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Encyclopedia > Yule Log
For other uses, see yule log (disambiguation)
A chocolate yule log.
A chocolate yule log.
Durian-flavoured log.
Durian-flavoured log.
Yule log made of birch.
Yule log made of birch.

A Yule log, sometimes known as the Great Ashen Faggot[1], is a large log which is burned in the hearth as a part of traditional Yule or Christmas celebrations in some cultures. It can be a part of the Winter Solstice festival or the Twelve Days of Christmas, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, or Twelfth Night. Yule log can refer to the following: Yule log refers to a Christmas tradition and a food stuff. ... Download high resolution version (1752x839, 493 KB)A chocolate yule log cake. ... Download high resolution version (1752x839, 493 KB)A chocolate yule log cake. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 976 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yule log User:Chensiyuan Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 976 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yule log User:Chensiyuan Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... This article is about the fruit. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Yule (disambiguation) and Jul (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the astronomical event of winter solstice or midwinter. ... The Twelve Days of Christmas and the associated evenings of those twelve days (Twelve-tide), are the festive days beginning the evening of Christmas Day (December 25) through the morning of Epiphany on (January 6). ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Twelfth Night is a holiday in some branches of Christianity marking the coming of the Epiphany, concluding the Twelve Days of Christmas, and is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as the evening of the fifth of January, preceding Twelfth Day, the eve of the Epiphany, formerly the last day...


The expression "Yule log" has also come to refer to log-shaped Christmas cakes, also known as "chocolate logs" or "Bûche de Noël". This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the U.S., the Yule log has also become a modern tradition in the form of a TV screen in one's home showing video of an actual Yule Log burning in a real fireplace. The video is accompanied by Christmas music, actual crackling fire sounds, or both at the same time. This is now a very popular trend on DVDs, but it began on a whim in 1966, by Fred Thrower, former TV programming director for WPIX in New York City, who wanted to offer a Yule Log for the majority in New York City who had no real fireplace of their own. It has been offered for several hours each year (on Christmas Eve and/or Christmas Day) as a video greeting card to viewers, and is syndicated across the U.S. Many others have offered their own versions over the years on TV, and in all video formats. This classic scene features holiday music every Christmas to viewers of WPIX-TV in New York since 1966 and again since 2001 after a eleven year absence from television screens. ... WPIX, channel 11, is a television station in New York City. ...

Contents

Origins

In Northern Europe, winter festivities complete with ceremonies full of spirits, devils, and the haunting presence of the Norse god, Odin, and his night riders. One particularly durable Solstice festival was "Jol" (also known as "Jul" and pronounced), a feast celebrated throughout Northern Europe and particularly in Scandinavia to honor Jolnir, another name for Odin. Since Odin was the god of intoxicating drink and ecstasy, as well as the god of death, Yule customs varied greatly from region to region. Odin's sleeping sacrificial beer became the specially blessed Christmas ale mentioned in medieval lore, and fresh food and drink were left on tables after Christmas feasts to feed the roaming Yuletide ghosts. Even the bonfires of ancient times survived in the tradition of the Yule log, perhaps the most universal of all Christmas symbols. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the astronomical event of winter solstice or midwinter. ... For other meanings of Odin,Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ...


The origins of the Yule log can be traced back to the Midwinter festivals in which the Norsemen indulged in nights filled with feasting, "drinking Yule" and watching the fire leap around the log burning in the home hearth. The ceremonies and beliefs associated with the Yule log's sacred origins are closely linked to representations of health, fruitfulness, productivity, and regularity. In England, the Yule was cut and dragged home by oxen or horses as the people walked alongside and sang merry songs. During winter, towns people would gather these large logs to be ridden, like a modern sled, down embankments of ice and snow. It was often decorated with evergreens and sometimes sprinkled with grain or cider before it was finally set alight.


In Yugoslavia, the Yule log was cut just before dawn on Christmas Eve and carried into the house at twilight. The wood itself was decorated with flowers, colored silks and gold, and then doused with wine and an offering of grain. In the area of France known as Provence, families would go together to cut the Yule log, singing as they went along. These songs asked for blessings to be bestowed upon their crops and their flocks. The people of Provence called their Yule log the tréfoire and, with great ceremony, carried the log around the house three times and christened it with wine before it was set ablaze. Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... For other uses, see Twilight (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... Wildflowers A flower is the reproductive organ of those plants classified as angiosperms ( flowering plants; Division Magnoliophyta). ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) was a Roman province and now is a region of southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Italy. ...


To all Europeans, the Yule log was believed to bring beneficial magic and was kept burning for at least twelve hours and sometimes as long as twelve days, warming both the house and those who resided within. When the fire of the Yule log was finally quenched, a small fragment of the wood would be saved and used to light the next year's log. It was also believed that as long as the Yule log burned, the house would be protected from witchcraft. The ashes that remained from the sacred Yule log were scattered over fields to bring fertility, or cast into wells to purify and sweeten the water. Sometimes, the ashes were used in the creation of various charms, to free cattle from vermin, for example, or to ward off hailstorms. Look up vermin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the precipitation. ...


Some sources state that the origin of Yule is often associated with an ancient Scandinavian fertility god and that the large, single Log is representative of a phallic idol. Tradition states that this Log was required to burn for twelve days and a different sacrifice to the fertility god had to be offered in the fire on each of those twelve days.


Confection

Sometime in the late 18th to early 19th century, a fascimile of the Yule Log became a traditional French desert. Usually, it is in the form of a large rectangular yellow cake spread with frosting and rolled up into a cylinder - one end is then lopped off and stood on end to indicate the rings of the "log." This "Bûche de Noël" became a traditional Christmas desert, and has recently spread to other regions, where it is often referred to as a yule log. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


References

  1. ^ Ashen Faggot at Dartmoor
  • The Yule Log at culture.gouv.fr
  • The Yule Log at noelnoelnoel.com

External links

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Yule Log (415 words)
A Yule log is a large log which is burned in the hearth as a part of traditional Yule or Christmas celebrations in some cultures.
To all Europeans, the Yule Log was believed to bring beneficial magic and was kept burning for at least twelve hours and sometimes as long as twelve days, warming both the house and those who resided within.
Bringing the yule log in was, as recently as the 19th century, as much a part of the pre-Christmas festivities as putting up an evergreen tree today.
Yule Log (118 words)
The word "yule" means wheel, a symbol representing the Sun, and the yule tide was a festivity celebrating the fact that the days and warmth would now start to get longer and warmer again.
The yule log was a huge log (sometimes an entire tree) that was burned slowly throughout these days to herald the birth of this new sun.
The log was slowly fed into the fire over the course of several days until it was completely consumed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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