FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Yule" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Yule
Yule
Yule
Juletræslys, a Danish Yule Tree Candle
Also called Yuletide, Yulefest, Yules, Jul, Juletid, Julfest, Jül, Jól, Joul, Joulu, Jõulud, Joelfeest, Géol, Feailley Geul, Christmas, Midwinter, The Winter Solstice
Observed by Northern Europeans and Various Anglosphereans
Type Cultural, Christian, Pagan
Significance Marks the Ancient Midwinter, the Christian Nativity, or the Winter solstice.
Date December 25. Wiccans celebrate on the Winter solstice
Celebrations Festivals, Burning Yule Logs, Feasting, Caroling, Being with Loved Ones.
Related to Nativity of Jesus, The Solstice, Quarter days, Wheel of the Year, Winter Festivals

Yule is a winter festival historically celebrated primarily in northern Europe but now celebrated in many other countries in various forms. Yule celebrations often coincide with Christmas. Modern Yule traditions include decorating a fir or spruce tree, burning a Yule log, hanging mistletoe and holly branches, giving gifts, and general celebration and merriment. Yule may refer to any of the following: Yule an ancient Germanic holiday sometimes conflated with Christmas a yule log Yule Log, a television program Yuletide Records, a record label a Yule process, a model for fission Annie Henrietta Yule Billy Yule Captain Charles Bampfield Yule, Royal Navy officer and... Jul or JUL may refer to: As an abbreviation of the month July Jul, Scandinavian and Germanic word for Yule. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 546 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 682 pixels, file size: 782 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) En: Christmas candle on a christmas tree. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is most inclined away from the sun. ... This article is about the astronomical and cultural event of winters solstice, also known as midwinter. ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... Definitions of the Anglosphere vary: Countries in which English is the first language of a large fraction of the population are shown in blue. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is most inclined away from the sun. ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... This article is about the astronomical and cultural event of winters solstice, also known as midwinter. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the book series Wicca see Sweep (book series) and Circle Of Three. ... This article is about the astronomical and cultural event of winters solstice, also known as midwinter. ... For other uses, see yule log (disambiguation) A chocolate yule log. ... A carol is a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character. ... The Nativity by Petrus Christus, c. ... “Summer solstice” redirects here. ... In British and Irish tradition, the quarter days were the four dates on which servants were hired, and rents and rates were due. ... In Neopaganism, the Wheel of the Year is the natural cycle of the seasons, commemorated by the eight Sabbats. ... This is an incomplete list of festivals and holidays that take place during the winter in the northern hemisphere, especially those commemorating the season. ... This is an incomplete list of festivals and holidays that take place during the winter in the northern hemisphere, especially those commemorating the season. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... Species About 35; see text. ... For other uses, see yule log (disambiguation) A chocolate yule log. ... Families Santalaceae (Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Misodendraceae Mistletoe is the common name for a group of hemi-parasitic plants in the order Santalales that grow attached to and within the branches of a tree or shrub. ... This article is about the plant. ... Love gift Man presents a cut of meat to a youth with a hoop. ...


The Germanic peoples celebrated Yule from late December to early January on a date determined by the lunar Germanic calendar.[1] When the Julian calendar was adopted in northern Europe, Yule was placed on December 25 to correspond with the date of Christmas.[2] Colloquially the terms "Yule" and "Christmas" are often used interchangeably.[3] Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... A lunar calendar is a calendar that is based on cycles of the moon phase. ... see also Runic calendar The Germanic calendars were the regional agricultural almanacs in use amongst the Germanic peoples, prior to the adoption of the Julian and later the Gregorian calendar. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... Look up Colloquialism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Etymology

The modern English word Yule likely derives from the word yoole, from 1450, which developed from the Old English term geōl and geōla before 899. The term has been linked to and may originate from the Old Norse Jōl, which refers to a Germanic pagan feast lasting 12 days that was later Christianized into Christmas.[4] Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... The Forum for European-Australian Science and Technology Cooperation (FEAST) is a non-government organisation aimed at highlighting and developing collaborative research activities between Europe (European countries and the European Union) and Australia. ...


In Old English geōla[2] meant "December". The ancient Anglo-Saxon calendar had two "tides" of 60 day periods: "Litha Tide", roughly equivalent to modern June and July, and "Giuli Tide" to December and January. The remaining months were lunar 29-day periods—the New Year began with the second half of that tide, also known as "Wulfmonath". see also Runic calendar The Germanic calendars were the regional agricultural almanacs in use amongst the Germanic peoples, prior to the adoption of the Julian and later the Gregorian calendar. ...


A 12-day period between the two halves—or "monaths"—became the traditional Twelve Days of Christmas. With the return to the Latin-based calendar through the invading Normans, the definition narrowed to mean Christmas day only in the combined Christian Norman and Anglo-Saxon England. This article is about the religious period from Christmas to Epiphany. ... Norman conquests in red. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ...


Jól may derive from Old Norse hjól, wheel, referring to the moment when the wheel of the year is at its low point, ready to rise again (compare to the Slavic karachun). This theory seems based more on similarities between the words jul and hjul (with a mute h) in modern Scandinavian languages, than on older cognates or historical sources. The Old English form Geohhol may connect to the word to Latin jocus.[5] Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... Karachun, Korochun or Kračún is a Slavic version of Halloween as a day when the Black God and other evil spirits are most potent. ...


In the Scandinavian Germanic languages, the term Jul covers both Yule and Christmas, and is occasionally used to denote other holidays in December, such as jødisk jul or judisk jul, meaning "Jewish Yule" for Hanukkah. Neighboring Finnic languages borrow the word to denote Christmas, Finnish as joulu and Estonian as jõul. For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Grand Rabbi Israel Abraham Portugal of Skulen Hasidism lighting Hanukkah lights Hanukkah (‎, also spelled Chanukah or Hanukah), also known as the Festival of Lights, is an eight-day Jewish holiday beginning on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may fall anytime from late November to... Finnic peoples (Fennic, sometimes Baltic-Finnic) refers to a group of related ethnic groups and nations speaking Finnic languages (also known as Balto-Finnic languages). ...


Ancient traditions

Yule celebrations at the winter solstice predate Christianity. Yule is a feast celebrated by sacrifice on mid winter night 12 January, according to Norwegian historian Olav Bø. [3] There are many references to Yule in the Icelandic sagas but few accounts of how Yule was celebrated beyond the fact it was a time for feasting. According to Adam of Bremen, Swedish kings sacrificed male slaves every ninth year during the Yule sacrifices at the Temple at Uppsala. 'Yule-Joy' with dancing continued through the Middle Ages in Iceland but was frowned upon after the Reformation. The ritual of slaughtering a boar on Yule survives in the modern tradition of the Christmas ham and the Boar's Head Carol. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: Íslendingasögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... The Temple at Uppsala was a temple in Gamla Uppsala (Old Uppsala), near modern Uppsala, Sweden, that was created to worship the Norse gods of ancient times. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Julskinka Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Christmas ham A Christmas Ham is a traditional ingredient in the Finnish and Swedish Christmas celebrations. ... The Boars Head Carol is a 15th century[1][2] song which may refer to one of several English Christmas carols that describes the ancient tradition of sacrificing a boar and presenting its head at a Yuletide feast. ...

On Yule Eve the best boar in the herd was brought into the hall where the assembled company laid their hands upon the animal and made their unbreakable oaths. Heard by the boar these oaths were thought to go straight to the ears of Freyr himself. Once the oaths had been sworn the boar was sacrificed in the name of Freyr and the feast of boar flesh began. The most commonly recognised remnant of the sacred boar traditions once common at Yule has to be the serving of the boar's head at later Christmas feasts.[4]

According to the medieval English writer the Venerable Bede, Christian missionaries sent to proselytize among the Germanic peoples of northern Europe were instructed to superimpose Christian themes upon existing local pagan holidays, to ease the conversion of the people to Christianity by allowing them to retain their traditional celebrations. Thus, Christmas was created by associating stories of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, the central figure of Christianity, with the existing pagan Yule celebrations, similar to the formation of Halloween and All Saint's Day via Christianization of existing pagan traditions. Mediæval Britain is a term used to suggest that there is a unity to the history of Great Britain from the 5th centurys withdrawal of Roman forces and Germanic invasions until the 16th century Reformations in Scotland and England. ... Bede, commonly known as the Venerable Bede, (c. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... This article is about the holiday. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ...


The confraternities of artisans of the 9th century, which developed into the medieval guilds, were denounced by Catholic clergy for their "conjurations" when they swore to support one another in coming adversity and in business ventures. The occasions were annual banquets on December 26, A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

"feast day of the pagan god Jul, when it was possible to couple with the spirits of the dead and with demons that returned to the surface of the earth... Many clerics denounced these conjurations as being not only a threat to public order but also, more serious in their eyes, satanic and immoral. Hincmar, in 858, sought in vain to Christianize them."[6]

Hincmar (c. ...

Contemporary traditions

Many symbols and motifs associated with the modern holiday of Christmas derive from traditional pagan northern European Yule celebrations. The burning of the Yule log, the decorating of Christmas trees, the eating of ham, the hanging of boughs, holly, mistletoe and others are all historically practices associated with Yule. When the Christianization of the Germanic peoples began, missionaries found it convenient to provide a Christian reinterpretation of popular pagan holidays such as Yule and allow the celebrations themselves to go on largely unchanged, versus trying to confront and suppress them. The Scandinavian tradition of slaughtering a pig at Christmas (see Christmas ham) is probably salient evidence of this. The tradition is thought to be derived from the sacrifice of boars to the god Freyr at the Yule celebrations. Halloween and aspects of Easter celebrations are likewise assimilated from northern European pagan festivals. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... For other uses, see yule log (disambiguation) A chocolate yule log. ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... This article is about the cut of meat. ... This article is about the plant. ... Families Santalaceae (Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Misodendraceae Mistletoe is the common name for a group of hemi-parasitic plants in the order Santalales that grow attached to and within the branches of a tree or shrub. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Julskinka Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Christmas ham A Christmas Ham is a traditional ingredient in the Finnish and Swedish Christmas celebrations. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... This article is about the holiday. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


English historian Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum contains a letter from Pope Gregory I to Saint Mellitus, who was on his way to England to conduct missionary work among the pagan Anglo-Saxons. Pope Gregory suggested that converting heathens would go easier if they were allowed to retain the outward forms of their traditional pagan practices and traditions, while recasting those traditions spiritually towards the Christian God instead of to their pagan "devils": "to the end that, whilst some gratifications are outwardly permitted them, they may the more easily consent to the inward consolations of the grace of God". [5] This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... For other uses, see Bede (disambiguation). ... Folio 3v from Codex Beda Petersburgiensis (746) The Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (in English: Ecclesiastical History of the English People) is a work in Latin by the Venerable Bede on the history of the Church in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between Roman... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Saint Gregory I, or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (circa 540 - March 12, 604) was pope of the Catholic Church from September 3, 590 until his death. ... Saint Mellitus (d. ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ...


Finland

Main article: Joulupukki
Main article: Joulupöytä

On the eve of the Finnish Joulu, children are visited by Joulupukki, a character similar to Santa Claus. The word Joulupukki means "Yule Goat" and probably derives from an old Finnish tradition where people called nuuttipukkis dressed in goat hides circulated in homes after Joulu, eating leftover food. Joulupukki visits people's homes and rides a sleigh pulled by a number of reindeer. He knocks on the front door during Jouluaatto, rather than sneaking in through the chimney at night. When he comes in, his first words are usually "Onkos täällä kilttejä lapsia?", "Are there (any) good (well behaving) children here?". Presents are given and opened immediately. He usually wears red, warm clothes and often carries a wooden walking stick. His workshop is in Korvatunturi, Lapland, Finland, rather than in the North Pole like Santa Claus, or on Greenland. He is married to Joulumuori (tr. Mother Yule). Typical Finnish yule dishes include ham, various root vegetable casseroles, beetroot salad, gingerbread and star-shaped plum-filled pastries. Other traditions with a non-Christian yule background include joulukuusi ("Uule spruce") and joulusauna ("yule sauna"). Joulupukki is the Finnish name for Santa Claus or Father Christmas. ... Joulupöytä is the name of the traditional food board served at Christmas in Finland. ... Joulupukki is the Finnish name for Santa Claus or Father Christmas. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... This article is about the domestic species. ... Hides are skins obtained from animals that are used for human use. ... For the cricket meaning, see Sledging (cricket) A sled, sledge or sleigh is a vehicle with runners for sliding instead of wheels for rolling. ... Caribou redirects here. ... Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Korvatunturi is a fell in Lapland, on the border of Finland (in the municipality of Savukoski) and Russia. ... Lappi, or the Province of Lapland is one of the Provinces of Finland, and a part of the larger geographical area of Lapland, which spans over four countries. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Joulupöytä is the name of the traditional food board served at Christmas in Finland. ... Julskinka Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Christmas ham A Christmas Ham is a traditional ingredient in the Finnish and Swedish Christmas celebrations. ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Picea abies (L.) H. Karst. ... For the music festival in Finland, see Sauna Open Air Metal Festival. ...


Norway

Main article: Jul (Norway)

The main Jul event for Norwegians is on Julaften (Tr:Yule Eve) on December 24th, when the main feast is served and gifts are exchanged. The family traditionally eat ribbe (pork ribs) or pinnekjøtt, with rice pudding for dessert, often with a scalded almond and a price for the finder. Almost all Norwegian breweries produce traditional beer, juleøl (Yule Ale), and a special soda, julebrus (Tr: Yule Brew). Jul dishes are also served on Julebord (Tr:Yule Table), where people from work gather in early December to feast and drink alcoholic beverages. Traditionally, the mother of the house bakes seven types of cookies, julekaker. In the tradition called Julebukk or Nyttårsbukk, children dress up in costumes, visit neighbours, singing Christmas carols and receiving candy, nuts and clementines. They do this any day between Julaften and New Year's Eve. In older times in some areas, primarily Setesdalen, adults commonly went from house to house drinking, an event called Toftirus, "12-day high", during 12 days surrounding Christmas eve. Although it is now only practiced by a tiny minority and is unknown to most of Norway, this tradition apparently developed into today's Drammebukk, where adults dress up later in the evening, visit neighbors and receive drinks. As in the other Scandinavian countries, the pre-Christian Jul (pronounced: Yule) has survived as the Christmas holiday of Norway. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rice pudding being served during the traditional Scandinavian Christmas meal, in Denmark Rice pudding (Arroz Doce) in a typical Christmas meal, in Portugal Pulut hitam served in a Malaysian restaurant Rice pudding is a dessert enjoyed by people of different cultures all over the world, originating in Japan. ... Kettles in a modern Trappist brewery A brewery can be a building or place that produces beer, or a business (brewing company) whose trade is the production and sale of beer. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ... Yarkand ladies summer fashions. ... For other uses, see Clementine (disambiguation). ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ...


Denmark

Main article: Jul (Denmark)

In Denmark, Jul is celebrated on December 24, which is called Juleaftensdag (Juleaften for Christmas Eve specifically). An elaborate dinner is eaten with the family, consisting of roast pork, roast duck or roast goose with potatoes, red cabbage and gravy. For dessert is rice pudding, traditionally with an almond hidden inside. The lucky finder of this almond is entitled to a small gift. After the meal is complete, the family gather around the Juletræ and sing Christmas carols. Then the children often hand out the presents which are opened immediately. This is followed by candy, chips, various nuts, clementines, and sometimes a mulled and spiced wine with almonds and raisins called Gløg is served hot in small cups. Julemiddag In Denmark, Jul is celebrated on December 24, which is referred to as Juleaftendag. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... For the short novel by Charles Dickens, see A Christmas Carol. ...


Sweden

Julbock at Gävle, Sweden
Julbock at Gävle, Sweden

As in many other countries in northern Europe Jultomten brings presents on julafton ("Yule Eve"), 24 December, the day generally thought of as the main jul day. Many Swedes[7] watch Kalle Anka och hans vänner(lit. Donald Duck and his friends), a compilation of Disney shorts, as well as Sagan om Karl-Bertil Jonssons Julafton by late Swedish poet, writer, filmmaker, playwright, and political satirist Tage Danielsson (with animation by Per Åhlin). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1360 × 1024 pixel, file size: 303 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Christmas worldwide G... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 796 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1360 × 1024 pixel, file size: 303 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Christmas worldwide G... One of Jenny Nyströms Christmas-themed tomte paintings, a popular image of the modern tomte A tomte or nisse is a mythical creature of Scandinavian folklore, believed to take care of a farmers home and barn and protect it from misfortune, in particular at night, when the... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Tage Danielsson, (February 5, 1928 - October 13, 1985) was a Swedish author, actor and film director. ... Per Ã…hlin, (born August 7, 1931), is a Swedish artist and animator. ...


Almost all Swedish families celebrate with a julbord, which almost always includes julskinka (baked ham) and is served with beer, julmust, and snaps. The dishes vary throughout the country. Businesses invite staff to a julbord dinner or lunch in preceding weeks, and people go privately to restaurants offering julbord during December. Swedes also enjoy glögg. After 'Kalle Anka' the presents are distributed either by Jultomten (usually from a sack) or from under the Christmas tree. In older days a julbock (yule goat) was an alternative to Jultomten; now it is used as an ornament, ranging in size from 10 cm to huge constructions like the Gävle goat. The following day some people attend a julotta and even more venture to the cinema districts as 25 December is the day of the big premieres. Smorgasbord is an anglification of the Swedish word Smörgåsbord. ... For other meanings of ham or Ham, see Ham (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Julmust is a soft drink that is consumed mainly in Sweden at Christmas. ... Snaps is a small shot of a strong alcoholic beverage taken during the course of a meal, very much like the German schnapps. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into mulled wine. ... One of Jenny Nyströms Christmas-themed tomte paintings, a popular image of the modern tomte A tomte or nisse is a mythical creature of Scandinavian folklore, believed to take care of a farmers home and barn and protect it from misfortune, in particular at night, when the... A Yule Goat from Uppland, Sweden. ... The Gävle Goat from 2004 The Gävle Goat (known in Swedish as the Julbocken i Gävle or Gävlebocken) is a giant version of a traditional Swedish Yule Goat figure made of straw that stands in (Slottstorget) Castle Square in central Gävle. ... The Julotta is a Swedish service that is held early on Christmas morning, at 7 a. ...


Shetland Islands

In the Shetland Islands of Scotland the Yules are considered to last a month beginning on December 18th and ending January 18th. The main Yules celebration occurs on December 31st. The rest of Scotland eventually adopted "Hogmanay" (the name of the New Years presents) as the name for the festival.[8] The Shetland Islands, also called Shetland (archaically spelled Zetland) formerly called Hjaltland, comprise one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... Hogmanay (pronounced — with the main stress on the last syllable - hog-muh-NAY) is the Scots word for the last day of the year and is synonymous with the celebration of the New Year (Gregorian calendar) in the Scottish manner. ...


Neopaganism

As forms of neopaganism can be quite different and have very different origins, these representations can vary considerably despite the shared name. Some celebrate in a way as close as possible to how they believe Ancient Germanic pagans observed the tradition, while others observe the holiday with rituals culled from numerous other unrelated sources including Germanic. Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ...


Germanic neopaganism

In Germanic Neopagan sects, Yule is celebrated with gatherings that often involve a meal and gift giving. Further attempts at reconstruction of surviving accounts of historical celebrations are often made, a hallmark being variations of the traditional. However it has been pointed out that this is not really reconstruction as these traditions never died out - they have merely removed the superficial Christian elements from the celebrations blót. The Blót was the pagan Germanic sacrifice to Norse gods and Elves. ...


Groups such as the Asatru Folk Assembly in the US recognize the celebration as lasting 12 days, beginning on the date of the winter solstice.[9] The Asatru Folk Assembly is an Ásatrú organization based in the US which was founded by Stephen McNallen in 1994. ... This article is about the astronomical and cultural event of winters solstice, also known as midwinter. ...


Wicca

Many Wiccan based sects favor a plethora of sources on winter solstice holidays to recreate a type of Yule holiday. While the name "Yule" is used, it is not a reconstruction of the historical holiday. Wreaths, Yule logs, decoration of trees, decorating with mistletoe, holly, and ivy, exchanges of presents, and even wassailing are incorporated and regarded as sacred. The return of the Sun as Frey is commemorated in some groups. In most Wiccan traditions, this holiday is also celebrated as the rebirth of the Great God,[10] who is viewed as the newborn solstice sun. The method of gathering for this sabbat varies by practitioner. Some have private ceremonies at home,[11] while others do so with their covens.[12] For the book series Wicca see Sweep (book series) and Circle Of Three. ... Look up wreath in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Families Santalaceae (Viscaceae) Loranthaceae Misodendraceae Mistletoe is the common name for a group of hemi-parasitic plants in the order Santalales that grow attached to and within the branches of a tree or shrub. ... This article is about the plant. ... Species Hedera algeriensis – Algerian Ivy Hedera azorica – Azores Ivy Hedera canariensis – Canaries Ivy Hedera caucasigena Hedera colchica – Caucasian Ivy Hedera cypria Hedera helix – Common Ivy Hedera hibernica – Irish Ivy Hedera maderensis – Madeiran Ivy Hedera maroccana Hedera nepalensis – Himalayan Ivy Hedera pastuchowii – Pastuchovs Ivy Hedera rhombea – Japanese Ivy Hedera sinensis... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Freyr is a very important god in Old Norse religion. ... In Neopaganism, the Wheel of the Year is the natural cycle of the seasons, commemorated by the eight Sabbats. ... Coven or covan was originally a late medieval Scots word (c1500) meaning a gathering of any kind, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. ...


References

  1. ^ "The Anglo-Saxon Calendar"
  2. ^ Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, "Yule in Ancient Norway"
  3. ^ AskOxford.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  4. ^ Barnhart, Robert K. The Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology (1995) ISBN 0062700847
  5. ^ (German) Fick, August; Falk, Hjalmar; Torp, Alf (1909). Wörterbuch der Indogermanischen Sprachen: Dritter Teil: Wortschatz der Germanischen Spracheinheit. Göttingen Vandenhoek und Ruprecht. p. 328.
  6. ^ Rouche, Michel (1987). "Private life conquers state and society", in Paul Veyne: A History of Private Life, Vol. I. Harvard University Press, 432. ISBN 0-674-39974-9. 
  7. ^ 3,610,000 in year 2006, which is about 40% of the population, see sv:Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar God Jul.
  8. ^ UK History
  9. ^ McNallen, Stephen The Twelve Days of Yule - 2005 [1]
  10. ^ James Buescher (2007-12-15). Wiccans, pagans ready to celebrate Yule. Lancaster Online. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.
  11. ^ Andrea Kannapell (1997-12-21). Celebrations; It's Solstice, Hanukkah, Kwannza: Let There Be Light!. nytimes.com. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.
  12. ^ Ruth la Ferla (2000-12-13). Like Magic, Witchcraft Charms Teenagers. nytimes.com. Retrieved on 2007-12-21.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert K. Barnhart is an American lexicographer and editor of various specialized dictionaries. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Holidays Portal

Image File history File links 500px-Xmas_tree_animated. ... Joulupukki is the Finnish name for Santa Claus or Father Christmas. ... Julebukking is a costumed holiday tradition of Norwegian origin. ... Smorgasbord is an anglification of the Swedish word Smörgåsbord. ... One of Jenny Nyströms Christmas-themed tomte paintings, a popular image of the modern tomte A tomte or nisse is a mythical creature of Scandinavian folklore, believed to take care of a farmers home and barn and protect it from misfortune, in particular at night, when the... A Yule Goat from Uppland, Sweden. ... Julskinka Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Christmas ham A Christmas Ham is a traditional ingredient in the Finnish and Swedish Christmas celebrations. ... The Yule Lads, or Yulemen, (Icelandic: jólasveinarnir) are the Icelandic santa clauses. ... For other uses, see yule log (disambiguation) A chocolate yule log. ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... As in the other Scandinavian countries, the pre-Christian Jul (pronounced: Yule) has survived as the Christmas holiday of Norway. ... Julemiddag In Denmark, Jul is celebrated on December 24, which is referred to as Juleaftendag. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the astronomical and cultural event of winters solstice, also known as midwinter. ... See Holidays in Sweden. ... Midwinter Christmas or Yulefest is a Midwinter/Yuletide related celebration custom in Australia and New Zealand during the wintertime (which on the Southern Hemisphere falls into the June-July-August period. ... This is an incomplete list of festivals and holidays that take place during the winter in the northern hemisphere, especially those commemorating the season. ... Midsummer may refer to the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the diverse celebrations of it around the world, but more often refers to European celebrations that accompany the summer solstice, or to Western festivals that take place in June and are usually related to Saint John... “Summer solstice” redirects here. ... In Neo-druidism, Alban Arthan is a seasonal festival at the Winter Solstice. ...

External links

Leo Ruickbie is the author of Witchcraft Out of the Shadows[1], a 2004 publication outlining the history of witchcraft from ancient Greece until the modern day. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: Yule (693 words)
In modern Paganism, Yule is celebrated on the winter solstice: in the northern hemisphere, circa December 21, and in the southern hemisphere, circa June 21.
Yule is one of the eight solar holidays or sabbats of Neopaganism.
Yule is a revival of a Germanic festival that was Christianized as Christmas ; indeed, many traditional trappings of Christmas, such as the Yule log, holly, and the Christmas tree are derived from pre-Christian Yule celebrations.
Yule (395 words)
Yule was the pre-Christian germanic Midwinter celebration, and is today one of the eight solar holidays or sabbatss of Neopaganism.
In modern neopaganism Yule is celebrated on the winter solstice, in the northern hemisphere circa December 21 and in the southern hemisphere circa June 21.
Yule is a revival of a Germanic festival that was Christianized as Christmas; indeed, many traditional trappings of Christmas, such as the Yule Log, holly, and the Christmas tree are derived from pre-Christian Yule celebrations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m