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Encyclopedia > Ypres
Ypres
Ieper (Dutch)
Location of Ypres in West Flanders
Geography
Country Belgium
Community Flemish Community of Belgium flag Flemish Community
Region Flemish Region flag Flemish Region
Province West Flanders flag West Flanders
Arrondissement Ypres
Coordinates 50°51′N 02°53′E / 50.85, 2.883Coordinates: 50°51′N 02°53′E / 50.85, 2.883
Area 130.61 km²
Population (Source: NIS)
Population
– Males
– Females
- Density
34,897 (January 1, 2006)
48.86%
51.14%
267 inhab./km²
Age distribution
0–19 years
20–64 years
65+ years
(January 1, 2006)
22.52%
58.08%
19.40%
Foreigners 1.89% (July 1, 2005)
Economy
Unemployment rate 8.01% (January 1, 2006)
Mean annual income 11,833 €/pers. (2003)
Government
Mayor Luc Dehaene (CD&V)
Governing parties CD&V
Other information
Postal codes 8900, 8902, 8904, 8906, 8908
Area codes 057
Web address www.ieper.be

Ypres (French, pronounced /ipr/ generally used in English1) or Ieper (official name in Dutch, pronounced /ˈi:pər/) is a Belgian municipality located in the Flemish province of West Flanders. The municipality comprises the city of Ypres and the villages of Boezinge, Brielen, Dikkebus, Elverdinge, Hollebeke, Sint-Jan, Vlamertinge, Voormezele, Zillebeke, and Zuidschote. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links RedDot. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links IeperLocatie. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Flanders. ... the Flemish community has jurisdiction over Flanders and over the Dutch language institutions in Brussels. ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Flanders. ... The Flemish region is one of the three official regions of the Kingdom of Belgium (alongside the Walloon Region and the Brussels-Capital Region). ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_West_Flanders. ... West Flanders (Dutch: West-Vlaanderen) is the westernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... This is a list of Belgian administrative arrondissements or districts. ... The Arrondissement of Ypres (Dutch: ; French: ) is one of the eight administrative arrondissements in the Province of West Flanders, Belgium. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Statistics Belgium is the main official statistical institution in Belgian offering a large choice of figures. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This distribution is named for the pyramidal shape of its graph. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of the world with countries colored according to their immigrant population as a percentage of total population: Immigration is the movement of people from one nation-state to another. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams (CD&V) (Christian Democratic and Flemish) is a political party in Belgium, formerly called Christelijke Volkspartij (CVP) (Christian Peoples Party). ... A coalition is an alliance among entities, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest. ... Christen-Democratisch en Vlaams (CD&V) (Christian Democratic and Flemish) is a political party in Belgium, formerly called Christelijke Volkspartij (CVP) (Christian Peoples Party). ... This is a list of postal codes for Belgium. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Belgium comprises 589 municipalities (Dutch: gemeenten, French: communes, German: Gemeinde) grouped into five provinces in each of two regions and into a third region, the Brussels-Capital Region, comprising 19 municipalities that do not belong to a province. ... The Flemish region is one of the three official regions of the Kingdom of Belgium (alongside the Walloon Region and the Brussels-Capital Region). ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... West Flanders (Dutch: West-Vlaanderen) is the westernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... Boezinge is located north of the town of Ieperin Belgium, on the N369 road in the direction of Diksmuide. ... Hollebeke is a Flemish village in the Belgian province of West Vlaanderen, now part of Ypres city. ... Zillebeke is a village in the Flemish province of West-Vlaanderen in Belgium. ...


During World War I, Ypres was the centre of intense and sustained battles between the German and the Allied forces. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Origins to World War I

Ypres is an ancient town, and is known to have been raided by the Romans in the first century BC [3]. During the Middle Ages, Ypres was a prosperous city with a population of 40,000, [1] renowned for its linen trade with England, which was mentioned in the Canterbury Tales. It was the hometown of William of Ypres, a commander of Flemish mercenaries in England who was reckoned among the more able of the military commanders fighting for King Stephen in his prolonged civil war with the Empress Matilda. Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... William of Ypres was King Stephen of Englands chief lieutenant and mercenary captain during the English civil wars of 1139-54 known as the Anarchy. ... Stephen (c. ... Empress Matilda (February 1102 – September 10, 1167; sometimes Maud or Maude), also called Matilda, Countess of Anjou or Matilda, Lady of the English, was the daughter and dispossessed heir of King Henry I of England. ...


In order to prosper and maintain its wealth, Ypres had to be fortified to keep out invaders. Parts of the early ramparts, dating from 1385, still survive near the Rijselpoort (Lille Gate). The famous Cloth Hall was built in the thirteenth century. During this time also, cats, then the symbol of the devil and witchcraft, were thrown off the cloth hall, possibly due to the belief that this would get rid of evil demons. Today, this act is commemorated with a triennial Cat Parade through town. Over time, the earthworks were replaced by sturdier masonry and earthen structures and a partial moat. Ypres was further fortified in 17th and 18th centuries while under the occupation of the Hapsburgs and the French. Major works were completed at the end of the 17th century by the French military engineer Sebastien Le Prestre, Seigneur de Vauban. The Cloth Hall, Ypres The Cloth Hall (Dutch: Lakenhal or Lakenhalle), of Ypres, Belgium, was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages, when it served as the main market and warehouse for the Flemish citys prosperous cloth industry. ... Minneke Poes, one of the giant cats in the Kattenstoet. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... Vauban designed this pentagonal fortress to withstand sieges. ...


World War I

Ypres was a key position during World War I because it stood in the path of Germany's planned sweep across the rest of Belgium and into France from the North (the Schlieffen Plan). Moreover, the neutrality of Belgium was guaranteed by Britain: Germany's invasion of Belgium brought the British Empire into the war. The German army surrounded the city on three sides, bombarding it throughout much of the war. To counterattack, British, French and allied forces made costly advances from the Ypres salient into the German lines on the surrounding hills. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Alfred Graf von Schlieffen For the French counter-plan, see Plan XVII The Schlieffen Plan was the German General Staffs overall strategic plan for victory on the Western Front against France, and was executed to near victory in the first month of World War I; however, a French counterattack... In military terms, a salient is a battlefield feature that projects into enemy territory. ...


In the First Battle of Ypres (31 October to 22 November 1914) the British captured the town from the Germans. In the Second Battle of Ypres (22 April to 25 May 1915) the Germans used poison gas for the first time on the Western Front (they had used it earlier at the Battle of Bolimow on 3 January 1915) and captured high ground east of the town. The first gas attack occurred against Canadian, British, and French soldiers; including both metropolitan French soldiers as well as Senegalese and Algerian tirailleurs (light infantry) from French Africa. The gas used was chlorine gas. Mustard gas, also called Yperite from the name of this city, was also used for the first time near Ypres in the autumn of 1917. Combatants United Kingdom France German Empire Commanders John French Ferdinand Foch Erich von Falkenhayn Strength UK: 7 infantry divisions, 3 cavalry divisions France: ? Fourth and Sixth Armies Casualties UK: 58,000 France: 50,000 130,000 The First Battle of Ypres, also called the Battle of Flanders, was the last... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Tirailleur means sharpshooter in French. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ...

Ruins of Ypres – 1919
Ruins of Ypres – 1919

Of the battles, the largest, best-known, and most costly in human suffering was the Third Battle of Ypres (21 July to 6 November 1917, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele) in which the British, Canadians and ANZAC forces recaptured the Passchendaele ridge east of the city at a terrible cost of lives. After months of fighting, this battle resulted in nearly half a million casualties to all sides, and only several miles of ground won by Allied forces. The town was all but obliterated by the artillery fire. Download high resolution version (856x332, 66 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (856x332, 66 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Passchendaele village, before and after the Battle of Passchendaele The Battle of Passchendaele, otherwise known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army near Ypres (Ieper in Flemish) in West Flanders... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... For the village, see Passendale. ... The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (popularly abbreviated as ANZAC) was originally an army corps of Australian and New Zealand troops who fought in World War I at Gallipoli against the Turks. ...


English-speaking soldiers in that war often referred to Ypres by the (perhaps humorous) mispronunciation "Wipers". British soldiers even self-published a wartime newspaper called the "Wipers Times". The Wipers Times is the most well-known of the trench magazines that were published by soldiers fighting on the front lines of The Great War. ...


Ypres today

Cloth Hall at night
Cloth Hall at night

After the war the town was rebuilt, with the main square, including the Cloth Hall and town hall, being rebuilt as close to the original designs as possible. (The rest of the rebuilt town is more modern in appearance.) The Cloth Hall today is home to In Flanders Fields Museum, dedicated to Ypres's role in the First World War. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The In Flanders Fields museum is devoted to study of World War I and occupies the second floor of the Cloth Hall, Ypres in Belgium. ...


Ypres these days has the title of "city of peace" and maintains a close friendship with another town on which war had a profound impact: Hiroshima. The association may be regarded as somewhat gruesome due to the fact that both towns witnessed warfare at its worst: Ypres was one of the first places where chemical warfare was employed, while Hiroshima suffered the debut of nuclear warfare. For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... This article is about nuclear war as a form of actual warfare, including history. ...


War graves, both of the Allied side and the Central Powers, cover the landscape around Ypres. The largest are Langemark German war cemetery and Tyne Cot Commonwealth war cemetery. The countryside around Ypres (Flanders Fields) is featured in the famous poem by John McCrae, In Flanders Fields. The Langemark German war cemetery is near the village of Langemark, part of the municipality of Langemark-Poelkapelle, in the Belgian province of West Flanders. ... Tyne Cot Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery and Memorial to the Missing is a Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) burial ground for the dead of World War I located in the Ypres Salient on the Western Front. ... Flanders Fields is the generic name of the World War I battlefields in the medieval County of Flanders. ... John McCrae Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae, MD (November 30, 1872 – January 28, 1918) was a Canadian poet, physician, author, artist, soldier during World War I and a surgeon during the battle of Ypres. ... A small portion of In Flanders Fields appeared alongside McCraes portrait on a Canadian stamp of 1968, issued to commemorate a half-century since his death. ...


Saint George's Memorial Church commemorates the British and Commonwealth soldiers, who died in the three battles fought for Ypres during World War I. Saint Georges Memorial Church, Ypres, Belgium, was built to commemorate over 500,000 British and Commonwealth troops, who had died in the three battles fought for the Ypres Salient, during World War I. The church was built following an appeal led by Field Marshal Sir John French, Earl of...


Sights

Town centre

Saint Martin's Cathedral
Saint Martin's Cathedral


The imposing Cloth Hall was built in the 13th century and was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages. The structure we see today is the exact copy of the original medieval building, rebuilt after the war. The belfry that surmounts the hall houses a 49-bell carillon. The whole complex was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1999. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 751 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 798 pixel, file size: 211 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) St Martins Cathedral, Ypres I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 751 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 798 pixel, file size: 211 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) St Martins Cathedral, Ypres I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Cloth Hall, Ypres The Cloth Hall (Dutch: Lakenhal or Lakenhalle), of Ypres, Belgium, was one of the largest commercial buildings of the Middle Ages, when it served as the main market and warehouse for the Flemish citys prosperous cloth industry. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Bruges Antwerp Ypres Ghent Mons Tournai Boulogne-sur-Mer Abbeville Fifty-six Belfries of Belgium and France are collectively designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, in recognition of an architectural phenomenon that arose during the emergence of the historic Flanders and neighboring regions from feudalism. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ...


The Gothic-style Saint Martin’s Cathedral, originally built in 1221, was also completely reconstructed after the war. It houses the tombs of Jansenius, bishop of Ypres and father of the religious movement known as Jansenism, and of Robert of Bethune, nicknamed "The Lion of Flanders", who was Count of Nevers (1273-1322) and Count of Flanders (1305–1322). Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... // Events May 13 - End of the reign of Emperor Juntoku, emperor of Japan Emperor ChÅ«kyō briefly reigns over Japan Former Emperor Go-Toba leads an unsuccessful rebellion against the Kamakura Shogunate Emperor Go-Horikawa ascends to the throne of Japan January - Mongol Army under Jochi captures the city of... Cornelius Jansen, Engraving by Jean Morin Cornelius Jansen, often known as Jansenius (October 28, 1585 — May 6, 1638) was bishop of Ypres and the father of the religious revival known as Jansenism. ... Jansenism was a branch of Catholic thought tracing itself back to Cornelius Otto Jansen (1585 – 1638), a Flemish theologian. ... Robert III of Flanders (1249 – September 17, 1322), was Count of Flanders 1305–1322. ... This is a list of the counts of Nevers. ... The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ...


Menin Gate

The ceremony at the Menin Gate

The Menin Gate Memorial2 in Ypres commemorates those soldiers of the British Commonwealth - with the exception of New Zealand and Newfoundland - who fell in the Ypres Salient during the First World War before 16 August 1917, who have no known grave. Those who died from that date - and all from New Zealand and Newfoundland - are commemorated elsewhere.[2] [3] The memorial's location is especially poignant as it lies on the eastward route from the town which allied soldiers would have taken towards the fighting - many never to return. Every evening since 1928, traffic around the imposing arches of the Menin Gate Memorial has been stopped while the Last Post is sounded beneath the Gate by the local fire brigade. This tribute is given in honour of the memory of British Empire soldiers who fought and died there. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 180 KB) Summery Menin Gate Memorial ceremony. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (768x1024, 180 KB) Summery Menin Gate Memorial ceremony. ... The Menin Gate Memorial at the eastern exit of the town of Ypres (known as Ieper in Dutch) in Flanders, Belgium, marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line during World War I. Designed by Sir... The Menin Gate Memorial at the eastern exit of the town of Ieper (usually known in English as Ypres) in Flanders, Belgium, marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line during World War I. Designed by... The Ypres Salient is the area around Ypres in Belgium which was the scene of some of the biggest battles in World War I. In military terms, a salient is a battlefield feature that projects into enemy territory. ... Last Post is a bugle call used at military funerals and ceremonies commemorating those who have fallen in war. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ...

The ceremony was prohibited by occupying German forces during the Second World War, but it was resumed on the very evening of liberation — 6 September 1944 — notwithstanding the heavy fighting that still went on in other parts of the town. The lions that marked the original gate were given to Australia by the people of Belgium and can be found at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra. from http://www. ... from http://www. ... The Menin Gate Memorial at the eastern exit of the town of Ypres (known as Ieper in Dutch) in Flanders, Belgium, marks the starting point for one of the main roads out of the town that led Allied soldiers to the front line during World War I. Designed by Sir... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

"Who will remember, passing through this Gate,
The unheroic Dead who fed the guns?"
-- Siegfried Sassoon, On Passing the Menin Gate

Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE MC (8 September 1886 – 1 September 1967) was an English poet and author. ...

Events

  • The Cat Parade ("Kattenstoet") takes place every three years on the second Sunday of May. It involves the throwing of toy cats from the belfry and a colourful parade of cats and witches. The last edition of the Cat Parade took place in May, 2006.
  • Ypres is also the home of The Belgium Ypres Westhoek Rally since its creation in 1965. It is organized by the Auto Club Targa Florio. Some of the drivers are among the best-known names in rallying, such as Juha Kankkunen, Bruno Thiry, Henri Toivonen, Colin McRae, Jimmy McRae, Marc Duez, François Duval, and Freddy Loix among others.

Minneke Poes, one of the giant cats in the Kattenstoet. ... The Belgium Ypres Westhoek Rally (BYWR) founded by Fanz Thevelin in 1965 is one of the most famous rallies in the European Rally Championship and the Intercontinental Rally Challenge. ... Juha Kankkunen, born in Laukaa, Finland on April 2, 1959, made his name principally as a rally car driver. ... Bruno Thiry (born October 8, 1962) is a Belgian rally driver. ... Henri Toivonen (August 25, 1956 – May 2, 1986) was a Finnish rally car driver. ... Colin Steele McRae, MBE (5 August 1968 – 15 September 2007) was a Scottish World Rally Championship (WRC) driver from Lanarkshire, the son of five-time British Rally Champion, Jimmy McRae and older brother of professional driver Alister McRae. ... Jimmy drives an Audi 80 S2 Quattro on a stage rally in Scotland. ... Marc Duez is a race and rally driver from Belgium. ... Born November 18 1980, François Duval is a Belgian rally driver in the World Rally Championship. ... Freddy Loix is a Belgian rally driver, born 10 November 1970 in Tongeren, Belgium. ...

Famous inhabitants

The fountain in the Grote Markt, Ieper, opposite the Cloth Hall.
The fountain in the Grote Markt, Ieper, opposite the Cloth Hall.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2046x1140, 782 KB) Summary Author: Redvers. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2046x1140, 782 KB) Summary Author: Redvers. ... Jacobus Clemens non Papa (also Jacques Clément or Jacob Clemens non Papa) (c. ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Cornelius Jansen, Engraving by Jean Morin Cornelius Jansen, often known as Jansenius (October 28, 1585–May 6, 1638) was Catholic bishop of Ypres and the father of the religious movement known as Jansenism. ... 1585 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. ... Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... Jansenism was a branch of Catholic thought tracing itself back to Cornelius Otto Jansen (1585 – 1638), a Flemish theologian. ... Jules Edouard Xavier Malou (19 October 1810 - July 1886) was a Belgian statesman, a leader of the clerical party. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Belgium, known regionally as: Premier Ministre in French, Eerste Minister in Dutch, and Premierminister in German. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Walter Fiers was born in Ieper (Belgium) in 1931. ... Catherine Verfaillie (b. ... Nicholas Lens, born on November 14, 1957, in Ypres, is a contemporary Belgian author and composer. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Renaat Landuyt, (born January 28, 1958 in Ieper) is a Belgian socialist politician and the current Minister of Transport in the federal government. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Henk Lauwers is a classical baritone singer (lyric baritone / Baryton-Martin), born in Ypres, Belgium in 1956. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Funeral celebration of Simona Noorenbergh at Fane, Papua New Guinea Sister Simona Noorenbergh (sometimes credited as Simona Noorenberghe, Simona Noorenberg, or Maria Noorenberghe) was one of the founders of the small mountain village Fane in Central Province, Papua New Guinea. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Fane is a surname, and may refer to: David Fane, 15th Earl of Westmorland Frederick Fane, Irish born cricketer, who captained England on five occasions Idonea Fane John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland Fane, a mountain village in Central Province in Papua New Guinea... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Fane is a surname, and may refer to: David Fane, 15th Earl of Westmorland Frederick Fane, Irish born cricketer, who captained England on five occasions Idonea Fane John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland John Fane, 11th Earl of Westmorland Fane, a mountain village in Central Province in Papua New Guinea... This article needs to be wikified. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yves Camille Désiré Leterme (born October 6, 1960 in Wervik, Belgium) is a Belgian Senator, a former Minister-President of Flanders and Flemish Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products, or L&H, was a Belgium-based speech and language technology leader company, which was founded by Jo Lernout and Pol Hauspie, and which went bankrupt in 2001. ...

Twin cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Sittingbourne is an industrial town about eight miles (12. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Siegen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ... Westphalia (in German, Westfalen) is a (historic) region in Germany, centred on the cities of Dortmund, Münster, Bielefeld, and Osnabrück and now included in the Bundesland of North Rhine-Westphalia (and the (south-)west of Lower Saxony). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Saint-Omer, a town and commune of Artois in northern France, sous-préfecture of the Pas-de-Calais département, 42 miles west-north-west of Lille on the railway to Calais. ... Pas-de-Calais is a département in northern France named after the strait which it borders. ...

External links

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Notes

  1. ^ See chapter 5.6.2 (in Dutch)
  2. ^ [1] "It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations (except New Zealand) who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917. Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery."
  3. ^ [2]

Footnote

1 The Dutch language was restricted by the French-speaking Belgian ruling class at the time of the First World War so that as a result the French name was used by British soldiers fighting there—they however, pronounced it "Wipers", probably as a result of poor education in pronunciation of the French language rather than any deliberate humour.[citation needed] Dutch (  ) is a West Germanic language spoken by around 23 million people, mainly in the Netherlands, Belgium and Suriname, but also by smaller groups of speakers in parts of France, Germany and several former Dutch colonies. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


2 The gate is called "Menin Gate" because it is situated on the road to another Flemish city, Menin in French or a (depricated) variant name in English, Menen in Dutch or English. Menen (French: Menin) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Menen is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


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Ypres (158 words)
Ypres (Ieper in Dutch) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of West Flanders.
The municipality comprises the city of Ypres and the towns of Boezinge[?], Dikkebus[?], Elverdinge[?], Vlamertinge[?], Voormezele[?], Zillebeke[?] and Zuidschote[?].
In Ypres, is the Menin Gate Memorial to the fallen soldiers of the war.
Ypres - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1402 words)
The municipality comprises the city of Ypres and the villages of Boezinge, Brielen, Dikkebus, Elverdinge, Hollebeke, Sint-Jan, Vlamertinge, Voormezele, Zillebeke, and Zuidschote.
Ypres is an ancient town, and is known to have been raided by the Romans in the first century BC During the Middle Ages, Ypres was a prosperous city with a population of 40,000,
Ypres was further fortified in 17th and 18th centuries while under the occupation of the Hapsburgs and the French.
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