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Encyclopedia > Youngstown, Ohio
City of Youngstown

Seal
Location within the state of Ohio
Location within the state of Ohio
Coordinates: 41°5′47″N 80°38′57″W / 41.09639, -80.64917
Country United States
State Ohio
Counties Mahoning, Trumbull
Founded 1796
Incorporated 1848 (village)
- 1867 (city)
Government
 - Mayor Jay Williams (I)
Area
 - City  34.2 sq mi (88.7 km²)
 - Land  33.9 sq mi (87.8 km²)
 - Water  0.3 sq mi (0.9 km²)
Elevation  850 ft (259 m)
Population (2006)[1] [2]
 - City 81,520
 - Density 2,312.9/sq mi (893/km²)
 - Metro 586,939
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 44500-44599
Area code(s) 330
FIPS code 39-88000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1058156GR3
Website: http://www.cityofyoungstownoh.org

Youngstown is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Mahoning County. The municipality is situated on the Mahoning River, approximately 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Cleveland and 61 miles (100 km) northwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.GR6 It has its own metro area although the Pittsburgh Tri-State and Greater Cleveland both influence the region. The city was named for John Young, an early settler from Whitestown, New York, who established the community's first sawmill and gristmill.[3] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1155 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Skyline of Downtown Youngstown Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adapted from Wikipedias OH county maps by Catbar. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Listed are the 88 counties of the state of Ohio. ... Mahoning County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Trumbull County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... The Mayor of Youngstown is the chief executive of the citys government. ... Jay Williams (born 1971) is the current mayor of Youngstown, Ohio. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... Area code 330 is a North American telephone area code serving part of Northeast Ohio, United States. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Mahoning County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... The Mahoning River is a river located in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The Pittsburgh Tri-State is the U.S. region that is centered around the transportation, medical, academic, economic, media and federal resources based in Pittsburgh. ... NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... John Young John Young (1763 - 1825) was the founder of Youngstown, Ohio, a village that eventually became one of the nations largest steel producers. ... Whitestown is a town located in Oneida County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 18,635. ... For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ... Gristmill with water wheel, Skyline Drive, VA, 1938 A gristmill is a building where grain is ground into flour. ...


Youngstown is located in a region of the United States that is commonly referred to as the Rust Belt. Traditionally known as a center of steel production, Youngstown was forced to redefine itself when the U.S. steel industry shifted production overseas in the 1970s, leaving many communities in the region without major industry.[4] As of the 2000 census, Youngstown had a total population of 82,026, making it Ohio's eighth largest city. Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


According to the US Census 2006 estimate, the Youngstown-Warren Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) contains around 586,939 people and includes Mahoning and Trumbull counties in Ohio, plus Mercer County in Pennsylvania. The Steel Valley area as a whole (including Youngstown-Warren and Sharon-Farrell-New Castle, Pennsylvania) comprises around 697,481 residents.[5] Youngstown lies 10 miles (16 km) west of the Pennsylvania state line and is centrally located between New York City and Chicago, and more locally between Cleveland and Pittsburgh. Warren is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Trumbull CountyGR6. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Mahoning County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Trumbull County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Mercer County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... The Steel Valley is a five county metropolitan area around Youngstown, Ohio that encompasses Mahoning County, Trumbull County, and Columbiana County in Ohio, plus Mercer County and Lawrence County in Pennsylvania. ... Sharon is a city in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, in the United States, 75 miles (121 km) northwest of Pittsburgh. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New Castle is a city in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, 50 miles (80 km) northwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; in 1910, the total population was 36,280; in 1920, 44,938; and in 1940, 47,638. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ...

Contents

Origins

Governor David Tod

Youngstown was named for New York native John Young, who first surveyed the area in 1796 and settled there soon after.[6] On February 9, 1797, Young purchased the township of 15,560 acres (63 km²) from the Western Reserve Land Company for $16,085.[7] The 1797 establishment of Youngstown was officially recorded on August 19, 1802.[8] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x868, 110 KB) Description: David Tod Source: Abbots History of Ohio Author: Unknown Permission: Public Domain {PD-US} File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x868, 110 KB) Description: David Tod Source: Abbots History of Ohio Author: Unknown Permission: Public Domain {PD-US} File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Surveyor at work with a leveling instrument. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Connecticuts land claims in the West The Connecticut Western Reserve was land claimed by Connecticut in the Northwest Territory in what is now northeastern Ohio. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... --69. ...


The area that constitutes present-day Youngstown was part of the Connecticut Western Reserve, which comprised land reserved for settlers from the state of Connecticut.[9] While some of the area's early settlers were natives of Connecticut, Youngstown attracted a significant number of Scots-Irish settlers from neighboring Pennsylvania as well.[10] The first European Americans to settle permanently in the area were Pittsburgh native James Hillman and wife Catherine Dougherty.[11] Within a year, Youngstown was the home of several families who were concentrated near the point where Mill Creek meets the Mahoning River. (The name Mahoning is believed to have derived from a Native American word, Mahonik, which means "salt lick.")[9] Connecticuts land claims in the West The Connecticut Western Reserve was land claimed by Connecticut in the Northwest Territory in what is now northeastern Ohio. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Settlers are people who have travelled of their own choice, from the land of their birth to live in new lands or colonies. ... Scots-Irish (also called Ulster Scots) is a Scottish ethnic group that historically resided in Ireland which ultimately traces its roots back to settlers from Scotland, and to a lesser extent, England. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...

Youngstown, 1910s: Central Square and Viaduct (view looking south).
Youngstown, 1910s: Central Square and Viaduct (view looking south).

As the Western Reserve became increasingly populated, the need to create administrative districts was apparent. In 1800, territorial governor Arthur St. Clair established Trumbull County (named in honor of Connecticut Governor Jonathan Trumbull), and designated the smaller settlement of Warren as the county seat.[12] In 1813, Trumbull County was divided into townships, with Youngstown Township comprising much of what became Mahoning County.[13] The village of Youngstown was incorporated in 1848, and in 1867 Youngstown was chartered as a city. The county seat was moved there from Canfield in 1876.[14] Youngstown, Ohio, Central Square, from undated postcard mailed in 1919 This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Youngstown, Ohio, Central Square, from undated postcard mailed in 1919 This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... The term Administration, as used in the context of government, differs according to jurisdiction. ... Portrait of St. ... Trumbull County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Gov. ... Warren is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Trumbull CountyGR6. ... Canfield is a city in Mahoning County, Ohio, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 224 and State Route 46 about ten miles southwest of Youngstown. ...


The discovery of coal by the community during the early 1800s paved the way for the Youngstown area's inclusion on the network of the famed Erie Canal. The Pennsylvania and Ohio Canal Company was organized in 1835, and the canal was completed in 1840.[15] Local industrialist David Tod (later Ohio governor during the Civil War) persuaded Lake Erie steamboat owners that coal mined in the Mahoning Valley could fuel their vessels if canal transportation were available between Youngstown and Cleveland. The railroad came to the community in 1856, smoothing the path for further economic growth.[16] Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The Erie Canal (currently part of the New York State Canal System) is a canal in New York State, United States, that runs from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... David Tod (February 21, 1805 - November 13, 1868) was a politician from Ohio. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


Peopling of the valley

Youngstown's subsequent industrial development changed the face of the Mahoning Valley. The community's burgeoning coal industry drew sizable numbers of immigrants from Wales, Germany, and Ireland. With the opening of the city's steel mills in the late 19th century, Youngstown became a popular destination for immigrants from Eastern Europe, Italy, and Greece as well.[17] In the early 20th century, the community also saw an influx of immigrants from non-European countries including Lebanon, Palestine, and Syria. By the 1920s, this dramatic demographic shift had fueled a nativist backlash, evidenced by a brief surge in Ku Klux Klan activity.[18] The situation reached a climax in 1924, when street clashes between Klan members and Italian and Irish Americans in neighboring Niles prompted Ohio Governor A. Victor Donahey to declare martial law.[19] By 1928, however, the Klan was in steep decline, and three years later, the organization sold its Canfield, Ohio, meeting area, Kountry Klub Field.[20] Today, ethnic diversity continues to be reflected in many of Youngstown's neighborhoods, where a Greek Orthodox church may share a street corner with an Italian restaurant. Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... This article is about the country. ... Steel Mill was one of Bruce Springsteens early bands and performed regularly on the Jersey Shore, in Virginia, and also in California from 1969 till January 1971. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ... The term Nativism is used in both politics and psychology in two fundamentally different ways. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Alvin Victor Donahey (also known as A. Victor Donahey, A. Vic Donahey, Vic Donahey, or A. V. Donahey) (July 7, 1873 - April 8, 1946) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Ethnicity redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Italian cuisine as a national cuisine known today has evolved from centuries of social and political change. ...


The growth of industry also attracted people from within the borders of the United States, and from Latin America. By the late 19th century, African Americans were well represented in Youngstown, and the first local congregation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church was established in 1871.[21] In the 1880s, local attorney William R. Stewart became the second African American elected to serve in the Ohio House of Representatives.[22] A significant influx of African Americans in the early 20th century owed much to developments in the industrial sector. During the Steel Strike of 1919, local industrialists recruited thousands of workers from the South, many of whom were African American.[23] This move exacerbated racist attitudes among working-class whites; and even decades later, African-American steelworkers experienced profound discrimination in the workplace.[24][25] The city's population grew more diverse in the post-World War II era, when a seemingly revitalized steel industry drew thousands of workers to the area.[26] In the 1950s, the Latino population expanded dramatically; and by the 1970s, St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church and the First Spanish Baptist Church of Ohio were among the largest religious institutions for Spanish-speaking residents in the Youngstown metropolitan area.[21] While the city's diversity remains one of its enduring qualities, the industrial economy that made it possible suffered collapse in the late 1970s. In response to the challenges that followed, the community has taken well-publicized steps to diversify economically, while building on some traditional strengths.[27] Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... William R. Stewart (October 29, 1864 - April 5, 1958) was the second African American to be elected to the Ohio State Senate. ... Ohio has a bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly, consisting a House of Representatives and Senate (the Ohio State Senate), based on its constitution of 1851. ... The Steel Strike of 1919 was an attempt by the weakened Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel and Tin Workers (the AA) to organize the American steel industry in the wake of World War I. The strike was a failure. ... This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... Saint Rose of Lima, (20 April 1586 - 30 August 1617), the first Catholic saint of The Americas, was born in Lima, Peru. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... An economic collapse is a devastating breakdown of a national, regional, or territorial economy. ...


Geography and climate

Youngstown is located at 41°5'47" North, 80°38'57" West (41.096258, -80.649299).GR1 It borders or touches the following other townships and municipalities:

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 88.7 km² (34.2 mi²). 87.8 km² (33.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.9 km² (0.3 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 1.02% water. Boardman is a suburban township located in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States, just south of Youngstown. ... Canfield is a city in Mahoning County, Ohio, at the intersection of U.S. Highway 224 and State Route 46 about ten miles southwest of Youngstown. ... Austintown is an unincorporated census-designated place and Youngstown suburb, located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ... Weathersfield Township is a township in Trumbull County, Ohio. ... Girard is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Liberty Township is an ugly, forlorn & foul smelling piece of wasteland, located in Trumbull County, Ohio, just north of Youngstown. ... Hubbard Township is a township in Trumbull County, Ohio. ... Map of Mahoning Countys municipalities and townships Coitsville Township is one of the fourteen townships of Mahoning County, Ohio. ... Campbell is a city located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ... Struthers is a city in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Youngstown is in the Mahoning Valley on the Glaciated Allegheny Plateau. At the end of the last Ice Age, the glaciers left behind a uniform plain, with valleys such as that caused by the Mahoning River traversing the plain.[28] Lakes created by glaciers that dammed small streams were eventually drained, leaving behind fertile terrain.[28] The Mahoning Valley encompasses the area of Northeast Ohio and Northwest Pennsylvania that drains into the Mahoning River. ... The Glaciated Allegheny Plateau is that portion of the Allegheny Plateau that lies within the area covered by the last glaciation. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... This article is about the geological formation. ... The Mahoning River is a river located in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 71 73 82 88 92 99 100 97 99 87 80 76
Norm High °F 32.4 36 46.3 58.2 69 77.1 81 79.3 72.1 60.7 48.4 37.3
Norm Low °F 17.4 19.3 27.1 36.5 46.2 54.6 58.7 57.5 50.9 40.9 33 23.4
Rec Low °F -22 -14 -10 11 24 30 40 32 29 20 1 -12
Precip (in) 2.34 2.03 3.05 3.33 3.45 3.91 4.1 3.43 3.89 2.46 3.07 2.96
Source: USTravelWeather.com [1]

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1870 8,075
1880 15,435 91.1%
1890 33,220 115.2%
1900 30,667 -7.7%
1910 79,066 157.8%
1920 132,358 67.4%
1930 170,002 28.4%
1940 167,720 -1.3%
1950 168,330 0.4%
1960 166,688 -1.0%
1970 139,788 -16.1%
1980 115,427 -17.4%
1990 95,787 -17.0%
2000 82,026 -14.4%
Est. 2006 81,520 -0.6%
Population 1870-1970[29]
Population 1980-2000[30]

According to the 2000 Census numbers, Youngstown has 32,177 households, and 19,724 families in the city. The population density is 893/km² (2,312.9/mi²). There are 37,159 housing units at an average density of 423.2/km² (1,096.3/mi²).[31] The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...


The racial makeup of the city is roughly 51% White, 44% Black or African American, and 5% Hispanic or Latino of any race, though Puerto Ricans are the dominant Spanish-speaking group.[31] The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


Records suggest that 27.2% of the households have children under the age of 18. Of these, 33.2% are married couples living together, 22.9% have a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% are non-families. Meanwhile, 34.0% of all households are made up of individuals, and 14.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.39 and the average family size is 3.07.[31] Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In Youngstown, the population leans toward greater numbers of youths, as is often the case in U.S. inner-city areas with higher birth rates. Survey data show the following: 25.8% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females, there are 91.9 males. For every 100 females aged 18 and over, there are 87.8 males.[31] For other uses, see Youth (disambiguation) Youth is defined by Websters New World Dictionary as, The time of life when one is young; especially: a: the period between childhood and maturity b: the early period of existence, growth, or development. ...


The median household income is $24,201, and the median family income is $30,701; but the per capita income for the city is $13,293. Males have a median income of $29,900 versus $21,050 for females. About 25% of the population is below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 37.3% of those under the age of 18 and 13.3% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.[31] The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... The median household income is commonly used to provide data about smaller geographic areas. ...


The United States Census Bureau's 2006 Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement Current Population Survey estimates a medium household income of $21,850. Analysis by CNNMoney states that Youngstown has the lowest median income of U.S. cities with more than 65,000 residents. [32] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Industry and business

Youngstown Sheet & Tube and Viaduct
Youngstown Sheet & Tube and Viaduct

Endowed with substantial deposits of coal and iron as well as "old growth" hardwood forests needed to produce charcoal, the Youngstown area eventually developed a thriving steel industry. The area's first blast furnace was established to the east of town in 1803 by James and Daniel Heaton.[33] In time, the wide availability of fossil fuels contributed to the development of other coal-fired mills, including the Youngstown Rolling Mill Company, which was established in 1846.[34] By the mid-19th century, Youngstown was the site of several iron industrial plants, notably David Tod's Brier Hill Iron & Coal Company.[35] The iron industry continued to expand in the 1890s, despite the depletion of local natural resources. Numerous rail connections ensured a consistent supply of coal and iron ore from neighboring states.[36] Image File history File links Sheet&tube. ... Image File history File links Sheet&tube. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... Charcoal is the blackish residue consisting of impure carbon obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. ... Steel framework Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... Blast furnace in Sestao, Spain. ... Fossil fuels are hydrocarbon-containing natural resources such as coal, petroleum and natural gas. ... Brier Hill is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, that was traditionally viewed as the citys Little Italy district. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... This heap of iron ore pellets will be used in steel production. ...


During the same period, local industrialists began to convert to steel manufacturing, amid a wave of industrial consolidations that placed much of the Mahoning Valley's industry in the hands of national corporations.[37] Shortly after the establishment of U.S. Steel in 1901, the corporate entity absorbed Youngstown's premier steel producer, the National Steel Company.[37] One year earlier, however, a group of city investors took steps to ensure high levels of local ownership in the area's industrial sector. Led by local industrialists George D. Wick and James A. Campbell, they established what became the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company,[37] among the nation's most important steel producers.[38] (The firm significantly expanded its operations in 1923, when it acquired plants in South Chicago and East Chicago, Indiana.) This impulse toward local ownership surfaced again in 1931, when Campbell, as chairman of the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company, attempted to merge the firm with Bethlehem Steel, in a bid to create the nation's second largest steel corporation.[39] The move was successfully blocked by other area industrialists.[40] The United States Steel Corporation (NYSE: X) is an integrated steel producer with major production operations in the United States and Central Europe. ... Colonel George Dennick Wick (February 19, 1854 - April 15, 1912) was an American industrialist who served as founding president of the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company, one of the nations largest steel-manufacturing firms. ... James A. Campbell (September 11, 1854 - September 20, 1933) was a business leader best known for his role as chairman of Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company, one of the largest steel-production plants in the United States. ... The Youngstown Iron Sheet and Tube Company was one of the largest steel manufacturers in the world. ... South Chicago, located on the south side of the city, is one of the 77 official community areas of Chicago, Illinois. ... East Chicago is a city in Lake County, Indiana, opposite Chicago, Illinois. ... Bethlehem Steel Corporations flagship manufacturing facility in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ...


In the late 1930s, the community's steel sector received national attention once again, when Youngstown became a site of the so-called "Little Steel Strike", an effort by the Steel Workers Organizing Committee (a precursor to United Steelworkers) to secure contract agreements with smaller steel companies".[41] These firms included Republic Steel, Bethlehem Steel, Youngstown Sheet and Tube, National Steel, Inland Steel, and American Rolling Mills.[41] Strikes in Youngstown and Warren were led by Gus Hall, one of the committee's founding organizers.[41] On June 21, 1937, strike-related violence in Youngstown resulted in two deaths and 42 injuries.[41] Despite deaths and injuries in Youngstown and Chicago, the Little Steel Strike proved to be a turning point in the history of the U.S. labor movement. As historian William Lawson noted, the strike transformed industrial unions from "basically local and ineffective organizations into all-encompassing, nationwide collective bargaining representatives of American workers".[41] A historical marker commemorating the strike was recently installed on the grounds of the Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor.[41][42] The United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (United Steelworkers or USW) claims over 1. ... The United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (United Steelworkers or USW) claims over 1. ... Republic Steel was once the third largest steel producer in the United States. ... The National Steel Corporation (1929—2003) was a major American steel producer. ... AK Steel Holding Corporation, formerly known as Armco, is a major American steel company founded in 1900 as the American Rolling Mills Corporation. ... Gus Hall Gus Hall (October 8, 1910 – October 13, 2000) was a labor organizer, a founder of the United Steelworkers of America trade union, a leader of the Communist Party USA, and five-time U.S. presidential candidate. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The labour movement or labor movement is a broad term for the development of a collective organization of working people, to campaign in their own interest for better treatment from their employers and political governments, in particular through the implementation of specific laws governing labor relations. ... A Collective agreement is a labor contract between an employer and one or more unions. ... Roadside hisotrical marker biography of Carter G. Woodson located in Huntington, West Virginia A historical marker is a plaque erected at historically significant locations, facilities, or buildings. ... The Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor, located in Youngstown, Ohio, preserves the history of the steel industry that dominated the Youngstown areas economic life for much of the 20th century. ...


Decline of steel

Between the 1920s and 1960s, the city was known as an important industrial hub, which featured the massive furnaces and foundries of such companies as Republic Steel and U.S. Steel. At the same time, Youngstown never became as economically diversified as did larger industrial cities (such as Chicago, Pittsburgh, Akron, or Cleveland).[38] Hence, when economic changes forced the closure of plants throughout the 1970s, the city was left with few substantial economic alternatives. Some observers have cited a 1969 corporate merger between the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company and the New Orleans-based Lykes Corporation as a turning point in the demise of the local steel industry. The merger and subsequent takeover of Youngstown Sheet and Tube burdened the community's primary steel producer with hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt. Further, the deal placed control of the company outside of the Mahoning Valley.[43] The September 19, 1977, announcement of the closure of a large portion of Youngstown Sheet and Tube (an event still remembered by many Youngstowners as "Black Monday") is widely regarded as the death knell of the old area steel industry. This was followed by the withdrawal of U.S. Steel in 1979 and 1980, and the bankruptcy of Republic Steel in the mid-1980s.[44] Shortly after the 1977 closure of most of Youngstown Sheet and Tube's local operations, area religious leaders, steelworkers, and activists such as Staughton Lynd participated in a grassroots effort to purchase and refurbish one of the company's former plants in neighboring Campbell, Ohio.[45] This effort met with failure two years later.[45] Sociologist Robert Bruno observed that, in the wake of the steel plant closures, the community lost an estimated 40,000 manufacturing jobs, 400 satellite businesses, $414 million in personal income, and from 33 to 75 percent of the school tax revenues.[46] Embittered by the collapse of the local steel industry, many former workers threw their hard hats and safety boots into the nearby Mahoning River.[47] The community has yet to fully recover from the loss of jobs in the steel sector.[48] The term foundry originally was a synonym for an ironworks or general metal works where metal casting operations were performed. ... The United States Steel Corporation (NYSE: X) is an integrated steel producer with major production operations in the United States and Central Europe. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... This page deals with the combination of two companies into one. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Black Monday may refer to: A rock/metal garage band in Australia. ... Staughton Lynd (b. ... A grassroots political movement is one driven by the constituents of a community. ... Campbell is a city located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ... A hard hat is a type of helmet predominately used in workplace environments such as construction sites to protect the head from injury such as from falling objects, debris and bad weather. ...


Post-steel economy

Today, Youngstown is the site of several steel and metalworking operations, though nothing on the scale seen during the "glory days" of the "Steel Valley." One of the largest current employers in the city is Youngstown State University (YSU), an urban public campus that serves about 13,000 students.[49] The blow dealt to the community's industrial economy in the 1970s, however, was mitigated by the continued presence of auto production plants in the metropolitan area. In the late 1980s, the Avanti, an automobile with a fiberglass body (originally designed by Studebaker to compete with the Corvette), was manufactured in an industrial complex located on Youngstown's Albert Street.[50] Today, the largest industrial employer in the metropolitan area is General Motors' Lordstown Assembly plant.[51] One of the nation's largest auto plants in terms of area, the Lordstown facility was home to production of the Chevrolet Impala, Vega, and Cavalier. Recently expanded and retooled with a new paint facility, it is the current home of the Cavalier's successor, the Chevrolet Cobalt.[52] Delphi, Packard Electric Systems, and the WCI Steel plant are also located in the Warren area. The largest industrial employers within the Youngstown city limits are V&M Star Steel Company (formerly North Star Steel), in the Brier Hill district, and Exal Corporation, located on Poland Avenue. The latter has recently expanded its operations.[53] Many observers have pointed out, however, that Youngstown has yet to move into a "post-steel" economy. Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... The name may refer to one of the following. ... Bundle of fiberglass Fiberglass (also called fibreglass and glass fibre) is material made from extremely fine fibers of glass. ... Studebaker Corporation, or simply Studebaker, was a United States wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate but larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... Lordstown Complex East and Lordstown Metal Center (formerly known as Lordstown Assembly) are part of a General Motors automobile factory in Lordstown, Ohio. ... Prince Rupert an archetypical cavalier For other uses, see Cavalier (disambiguation). ... The Chevrolet Cobalt is a compact car introduced by Chevrolet in 2004 for the 2005 model year. ... Delphi logo from 2005 Delphi (NASDAQ: DPHIQ) is an automotive parts company headquartered in Troy, Michigan. ...


New growth

Downtown Youngstown at night
Downtown Youngstown at night

Youngstown's downtown, which once underscored the community's economic difficulties, is now a site of new business growth. The Youngstown Business Incubator, located in the heart of the downtown, houses several start-up technology companies, which have received office space, furnishings, and access to utilities.[54] Some of the companies supported by the incubator have earned recognition, and a few are beginning to outgrow their current space. In an effort to keep such companies downtown, the incubator secured approval to demolish a row of vacant buildings nearby to clear space for expansion. The project will be funded by a $2 million federal grant awarded in 2006.[54] Meanwhile, the downtown has retained its traditional role as the community's financial center. Several banks, including JP Morgan Chase, National City, Huntington, and First National Bank have offices in the city; and the Youngstown-based Home Savings & Loan is also headquartered there. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1070 KB) Buildings in Youngstown, Ohio. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1070 KB) Buildings in Youngstown, Ohio. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... For other uses, see Demolition (disambiguation). ... Occupancy is a defined legal term in building construction and building codes. ... FINANCIAL is the weekly English-language newspaper with offices in Tbilisi, Georgia and Kiev, Ukraine. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... National City Corporation (NYSE: NCC), based in Cleveland, Ohio, is one of the ten largest banks in America in terms of deposits. ... The Huntington Center and Building in Downtown Columbus Huntington Bancshares Inc. ... FNB Corporation is a financial services corporation based in Hermitage, Pennsylvania, which operates banks under the name First National Bank in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. ...


Legacy of innovation

Extensive coverage of Youngstown's economic challenges has overshadowed the city's long entrepreneurial tradition. A number of products and enterprises introduced in Youngstown later became national household names. Among these is Youngstown-based Schwebel's Bakery, which was established in neighboring Campbell in the 1900s. The company now distributes bread products nationally.[49] In the 1920s, Youngstown was the birthplace of the Good Humor brand of ice cream novelties,[55]and the popular franchise of Handel's Homemade Ice Cream & Yogurt was established there in the 1940s. In the 1950s, the suburb of Boardman became the site of one of the country's first modern shopping plazas, which was established by Youngstown-born developer Edward J. DeBartolo, Sr..[56] The fast-food chain, Arby's, opened the first of its restaurants in Boardman in 1964, and Arthur Treacher's Fish & Chips was headquartered in Youngstown in the late 1970s. More recently, the city's downtown hosted the corporate headquarters of the now-defunct pharmacy chain store Phar-Mor, which was established by Youngstown native Mickey Monus. In the 1980s, before it was compelled to declare bankruptcy, Phar-mor was the fiercest competitor of Wal-mart.[57] (The firm's local assets were later purchased by the Pittsburgh-based supermarket chain Giant Eagle.) An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... Schwebels Bakery is a major regional producer of bread and other baked goods that was established in Youngstown, Ohio, in the early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Good Humor is an American brand of ice cream once sold from the back of refrigerated ice cream trucks with bells to announce their presence. ... Handels Homemade Ice Cream & Yogurt is a popular franchise whose success has been reported in various publications including travelchannel. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Edward John DeBartolo Sr. ... Fast food is food cooked in bulk and in advance and kept warm, or reheated to order. ... Arbys is a fast food restaurant franchise in the United States and Canada that is primarily known for selling roast beef sandwiches, chicken sandwiches, potato cakes, curly fries, Jamocha milkshakes and chicken strips. ... Boardman is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States, just south of Youngstown. ... Arthur Treachers Fish and Chips is a fast food seafood restaurant chain with, as of 2003, 177 stores which serve fish and chips. ... Phar-Mor was a U.S. chain of discount drug stores, based in Youngstown, Ohio and founded by Michael I. Monus (usually called Mickey Monus) and David S. Shapira in 1982. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... Phar-Mor was a U.S. chain of discount drug stores, based in Youngstown, Ohio and founded by Michael I. Monus (usually called Mickey Monus) and David S. Shapira in 1982. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Packaged food aisles in a Fred Meyer store in Portland, Oregon A supermarket is a departmentalized self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise. ... This article is about the supermarket chain. ...


Post-steel image in popular culture

For a large segment of the American public, however, Youngstown continues to be associated with the economic malaise that befell much of the industrial northeast following the collapse of its manufacturing sector. The decline of Youngstown's steel industry and its devastating impact on local workers were famously treated in Bruce Springsteen's ballad, "Youngstown," featured on his The Ghost of Tom Joad album.[58] Springsteen included Youngstown as a stop on his subsequent Ghost of Tom Joad Tour. Malaise is a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness, an out of sorts feeling, often the first indication of an infection or other disease. ... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... The Ghost of Tom Joad is the eleventh studio album by Bruce Springsteen, released in 1995 (see 1995 in music). ... The Ghost of Tom Joad Tour was a lengthy, worldwide concert tour featuring Bruce Springsteen performing alone on stage in small halls and theatres, that ran off and on from late 1995 through the middle of 1997. ...


Government

Youngstown is governed by a mayor who is elected every four years and limited to a maximum of two terms. Mayors are traditionally inaugurated on or around the second of January. For complex reasons, the city has tended to elect Democratic mayors since the late 1920s.[59] Youngstown's current mayor is Jay Williams, the city's first African-American mayor as well as its first independent mayor since 1922.[60] The Mayor of Youngstown is the chief executive of the citys government. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Jay Williams (born 1971) is the current mayor of Youngstown, Ohio. ...


Mayor Williams is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition[61], a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston, Massachusetts Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... “Boston” redirects here. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ...


Residents also elect an eight-member city council, which includes representatives of the city's seven wards as well as a council president. The council, in turn, appoints a city clerk. The council traditionally meets every first and third Wednesday of the month. City council meetings are generally held from the third week in September to the third week in June. Meanwhile, the board of control oversees contracts for public projects within the municipal limits. The Youngstown Police Department and Youngstown Fire Department fall under the board's supervision, as do the parks, civil service, community development, health, planning, and water departments. A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... A car of the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary, England Police forces are government organisations charged with the responsibility of maintaining law and order. ... The Youngstown Fire Department provides essential fire and allied public safety services for the City of Youngstown, Ohio. ... For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... The Roman civil service in action. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Youngstown's finance department oversees all municipal finances and supervises the departments of economic development and income tax. The city's department of public works also has sweeping supervisory responsibilities and oversees the departments of engineering, building inspection, building and grounds, signal and sign, demolition and housing, litter and recycling, street, and water waste treatment. The city's law department represents the city on all legal issues, serving as counsel to all municipal departments. Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Look up Public works in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... For other uses, see Demolition (disambiguation). ... Houses in Fishpool Street, St Albans, England For other meanings of the word house, see House (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Waste treatment refers to the activities required to ensure that waste has the least practicable impact on the environment. ...


Education

Public

The Youngstown City Schools manage all public education within the city. As of 2007, the school district was engaged in a process of reconfiguration, consolidating existing schools while building some new ones. District high schools once included Chaney, Rayen, Woodrow Wilson, Youngstown Early College, and Choffin Career and Technical Center. This roster has changed, however. Chaney expanded, while Rayen and Wilson were closed to make way for a newly built East High School.[62] Youngstown City Schools participate in an "Early College" program, in cooperation with Youngstown State University. This program enables high school students to attend classes on campus and earn college credit.[63] Youngstown City Schools is the public school system for Youngstown, Ohio. ... Chaney High School is one of three traditional public high schools in the city of Youngstown, Ohio. ... Rayen High School is one of three traditional public high schools in the city of Youngstown, Ohio. ... Woodrow Wilson High School is one of three traditional public high schools in the city of Youngstown, Ohio. ... East High School was a public high school in the city of Youngstown, Ohio from 1925 to 1998. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ...


Private

The Diocese of Youngstown once oversaw more than 20 schools within the city limits. As a result of dwindling enrollment, however, only four Catholic schools continue to operate within Youngstown proper.[64] These include two elementary schools--Byzantine Catholic Central and St. Christine's--and two secondary schools, Ursuline and Cardinal Mooney. (The two high schools share a heated and longstanding rivalry in athletics.) Several additional Catholic schools operate in Mahoning, Trumbull, Columbiana, Portage, Stark, and Ashtabula counties. Youngstown also hosts a small number of charter schools and one Montessori school. The Montessori School of the Mahoning Valley, which recently celebrated its 30th year, offers alternative learning environments for students ranging from preschool to eighth grade.[65] The Diocese of Youngstown Coat of Arms of the Diocese of Youngstown The Diocese of Youngstown consists of six (6) counties in Northeast Ohio: Mahoning, Trumbull, Columbiana, Stark, Portage, and Ashtabula. ... A kindergarten classroom in Afghanistan. ... The domes of an Ukrainian Catholic parish in Simpson, Pennsylvania This article refers to Eastern Churches in full communion with the See of Rome. ... Address 750 Wick Avenue City Youngstown CDP, Mahoning County, Ohio 44505 Established 1905 Type Private Secondary Superintendent Dr. Michael Skube Principal Ms. ... Cardinal Mooney High School is a coeducational Catholic high school located in Youngstown, Ohio. ... In the United States, a charter school is a school that is created via a legal charter. ... The Montessori method is a methodology for nursery and elementary school education, first developed by Dr. Maria Montessori. ...


Higher education

Youngstown State University's Jones Hall
Youngstown State University's Jones Hall

Youngstown State University, the primary institution of higher learning in the Youngstown-Warren metropolitan area, traces its origins to a local YMCA program that began offering college-level courses in 1908.[66] YSU joined the Ohio system of higher education in 1967.[66] Once regarded as a commuter school, YSU currently serves about 13,000 students, many of whom hail from outside the Youngstown area. The campus is situated just north of the city's downtown and south of Youngstown's historic district, a leafy neighborhood of Tudor-, Victorian-, and Spanish Colonial Revival-style homes.[67] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2816x2112, 2214 KB) Summary Picture of Youngstown State Universitys Jones Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2816x2112, 2214 KB) Summary Picture of Youngstown State Universitys Jones Hall. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Commuting is the process of travelling from a place of residence to a place of work. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ... Kings College Chapel outside view The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... The Spanish Colonial Revival Style was an architectural movement that came about in the early 20th century after the opening of the Panama Canal and the overwhelming success of the novel Ramona. ...


YSU offers the lowest tuition of any public institution of higher learning in Ohio. In addition, the campus is reportedly one of the safest in the state. Among the university's assets is the Dana School of Music, an All-Steinway school that is regarded as one of the finest non-conservatory schools of music in the country. Dana School of Music is ranked among similar programs at prestigious institutions including Oberlin College, New York University, and Yale University.[68] Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Steinway & Sons is a piano manufacturing firm, currently based in New York and Hamburg, Germany. ... A university school of music or college of music, or academy of music or conservatoire (British English) — also known as a conservatory (American English) or a conservatorium (Australian English) — is a higher education institution dedicated to teaching the art of music, including the playing of musical instruments, musical composition, musicianship... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Yale redirects here. ...


The Youngstown-Warren area also hosts a regional branch of Kent State University. Kent State-Trumbull was established several decades ago (in the mid-1960s), in Champion, Ohio, just north of Warren. Yet another branch, Kent State-Salem, is located in the Steel Valley and serves the area's southlands. It is located about 25 minutes south of Youngstown. Kent State University's expansive main campus, a primary center of education for Northeast Ohioans, is located just east of Akron, and 30 to 40 minutes west of downtown Youngstown.[69] For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... Champion Township is a township in Trumbull County, Ohio. ... Warren is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Trumbull CountyGR6. ... A once-relative nickname used to describe the post-industrial region in Northeast Ohio (between Cleveland and Pittsburgh) that is the Greater Youngstown-Warren Metropolitan Area. ... For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio are nicknames for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... Downtowns Central Square (Federal Plaza) from the east. ...


Attractions

Chevrolet Centre

Main article: Chevrolet Centre

Despite the impact of regional economic decline, Youngstown offers an array of cultural and recreational resources. Moreover, the community's range of attractions has increased in recent years. The newest addition is the Chevrolet Centre, which offers a variety of activities, including professional hockey games, arena football, and "on ice" shows The main entrance to the Chevrolet Centre The Chevrolet Centre (Formerly the Youngstown Convocation Center) is a 5,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio, United States. ... Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin), (colloquially Chevy) , is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ...


Theater

A "jewel" of elite local culture is Powers Auditorium, a former Warner Brothers movie palace[70] that currently serves as the city's primary music hall as well as the home of the Youngstown Symphony Orchestra.[71] Powers Auditorium is one of five auditoriums located within the city limits. In 2006, Ford Recital Hall was built as an addition to the restored and renovated Powers Auditorium. Another facility, imposing and neo-classical Stambaugh Auditorium, located on the city's north side, has served for decades as a popular site of concerts. Often rented for private events, the auditorium also hosts the Stambaugh Youth Concert Band.[72] Powers Auditorium, in Youngstown, Ohio is the largest auditorium in the Youngstown-Warren area. ... “WB” redirects here. ... Movie palace is a synonym for movie theater, but nowadays usually used for the grand art deco cinemas of the 1910s to 1940s, contrasting with modern multiplexes. ... The Youngstown Symphony is a symphony orchestra based in Youngstown, Ohio. ... The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... Stambaugh Auditorium as it appeared in 1920s. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 Kasia Kowalska concert in Warsaw A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ...


Meanwhile, the Oakland Center for the Arts serves as a venue for locally produced plays, while the Youngstown Playhouse, located on the city's South Side, is the Mahoning County's primary community theater. The Youngstown Playhouse has served the area for more than 80 years, despite intermittent financial challenges. Famous theatrical personalities from the Youngstown area include comedic actor Joe Flynn, screen actress Elizabeth Hartman, singer and Broadway performer Maureen McGovern, and television and screen actor Ed O'Neill. The Oakland Center for the Arts is an interdisciplinary arts center based in Youngstown, Ohio. ... The Youngstown Playhouse, based in the former industrial center of Youngstown, Ohio, is one of the nations oldest and most respected community theaters. ... Community Theatre is a very popular form of theatre in which all or most of the participants are unpaid or amateur in the most literal definition of the word. ... Joe Flynn (November 8, 1924 - July 19, 1974) was an American character actor best known for his participation in the popular 1960s TV sitcom, McHales Navy. ... Mary Elizabeth Hartman (December 23, 1943 – June 10, 1987) was an American actress best known for her performance in the 1965 film A Patch of Blue, a role for which she won a Golden Globe for Most Promising Female Newcomer and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... A former secretary, Maureen McGovern quickly became the new it singer in 1973 with the Oscar-winning Morning After. ... The term screen has a number of meanings: A window screen is a wire mesh that covers a window opening to keep out insects even when the window is open. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Other entertainment centers were expected on the horizon. In April 2006, a group formed a limited liability company led by Grande Venues, Inc., an Illinois-based developer of theatre properties, and purchased the long-defunct Liberty/Paramount Theatre. The group planned to develop the old landmark known as the Liberty Paramount Theatre Youngstown, LLC, which was designed by noted theatre architect, C. Howard Crane, and built in 1918.[49] The group's plans to restore the early-20th century structure and transform it into a venue for public events[73] came apart in July 2007, when Grand Venues, who expected area residents to finance the project, could not secure a financier. In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hindrance, or puts individuals at a disadvantage. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Liberty/Paramount Theatre is an early movie palace located on West Federal Street and Hazel Avenue in Youngstown, Ohio. ... Charles Howard Crane 1885-1952 Designed the United Artist theater in Detroit and many other theaters in Detroit. ...


Museums

Youngstown's most widely known museum is the Butler Institute of American Art, established by industrialist Joseph G. Butler, Jr., as the first museum in the country dedicated to American art.[49] The Butler is located near Youngstown State University's campus, just north of the downtown area. Directly across the street from the Butler stands the McDonough Museum of Art, which was established in 1991. Owned and operated by Youngstown State University, the McDonough showcases contemporary art and hosts programs for students on campus and throughout the surrounding area.[74] The YSU campus is also the site of the Clarence R. Smith Mineral Museum, which is operated by the university's geology department and housed in a campus building.[49] Cafe & Giftshop The Butler Institute of American Art, located on Wick Avenue in Youngstown, Ohio, was the first museum to feature exclusively American Art. ... Joseph Green Butler, Jr. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...

The Butler Institute of American Art
The Butler Institute of American Art

Within walking distance of the institutions mentioned above is the Arms Family Museum of Local History. The museum, housed in a 1905 Arts & Crafts Style mansion on the main artery of Wick Avenue, is managed by the Mahoning Valley Historical Society. Once the estate of a local industrialist, the museum maintains period rooms that showcase the original contents of the household, including furnishings, art objects, and personal artifacts. The museum also mounts rotating exhibits on topics related to local history. Recently, the museum opened the "Anne Kilcawley Christman Hands-on History Room". The MVHS Archival Library operates in the estate's former carriage house, located near the back of the site. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2357 KB) The Butler Institute of American Art, during their annual Trash and Treasure Sale. Photo by Blue80. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2357 KB) The Butler Institute of American Art, during their annual Trash and Treasure Sale. Photo by Blue80. ... This subject should not be confused with the British Arts and Crafts Movement. ... Furnishings (aka art objects, decorative arts, knick-knacks, bric-a-brac) are the objects, other than furniture, that occupy an interior space. ... An artifact (also artefact) is a term coined by Sir Julian Huxley meaning any object or process resulting from human activity. ... Catherine IIs carved, painted and gilded Coronation Coach (Hermitage Museum) George VI and Queen Elizabeth in a landau with footmen and an outrider, Canada 1939 The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs (elliptical springs in the 19th century... For other uses, see House (disambiguation). ...


Located just south of the YSU campus is the Youngstown Historical Center of Industry and Labor, which sits on a grade overlooking the downtown area. This unusual museum, owned and operated by the Ohio Historical Society, focuses mainly on the Mahoning Valley's history of steel production.[49] The museum has an extensive archive that includes taped and transcribed oral historical accounts. The Ohio Historical Society recently expanded its support for the museum, and local interest appears to be on the rise. The Ohio Historical Society is a non-profit organization incorporated in 1885 ...to promote a knowledge of archaeology and history, especially in Ohio. ... Archive of the AMVC An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... Oral history is an account of something passed down by word of mouth from one generation to another. ...


The Children's Museum of the Valley, located in the downtown area, provides regional educational opportunities for hands-on interaction. Activities and exhibits explore the culture, art, drama, construction, science, and natural history connected to the Mahoning Valley.[75]


Finally, visitors to Mill Creek Park have the opportunity to explore the Davis Education and Recreation Center, a small museum showcasing the history of the park as well as the life of park founder Volney Rogers.[76] Volney Rogers (December 1, 1846 - December 3, 1919) was a lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio, best known for his arduous but ultimately successful effort to turn Mill Creek hollow into one of the nations most celebrated metropolitan parks. ...


Parks

Youngstown's most beloved resource is perhaps Mill Creek Park, a five-mile-long stretch of landscaped woodland reminiscent of Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C. Mill Creek is the oldest park district in Ohio, established as a township park in 1891. The park's highlights include the restored 19th century Lanterman's Mill, the dramatic rock formations of Bear's Den, scores of nature trails, the Fellows Riverside Gardens and Nature Center, and the "Cinderella" iron link bridge.[77] Mill Creek Park is a municipal park in Youngstown, Ohio. ... Rock Creek Park is an urban natural area with public park facilities which bisects Washington, D.C. East of the park, except for a few enclaves, the city has a decidedly urban character. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Fellows Riverside Gardens (11 acres) are public botanical gardens in the Mill Creek Metro Parks system, located at 123 McKinley Avenue, Youngstown, Ohio. ...

Mill Creek Park's "Cinderella" iron link bridge
Mill Creek Park's "Cinderella" iron link bridge

It encompasses approximately 2,600 acres, 20 miles of drives, and 15 miles of foot trails, and a rare collection of gardens, streams, lakes, woodlands, meadows and wildlife. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1167x789, 89 KB) Description: Cinderella Bridge in Mill Creek Park, Youngstown, Ohio Author: Self-created I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1167x789, 89 KB) Description: Cinderella Bridge in Mill Creek Park, Youngstown, Ohio Author: Self-created I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation...


The Nature Center's popular lookout point provides visitors with contrasting views of the area. From the south side, the canopied woodlands overlooking Lake Glacier are visible; from the north side, viewers are presented with a scenic view of downtown Youngstown. The park also features two golf courses: an 18-hole short holes course, and a 36-hole professional course.[49] In addition, it offers playgrounds, an ice-skating rink, picnic areas and other recreational spaces. This article is about the sport. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ... Friends and family gather for a picnic in a public park in Columbus, Ohio, c. ...


In 2005, the park was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.[78] A monument commemorating this event is located near a commemorative statue of Volney Rogers, the Youngstown attorney who set aside land that would later become Mill Creek Park.[79] A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The memorial at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii commemorates American dead from wars in the Pacific. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ...


The city also features a smaller municipal recreational area, Wick Park, which is located on the historic north side. The periphery of Wick Park is lined with early 20th century mansions built by the city's industrialists, business leaders, and professionals during Youngstown's "boom" years.[67] Near the southwestern edge of the park is Stambaugh Auditorium, described earlier as a popular site of concerts and other public events.[80] In addition, several cemeteries (notably historic Oak Hill Cemetery) and small recreational spaces are scattered throughout the city. Wick Park (known by the National Register of Historic Places as, The Wick Park Historic District) is a neighborhood on the Northside of Youngstown, Ohio, named after the park that is the centerpiece of the area. ... Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands Introduction A mansion is a large and stately dwelling house. ... Stambaugh Auditorium as it appeared in 1920s. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ...


Sports

Youngstown has enjoyed a long tradition of professional and semi-professional sports.[81] In earlier decades, the city produced scores of minor league baseball teams, including the Youngstown Ohio Works, Youngstown Champs, Youngstown Indians, Youngstown Steelmen, Youngstown Browns, Youngstown Gremlins, and Youngstown Athletics. Local enthusiasm for baseball was such that the community hosted championship games of the National Amateur Baseball Federation throughout the 1930s and 1940s.[82] The area's minor league teams were supplemented by semi-professional football teams, including the Youngstown Patricians, which won the 1915 championship of what became the National Football League,[49] and the Youngstown Hardhats, which competed in the Middle Atlantic Football League in the 1970s and early 1980s. Youngstown is currently home to the Mahoning Valley Thunder of af2, the minor league for the Arena Football League.[83] Local minor league basketball teams have included the Youngstown Pride (which played in the WBA from 1987-1992), the Youngstown Hawks (IBA, 1999), and the Mahoning Valley Wildcats (IBL, 2005). The current minor league baseball team just outside of the city is the Mahoning Valley Scrappers, which are the single-A short season affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. The Scrappers compete in the New York-Penn League and play their games at Eastwood Field in neighboring Niles, Ohio. Since their first season of play in 1999, the Scrappers have become a successful franchise in minor league baseball. Youngstown is also the home to the Youngstown Steelhounds hockey team, who play in the CHL. Youngstown Ohio Works (1906), with pitcher Roy Castleton seated in second row, second from left The Youngstown Ohio Works baseball team was a minor league club that served as a training ground for players and officials who later established careers in major league baseball. ... The Youngstown Champs were a minor league baseball team that competed in the Ohio-Pennsylvania League in 1907 and 1908. ... The Youngstown Indians were a minor league baseball club that competed during the 1909 season in the Ohio-Pennsylvania League. ... The Youngstown Steelmen was a minor league baseball franchise that competed in three different leagues between 1910 and 1915. ... Browns fielder Floyd Baker played for the St. ... The Youngstown Gremlins were a minor league club affiliated with the Mid-Atlantic League. ... Patricians player-coach Ray L. Thomas (1915) The Youngstown Patricians were a semi-professional football team based in Youngstown, Ohio. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Youngstown Hardhats were a semi-professional football team who played in the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... The Mahoning Valley Thunder are a professional af2 arena football team. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The Youngstown Pride was a professional basketball team that competed in the World Basketball League during the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... World Basketball League or WBL was a minor professional basketball league in the United States and Canada. ... The Youngstown Hawks were an International Basketball Association team based in Youngstown, Ohio, USA from 1999 to 2000. ... The International Basketball Association is a non-profit (501-c-3) based in Washington, D.C. and has been in existance since 1989. ... The Mahoning Valley Wildcats (sometimes referred to as the Youngstown Wildcats), are a team in the International Basketball League (2005-) based in Struthers, Ohio. ... The International Basketball League is a U.S.-based professional basketball summer league featuring teams from the West Coast and the Midwest. ... The Mahoning Valley Scrappers are a minor league baseball club based in Niles, Ohio, a city in the valley of the Mahoning River. ... The New York - Penn League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the northeastern United States. ... Eastwood Field is a minor league baseball stadium located in Niles, Ohio. ... The Youngstown SteelHounds are a professional ice hockey team in the Central Hockey League. ... This article is about the current CHL; for earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation) The Central Hockey League (CHL) is a mid-level professional hockey league, owned by Global Entertainment Corporation. ...


Meanwhile, the community has an unbroken tradition of collegiate sports, which is exemplified by the Youngstown State University Penguins, a major regional draw. The football team, which competes in the Gateway Football Conference, is among the most storied and successful in 1-AA football. The Penguins play in Stambaugh Stadium and enjoy one of the most supportive fanbases in Division 1 FCS football. All other YSU athletic teams compete in the Horizon League. The Youngstown State men and women's basketball teams hold their games at Youngstown State's Beeghly Center. The teams average about 2500 fans per game, a number which has been on the rise the past two seasons with a new style of play under Head Coach Jerry Slocum. Meanwhile, the YSU baseball and softball teams have enjoyed both local support and success, with the baseball team reaching the NCAA super-regionals in 2005 and the softball team doing so in 2006..[84] The Gateway Football Conference is a college athletic conference which operates in the midwestern United States. ... Stambaugh Stadiums west bleachers Arnold D. Stambaugh Stadium, usually shortened to just Stambaugh Stadium, is the home of football and soccer teams at Youngstown State University in Ohio, USA. Built in 1982, Stambaugh has seen the Penguins football team rise to become a power in NCAA Division I-AA... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... The Beeghly Physical Education Center, or simply,Beeghly Center, is a 6,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio. ...


Building on tradition

One of the city's most recent sports-related attractions is the Chevrolet Centre (formerly the Youngstown Convocation Center), which was funded primarily through a $26 million federal grant. Located on the site of an abandoned steel mill, the impressive, high-tech facility opened in October 2005.[85] The Centre's main tenants are the Youngstown Steelhounds hockey team, who play in the CHL, and the Mahoning Valley Thunder, an af2 Arena football team which will play its first season in 2007. The city plans to develop vacant land adjacent to the Centre. Plans included using the space for a park, riverwalk (the Mahoning River flows through the site), amphitheater, or athletic stadium for the city's public and private high schools. The main entrance to the Chevrolet Centre The Chevrolet Centre (Formerly the Youngstown Convocation Center) is a 5,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio, United States. ... The Youngstown SteelHounds are a professional ice hockey team in the Central Hockey League. ... This article is about the current CHL; for earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation) The Central Hockey League (CHL) is a mid-level professional hockey league, owned by Global Entertainment Corporation. ... The Mahoning Valley Thunder are a professional af2 arena football team. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ...


Such investments reflect wide appreciation of Youngstown's athletic tradition, which has produced noted figures in a variety of sports. Prominent athletes with connections to the city include IBF lightweight champion Harry Arroyo, College Football Hall of Fame end Bob Dove, Hall of Fame umpire Billy Evans, major league pitcher Dave Dravecky, NFL quarterback Bernie Kosar, IBF cruiserweight champion Jeff Lampkin, WBA lightweight champion "Boom Boom" Mancini, major league manager Jimmy McAleer, current WBC and WBO middleweight champion Kelly Pavlik, legendary baseball trainer "Bonesetter" Reese, major league outfielder George Shuba, and Heisman Trophy recipient Frank Sinkwich.[83] The International Boxing Federation, or IBF, is one of many organizations which sanction world championship boxing bouts, alongside the WBA, WBC, WBO, and a dozen or so others. ... For other uses, see Lightweight (disambiguation). ... Harry Arroyo (born October 25, 1957 in Youngstown, Ohio) is a retired boxer from the United States. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... An End in American football is a player that lines up at the very end of the line of scrimmage. ... Bob Dove (Feb. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... William George Evans (February 10, 1884 - January 23, 1956) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball, working in the American League from 1906 to 1927. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Francis Dravecky (born February 14, 1956 in Youngstown, Ohio) is a Christian motivational speaker, author, and former Major League Baseball player for the San Diego Padres (1982-87) and San Francisco Giants (1987-89). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Bernard Joseph Kosar, Jr. ... International Boxing Federation (IBF) is one of several boxing organisations. ... Jeff Lampkin (born September 21, 1959 in Youngstown, OH) was an American professional boxer. ... World Boxing Association (WBA) is a boxing organization that sanctions official matches, and awards the WBA world championship title, at the professional level. ... Ray Mancini (born March 4, 1961) is an Italian American former boxer from the south side of Youngstown, Ohio. ... James Robert McAleer (July 10, 1864 - April 29, 1931) was an American center fielder and manager in Major League Baseball who spent the bulk of his fourteen-year professional playing career with the Cleveland Spiders. ... WBC logo mark “WBC” redirects here. ... The World Boxing Organization (WBO) is one of the sanctioning organizations currently recognizing world boxing champions. ... Kelly Robert Pavlik (born April 4, 1982 in Youngstown, Ohio) is currently the reigning WBC, WBO, and Ring Magazine middleweight champion of the world. ... Bonesetter Reese (1855 - 1931) became one of the most beloved figures in early 20th major league baseball for his ability to get injured athletes back in the game. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... George Shuba (Dec. ... “Heisman” redirects here. ... Francis Frank Sinkwich (October 10, 1920 - October 22, 1990) won the Heisman Trophy in 1942, while playing at the University of Georgia, the first recipient from the Southeastern Conference. ...

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Mahoning Valley Scrappers Baseball 1999 New York-Penn League Eastwood Field
Youngstown Steelhounds Hockey 2005 Central Hockey League Chevrolet Centre
Mahoning Valley Thunder Arena Football 2007 Af2 Chevrolet Centre
Youngstown St. Penguins College football, College basketball 1908 (University's founding) NCAA: Horizon League Stambaugh Stadium, Beeghly Center

The Mahoning Valley Scrappers are a minor league baseball club based in Niles, Ohio, a city in the valley of the Mahoning River. ... This article is about the sport. ... The New York - Penn League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the northeastern United States. ... Eastwood Field is a minor league baseball stadium located in Niles, Ohio. ... The Youngstown SteelHounds are a professional ice hockey team in the Central Hockey League. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... This article is about the current CHL; for earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation) The Central Hockey League (CHL) is a mid-level professional hockey league, owned by Global Entertainment Corporation. ... The main entrance to the Chevrolet Centre The Chevrolet Centre (Formerly the Youngstown Convocation Center) is a 5,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio, United States. ... The Mahoning Valley Thunder are a professional af2 arena football team. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... The main entrance to the Chevrolet Centre The Chevrolet Centre (Formerly the Youngstown Convocation Center) is a 5,700-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio, United States. ... Youngstown State University, founded in 1908, is an accredited university located in Youngstown, Ohio US. As of 2005, there were 13,101 students and a student-faculty ratio of 19:1. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Horizon League is a nine school, NCAA Division I college athletic conference, whose members are located in five of the Midwestern United States. ... Stambaugh Stadiums west bleachers Arnold D. Stambaugh Stadium, usually shortened to just Stambaugh Stadium, is the home of football and soccer teams at Youngstown State University in Ohio, USA. Built in 1982, Stambaugh has seen the Penguins football team rise to become a power in NCAA Division I-AA... The Beeghly Physical Education Center, or simply,Beeghly Center, is a 6,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Youngstown, Ohio. ...

Former attractions

Several of the city's treasured recreational resources failed to survive the economic hardships that came in the late 1970s. The most notable of these was Idora Park, an amusement park that served as a pleasant alternative to Youngstown residents who preferred not to travel to some of the larger parks located in Northern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania. (These included Conneaut Lake Park in Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania, Geauga Lake in Aurora, Ohio, Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio, and Kennywood in Pittsburgh.) Beyond its sentimental value, the park, which closed in 1984, enjoyed a degree of historical significance. Former Youngstown resident Jack Warner noted in his autobiography that the famed Warner brothers' first step into the movie business came when they screened a worn copy of The Great Train Robbery at Idora Park and other local venues.[86] Idora Park (1899 - 1984) was a northeastern Ohio amusement park popularly known as Youngstowns Million Dollar Playground. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Conneaut Lake Park is an amusement park located in Conneaut Lake, Pennsylvania, USA. It has long served as a regional tourist destination, and is loved by roller coaster enthusiasts for its classic Blue Streak coaster. ... Conneaut Lake is a borough located in Crawford County, Pennsylvania. ... It has been suggested that Six Flags Worlds of Adventure be merged into this article or section. ... Aurora is a city located in Portage County, Ohio, United States. ... Cedar Point is a 364 acre (1. ... Aerial view of Sandusky, Ohio on Sandusky Bay Muddy brown water fills Sandusky Bay, just south of Lake Erie in this astronaut photograph. ... Kennywood is an amusement park near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the borough of West Mifflin. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... “WB” redirects here. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... The Great Train Robbery is a 1903 western film. ...


Also a thing of the past is downtown Youngstown's traditional position as a retail and entertainment hub. From the early 1900s to the mid-1970s, Youngstown served as the retail center of the Mahoning Valley. There were formerly two department stores in the downtown area, including Strouss Hirshberg's (which later became Strouss' and then Kaufmann's, now part of Macy's) and McKelvey's (which later became Higbee's, now part of Dillard's). Specialty shops once lined the main artery of West Federal Street, and the district had four luxurious movie theaters, including the Palace Theater, the Warner Brothers' Theater, the State Theater, and the Paramount Theater. These businesses were the first to disappear amid declining attendance in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. In the early 1970s, the appearance of two suburban malls (the Southern Park Mall, in Boardman, and the Eastwood Mall, in Niles) contributed to the closure or relocation of many of those businesses that survived. The collapse of the community's steel industry at the end of the decade sharpened challenges faced by downtown business owners; and throughout the 1980s and '90s, efforts to revive the former retail hub proved fruitless.[87] Drawing of a self-service store. ... A stilt-walker entertaining shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure or relaxation to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the audience may be only one person). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about a department store chain. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... The Southern Park Mall is a shopping mall in Boardman, Ohio. ...


Redevelopment

The George Voinovich Center (left) and Mahoning County Childrens Services Center (right) in downtown
The George Voinovich Center (left) and Mahoning County Childrens Services Center (right) in downtown

The cityscape of Youngstown is remarkable for its relative dearth of newer buildings, and from certain angles, the downtown area may appear to have changed little since the 1960s. Moreover, the forces of suburbanization that undermined the downtown area's once thriving retail sector have taken their toll on the city's periphery as well. Observers note the absence of a single new car dealership operating within the city limits, and also observe that city residents are often forced to do their shopping in the surrounding suburbs of Boardman, Niles, Austintown, or Liberty. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1209 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1209 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Seattle, Washington cityscape Houses of Parliament, Sunset, 1902, by Claude Monet View of Delft (1660-1661) by Jan Vermeer A cityscape is the urban equivalent of a landscape. ... Typical car dealership selling used cars outside, new cars in the showroom, as well as a vehicle entrance to the parts and service area in the back of the building. ... Shopping is the examining of goods or services from retailers with intent to purchase. ... Boardman is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States, just south of Youngstown. ... Niles is a city in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Austintown is an unincorporated census-designated place and Youngstown suburb, located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ... Liberty Township is an ugly, forlorn & foul smelling piece of wasteland, located in Trumbull County, Ohio, just north of Youngstown. ...


Yet downtown Youngstown has seen modest (and steadily increasing) levels of new construction in recent years. New additions include a state office complex (the George Voinovich Government Center) and two federal courthouses, one of which (the Frank J. Battisti and Nathaniel R. Jones Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse) features an award-winning design by the architectural firm, Robert AM Stern.[49] George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... In most counties in the United States the local trial courts conduct their business in a centrally located courthouse which may also house the offices of the county treasurer, clerk and recorder and assessor. ... Frank James Battisti (October 4, 1922 – October 19, 1994) served as the 21st district judge for the Northern District of Ohio, between 1961 and 1990. ... Judge Nathaniel R. Jones (1926 - ) has distinguished himself as a lawyer, jurist, academic, and public servant. ...


In 2005, Federal Street, a major downtown thoroughfare that had been closed off to create a pedestrian-oriented plaza, was reopened to through traffic. The downtown area has also seen the razing of structurally unsound buildings, as well as the expansion and/or restoration of many others.[88] Mitchell Freeway in Perth, Western Australia For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... Look up Pedestrian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Construction and business development

Recently re-opened Federal Street
Recently re-opened Federal Street

In 2004, construction began on a 60-home upscale development called Arlington Heights, and a grant from the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development allowed for the demolition of Westlake Terrace, a sprawling and dilapidated public housing project. The site currently features a blend of senior housing, rental townhouses and for-sale single-family homes. Low real-estate prices and the efforts of the Youngstown Central Area Improvement Corporation (CIC) have contributed to the purchase of several long-abandoned downtown buildings (many by out-of-town investors) as well as their restoration and conversion into specialty shops, restaurants, and eventually condominia. Further, a nonprofit organization called Wick Neighbors is planning a $250 million New Urbanist revitalization of Smoky Hollow, a former ethnic neighborhood that borders the downtown and university campus. The neighborhood will eventually comprise about 400 residential units, university student housing, retail space, and a central park.[89] Construction for the project began in 2006. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1113 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1113 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes are forms of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Leinster House Henrietta Street In the United Kingdom, Ireland and in some other countries, a townhouse was a residence of a peer or member of the aristocracy in the capital or major city. ... This article refers to a form of housing. ... Overview New Urbanism is an urban design movement that became very popular beginning in the 1980s and early 1990s. ...


New construction has dovetailed with efforts to cultivate business growth. One of the area's more successful business ventures in recent years has been the Youngstown Business Incubator. This nonprofit organization, based in a former downtown department store building, fosters the growth of fledgling technology-based companies. The incubator, which currently boasts more than a dozen business tenants, will soon begin construction on a multi-million dollar downtown technology center, where some of its largest firms will relocate.[54] A non-profit organization (often called non-profit org or simply non-profit or not-for-profit) can be seen as an organization that doesnt have a goal to make a profit. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ...


Crime control

Meanwhile, the city has attempted to come to terms with its troubling reputation for crime and corruption. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Youngstown was nationally identified with gangland slayings that were often committed with car bombs.[90] Hence, the town gained the nickname "Murder City", and the phrase "Youngstown tune-up" became a regionally popular slang term for car-bomb assassination.[91] This dubious image has been reinforced by the widely reported fact that five prisons operate within the metropolitan area.[92] The city, however, has accelerated measures to limit the influence of organized crime upon all sectors of municipal life. For some observers, the climax of this ongoing effort was the arrest, trial, and 2002 conviction of former U.S. Representative James A. Traficant Jr. on bribery and racketeering charges.[93] Meanwhile, the municipal government has responded to a rise in gang- and drug-related violence by increasing the presence of police in urban neighborhoods. In the course of enforcing traffic laws and issuing warrants, police and state troopers have apprehended serious criminal offenders.[94] This article is about explosive devices. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... In rhetoric, climax is a figure of speech, in which words, phrases, or clauses are arranged in order of increasing importance. ... For other uses, see Arrest (disambiguation). ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... James Traficant James A. Traficant Jr. ... Bribery is a crime implying a sum or gift given alters the behaviour of the person in ways not consistent with the duties of that person. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ...


Renewal plan

In line with these efforts to change the community's image, the city government, in partnership with the university, has organized an ambitious urban renewal plan titled Youngstown 2010. The stated goals of Youngstown 2010 include the creation of a "cleaner, greener, and better planned and organized Youngstown". In January 2005, the organization unveiled its "master plan", which took shape in the course of several public meetings that featured input from citizens. The plan, which received national attention, is consistent with efforts in other metropolitan areas to address the phenomenon of urban depopulation.[27] Given that the communities to the south and west of the city continue to enjoy a measure of economic prosperity, supporters of such projects hold out hope for the revitalization of Youngstown. A partnership is a type of business entity in which partners share with each other the profits or losses of the business undertaking in which all have invested. ... 1999 photograph looking northeast on Chicagos now demolished Cabrini-Green housing project, one of many urban renewal efforts. ...


Neighborhoods

Downtown's Central Square (Federal Plaza) from the east.
Downtown's Central Square (Federal Plaza) from the east.
  • Lincoln Knolls
  • Lower Gibson
  • Mahoning Commons
  • McGuffey Heights
  • McKinley Heights
  • Nebo- southeast section in Struthers
  • Newport
  • North Heights
  • Oak Hill
  • Pleasant Grove
  • Riverbend
  • Salt Springs
  • Schenley
  • Scienceville
  • Sharon-Line
  • Smoky Hollow
  • Steelton
  • Struthers
  • Warren
  • West Side
  • Wick Park

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1201 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1201 KB) Summary (photo by Blue80) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Belle Vista is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, located on the citys west side. ... Brier Hill is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, that was traditionally viewed as the citys Little Italy district. ... Downtowns Central Square (Federal Plaza) from the east. ... Fosterville is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio located on the south-southwestern side of the city. ... Hazelton (also alternatively spelled Haselton) is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, on the citys east side. ... Lansingville is a neighborhood on the south side of Youngstown, Ohio. ... Lincoln Knolls is a neighborhood within Youngstown, Ohio, on the citys east side. ... North Heights is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, nestled on the citys upper-Northside. ... Smoky Hollow, also nicknamed The Hollow, is a neighborhood in Youngstown, Ohio, situated east of Youngstowns Downtown. ... Wick Park (known by the National Register of Historic Places as, The Wick Park Historic District) is a neighborhood on the Northside of Youngstown, Ohio, named after the park that is the centerpiece of the area. ...

Transportation

The Youngstown area is served by the Western Reserve Transit Authority (WRTA) bus system, which is supported through income tax. WRTA, whose main terminal is located in the downtown area, provides service throughout the city as well as to locations in Mahoning and Trumbull counties. The downtown terminal also serves as the Youngstown area's Greyhound terminal.[95] Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America , serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ...


Located in the vicinity of the WRTA terminal is a former Baltimore and Ohio Railroad station. The historic terminal building, which has been converted into a banquet hall, served as an Amtrak station from 1995 to 2005.[96] Currently, local railroads only serve cargo trains. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) was one of the oldest railroads in the United States, with an original line from the port of Baltimore, Maryland, west to the Ohio River at Wheeling and Parkersburg, West Virginia. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ...


The only airport within the city limits is the Lansdowne Airport, located on the city's east side. This facility is utilized for general aviation. The metropolitan area's main airport is the Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (YNG), located in nearby Vienna, Ohio. The only commercial route currently available is a flight to Orlando, Florida through Allegiant Air.[97] Most valley residents choose to take advantage of larger airports in Cleveland, Akron, and Pittsburgh. Lansdowne Airport (FAA LID: 04G) is a small, local airport on the East Side of Youngstown, Ohio, US near the Pennsylvania border. ... General aviation (abbr. ... Youngstown Warren Regional Airport (IATA: YNG, ICAO: KYNG) is a regional airport located in Vienna, Ohio, near Youngstown, Ohio. ... Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport (IATA: YNG, ICAO: KYNG) is a public airport located in Vienna, Ohio, 11 miles north of Youngstown and 10 miles east of Warren, in Trumbull County, Ohio, USA. The airport has been open for over 50 years and serves the Mahoning and Shenango (Steel) Valleys, and... Vienna is an unincorporated community in Trumbull County, Ohio, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Orange County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange Government  - Mayor Buddy Dyer (D) Area  - City 101 sq mi (261. ... Allegiant Air is an American low fare airline, owned by Allegiant Travel Co. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... FAA diagram of Akron-Canton Airport Akron-Canton Airport (IATA: CAK, ICAO: KCAK) is a commercial Class C airport located in southern Summit County, Ohio (a very small portion of both runways extend into Stark County,) roughly 10 miles southeast of Akron, Ohio, and roughly 10 miles northwest of Canton... “PIT” redirects here. ...


Youngstown's sister cities

Salerno is a town in Campania, south-western Italy, the capital of the province of the same name. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... SpiÅ¡ská Nová Ves (-Slovak, German: (Zipser) Neu(en)dorf, Hungarian: Igló, Romany Noveysis) is a city in the KoÅ¡ice Region of Slovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Slovakia. ... al-Bireh or el-Bira (Arabic: ; ‎) is a Palestinian city adjacent to Ramallah in the central West Bank, 15 kilometers (9 mi) north of Jerusalem. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ...

Media

Youngstown features diverse media, including television, print and radio. An important regional source of news is the daily newspaper, The Vindicator, a broadsheet published by The Vindicator Publishing Company. Youngstown is also served by 10 television stations, three of which are low-power repeaters of TV stations in other cities. This is unusual for a mid-sized city located near large metros such as Cleveland and Pittsburgh. Interestingly, nearby Akron, Ohio, with a larger population than Youngstown and Warren combined, has no local television stations and relies on Cleveland for its local news. The majority of the most powerful and popular radio stations in the Youngstown-Warren market are divided between two conglomerates: Clear Channel and Cumulus Media. The Vindicator is a daily newspaper serving the region surrounding Youngstown, Ohio. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... Not to be confused with clear channel radio stations, which are AM radio stations with certain technical parameters. ... Cumulus Media, Inc. ...


Television

The Youngstown-Warren regional area television stations include:

WFMJ Channel 21, is the NBC affiliate in Youngstown, Ohio. ... This article is about the television network. ... WKBN Channel 27, is the CBS affiliate in Youngstown, Ohio. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... WYTV Channel 33, is the ABC affiliate in Youngstown, Ohio. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... WYFX Channel 62, is the FOX affiliate in Youngstown, Ohio. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... WBCB can mean: WBCB (AM), a radio station in Levittown, Pennsylvania with the legal callsign WBCB WBCB (The CW Plus), a digital sub-channel of WFMJ-TV in Youngstown, Ohio which uses the false callsign WBCB Category: ... “The CW” redirects here. ... WNEO Channel 45, is the PBS member station in Youngstown, Ohio. ... “PBS” redirects here. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... My Network TV (sometimes written MyNetworkTV, and unofficially abbreviated MNT or MNTV) is an upcoming television network in the United States, owned by News Corporation, which is scheduled to launch on September 5, 2006. ... WBGN-LP is an low-powered independent station in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and owns satellite low-powered stations in surrounding areas. ... The Trinity Broadcasting Network, or TBN, is the largest Christian religious television network in the world and is headquartered near Los Angeles in Costa Mesa, California with studios near Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Irving, Texas and near Nashville in Hendersonville, Tennessee. ... WPCB-TV is an independent Christian UHF station in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DMA. It broadcasts its analog signal on UHF channel 40, and its digital signal on UHF channel 50. ...

Print

The Youngstown area's primary daily newspaper is The Vindicator, the only newspaper that covers Mahoning, Trumbull, and Columbiana counties, as well as Western Pennsylvania. It has competitors, such as the Warren-based Tribune Chronicle, and the Lisbon -based Morning Journal, but they primarily cover their respective counties, with limited coverage of Mahoning County and the city. Other newspapers that print in Youngstown include The Business Journal (twice-monthly), The Metro Monthly (monthly), and YSU's student newspaper The Jambar (Tuesdays and Thursdays while classes are in session). The Vindicator is a daily newspaper serving the region surrounding Youngstown, Ohio. ... Warren is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Trumbull CountyGR6. ... Lisbon is a village located in Columbiana County, Ohio. ...


Radio

Radio stations in the Youngstown market include:

  • WEXC 107.1 FM (contemporary Christian, owned by Beacon Broadcasting )
  • WKBN 570 AM (news/talk; Clear Channel)
  • WSOM 600 AM (adult standards; Cumulus)
  • WPIC 790 AM (news/talk; Cumulus)
  • WKTX 830 AM (ethnic and variety)
  • WGRP 940 AM (oldies)
  • WKST 1200 AM (news/talk; Forever Broadcasting)
  • WJST 1280 AM (oldies; Forever Broadcasting)
  • WBBW 1240 AM (sports; Cumulus)
  • WGFT 1330 AM (news talk)
  • WSAJ 1340 AM (Slient; Grove city college)
  • WNIO 1390 AM (adult standards; Clear Channel)
  • WHKZ 1440 AM (religious; Salem Communications)
  • WLOA 1470 AM (Beacon Broadcasting)
  • WASN 1500 AM (Syndication One/Urban Talk)
  • WRTK 1540 AM (Beacon Broadcasting)
  • WANR 1570 AM (oldies; Beacon Broadcasting)

Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Struthers is a city in Mahoning County, Ohio, United States. ... WPKL began in March of 1981 as WPQR. WPQR would carry a country format until 2000, when it would flip to oldies, via ABCs Oldies Radio, as The Pickle. No real information on why The Pickle was chosen as their name, but it is one-of-a-kind. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used to describe a radio format that usually concentrates on Top 40 music from the 50s, 60s and 70s. ... WNCD is a rock radio station in Youngstown, Ohio owned by Clear Channel, broadcasting at 93. ... Active rock is a radio format used by many commercial radio stations in Canada and the United States. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... WWGY is a country music radio station in Grove City, Pennsylvania and is branded as Froggy 95. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... WLLF is a commercial FM radio station in Mercer, Pennsylvania, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 96. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... WHOT-FM is a commercial FM radio station in Youngstown, Ohio, USA, broadcasting at 100. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... WYFM is a commercial FM radio station in Sharon, Pennsylvania, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 102. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... WWIZ is a commercial FM radio station in Mercer, Pennsylvania, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 103. ... Active rock is a radio format used by many commercial radio stations in Canada and the United States. ... WQXK is a commercial FM radio station in Salem, Ohio, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 105. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... WBBG is a commercial FM radio station in Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 106. ... Oldies is a generic term commonly used to describe a radio format that usually concentrates on Top 40 music from the 50s, 60s and 70s. ... WKBN is an AM radio station in Youngstown, Ohio, USA broadcasting at 570 kHz with a talk radio format. ... WSOM is an AM radio station in Salem, Ohio, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 600 kHz with standards format. ... WPIC is an American radio station, licensed to the city of Sharon, Pennsylvania; the seat of government for Mercer County, Pennsylvania. ... WKST is an AM radio station in New Castle, Pennsylvania, USA broadcasting at 1200 kHz with a news/talk format. ... WBBW is an AM radio station in Salem, Ohio, USA, serving the Youngstown, Ohio market broadcasting at 1240 kHz with a sports talk format. ... WNIO is an AM radio station in Youngstown, Ohio, USA broadcasting at 1390 kHz with an adult standards format. ... WHKZ is an AM radio station in Warren, Ohio, USA, operating on 1440 kHz. ... WANR AM 1570 is a radio station based in Warren, Ohio. ...

Famous Youngstowners and former Steel Valley residents

The following are notable or famous people who were all born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Youngstown, Ohio, and the Steel Valley. ...

References

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  68. ^ Dana School of Music Accessed 2007-03-08
  69. ^ Kent State University Homepage Accessed 2007-03-08
  70. ^ "A Sam Warner Memorial – Brothers Will Build a $1,000,000 Movie Theatre in Youngstown", The New York Times, March 19, 1930, p. 31. 
  71. ^ DeYor Performing Arts Center Homepage. Accessed 2007-02-18
  72. ^ Stambaugh Auditorium Homepage Accessed 2007-03-12
  73. ^ Shilling, Don. "Buyer visualizes performing arts center in long-neglected historical building", The Vindicator, May 3, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-15. 
  74. ^ McDonough Museum of Art. Youngstown State University. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  75. ^ Children's Museum of the Valley Homepage. Accessed 2007-02-18
  76. ^ Mill Creek Metro Parks Homepage. Accessed 2007-02-17
  77. ^ Mahoning Valley Historical Society page on Mill Creek Park
  78. ^ Gwin, Harold. "Ceremony marks placement on National Register", The Vindicator, June 14, 2006. 
  79. ^ Mill Creek Metro Parks Homepage. Accessed 2007-02-17
  80. ^ Stambaugh Auditorium Homepage Accessed 2007-03-12
  81. ^ Company Sports Teams and the Early Industrialization of Youngstown, Ohio. Youngstown State University. Retrieved on 2007-03-08.
  82. ^ Ward, Frank B.. "Along the Sports Rialto", The Youngstown Vindicator, September 16, 1946, p. 7. 
  83. ^ a b Bassetti, John, Kovach, John. "Area breeds toughness, tradition; From players, coaches, officials, the area has been well-represented in the NFL.", The Vindicator, March 31, 2007, p. 1. 
  84. ^ YSU Sports Homepage. Accessed 2007-02-18
  85. ^ Skolnick, David. "Sealing the deal on Chevrolet Centre", The Vindicator, November 18, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. 
  86. ^ Warner, Jack L., My First Hundred Years in Hollywood (New York: Random House, 1964), pp. 49-54.
  87. ^ Linkon, Sherry Lee; Russo, John (2002). Steeltown U.S.A.: Work & Memory in Youngstown. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, pp. 42-46. ISBN 0700611614. 
  88. ^ "City unveils its new logo", The Vindicator, September 21, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  89. ^ Skolnick, David. "City is looking up expert says", The Vindicator, May 4, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-14. 
  90. ^ Heltzel, Bill. "Mob Rule in Youngstown", The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, December 7, 1997, p. C-1. 
  91. ^ Grann, David. "Crimetown USA - The city that fell in love with the mob.", The New Republic, July 10, 2000, p. 23. Retrieved on 2007-02-15. 
  92. ^ Clines, Francis X.. "Imprisoned fathers tell their children: don't follow in our footsteps.", The New York Times, July 2, 2000, p. 9-10. Retrieved on 2007-02-15. 
  93. ^ Clines, Francis X.. "Ohio Congressman guilty in bribery and kickbacks", The New York Times, April 12, 2002. Retrieved on 2007-02-14. 
  94. ^ "Zero tolerance means numerous changes", The Vindicator, February 16, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-02-14. 
  95. ^ WRTA Youngstown Web site Accessed 2007-03-07
  96. ^ B & O Banquet Hall Web site Accessed 2007-03-07
  97. ^ Youngstown-Warren Regional Airport Homepage Accessed 2007-03-07

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Coordinates: 41.096258° N 80.649299° W Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Youngstown: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (6369 words)
Youngstown is a city located in Mahoning county in Ohio, on the Mahoning River, 65 miles southeast of Cleveland, Ohio, and approximately 62 miles northwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Youngstown is located in--and heavily affected by the forces which produced--the Rust Belt region of the United States.
Youngstown's most beloved resource is perhaps Mill Creek Park, a five-mile-long stretch of landscaped woodland reminiscent of Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C. Mill Creek is the second-largest municipal park in the country, behind New York City's Central Park.
Renner Brewing Co., Youngstown, Ohio (3246 words)
Youngstown's longest operating brewery was founded in early 1865 by Philip Schuh (also spelled Schub, Schule) and John Bayer, two German immigrants.
Wahl's words were prophetic of the future, at least in Ohio: within twenty years, the only breweries which would survive were those which had gone to a streamlined, mechanical, and purely scientific approach to the brewing of beer.
Another twenty years after that, nearly all of Ohio's original brewing companies were out of business, unable to compete with the national giants and their entirely "industrial" approach to brewing.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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