FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Zachery Taylor
Zachary Taylor
Term of office March 4, 1849July 9, 1850
Preceded by James Knox Polk
Succeeded by Millard Fillmore
Date of birth November 24, 1784
Place of birth Barboursville,Virginia
Date of death July 9, 1850
Place of death Washington, D.C.
Spouse Margaret Taylor (wife)
Mary Elizabeth Bliss (daughter)
Political party Whig

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784July 9, 1850), also known as "Old Rough and Ready," was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. Taylor was noted for his extensive military career and for becoming the first president not previously elected to any other public office. He was the second president to die in office. Image File history File links Source: http://www. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was an American politician and the eleventh U.S. President, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Barboursville is the name of several places in the United States of America: Barboursville, Virginia Barboursville, West Virginia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Washington, D.C. is the capital city of the United States of America. ... Margaret Mackall Smith Taylor (September 21, 1788 - August 14, 1852), wife of Zachary Taylor, was First Lady of the United States from 1849 to 1850. ... Mary Elizabeth Taylor Bliss (April 20, 1824 - July 25, 1909) was the daughter of President Zachary Taylor and First Lady Margaret Taylor. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated “POTUS”) is the head of state of the United States. ...

Contents


Biography

Taylor was born in a log cabin to Richard Taylor and Sarah Strother, near Barboursville, Virginia, though his family was aristocratic. As an infant he and his family moved to Kentucky, where Taylor grew up on a plantation and was known as "Little Zack." Taylor and Margaret Mackall Smith met in early 1810 and were married on June 21, 1810. They had one son and five daughters, two of whom died in infancy. Details of cabin corner joint with squared off logs A log cabin is a small house built from logs. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Official languages English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 7. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... // Forestry plantations A plantation of Douglas-fir in Washington, USA; note the trees of uniform size and planted in straight lines, and the lack of diversity in the ground flora In forestry, plantations of trees are typically grown as an even-aged monoculture for timber production, as opposed to a... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1808, Taylor joined the U.S. Army and was commissioned as a first lieutenant. Soon afterward he was ordered west into Indiana Territory, taking command of Fort Harrison. In the War of 1812 (1812–1815), he became known as an excellent military commander. Taylor was also noted for standing 5'8" or 5'9" tall and weighing between 170 and 200 pounds, with long arms, short, stubby legs and a thick torso. It is believed that Taylor sometimes needed to be boosted into his saddle. US Army Seal HHC, US Army Distinctive Unit Insignia The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces that has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ... First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... The Battle of Fort Harrison was a decisive victory for the United States against an Indian force which greatly outnumbered their own. ... This page refers to the war between the United States of America and Great Britain. ...


Taylor also served in the Black Hawk War (1832) and the Second Seminole War (1835–1842). During the Seminole War he gained the nickname "Old Rough and Ready" after the Battle of Lake Okeechobee. Chief Black Hawk The Black Hawk War was fought in 1832 in the Midwestern section of the United States. ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ... The Battle of Lake Okeechobee was one of the major battles of the Second Seminole War. ...


President James K. Polk sent an army under his command to the Rio Grande in 1846. When the Mexicans attacked Taylor's troops, Taylor defeated them despite being outnumbered 4-to-1. Polk later declared war; in the Mexican-American War that followed, Taylor won additional important victories at Monterrey and Buena Vista and became a national hero. James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 3, 1849. ... The Rio Grande flowing in Big Bend National Park Known as the Rio Grande in the United States and as the Río Bravo (or, more formally, the Río Bravo del Norte) in Mexico, the river, 3034 km long, rises in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, USA, flows... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Strength 60,000 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 (Mexican government estimate) The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... The Battle of Monterrey (September 21–September 23, 1846) was an engagement in the Mexican-American War in which General Pedro de Ampudia and the Mexican Army of the North managed to fight US troops to a standstill at the important fortress town of Monterrey. ... The Battle of Buena Vista was a land battle of the Mexican-American War fought on 23 February 1847 in Buena Vista, Coahuila, seven miles (12 km) south of Saltillo, in northern Mexico. ... Sir Galahad, a hero of Arthurian legend In many myths and folk tales, a hero is a man or woman (the latter often called a heroine), traditionally the protagonist of a story, legend or saga, commonly possessed of abilities or character far greater than that of a typical person, which...


Polk kept Taylor in northern Mexico, disturbed by his informal habits of command and his affiliation with the Whig Party. He sent an expedition under General Winfield Scott to capture Mexico City. Taylor, incensed, thought that "the battle of Buena Vista opened the road to the city of Mexico and the halls of Montezuma, that others might revel in them." Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the name of a megacity located in the Valley of Mexico (Valle de México), a large valley in the high plateaus (altiplano) at the center of Mexico, about 2,240 metres (7,349 feet) above sea-level, surrounded on most sides... Moctezuma II (also Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin) (1466–1520) was an Aztec ruler or huey tlatoani, c. ...


Presidency

Whig Party banner from 1848 with candidates Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore.
Whig Party banner from 1848 with candidates Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore.

He received the Whig nomination for President in 1848, although he had never even bothered to vote before. In fact, he had never even bothered to register, and didn't vote in his own election. His homespun ways were political assets, his long military record would appeal to northerners, and his ownership of slaves would attract southern votes. He also had not previously committed himself on troublesome issues. He ran against the Democratic candidate, Lewis Cass, who favored letting the residents of territories decide for themselves whether they wanted slavery. In protest against Taylor, a slaveholder, and Cass, an advocate of "squatter sovereignty," northerners who opposed extension of slavery into territories formed the Free Soil Party and nominated Martin Van Buren. In a close election, the Free Soilers pulled enough votes away from Cass to elect Taylor. Image File history File links 1848whigbanner. ... Image File history File links 1848whigbanner. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or... Lewis Cass Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ...


Taylor earned a footnote in Presidential history before he even took office. His term of service was scheduled to begin on March 4, 1849, but it being a Sunday, Taylor refused to be sworn in until the following day. Vice President Millard Fillmore was also not sworn in on that day. As a result, it is claimed that the nation technically had no President or Vice President for one day. Some people postulate that David Rice Atchison, the previous President Pro Tempore of the Senate, was technically Acting President, but this statement is rejected by virtually every constitutional scholar. Constitutionally, Taylor's term began on March 4, regardless of whether he had taken the oath or not. March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Richard B. Cheney, 46th and current Vice President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... David Rice Atchison David Rice Atchison (August 11, 1807 - January 26, 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska is the current President pro tempore of the Senate. ...

Portrait of Taylor during Mexican War.
Portrait of Taylor during Mexican War.

Although Taylor had subscribed to Whig principles of legislative leadership, he was not inclined to be a puppet of Whig leaders in Congress. He acted at times as though he were above parties and politics. As disheveled as always, Taylor tried to run his administration in the same rule-of-thumb fashion with which he had fought Indians. Portait of Zachary Taylor by William Garl Brown, Jr. ... Portait of Zachary Taylor by William Garl Brown, Jr. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... Congress in Joint Session. ...


Under Taylor´s administration the United States Department of the Interior was organized, although the Department had been activated under President Polk´s last day in office. The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ...


Traditionally, people could decide whether they wanted slavery when they drew up new state constitutions. Therefore, to end the dispute over slavery in new areas, Taylor urged settlers in New Mexico and California to draft constitutions and apply for statehood, bypassing the territorial stage. The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... State nickname: Land of Enchantment Official languages English Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Governor Bill Richardson (D) Senators Pete Domenici (R) Jeff Bingaman (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 5th 315,194 km² 0. ... State nickname: The Golden State Official languages English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 4. ...


Southerners were furious, since neither state constitution was likely to permit slavery; members of Congress were dismayed, since they felt the President was usurping their policy-making prerogatives. In addition, Taylor's solution ignored several acute side issues: the northern dislike of the slave market operating in the District of Columbia and the southern demands for a more stringent fugitive slave law. ...


In February 1850 President Taylor had held a stormy conference with southern leaders who threatened secession. He told them that if necessary to enforce the laws, he personally would lead the Army. Persons "taken in rebellion against the Union, he would hang ... with less reluctance than he had hanged deserters and spies in Mexico." He never wavered. The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ...

Taylor postage stamp
Taylor postage stamp

After participating in ceremonies at the Washington Monument on a blistering July 4, 1850, Taylor fell ill with acute indigestion and was diagnosed by his physicians with cholera morbus. He died five days later, after just 16 months in office. He is buried in Louisville, Kentucky in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery. Taylor was succeeded by his Vice President, Millard Fillmore. 1938 u. ... 1938 u. ... The Washington Monument The Washington Monument usually refers to the large white-colored obelisk in the center of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built as a memorial to George Washington, the first President of the United States and the leader of the revolutionary Continental Army, which won independence... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Indigestion is a condition that is frequently caused by eating too fast, especially by eating high-fat foods quickly. ... Louisville (usually pronounced ; see Pronunciation below) is Kentuckys largest city and one of the largest cities in the United States (see Official naming and population statistics below). ... Zachary Taylor National Cemetery is a national cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky where President Zachary Taylor is buried. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ...


It is widely held that the cause of Taylor's death was put to rest in the early 1990s when Taylor's remains were exhumed and examined [1] for arsenic poisoning. However critics point out the cause of death remains unknown, despite frequent reporting in the media otherwise. Scientists determined the levels of arsenic from hair and nail samples. A medical examiner then concluded that the amount of arsenic found in the samples was not sufficient to be fatal but "the symptoms which he exhibited and the rapidity of his death are clearly consistent with acute arsenic poisoning." [2] Taylor had eaten a large quantity of iced milk and cherries on the hot day prior to falling ill, one of which may have been contaminated, and which likely led to a still-extant old wives' tale stating that milk and cherries become toxic when consumed together. By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... General Name, Symbol, Number arsenic, As, 33 Chemical series metalloids Group, Period, Block 15, 4, p Appearance metallic gray Atomic mass 74. ... Ice milk is a frozen dessert with less than 10% milk fat and the same sweetener content as ice cream. ... A cherry is both a tree and its fleshy fruit, a type known as a drupe with a single hard pit enclosing the seed. ... An old wives tale is a wisdom much like an urban legend, supposedly passed down by old wives to a younger generation. ...


Taylor's son Richard became a Confederate Lieutenant-General, while his daughter Sarah Knox Taylor married Jefferson Davis. Taylor's brother, Joseph Pannill Taylor, was a Brigadier General in the Grand Army of the Republic during the Civil War. Richard Taylor (1826-1879) was a General for the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... Categories: Stub | 1814 births | 1835 deaths | American people ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician. ... G.A.R. Memorial, Washington, D.C. The Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army who had served in the American Civil War. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the...


Cabinet

OFFICE NAME TERM
President Zachary Taylor 1849–1850
Vice President Millard Fillmore 1849–1850
Secretary of State John M. Clayton 1849–1850
Secretary of the Treasury William Meredith 1849–1850
Secretary of War George Crawford 1849–1850
Attorney General Reverdy Johnson 1849–1850
Postmaster General Jacob Collamer 1849–1850
Secretary of the Navy William Preston 1849–1850
Secretary of the Interior Thomas Ewing 1849–1850


The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated “POTUS”) is the head of state of the United States. ... Richard B. Cheney, 46th and current Vice President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... The Seal of the United States Department of State The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... John Middleton Clayton (July 24, 1796–November 9, 1856) was an American statesman from Delaware who served as a U.S. Senator and as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1849 to 1850. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... William Morris Meredith (June 8, 1799–August 17, 1873) was an American lawyer and politician. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... George Walker Crawford (1798 - 1872) was an American political figure. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796–February 10, 1876) was an American statesman and jurist. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Jacob Collamer (NSHC statue) Jacob Collamer (January 8, 1792 – November 9, 1865) was an American politician from Vermont. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... William Ballard Preston (1805 - 1862) was a U.S. political figure. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ...


External links

Project Gutenberg (often abbreviated as PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive, and distribute cultural works. ...

References

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
  • Bauer, Jack K. Zachary Taylor: Soldier, Planter, Statesman of the Old Southwest. Louisiana State University Press: 1993. ISBN 0807118516
  • Smith, Elbert B. The Presidencies of Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore. University Press of Kansas: 1988. ISBN 070060362X.
Preceded by:
Henry Clay
Whig Party presidential candidate
1848 (won)
Succeeded by:
Winfield Scott
Preceded by:
James K. Polk
President of the United States
March 4, 1849(a)July 9, 1850
Succeeded by:
Millard Fillmore
(a) Although Taylor's term started on March 4, he did not take the oath of office until March 5.
Presidents of the United States of America U.S. presidential seal
Washington | J Adams | Jefferson | Madison | Monroe | JQ Adams | Jackson | Van Buren | W Harrison | Tyler | Polk | Taylor | Fillmore | Pierce | Buchanan | Lincoln | A Johnson | Grant | Hayes | Garfield | Arthur | Cleveland | B Harrison | Cleveland | McKinley | T Roosevelt | Taft | Wilson | Harding | Coolidge | Hoover | F Roosevelt | Truman | Eisenhower | Kennedy | L Johnson | Nixon | Ford | Carter | Reagan | GHW Bush | Clinton | GW Bush

  Results from FactBites:
 
Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) (239 words)
Zachery Taylor was born in Orange County, Virginia, on November 24, 1784.
He was the third child (of eight surviving children) born to Colonel Richard Taylor and Sarah Strother Taylor.
Taylor married Margaret Mackall Smith (1788-1852), the daughter of a Continental Army major, in 1810.
Trustin Brown Kinder (11708 words)
Taylor promptly returned for answer that he cared not for the size of the army, as he, Taylor, had an army that was able to whip it; but if Santa Anna saw fit to surrender to him, he would be treated in a proper manner.
Taylor, with his usual equanimity and coolness, commanded the forces as commander in chief, and his presence was a host in itself; inspiring confidence in every breast that all could be done would be done, and that defeat would never disgrace us, however great the disparity of numbers.
Taylor has fought and vanquished Santa Anna in a battle [near Buena Vista], which at the same time that it will have a weighty and forcible argument for a speedy conclusion of the war, will not leave a rag of popularity on the back of the one-legged hero of San Jacinto.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m