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Encyclopedia > Yugoslavs
Yugoslavs
Југословени - Jugosloveni
Jugoslaveni
Jugoslovani
Total population

exact figure unknown (over 400,000) Image File history File links Jugosloveni. ... Josip Broz Tito (Cyrillic: Јосип Броз Тито, May 7, 1892 (May 25th according to official birth certificate) – May 4, 1980) was the leader of the Second Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1943 until 1991. ... Sava Kovačević Sava Kovačević (born 1905 - NikÅ¡ić, Montenegro) was partisan commander during WWII. He fell fighting the Germans at TjentiÅ¡te, near the Sutjeska river, in 1943. ... Ante Trumbić (May 17, 1864 - November 17, 1938) was an influential Croatian nationalist leader from the early 20th century. ... Fahreta Jahić-Živojinović, or better known as Lepa Brena, is arguably the most well-known and successful singer of the 1980s in the former Yugoslavia and nowadays a successful producer of folk-pop music. ... Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Yugoslav[1] with links to a group known as the Black Hand (Црна Рука or Crna Ruka) and Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. ...

Regions with significant populations
United States: 328,547 (2000 census)[1]
Serbia and Montenegro:
80,721 (2002 census)[2]

Bosnia and Herzegovina:
unknown
Slovenia:
527 (2002 census)[3]
Brazil:
500,000 - 800,000 (2006)[citation needed]
Croatia:
176 (2001)[4]
Republic of Macedonia:
unknown
Canada:
65,505 (2001)[5]
Argentina:
60,000 - 80,000(2005)[citation needed] 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 9th century   -  First unified state c. ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian(Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006... For an explanation of terms related to Macedonia, see Macedonia (terminology). ...

Languages
Serbo-Croatian, fewer Slovenian or Macedonian
Religions
Atheism, Eastern Orthodoxy,
Roman Catholicism, and Sunni Islam
Related ethnic groups
South Slavs

Yugoslavs (Bosnian: Jugosloveni; Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) is an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... “Atheist” redirects here. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in black) Distribution of Slavic peoples by language The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... The Cyrillic alphabet (or azbuka, from the old name of the first two letters) is an alphabet used for several East and South Slavic languages; (Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Rusyn, Serbian, and Ukrainian) and many other languages of the former Soviet Union, Asia and Eastern Europe. ... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: Land of the South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


In socialist Yugoslavia, 1943-1991, official designation for those who wanted to declared themselves that way was with quotation marks, "Yugoslavs" (introduced in census 1971). Quotation marks were added to distinguish the ethnicity from statehood (legal statuses such as citizenship), which was written without quotation marks. The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ...


A few years before the dissolution of Yugoslavia, most of those who declared themselves "Yugoslavs" reverted to or adopted traditional nationalities such as "Muslims" (in the sense of nationality), Croats, Macedonians, Montenegrins, Serbs, Slovenes as well as those which were played down including Janjevs, Bunjevci and Šokci etc) but the designation continues to be used by some. Languages Serbo-Croat(Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian) Macedonian Religions Predominantly Islam Related ethnic groups South Slavs Muslims by nationality (Muslimani, Муслимани) was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe mainly native Slavic Muslims. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Janjevci are the inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ... The Catholic Church in the Bunjevac village of Stari Žednik Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region... Catholic Church in the Å okac village of Sonta, Serbia Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of...


It was estimated, according to comparison of census numbers, that "Yugoslavs" came mostly from constitutional Slavic peoples.


In the 2002 census, 49,881 inhabitants of the Serbian province Vojvodina declared themselves as "Yugoslav" (at a time when Serbia was part of the country still called FR Yugoslavia). For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Vojvodina (red) is one of Serbias two autonomous provinces Capital (and largest city) Novi Sad Official languages Ethnic groups  2. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbian Government Republic President  - 1992 - 1993 Dobrica Ćosić  - 1993 - 1997 Zoran Lilić  - 1997 – 2000 Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević  - 2000 - 2003 Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Prime Minister  - 1992 - 1993 Milan Panić  - 1993 - 1998 Radoje Kontić  - 1998 - 2000 Momir Bulatović  - 2000 - 2001 Zoran Žižić  - 2001 - 2003 DragiÅ¡a Pe...

Contents

Background

One use of the term "Yugoslavs" is for people who believe that Serbs, Croats, Bosniaks, and Montenegrins are one and the same people, and that Slovenes and Macedonians are slightly different linguistically but are an extended and crucial part of the Yugoslav identity, who have cultural differences (mainly religious) because of empires which ruled their tribes in the past. For instance, if one wished to see the impact of Germanic and Hungarian influences on the Yugoslavs, they would look to the (Catholic) Croatian and Slovenian region, the (Muslim) Bosnian region under the Ottoman influence, and the (Orthodox) Serbian region under both Russian and, in the middle ages, Greek influence. Those who were raised in the Yugoslav spirit embrace the three different nationalities as one ethnicity who speak one language, and see this as the reason to unite in a similar way that Italy was unified in 1861.[6] Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (Ä°stanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–22 Mehmed VI... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ...


History

Since the late 18th century, when traditional European ethnic affiliations started to mature into modern ethnic identities, there have been numerous attempts to define a common South Slavic ethnic identity. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in black) Distribution of Slavic peoples by language The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ...


Corfu agreement

During June and July 1917, the Yugoslav Committee met with the Serbian Government in Corfu and on 20 July a declaration that laid the foundation for the post-war state was issued. The preamble stated that the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes were "the same by blood, by language, by the feelings of their unity, by the continuity and integrity of the territory which they inhabit undividedly, and by the common vital interests of their national survival and manifold development of their moral and material life." The future state was to be called the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes and was to be a constitutional monarchy under the Karađorđević dynasty. Yugoslav Committee (Jugoslavenski odbor) was a political interest group formed by south Slavs from Austria-Hungary during World War I aimed at joining the existing south Slavic nations in an independent state. ... Pontikonisi island in the background with the Vlaheraina Monastery in the foreground. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... The House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian: Карађорђевићи; English: House of Karageorgevich) was a Serbian ruling dynasty descended from KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e (George Petrović). The family had a long feud with the Obrenović dynasty. ...


World War I

On June 28, 1914, Gavrilo Princip shot and killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austrian throne, and his wife, in Sarajevo. Princip was a member of Young Bosnia, a group whose aims included the unification of the Yugoslavs and independence from Austria-Hungary..[7] Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Yugoslav[1] with links to a group known as the Black Hand (Црна Рука or Crna Ruka) and Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. ... Franz Ferdinand links to here. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


After the assassination, Princip was captured. During his trial he stated "I am a Yugoslav nationalist, aiming for the unification of all Yugoslavs, and I do not care what form of state, but it must be free from Austria."[8]


Before the Second World War

The Illyrian movement sought to identify Southern Slavs with ancient Illyrians and to construct the Illyrian literary language which would unite not only Serbian and Croatian, but also Slovenian. Some Serbian writers contended that all Southern Slavs (or at least those speaking Serbo-Croatian) were Serbs, some Croatian writers thought that they were all Croats. Some settled for a common designation of Serbo-Croats. Vlaho Bukovac: Hrvatski narodni preporod, Zastor u HNK Zagreb Illyrian movement (Croatian/Serbian: Ilirski pokret), also Croatian national revival (Hrvatski narodni preporod), was a nationalistic campaign initiated by a group of young Croatian intellectuals during the first half of 19th century, around the years of 1835-1849 (there is some... Illyria (disambiguation) Illyrians has come to refer to a broad, ill-defined Indo-European[1] group of peoples who inhabited the western Balkans (Illyria, roughly from northern Epirus to southern Pannonia) and even perhaps parts of Southern Italy in classical times into the Common era, and spoke Illyrian languages. ... Serbo-Croatian or Croato-Serbian (also Croatian or Serbian, Serbian or Croatian) (srpskohrvatski or cрпскохрватски or hrvatskosrpski or hrvatski ili srpski or srpski ili hrvatski), earlier also Serbo-Croat, was an official language of Yugoslavia (along with Slovenian, Macedonian). ...


In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the term Yugoslavs started to be used as a synonym for South Slavs, especially to denote those in Austria-Hungary. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


After the First World War, when South Slavic lands were united in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, the term Yugoslavs was used to refer to all of its inhabitants, but particularly to those of Southern Slavic origin. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ...


In 1929, King Alexander sought to resolve a deep political crisis brought on by ethnic tensions by assuming dictatorial powers, renaming the country "Kingdom of Yugoslavia", and officially pronouncing that there is one single Yugoslav nation with three tribes. The Yugoslav ethnic designation was thus for a time imposed on all South Slavs in Yugoslavia. Changes in Yugoslav politics after King Alexander's death in 1934 brought an end to this policy, but the designation continued to be used by some people. Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... King Alexander I of Yugoslavia also called King Alexander Unificator (Serbian Краљ Александар I Карађорђевић, Latin: Kralj Aleksandar I Karađorđević) (Cetinje, Montenegro, 16 December 1888 – Marseille, France, 9 October 1934) of the Royal House of Karađorđević was the first king of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1929–34) and before... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Second Yugoslavia and later

After liberation from Axis Powers in 1945, the new socialist Yugoslavia became a federal country which officially recognized and valued its ethnic diversity. Traditional ethnic identities again became the primary ethnic designations used by most inhabitants of Yugoslavia. However, many people still declared themselves as "Yugoslavs" because they wanted to express an identification with Yugoslavia as a whole, but not specifically with any of its peoples. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ...


The 1971 census recorded 273,077 "Yugoslavs", or 1.33% of the total population. The 1981 census recorded 1,216,463 or 5.4% Yugoslavs. In the 1991 census of 5.51% (239,777) of the inhabitants of Bosnia and Herzegovina declared themselves to be "Yugoslav". 4.25% of the population of the republic of Montenegro also declared themselves "Yugoslav" in the same census. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthem Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, Bright Dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Podgorica Official languages Serbian(Ijekavian dialect)1 Demonym Montenegrin Government Republic  -  President Filip Vujanović  -  Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence due to the dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro   -  Declared June 3, 2006...


The Constitution of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1990 that ratified a Presidency of 7 member-Presidents accounted 1 of them to be elected amongst/by the republic's "Yugoslavs", thereby introducing the Yugoslavs next to Muslims, Serbs and Croats into the Constitutional framework of BH, although on an inferior level. But due to the Bosnian War that erupted in 1992, this Constitution was short-lived and unrealized. Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim...


The first census taken in independent Croatia revealed that "Yugoslavs" made up around 2% of the population. This to date has been the highest percentage of "Yugoslavs" within Croatia's borders. Due to the disparity with religion and language on one side, Orthodoxy and Serbian having been declared previously, and nationality on the other, that what was "Yugoslav", accompanied by a mild drop in numbers of ethnic-Serbs in Croatia, it is fair to assume that the majority of this 2% "Yugoslav" population were previously (and possibly again afterwards) Serbs, or more correctly, closely affiliated citizens embedded within the ethnic Serbian circles. The 2001 census in Croatia registered only 176 Yugoslavs. Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ...


After the dissolution of Yugoslavia, most "Yugoslavs" switched back to traditional ethnic designations. Nevertheless, the concept has survived into Bosnia and Herzegovina (where most towns have a tiny percentage), and Serbia and Montenegro (2003-2006), which kept the name "Yugoslavia" the longest, right up to February, 2003. New censa will show whether Yugoslav is still being used in the new states of Serbia and Montenegro respectively. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Famous Yugoslavs

Yugoslavs have affected world history on many occasions.[9][10] One prime example is the leader, president for life, and founder of second Yugoslavia, Marshal Josip Broz Tito. First to organize a resistance against Nazi Germany in Yugoslavia,[11][12][13] he effectively expelled Nazi occupation in Yugoslavia, co-founded the Non-Aligned Movement, and defied Stalin's Soviet pressure on Yugoslavia. Other prominent figures include writer Ivo Andric, Yugoslav Committee member Ante Trumbic, and Yugoslav nationalist Gavrilo Princip. Princip, also being a prime example of a Yugoslav who impacted world history, triggered the first World War by successfully assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in the city of Sarajevo. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Josip Broz Tito (Cyrillic: Јосип Броз Тито, May 7, 1892 (May 25th according to official birth certificate) – May 4, 1980) was the leader of the Second Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1943 until 1991. ... Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian, Albanian, Hungarian and languages of other minority groups. ... Josip Broz Tito (Cyrillic: Јосип Броз Тито, May 7, 1892 (May 25th according to official birth certificate) – May 4, 1980) was the leader of the Second Yugoslavia, which lasted from 1943 until 1991. ... Member states of the Non-Aligned Movement (2005). ... Iosif (usually anglicized as Joseph) Vissarionovich Stalin (Russian: Иосиф Виссарионович Сталин), original name Ioseb Jughashvili (Georgian: იოსებ ჯუღაშვი&#4314... Ivo Andrić. Ivo Andric; (hr/sr-lat:Ivo Andrić; sr-cyr:Иво Андрић) (October 9, 1892 in Dolac near Travnik (Bosnia and Herzegovina) – March 13, 1975 in Belgrade, then Yugoslavia), a Serbian-Croatian novelist, short story writer, and Nobel Prize... Ante Trumbić (May 17, 1864 - November 17, 1938) was an influential Croatian nationalist leader from the early 20th century. ... Gavrilo Princip (Serbian Cyrillic: Гаврило Принцип, IPA: ) (July 25, 1894) – April 28, 1918) was an ethnic Yugoslav[1] with links to a group known as the Black Hand (Црна Рука or Crna Ruka) and Mlada Bosna, who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife in Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Bosnia and Herzegovina Entity Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ...


Other Yugoslavs include entertainers and singers, such as Lepa Brena, Goran Bregovic, Branko Đurić and Nele Karajlic from Zabranjeno Pusenje. Most recently, Oliver Dulić, Serbia's parliament speaker, identified himself as a Yugoslav. Fahreta Jahić-Živojinović, or better known as Lepa Brena, is arguably the most well-known and successful singer of the 1980s in the former Yugoslavia and nowadays a successful producer of folk-pop music. ... Goran Bregović (Горан Бреговић) (born March 22, 1950) is one of the most recognizable modern composers of the Balkans. ... Ðurić is probably best known for playing the protagonist role of ÄŒiki in the award-winning No Mans Land. ... dr Nele Karajlić (born December 11, 1962 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina) is Bosnian/Serbian rock and roll musician, composer, actor and television director. ... Zabranjeno Pušenje (phrase meaning Smoking is forbidden) were a Bosnian garage rock band founded in the 1980s. ... Oliver Dulić (Serbian Cyrillic: Оливер Дулић) (born 21 January 1975 in Belgrade) is a Serbian politician, long-time member of Democratic Party, and incumbent president of the National Assembly of Serbia. ...


See also

This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Population: 10,600,000 (Serbia - 9,981,929; Montenegro - 620,000) note: Age structure: 0-14 years: Serbia - 19. ... // Population pyramid 4,498,976 (July 2006 est. ... Croatia is inhabited mostly by Croats, while minority groups include Serbs, Bosniaks, Hungarians, Italians, Germans, Czechs, Roma people and others. ... Population Some statistics are from the 2002 census data, while the rest are estimates from the CIA World Factbook publication. ... Demographics of Montenegro (based on the 2003 census) Ethnic map of Montenegro according to the census The 2003 census was undertaken by Montenegro, which, together with Serbia, constitutes Serbia and Montenegro. ... Ethnic map of Serbia // Demographics of Serbia Population of Serbia (including Kosovo) Serbs 66% Albanians 17% Hungarians 3. ... The majority of Slovenias population is Slovenian (over 88%). Hungarians and Italians have the status of indigenous minorities under the Constitution of Slovenia, which guarantees them seats in the National Assembly. ...

References

  1. ^ US census
  2. ^ 2002 census in Republic of Serbia
  3. ^ Slovenian census 2002 (in English)
  4. ^ Croatian 2001 census, detailed classification by nationality
  5. ^ Statistics of Canada
  6. ^ A Short History of the Yugoslav Peoples
  7. ^ Wikipedia's World War I Article
  8. ^ Gavrilo Princip
  9. ^ World War 1 Lecture 15: The Balkan causes of World War I
  10. ^ Tito-Stalin Split
  11. ^ Tito and his People by Howard Fast
  12. ^ Liberation of Belgrade and Yugoslavia
  13. ^ The Resistance Movement in Yugoslavia

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