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Encyclopedia > Yupik

The Yupik or, in the Central Alaskan Yup'ik language, Yup'ik, are a group of indigenous or aboriginal peoples of western, southwestern, and southcentral Alaska and the Russian Far East. They include the Central Alaskan Yup'ik people of the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta, the Kuskokwim River, and coastal Bristol Bay in Alaska; the Alutiiq (or Suqpiaq) of the Alaska Peninsula and coastal and island areas of southcentral Alaska; and the Siberian Yupik of the Russian Far East and St. Lawrence Island in western Alaska. They are Eskimo and are related to the Inuit. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (753x1024, 171 KB) Woman and child - Nunivak Edward S. Curtis, 1930 Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtiss The North American Indian: the Photographic Images, 2001. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (753x1024, 171 KB) Woman and child - Nunivak Edward S. Curtis, 1930 Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtiss The North American Indian: the Photographic Images, 2001. ... Yupik may refer to: Yupik languages in general. ... For the people, see Yupik. ... The term indigenous people has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... The Yupik or, in the Central Alaskan language, Yupik, are aboriginal people who live along the coast of western Alaska, especially on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta and along the Kuskokwim River (Central Alaskan Yupik), in southern Alaska (the Alutiiq) and in the Russian Far East and St. ... The Yukon River is a major watercourse of northwestern North America. ... The Kuskokwim River (Kusquqvak in Central Yupik) is a river, approximately 724 mi (1,165 km) long, in southwest Alaska in the United States. ... The Kuskokwim River (Kusquqvak in Central Yupik) is a river, approximately 724 mi (1,165 km) long, in southwest Alaska in the United States. ... Shore of Bristol Bay near Naknek. ... The Alutiiq (plural: Alutiit), also called Pacific Yupik or Sugpiaq, are a southern, coastal branch of Alaskan Yupik. ... Volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula The Alaska Peninsula is a peninsula extending about 800 km (500 miles) to the southwest from the mainland of Alaska and ending in the Aleutian Islands. ... Siberian Yupik are an indigenous people who reside along the coast of the Chukchi Peninsula in the far northeast of the Russian Federation and the St. ... Far Eastern Federal District (highlighted in red) Russian Far East (Russian: Д́альний Вост́ок Росс́ии; English transliteration: Dalny Vostok Rossii) is an informal term that refers to the Russian part of the Far East, i. ... St. ... For other uses, see Eskimo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...


The Central Alaskan Yup'ik are by far the most numerous group of Yupik. The Central Alaskan Yup'ik who live on Nunivak Island call themselves Cup'ig (plural Cup'it). Those who live in the village of Chevak call themselves Cup'ik (plural Cup'it). The Yupik or, in the Central Alaskan language, Yupik, are aboriginal people who live along the coast of western Alaska, especially on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta and along the Kuskokwim River (Central Alaskan Yupik), in southern Alaska (the Alutiiq) and in the Russian Far East and St. ... Nunivak Island is the second largest island in the Bering Sea, 48 km (30 miles) offshore from the delta of the Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers, at about 60° North latitude. ... Chevak is a city located in Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska. ...

Contents

Culture

Traditionally, families spent the spring and summer at fish camp, then joined with others at village sites for the winter. Many families still harvest the traditional subsistence resources, especially salmon and seal. Illustration of a male Coho Salmon The Chinook or King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America and can grow to 1. ... subfamilies Otariidae Phocidae Odobenidae Pinnipeds are large marine mammals belonging to the Pinnipedia, a family (sometimes a suborder or superfamily, depending on the classification scheme) of the order Carnivora. ...


The men's communal house, the qasgiq, was the community center for ceremonies and festivals which included singing, dancing, and storytelling.example The qasgiq was used mainly in the winter months, because people would travel in family groups following food sources throughout the spring, summer, and fall months. Aside from ceremonies and festivals, it was also where the men taught the young boys survival and hunting skills, as well as other life lessons. The young boys were also taught how to make tools and qayaqs (kayaks) during the winter months in the qasqig. There is also a shaman involved in the ceremonies. For the 2001 film, see Storytelling (film) Storytelling is the ancient art of conveying events in words, images, and sounds. ... Kayak is also the name of a Dutch progressive rock band. ...

A Yupik mask
A Yupik mask

The women's house, the ena, was traditionally right next door, and in some areas they were connected by a tunnel. Women taught the young girls how to sew, cook, and weave. Boys would live with their mothers until they were about five years old, then they would live in the qasgiq. Each winter, from anywhere between three to six weeks, the young boys and young girls would switch, with the men teaching the girls survival and hunting skills and toolmaking and the women teaching the boys how to sew and cook. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 397 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1900 × 2870 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 397 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1900 × 2870 pixel, file size: 2. ... For other uses, see Mask (disambiguation). ...


Yup'ik group dances are often with individuals staying stationary, with all the movement done with rhythmic upper body and arm movements accentuated with hand held dance fans very similar to Cherokee dance fans. The limited movement area by no means limits the expressiveness of the dances, which cover the whole range from graceful flowing to energetically lively to wryly humorous.


The Yup'ik are unique among native peoples of the Americas in that children are named after the last person in the community to have died, whether that name be a boy or girl name.


Languages

Main article: Yupik languages

The five Yupik languages (related to Inuktitut) are still very widely spoken, with more than 75% of the Yupik/Yup'ik population fluent in the language. The Yupik people speak five distinct languages, depending on their location. ... The Yupik (Yupik/Юпик) people speak several distinct languages, depending on their location. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ...


The Alaskan and Siberian Yupik, like the Alaskan Inupiat, adopted the system of writing developed by Moravian missionaries during the 1760s in Greenland. The Alaskan Yupik and Inupiat are the only Northern indigenous peoples to have developed their own system of hieroglyphics, a system that died with its inventors.[1] The Inupiat or Iñupiaq are the Inuit people of Alaskas Northwest Arctic and North Slope boroughs and the Bering Straits region. ... A Moravian can be: an ethnic group a Christian denomination This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hieroglyphs are a system of writing used by the Ancient Egyptians, using a combination of logographic, syllabic, and alphabetic elements. ...


Through a confusion among Russian explorers in the 1800s, the Yupik people bordering the territory of the unrelated Aleuts were erroneously called Aleuts, or Alutiiq, in Yupik. This term has remained in use to the present day, along with another term, Sugpiaq, which both refer to the Yupik of Southcentral Alaska and Kodiak. The Aleuts (self-denomination: Unangax) are the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, U.S.A.. The homeland of the Aleuts includes the Aleutian Islands, the Pribilof Islands, the Shumagin Islands, and the far western part of the Alaska Peninsula. ... The Alutiiq (plural: Alutiit), also called Pacific Yupik or Sugpiaq, are a southern, coastal branch of Alaskan Yupik. ... The Alutiiq (plural: Alutiit), also called Pacific Yupik or Sugpiaq, are a southern, coastal branch of Alaskan Yupik. ...


See

  • the genealogical tree
  • the distribution map

of Yupik languages. The whole Eskimo-Aleut family, and also all Alaskan languages are shown. Available online [2]. Here is a wikified version of the mentioned tree (restricted to the Eskimo-Aleut family): Eskimo-Aleut (also called Inuit-Aleut, but both names are considered offensive by some) is a language family native to Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, and parts of Siberia. ... Eskimo-Aleut (also called Inuit-Aleut, but both names are considered offensive by some) is a language family native to Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, and parts of Siberia. ...

Some differences may exist in the terminolgy or in the details of the classification, in comparison to the main article. Eskimo-Aleut (also called Inuit-Aleut, but both names are considered offensive by some) is a language family native to Greenland, the Canadian Arctic, Alaska, and parts of Siberia. ... Languages English, Russian, Aleut Religions Christianity, Shamanism Related ethnic groups Inuit, Yupik The Aleuts (self-denomination: , Unangan or Unanga) are the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska, United States and Kamchatka Krai, Russia. ... For other uses, see Eskimo (disambiguation). ... For the Alutiiq people, see Alutiiq. ... For the people, see Yupik. ... Naukan is a dialect of the Eskimo language. ... For the people, see Siberian Yupik. ... Sirenik is a moribund Yupik language, with just one remaining elderly fluent speaker in Sireniki village, Chukotka, northeastern Russia. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... The Yupik (Yupik/Юпик) people speak several distinct languages, depending on their location. ...


See also

This is a list of Alaska Native Tribal Entities which are recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. ... Siberian Yupik are an indigenous people who reside along the coast of the Chukchi Peninsula in the far northeast of the Russian Federation and the St. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "The Inuktitut Language" in Project Naming, the identification of Inuit portrayed in photographic collections at Library and Archives Canada
  2. ^ Alaska Native Language Center

Bibliography

  • Campbell, Lyle. (1997). American Indian languages: The historical linguistics of Native America. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-509427-1.
  • Mithun, Marianne. (1999). The languages of Native North America. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-23228-7 (hbk); ISBN 0-521-29875-X.
  • de Reuse, Willem J. (1994). Siberian Yupik Eskimo: The language and its contacts with Chukchi. Studies in indigenous languages of the Americas. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press. ISBN 0-87480-397-7.
  • Project Naming, the identification of Inuit portrayed in photographic collections at Library and Archives Canada

External links

  • Alaska Native Language Center

  Results from FactBites:
 
Alaska Native Language Center -- Comparative Yupik and Inuit (498 words)
Four distinct Yupik (or Western Eskimo) languages are spoken along the shores of the Gulf of Alaska, in southwestern Alaska, and on the easternmost tip of Siberia.
The Inuit (or Eastern Eskimo) language continuum is spoken in northern Alaska, Canada, and Greenland.
Yupik has a fourth vowel, the shwa (like the e in the word roses), in addition to the three vowels a, i, and u found in all Eskimo (and Aleut; Inuit as a result has two kinds of i, that from original i and that originally from the shwa),
Yupik language, alphabet and pronunciation (202 words)
The Yupik languages belong to the Yupik branch of the Eskimo language family.
Yupik is written with the Latin alphabet in Alaska and with the Cyrillic alphabet in Siberia.
In the 1960s a group of scholars and native Yupik speakers came together at the University of Alaska to develop a new orthography for Yupik.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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