (YPA) (Serbo-Croatian: Jugoslovenska narodna armija or Jugoslavenska narodna armija; Serbian and Macedonian: Југословенска народна армија—JHA; Macedonian and Serbian Latin forms: Jugoslovenska narodna armija; Croatian and Bosnian: Jugoslavenska narodna armija—JNA; Slovene: Jugoslovanska ljudska armada—JLA) was the military force of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... MiloÅ¡ević redirects here. ... Combatants Yugoslavia (JNA) Local Serb forces Croatia (HV, police forces, HOS) Commanders Colonel Ratko Mladić (JNA) Strength JNA 9th Corps (Knin): 63 tanks 45 APCs Other units 6th Operational Zone (Several infantry brigades) Map showing the location of Dalmatia, in present day Croatia Battle of Dalmatia (Croatian: Bitka za Dalmaciju... In 1990 the Yugoslav navy had 10,000 sailors (4,400 conscripts), including 2,300 in twenty-five coastal artillery batteries and 900 marines in one light naval infantry brigade. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... According to the census of 1991, Å kabrnja was inhabited by 1,953 people in 397 households, and the vast majority of them were Croats, there wasnt a single Serb resident. ... Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - Total 641. ... Pag (Latin Pagus, village, Italian Pago) is an island in northern Adriatic Sea, off the coast of Croatia. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants Croatia (HV) Bosnia and Herzegovina (ABiH) Republic of Serbian Krajina (VSK) Republika Srpska (VRS) Commanders Zvonimir ÄŒervenko (HV) Atif Dudakovic (ABiH) Mile MrkÅ¡ić (VSK) Strength 150,000 soldiers, 350 tanks, 400 artillery pieces, 50 rocket launchers, 50 aircraft and helicopters 40,000 soldiers, 150 tanks, 350 artillery pieces...


Main sights

Architecture

Zadar gained its urban structure in Roman times; during the time of Julius Caesar and Emperor Augustus, the town was fortified and the city walls with towers and gates were built. On the western side of the town were the forum, the basilica and the temple, while outside the town were the amphitheatre and cemeteries. The aqueduct which was supplying the town with water has been partly preserved. Inside the ancient town, a medieval town had developed, when a series of churches and monasteries had been built. The city of Los Angeles is an example of urbanisation Urbanization or Urbanisation means the removal of the rural characteristics of a town or area, a process associated with the development of civilization. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... Look up basilica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... For other uses, see Aqueduct (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ...


During the Middle Ages, Zadar had fully gained its urban aspect, which has been maintained until today. In the 16th century, Venice fortified the town with a new system of defensive walls on the side facing land. In the first half of the 16th century, architectural building in the Renaissance style was continued. Defence trenches were built also (Foša), which were completely buried during the Italian occupation. In 1873 under Austrian rule the ramparts of Zadar were converted from fortifications into elevated promenades commanding extensive views to seaward and to landward, wall lines thus being preserved; of its four old gates one, the Porta Marina, incorporates the relics of a Roman arch, and another, the Porta di Terraferma, was designed in the 16th century by the Veronese artist Sanmichele. In the bombardments during the Second World War, entire blocks were destroyed, but some of the structures were preserved. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...

St. Donatus' Church, a pre-Romanesque church from the 9th century.
St. Donatus' Church, a pre-Romanesque church from the 9th century.
St. Mary's Church, located in the old city across St. Donatus' Church.
St. Mary's Church, located in the old city across St. Donatus' Church.

Most important landmarks: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1068x1094, 157 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Croatia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1068x1094, 157 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Croatia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 649 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zadar Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 649 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Zadar Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used...

  • Roman Forum - the largest on the eastern side of the Adriatic, founded by the first Roman Emperor Augustus, as shown by two stone inscriptions about its completion dating from the 3rd century.
  • Most of the Roman remains were used in the construction of the fortifications, but two squares are embellished with lofty marble columns; a Roman tower stands on the east side of the town; and some remains of a Roman aqueduct may be seen outside the ramparts.

The chief interest of Zadar lies in its churches. The Forum of Jerash, in Jordan. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman era aqueduct circa 19 BC. It is one of Frances top tourist attractions at over 1. ...

  • St. Donatus' Church - the monumental round building in the pre Romanesque style, traditionally but erroneously said to have been erected on the site of a temple of Juno, from the 9th century is the most important structure of its period preserved in Dalmatia; the massive dome of the rotunda is surrounded by a vaulted gallery in two stories which also extends around the three apses to the east. The church treasury contains some of the finest Dalmatian metal-work; notably the silver ark or reliquary of St Simeon (1380), and the pastoral staff of Bishop Valaresso (1460).
  • St. Anastasia's Cathedral (Croatian: Sv. Stošija), basilica in Romanesque style built in the 12th to 13th century (high Romanesque style), the largest cathedral in Dalmatia.
  • The churches of St. Chrysogonus and St. Simeon are also in the Romanesque style.
  • St. Krševan's Church - monumental Romanesque church of very fine proportions and refined Romanesque ornaments.
  • St. Elijah's Church (Croatian: Sv. Ilija)
  • St. Francis' Church, gothic styled church, site of the signing of the Zadar Peace Treaty 1358
  • Five Wells Square
  • St. Mary's Church which retains a fine Romanesque campanile of 1105 belongs to a Benedictine Convent founded in 1066 by a noblewoman of Zadar by the name of Cika with The Permanent Ecclesiastical Art Exhibition "The Gold and Silver of Zadar"

Other architectual acivments: In Mosta, Malta, the Rotunda of Santa Marija Assunta is covered by a saucer dome. ... This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... Cathedral of St. ... South transept of Tournai Cathedral, Belgium, 12th century. ... A campanile (pronounced []) is, especially in Italy, a free-standing bell tower (Italian campana, bell), often adjacent to a church or cathedral. ...

  • Citadel - built in 1409, southwest of the Land gate, it has remained the same to this day.
  • The Land Gate - built according to a layout of the Venetian architect Michele Sanmicheli in 1543
  • The unique sea organ[1]
  • The Great Arsenal [2]
  • Among the other chief buildings are the Loggia del Comune, rebuilt in 1565, and containing a public library; the old palace of the priors, now the governor's residence; and the episcopal palaces.

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sea organ in scaled form - the sound emerges from the holes along the top step - Courtesy of Toni Perinić Girl is sitting on stone step of Sea organ, behind is cruiser Columbus which is leaving The Sea organ is an architectural object located in Zadar, Croatia which plays music by...

Culture

The first university of Zadar is mentioned in 1396 and it was a part of the Dominican monastery. It was closed in 1807. Events September 25 - Bayazid I defeats Sigismund of Hungary and John of Nevers at the Battle of Nicopolis. ...


Zadar was, along with Split and Dubrovnik, one of the centres of development of Croatian literature. For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Look up Dubrovnik in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... // (ca. ...


The 15th and the 16th centuries were marked by important activities of Croatian writers writing in the national language: Jerolim Vidolić, Petar Zoranić (who wrote first Croatian novel, Mountains), Brne Krnarutić, Juraj Barakovic, Šime Budinić. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Petar Zoranic (Petar Zoranic) (1508 - after 1569) is Croatian writer from Zadar. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ...


During the French rule (1806–1810), the first Dalmatian newspaper Kraglski Dalmatin - Il Regio Dalmata was published in Zadar. It was printed in Italian and Croatian; this last used for the first time in a newspaper.

Il Regio Dalmata-Kraglski Dalmatin. Printed in Italian and Croatian.

In the second half of the 19th century, Zadar was a centre of the movement for the cultural and national revivals in Dalmatia (Italian and Croatian). Image File history File links Regio_Dalmata. ... Image File history File links Regio_Dalmata. ...


Today Zadar's cultural institutions include:

  • The Croatian Theatre House
  • The National Museum
  • The Archaeological Museum (established in 1830)
  • The University of Zadar (refounded in 2003)
  • The Maritime Museum
  • Permanent Exhibition of Sacral Art
  • Croatian Singing Musical Society Zoranić (established 1885)
  • Musical Evenings in St. Donatus [3] (established 1961)
  • International Choirs Competition (established 1997)
  • Arsenal Zadar [4]

The University of Zadar (Croatian Sveučilište u Zadru, Latin Universitas Studiorum Jadertina) is a university located in Zadar, Croatia. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Musical evenings in St. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Government

The administrative area of the City of Zadar includes the nearby villages of Babindub, Crno, Kožino and Petrčane, as well as the islands of Ist, Iž, Molat, Olib, Premuda, Rava and Silba. Total City area, including the islands, covers 194 km2. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Iž (Croatia) Satellite image of Iž Iž (in Italian Isola Esa) is an island in Croatian part of Adriatic Sea. ... Satelite image of Molat This is an article about island named Molat. ... Olib is an island in northern Dalmatia, located northwest of Zadar, southwest of Pag, southeast of LoÅ¡inj and just east of Silba. ... Premuda is a little island in the croatian part of the northern adriatic. ... Rava was a Babylonian amora born in 270, and one of the most often-cired Rabbis in the talmud. ... Silba is an island in Croatia, northen Dalmatia, Zadar county, south-east of Lošinj (Losheeny), between the islands of Premuda and Olib. ...


Zadar is divided into 21 local committees: Arbanasi, Bili Brig, Bokanjac, Brodarica, Crvene Kuće, Diklo, Dračevac, Gaženica, Jazine I, Jazine II, Maslina, Novi Bokanjac, Poluotok, Ploča, Puntamika, Ričina, Smiljevac, Stanovi, Vidikovac, Višnjik, Voštarnica.


Economy

Major industries include tourism, traffic, seaborne trade, agriculture, fishing and fish farming activities, metal manufacturing and mechanical engineering industry, chemicals and non-metal industry and banking. The headquarters of the following companies are located in Zadar:

The farmland just northeast of Zadar, Ravni Kotari, is a well known source of marasca cherries. Distilleries in Zadar have produced Maraschino since the 16th century. For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... Maraschino is a bittersweet, clear liqueur flavored with marasca cherries, which are grown in northern Italy (near Trieste), Croatia, and Slovenia. ...


Science

In 1998, Zadar hosted the Central European Olympiad in Informatics (CEOI). The Central European Olympiad in Informatics (CEOI) is an annual informatics competition for secondary school students. ...


Transportation

In the 20th century, roads became more important than sea routes, but Zadar remained an important traffic point. The main road along the Adriatic passes through the city. In the immediate vicinity, there is the Zagreb-Split highway, finished in 2005. Since 1966, a railroad has linked it with Knin, where it joins the main railroad from Zagreb to Split. It has an international sea line to Ancona in Italy. The Zadar Airport is located in Zemunik, around 14 km to the east. It is planned to build a semi-highway from the port of Gaženica in Zadar to the highway hub of Zemunik. Another plan is the "Adriatic railroad" linking Gospić with Zadar and Split. Location of Zagreb within Croatia Coordinates: , Country RC diocese 1094 Free royal city 1242 Unified 1850 Government  - Mayor Milan Bandić Area [1]  - Total 641. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Knin Knin (Croatia) Knin (Serbian: Книн, Latin and medieval Hungarian: Tinin) is a historical town in the Å ibenik-Knin county of Croatia, located near the source of the river Krka at , in the Dalmatian hinterland, on the railroad Zagreb–Split. ... Ancona is a city and a seaport in the Marche, a region of central Italy, population 101,909 (2005). ... Gospić is a town in the mountainous and sparsely populated region of Lika, Croatia. ...


Sports

The local basketball club is KK Zadar, and the football club NK Zadar. The bowling club Kuglački klub Zadar is also very successful. KK Zadar is a Croatian basketball team from the city of Zadar. ... NK Zadar is a Croatian football club, from Zadar on the Croatian coast. ...


Twinning

Zadar maintains cultural, economic and educational ties with:

Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Country Italy Region Emilia-Romagna Province Reggio Emilia (RE) Mayor Graziano Delrio (from July 1, 2004) Elevation 58 m Area 231 km² Population  - Total 141,383  - Density 612/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Reggiani Dialing code 0522 Postal code 42100 Frazioni see list Patron San Prospero  - Day... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... General view The collegiate church of Saint-Barnard Romans-sur-Isère or Romans is a town in South-East of France in the Drôme département. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Fürstenfeldbruck is a town in Bavaria, Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Székesfehérvár (German: Stuhlweißenburg, Latin: Alba Regia, colloquial Hungarian: Fehérvár, Croatian: Stolni Biograd) is a city in central Hungary, located around 65 km southwest of Budapest. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Walk Baquedano Iquique (IPA /ikike/) is a city in northern Chile, capital of Tarapacá Region, on the Pacific coast, just west of the Atacama Desert. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... Banská Bystrica (German: Neusohl, Hungarian: Besztercebánya) is a town in central Slovakia, in the Hron river valley, surrounded by the mountains Nízke Tatry, Veľká Fatra, and Kremnické vrchy. ...

Famous people from Zadar

From the foundation to 1850

  • Juraj Baraković - renaissance poet
  • Šime Budinić - poet and writer
  • Federico Crisogono (Federicus Chrysogonus) (1472 - 1538) - Scientist, professor at the University of Padua
  • Donatus - saint
  • Francesco Maria Fenzi (1738 - 1829) - Bishop of Jerusalem[6]
  • Giovanni Francesco Fortunio - linguist and writer (author of the first Italian grammar)
  • Giacomo da Bitetto (Giacomo Varinguer) - Blessed from 15th century[7][8]
  • Jelena of Zadar - Croatian queen from 10th century
  • Pope John IV - Pope in the 7th century
  • Brne Karnarutić- renaissance writer
  • Šimun Kožičić Benja - Modruš bishop and founder of glagolitic printing house in Rijeka
  • Luciano Laurana - painter
  • Francesco Laurana - sculptor and medallist
  • Giorgio Orsini - architect and sculptor
  • Andrea Schiavone - painter
  • Jeronim Vidulić - poet
  • Petar Zoranić - Writer of the first Croatian novel

Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... The name Donatus can refer to the following people: Aelius Donatus, a Roman grammarian and teacher of rhetoric Donatus Magnus, a bishop of Carthage who founded the heretic Donatist sect Saint Donatus of Libya Saint Donatus, an Irish monk who became bishop of Fiesole in 824 - Catholic Encyclopedia article Category... Italian grammar is the study of grammar of the Italian language. ... Jelena of Zadar, Queen of Croatia, was the wife of Croatian King Mihajlo KreÅ¡imir II. They jointly ruled over Croatia from 946 to 969, a period which was marked by peace, order and expeditious growth. ... John IV was a native of Dalmatia, and the son of the scholasticus (advocate) Venantius. ... Å imun Kožičić Benja (born c. ... The diocese of Senj-ModruÅ¡ (German: Zengg-Modrus) was located in the historical Kingdom of Croatia, while it was in personal union with Kingdom of Hungary, and it was suffragan of Zagreb. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Tablet inscribed with the Glagolitic alphabet The Glagolitic alphabet or Glagolitsa is the oldest known Slavonic alphabet. ... Rijeka (in local Croatian dialects Rika and Reka; Fiume in Italian and Hungarian. ... Urbino is a city in the Marche in Italy, southwest of Pesaro, a World Heritage Site with a great cultural history during the Renaissance as the seat of Federico da Montefeltro. ... Francesco Laurana [de la Vrana], (born in Vrana, near Zara [now Zadar, Croatia]; died Marseille, before 12 March 1502), was an Italian sculptor and medallist. ... Juraj Matejev Dalmatinac (called Giorgio Orsini in Italy) (circa 1410 - 1473/1475), originally called Georgius Mathaei Dalmaticus (in Latin) was a medieval sculptor and architect. ... Holy Family with St Catherine, 1552, Vienna. ... Petar Zoranić (1508 - after 1569) was a Croatian writer from Zadar. ...

1800 - 1950

  • Silvio Ballarin (1901 - 1968) - Mathematic[9]
  • Vladimir Bersa - composer
  • Dragutin Blažeković - Austrian governor of Dalmatia, born in Osijek
  • Spiridon Brusina - scientist
  • Antonio Calebotta - basketball player
  • Raffaele Cecconi (1930) - Italian poet and writer[10]
  • Bruno Cervenca (1903 - 1986) - Italian composer[11]
  • Count Antonio Cippico (1877 - 1935) - Italian politicman and patriot [12]
  • Arturo Colautti (1851 - 1914), Italian poet, patriot and irredentist [13]
  • Simeone Duca - (Šime Duka) maecena and priest
  • Gianni Garko (Giovanni Garcovich) (1935) - Italian actor[14][15]
  • Baron Giovanni De Ghetaldi military and diplomat (son of Baron Biagio de Ghetaldi)
  • Roberto Ghiglianovich - (1863 - 1830), Politicman, Italian irredentist [16]
  • Niccolò Gradi - (1823 – 1894), poet
  • Marije Kraja (1911 - 1999) - Albanian singer
  • Furio Lauri (1918 - 2002) - Italian patriot[17]
  • Girolamo Luxardo - founder of the Original Marischino brand, Luxardo
  • Stelvio Mestrovich (1948) - Musical critic and writer[18]
  • Ottavio Missoni - fashion designer; owner of the Missoni fashion brand
  • Natko Nodilo - Founder of the oldest running Croatian newspaper Narodni list
  • Secondo Raggi Karuz (1933) - Italian painter[19]
  • Giuseppe Sabalich - literary worker
  • Francesco Salghetti-Drioli (1811 - 1877) - Painter, owner of the Salghetti-Drioli industries[20]
  • Giovanni Smirich - conservation worker and painter
  • Simone Stratico - Scientist
  • Carlo Tivaroni (1843 - 1906) - historian, Garibaldist [21]
  • Georg Ritter von Trapp - Austrian Navy officer and head of the Trapp family singers
  • Felix von Weingartner - Austrian composer, conductor, pianist and writer
  • Vicko Zmajević - archbishop and politician

Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... Gianni Garko (born Giovanni Garcovich in 1935 and often billed as John Garko) is a Dalmatian actor who found much fame in Italian westerns especially as the enigmatic Sartana, starting with the first official film If You Meet Sartana Pray for Your Death. ... Ottavio Missoni Ottavio Missoni was born in Ragusa 1921. ... Garibaldi may refer to: People Giuseppe Garibaldi, an Italian and French revolutionary, and Anita Garibaldi, his wife; Michael Garibaldi, a fictional character in the television series Babylon 5; Garibaldi, a pop music group; Places Garibaldi, Oregon; Garibaldi, British Columbia; Mount Garibaldi; Garibaldi (city), Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil; Garbaldis... Kommandant Georg, Ritter von Trapp (April 4, 1880 – May 30, 1947) headed the Austrian singing family portrayed in The Sound of Music. ... Felix Weingartner, Edler von Münzberg (June 2, 1863 – May 7, 1942) was a conductor, composer and pianist. ...

1950 - present days

  • Saša Bjelanović- international football player
  • Krešimir Ćosić - member of the Basketball Hall of Fame
  • Goranko Fižulić - former Croatian economy minister
  • Giuseppe Gjergja - basketball player
  • Ante Gotovina - Croatian Army general
  • Mladen Grdović - singer
  • Božidar Kalmeta - current Croatian Minister of Traffic and Tourism
  • Ive Livljanić - diplomat
  • Budimir Lončar - diplomat
  • Duško Lokin - singer
  • Korina Longin - top model
  • Gianni Maršan - diplomat and composer
  • Ivica Maštruko - diplomat
  • Luka Modrić- Football player
  • Antun Nalis - actor
  • Dado Pršo - football player
  • Riva - pop band, 1989 Eurovision Song Contest winners
  • Joso Škara - former Croatian Labour and Healthcare Minister
  • Josip Skoblar - football player, 1974 Golden boot
  • Joso Špralja - artist
  • Ana Lovrin- Croatian minister of law, former mayor of Zadar
  • Zoran Primorac- Croatian prize winning table tennis player
  • Arijan Komazec- Noted Croatian basketball player
  • Stojko Vranković- Famous Croatian basketball player
  • Vladan Desnica - writer
  • Natali Dizdar - Croatian pop-singer
  • Pavle Dešpalj - conducter and composer
  • Valter Dešpalj - cello player
  • Tomislav Ivčić - composer, singer and politician

  • Krist Novoselic- Nirvana bassist, went to school in Zadar
  • Mark Viduka- Australian football international (father from Zadar)
  • David Zdrilic- Australian football international (father from Zadar)
  • Teddy Lučić- Swedish football international (father from Zadar)
  • Zlatan Ibrahimović- Swedish football international (mother from Zadar)
  • Jason Čulina- Australian football international (father from Zadar)
  • Ivica Jerak - Former U.S. Army Delta Force Operator, killed in Iraq in 2005.
  • Agim Çeku- Kosovo prime minister (lived in Zadar for long time period)

Saša Bjelanović (born 11 June 1979 in Zadar) is a Croatian footballer striker who is currently playing for Torino of the Italian Serie A. // Saša Bjelanović started is career at Zadar. ... For the Croatian politician, see Krešimir Ćosić (politician). ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Ante Gotovina Ante Gotovina (born October 12, 1955, Island of Pašman, Yugoslavia, now Croatia) is a former lieutenant general (general pukovnik) of the Croatian Army who served in the 1991-1995 war in Croatia. ... Croatian Ground Army (Croatian: Hrvatska kopnena vojska), commonly referred as Croatian Army (Hrvatska vojska) is a branch of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Croatia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Luka Modrić [] (born September 9, 1985) is a Croatian football midfielder who is currently playing for one of the countrys top clubs, Dinamo Zagreb. ... Antun Nalis (February 9th, 1911 - February 14th, 2000), also known as Tonči Nalis, is Croatian actor. ... Miladin Dado Pršo [] (born 5 November 1974 in Zadar) is a former Croatian professional football striker. ... Riva was a pop band from Yugoslavia in the late 1980s. ... The Eurovision Song Contest 1989 was the 34th Eurovision Song Contest and was held on May 6, 1989 in Lausanne, Switzerland. ... Josip Skoblar (born March 12, 1941 in Privlaka, near Zadar) is a former Croatian football player, as forward and capable of playing on both wings, and also football manager. ... The Golden Boot is the award given to the top goalscorer in a football (soccer) tournament. ... Zoran Primorac (born May 10, 1969) is an accomplished male table tennis player from Croatia. ... Arijan Komazec(born January 23, 1970 in Zadar) is a Croatian basketball player. ... Stojan Stojko Vranković (born January 22, 1964 in Drniš, Croatia, SFR Yugoslavia) is a retired Croatian basketball player. ... Vladan Desnica (September 17th, 1905 - March 4th, 1967) is a Croatian writer. ... Tomislav Ivčić (1953 – March 4, 1993) was a Croatian singer, songwriter and politician. ... Krist Anthony Novoselić II (born May 16, 1965) is an American rock musician best known as the bassist for Nirvana. ... Marko Anthony Mark Viduka (IPA: ) (born October 9, 1975 in Melbourne) is an Australian football striker of Croatian descent. ... David Allen Zdrilic (born April 13, 1974) plays football (soccer) for newly established Australian A-League team Sydney FC. In the past he has played extensively throughout Europe in clubs from Walsall in England, Aberdeen in Scotland, FC Aarau in Switzerland and Unterhaching, SSV Ulm 1846 and Eintracht Trier in... Teddy Lučić [IPA: tɛdʏ lʊtɕɪtɕ] (born April 15, 1973 in Biskopsgården, Gothenburg) is a Swedish football defender. ... Zlatan Ibrahimović (IPA: [], pronunciation; born October 3, 1981) is a Swedish football player of Bosniak and Croatian descent. ... Jason Čulina [] (born August 5, 1980 in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian football (soccer) player of Croatian descent who currently plays for PSV Eindhoven in the Dutch Eredivisie. ... Agim Çeku (born 29 October 1960 in the village of Ćuška [1] near Peć, in Kosovo, Yugoslavia), is the current Prime Minister of Kosovo, a Serbian province under United Nations administration. ...

See also

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Zadar takes its name from its episcopal see, the city of Zadar, in Croatia. ... now. ... This is the history of Croatia. ... This is the history of Dalmatia. ... United in 1861, Italy has significantly contributed to the cultural and social development of the entire Mediterranean area, deeply influencing European culture as well. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...

Sources

  • the "Miroslav Krleža" Lexicographic Institute text about Zadar.
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

History about world Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


References

  1. ^ Mate Suić: O imenu Zadra, Zadar Zbornik, Matica Hrvatska, Zagreb 1964
  2. ^ M.Suić: Prošlost Zadra 1, Zadar u starom vijeku, Filozofski Fakultet Zadar, 1981
  3. ^ V. Graovac: Populacijski razvoj Zadra, Odjel za geografiju, Sveučilište u Zadru, p.52, UDK:314.8(497.5 Zadar)
  4. ^ a b c d e Britannica 1911: Illyria
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Britannica 1911: Dalmatia
  6. ^ Britannica 1911: Zara

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Zadar
  • Zadar Tourist Board
  • Zadar Airport
  • The University of Zadar
  • Old postcards of Zara/Zadar (it.)

Gallery

Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Zadar county - Zadarska županija is a county in Croatia, it encompasses northern Dalmatia and southeastern Lika. ... Benkovac (Croatia) Benkovac is a town and municipality in the interior of Zadar county, Croatia. ... Coat of arms Biograd na Moru is a town in northern Dalmatia, Croatia. ... Coat of arms The church of St. ... Obrovac is a town located in northern Dalmatia, in the Zadar county of Croatia. ... This is an article about town named Pag. ... Coastal Bibinje Bibinje is a village in southern Croatia, situated southeast from Zadar, between the Adriatic tourist road and the sea, having a four kilometer coastline with beaches and pathways. ... Galovac on the map of Croatia Galovac is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Gračac is a small town in the southern part of Lika, Croatia. ... Jasenice on the map of Croatia Jasenice is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Kali on the map of Croatia Kali is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Kukljica on the map of Croatia Kukljica is a village on the island of Ugljan in Croatia. ... Novigrad on the map of Croatia Novigrad is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Lišane Ostrovičke on the map of Croatia Lišane Ostrovičke is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Pakoštane on the map of Croatia Pakoštane is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... View of Pašman and Ugljan from the highest point of Pašman Pašman is an Adriatic Sea island off the coast of Croatia, located to the south of Zadar, surrounded by the islands Ugljan, Iž, Dugi otok and Kornati. ... Polača on the map of Croatia Polača is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Poličnik on the map of Croatia Poličnik is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Posedarje is a municipality in Zadar County of Croatia. ... Povljane on the map of Croatia Povljane is a village in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Preko on the map of Croatia Preko is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Privlaka (Croatia) Privlaka is a municipality in the Zadar county in Croatia. ... Ražanac on the map of Croatia Ražanac is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Sali is a hindi word for sister in law. ... Stankovci on the map of Croatia Stankovci is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Starigrad on the map of Croatia Starigrad is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Sukošan is a small town in Dalmatia, Croatia, population 3 000 (2005), 5 022 in the municipality. ... Sveti Filip i Jakov on the map of Croatia Sveti Filip i Jakov is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... Škabrnja is a village in northern Dalmatia, Croatia, located halfway between Zadar and Benkovac in the lowland region of Ravni Kotari. ... Tkon on the map of Croatia Tkon is a village in Croatia in the Zadar county. ... VIR/Vir can refer to: Virgin Atlantic Airways Vir Cotto, a character from the fictional Babylon 5 universe. ... Zemunki Donji on the map of Croatia Zemunik Donji is a municipality in Croatia in the Zadar county. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Zadar - Encyclopedia.com (0 words)
BC It passed to the Byzantine Empire in 553 and was settled by the South Slavs in the 7th cent.
The Treaty of Campo Formio (1797) gave it to Austria, where, from 1815 to 1918, it was the capital of the crownland of Dalmatia.
Zadar passed to Italy by the Treaty of Saint-Germain (1919), was occupied (1945) by Yugoslav forces at the end of World War II, and was formally ceded to Yugoslavia by the Italian peace treaty of 1947 as part of the constitutent republic of Croatia.
Zadar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2248 words)
Zadar (Italian Zara, Latin Iader or Iadera) is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea, with a population of 82 000 (2005).
It is the centre of modern Croatia's Zadar county and the wider northern Dalmatian region.
Zadar was under the Republic of Venice between 1111 and 1154 and between 1160 and 1183.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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