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Encyclopedia > Young Frankenstein
Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein film poster
Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Michael Gruskoff
Written by Mel Brooks
Gene Wilder
Starring Gene Wilder
Peter Boyle
Teri Garr
Marty Feldman
Cloris Leachman
Madeline Kahn
Kenneth Mars
Gene Hackman
Music by John Morris
Cinematography Gerald Hirschfeld
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) December 15, 1974
Running time 106 min.
Country US
Language English
Budget $2,800,000 (est.)
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Young Frankenstein is a 1974 comedy film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character. Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, Marty Feldman, Peter Boyle, Madeline Kahn, Kenneth Mars, and Gene Hackman also star. The screenplay was written by Brooks and Wilder. Young Frankenstein is a musical with a book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan and music and lyrics by Brooks. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (494x755, 94 KB) Summary movie poster for the American theatrical release of the film Young Frankenstein (1974) Source URL: http://www. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Peter Lawrence Boyle (October 18, 1935 – December 12, 2006)[1][2] was an Emmy Award-winning American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Frank Barone on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... Teri Garr (born December 11, 1947 in Lakewood, Ohio) is an American actress and comedienne. ... Martin Alan Marty Feldman (8 July 1934[1] – 2 December 1982) was an English writer, comedian and BAFTA award winning actor, notable for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition known as Graves Disease. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Kenneth Mars (born April 14, 1935[1] or 1936) is an American television, movie and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles in several Mel Brooks films, the most memorable being the insane Nazi playwright of Springtime for Hitler, Franz Liebkind, in 1968s The Producers and the relentless... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... John Morris (born October 18, 1926) is a film and television composer, best known for his work with filmmaker Mel Brooks. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... A comedy is a dramatic performance of a light and amusing character, usually with a happy conclusion to its plot. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Teri Garr (born December 11, 1947 in Lakewood, Ohio) is an American actress and comedienne. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... Martin Alan Marty Feldman (8 July 1934[1] – 2 December 1982) was an English writer, comedian and BAFTA award winning actor, notable for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition known as Graves Disease. ... Peter Lawrence Boyle (October 18, 1935 – December 12, 2006)[1][2] was an Emmy Award-winning American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Frank Barone on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Kenneth Mars (born April 14, 1935[1] or 1936) is an American television, movie and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles in several Mel Brooks films, the most memorable being the insane Nazi playwright of Springtime for Hitler, Franz Liebkind, in 1968s The Producers and the relentless... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ...


The film is an affectionate parody of the classical horror film genre, in particular the various film adaptations of Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein produced by Universal in the 1930s. This is reflected by the fact that most of the pieces of lab equipment used as props are the same ones created by Ken Strickfaden for the 1931 film Frankenstein. To further reflect the atmosphere of the earlier films, Brooks shot the picture entirely in black-and-white, a rare choice at the time, and employed 1930s-style opening credits and period scene transitions such as iris outs, wipes, and fades to black. The film also features a notable period score by Brooks' longtime composer John Morris. In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... In film theory, genre refers to the primary method of film categorization. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... A gallery of classic Universal monsters Universal Horror is the name given to the distinctive series of horror films made by Universal Studios in California from the 1920s through to the 1950s. ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... John Morris (born October 18, 1926) is a film and television composer, best known for his work with filmmaker Mel Brooks. ...


Young Frankenstein is number 28 on Total Film Magazine's List of the 50 Greatest Comedy Films of All Time, number 56 on Bravo television network's list of the "100 Funniest Movies", and number 13 on the American Film Institute's list of the 100 funniest American movies of all time.[1] In 2003, it was deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant" by the United States National Film Preservation Board, and selected for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... The United States National Film Preservation Board is the board selecting films for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...

Contents

Cast

Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an American actor who is best known for his role as Willy Wonka, his collaborations with Mel Brooks in Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his four movies with Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Stir Crazy, See No Evil... Peter Lawrence Boyle (October 18, 1935 – December 12, 2006)[1][2] was an Emmy Award-winning American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Frank Barone on the sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond. ... Martin Alan Marty Feldman (8 July 1934[1] – 2 December 1982) was an English writer, comedian and BAFTA award winning actor, notable for his bulging eyes, which were the result of a thyroid condition known as Graves Disease. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... Teri Garr (born December 11, 1947 in Lakewood, Ohio) is an American actress and comedienne. ... Kenneth Mars (born April 14, 1935[1] or 1936) is an American television, movie and voice actor, perhaps best known for his roles in several Mel Brooks films, the most memorable being the insane Nazi playwright of Springtime for Hitler, Franz Liebkind, in 1968s The Producers and the relentless... Richard Haydn (1905-1985) was a comic actor in radio, movies and TV. He was known for playing eccentric characters, emphasized by a deliberate over-nasalized and over-enunciated speech pattern. ... Liam Dunn (1916-1976) was an American actor. ... Danny Goldman is a an American actor, voice artist, and, more recently, casting director. ... Leon Askin (left) and Paulus Manker in a café in Vienna. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ...

Plot

Frederick Frankenstein is a respected lecturer at an American medical school and is more or less happily (though blandly) engaged to the tightly-wound Elizabeth. Frederick becomes exasperated when anyone brings up the subject of his grandfather, the famous mad scientist, to the point of insisting that his name is actually pronounced "Fronk-en-steen". Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution or part of such an institution that teaches medicine. ... Victor Frankenstein is the protagonist of the 1818 novel Frankenstein, written by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. ... They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! Ill destroy them all! Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist. ...


A solicitor informs Frederick that he has inherited his family's estate. Traveling to said estate in Transylvania, Frankenstein meets his comely new lab assistant Inga, along with the household servants Frau Blücher and Igor (who, after hearing Frederick claim his name is pronounced "Fronkensteen" counter-claims that his is pronounced "Eye-gor.") A solicitor is a type of lawyer in many common law jurisdictions, such as the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Republic of Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and in a few regions of the United States. ... Look up estate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Inga assists Frederick in discovering the secret entrance to his grandfather's laboratory. Upon reading his grandfather's private journals the doctor is inspired to resume his grandfather's experiments in re-animating the dead. He and Igor successfully exhume and spirit away the enormous corpse of a recently-executed criminal, but Igor's attempt to steal the brain of a revered scientist from the local "brain depository" goes awry, and he takes one labeled, "Abnormal Brain - Do Not Use!" instead. By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ...


The doctor and reassembled monster are elevated on a platform to the roof of the laboratory during a lightning storm. The experimenters are first disappointed when the electrically-charged creature fails to come to life, but the reassembled monster eventually revives. The doctor assists the monster in walking but, frightened by Igor lighting a match, it attacks Frederick and must be sedated. Upon being asked by the doctor whose brain was obtained, Igor confesses that he supplied "Abby Normal's" brain and becomes the subject of a strangulation attempt himself. Not to be confused with lighting. ...


Meanwhile, the local townspeople are uneasy at the possibility of Frederick continuing his grandfather's work. Most concerned is Inspector Kemp, who sports an eyepatch covered by a monocle, a jointed and extremely creaky wooden arm that often comes apart (His real arm being ripped off by Fredericks's grandfather's monster.), and an accent so thick even his own countrymen cannot understand him (He says phvuutshtaaps instead of footsteps). Kemp visits the doctor and demands assurance that he will not create another monster. Upon returning to the lab, Frederick discovers that Frau Blücher is setting the creature free; she then plays the violin to show that he loves music. After she reveals her romantic relationship to Frederick's grandfather, the creature is enraged by sparks from a thrown switch, and escapes from the Frankenstein castle.


While roaming the countryside, the monster has frustrating encounters with a young girl and a blind hermit; these scenes directly parody ones from the original Frankenstein movies. After recapturing the monster, Frederick wins him over with flattery, and finally fully acknowledges his heritage. After a period of training, he offers some illustrious guests the sight of "The Creature" following simple commands. The demonstration continues with Frederick and the monster launching into the musical number "Puttin' on the Ritz", complete with top hats and tails, which ends disastrously when a stage light breaks and frightens the monster into running into the audience where he is captured and chained by police. For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... Puttin on the Ritz is a popular song written and published in 1929 by Irving Berlin and introduced by Harry Richman in the musical film Puttin on the Ritz (1930). ...


He later escapes again, then kidnaps and ravishes the not-unwilling Elizabeth after she arrives unexpectedly for a visit. Elizabeth falls in love with the creature due to his inhuman stamina and his "enormous schwanzstucker".


The townspeople, led by Inspector Kemp (Well, it's about time we had one (a riot)."), hunt for the monster. Desperate to get the creature back and correct his mistakes, Frederick plays music and lures the monster back to the castle. Just as the Kemp-led mob storms the laboratory, Dr. Frankenstein transfers some of his stabilizing intellect to the creature who, as a result, is able to reason with and placate the mob. The film ends happily, with Elizabeth married to the now erudite and sophisticated monster, while Inga joyfully learns what her new husband Frederick got in return from the monster during the transfer procedure.


Production

During his pilot episode commentary on the Get Smart DVD Season One set, Mel Brooks said Columbia Pictures would not greenlight Young Frankenstein to be made in black and white. Brooks refused to compromise and took the film to 20th Century Fox, where executives agreed that the film should be made sans color. The theatrical trailer described the film as "presented in black and white - no offense" as a pun on segregation (cf. separate but equal), which had been outlawed in preceding decades. For the updated film based on the TV series, see Get Smart (film). ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Segregation means separation. ... Separate but equal was a policy enacted into law throughout the U.S. Southern states during the period of segregation, in which African Americans and Americans of European descent would receive the same services (schools, hospitals, water fountains, bathrooms, etc. ...


While shooting, the cast ad-libbed several of the jokes in the film: Cloris Leachman improvised the scene with Frau Blucher offering "varm milk" and Ovaltine to Dr. Frankenstein, while Marty Feldman surreptitiously moved his character's hump from shoulder to shoulder until someone noticed it, and the gag was added to the film ("What hump?"). It is rumored that Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder were reluctant to wrap filming because the cast and crew enjoyed the filming so much, and extra scenes were filmed not originally in the script.[citation needed] Ovaltine is a brand of sweetened milk flavoring product made with sugar (except in Switzerland), malt extract, cocoa, and whey. ...


Cultural references

  • The brain which Igor is sent to steal is labeled as belonging to "Hans Delbrück, scientist and saint." A real-life Hans Delbrück was a nineteenth-century military historian; his son Max Delbrück was a twentieth-century biochemist and Nobel laureate.
  • Every time Frau Blücher's name is mentioned, horses are heard whinnying as if afraid of her name. Because of this, many erroneously believed that Blücher means "glue" in German.[3] Brooks suggested in a 2000 interview that he had based the joke on that erroneous translation, which he had heard from someone else.[4]
  • The US AMC cable network broadcast a 2007 "DVD_TV" version of the film with commentary in subtitles. Among other information, it stated that Inga was based on Ulla from Brooks' earlier film The Producers.

Hans Delbrück, 1848-1929 Hans Delbrück (November 11, 1848 - July 14, 1929), German historian, was born at Bergen on the island of Rügen, and studied at the universities of Heidelberg and Bonn. ... Max Delbrück in the early 1940s at Vanderbilt University. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... AMC is a cable television network that primarily airs movies. ... This page is about the 1968 film. ...

Cultural legacy

  • Raiders of the Lost Ark features a line very similar to Igor's comment to Dr. Frankenstein: "It looks dangerous. You go first."
  • When the film was in theaters, the band Aerosmith was working on its third studio album, Toys in the Attic. The members of the band had written the music for a song but couldn't come up with any lyrics to go with it. After a while, they decided to take a break and see Young Frankenstein, where the "Walk This Way" gag provided the basis (or phrase) for the Aerosmith hit "Walk This Way".[5]
  • The scene with Frankenstein and Inga trying to get through the revolving bookcase is shown in the film Big Daddy.
  • The scene with Frankenstein and the Monster performing "Puttin' on the Ritz" is briefly parodied in the Family Guy episode "The Story on Page One" - where Stewie notes, "Not my bit, but still funny." The scene in the film is itself a parody of Fred Astaire in Blue Skies.
  • Peter Boyle reprised his role (after a fashion) in the TV sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, when his character costumed himself as the monster for Halloween.
  • The success of Young Frankenstein led to another horror spoof, 1974's Vampira starring David Niven and Teresa Graves. It was renamed Old Dracula for North American release in order to cash in on the name recognition of Young Frankenstein. In many locations, the two films were shown back-to-back as a double bill.
  • Eppu Normaali, one of Finland's most successful bands, was named after a translation in the Finnish subtitles of Young Frankenstein (character Abby Normal [abnormal] was translated to Eppu Normaali [epänormaali]).
  • In StarCraft: Brood War, the Valkyrie unit, which is piloted by a woman with a strong German accent, says, after being clicked enough times, "Blucher!", to be answered by the whinny of a horse.
  • In The Simpsons episode "Homer vs. Patty & Selma", Homer takes up a job as a limo driver. One of his passenger is Mel Brooks. Homer says to Mel, "Mel Brooks! I loved Young Frankenstein. Scared the hell out of me!", to which Brooks replies sarcastically, "Umm...thanks."
  • In June 2007, the dramatic sting used by composer John Morris when the castle is seen the first time, 19 minutes into the film, was combined with video footage from a 2001 episode of the Japanese TV show "Hello Morning!", to become the viral video "Drama Prairie Dog".
  • In a Reno 911 episode, Deputy Wiegal (Kerry Kenny-Silver) says to Deputy Williams (Niecy Nash): "put the candle back" in homage to the revolving wall scene with Gene Wilder and Teri Garr

This article is about the film. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Toys in the Attic is the third album by American hard rock band Aerosmith. ... Walk this way is a recurrent joke in a number of movies and television shows, most notably movies by Mel Brooks. ... Walk This Way is a song by American hard rock group Aerosmith. ... Big Daddy is a comedy film starring Adam Sandler that was released in 1999. ... Puttin on the Ritz is a popular song written and published in 1929 by Irving Berlin and introduced by Harry Richman in the musical film Puttin on the Ritz (1930). ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... “The Story on Page One” is an episode from the second season of the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Stewart Gilligan Stewie Griffin is a fictional character in the animated television series Family Guy. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Blue Skies is a 1946 musical film. ... Everybody Loves Raymond is an American sitcom originally broadcast on CBS from 1996 to 2005. ... Vampira is a 1974 comedy film spoofing the vampire genre. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Teresa Graves was an African-American actress and singer. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Martti Syrjä Eppu Normaali is one of the most popular bands in Finland. ... For other uses, see Subtitle. ... StarCraft: Brood War is an expansion pack released in 1998 for StarCraft — an award winning real-time strategy computer game developed by Blizzard Entertainment. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer vs. ... John Morris (born October 18, 1926) is a film and television composer, best known for his work with filmmaker Mel Brooks. ... The term viral video refers to video clip content which gains widespread popularity through the process of Internet sharing, typically through email or IM messages, blogs and other media sharing websites. ...

Musical adaptation

Brooks has adapted the film into a musical of the same name. The musical premiered in Seattle at the Paramount Theatre and ran from August 7September 1, 2007.[6] The musical opened on Broadway at the Hilton Theatre on November 8, 2007.[7] Young Frankenstein is a musical with a book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan and music and lyrics by Brooks. ... Paramount Theater in Seattle The Paramount Theatre in Seattle, Washington is a 2,803-seat performing arts venue on the north edge of Downtown. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Hilton Theatre is a Broadway theatre, located at 213 West 42nd Street. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Awards

Nominated
  • Academy Award for Sound, Richard Portman and Gene S. Cantamessa (1975)
  • Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay, Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder (1975)
  • Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, Cloris Leachman (1975)
  • Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture, Madeline Kahn (1975)
  • WGA Award for Best Comedy Adapted from Another Medium, Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder (1975)
Won

The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... The Academy Award for Writing Adapted Screenplay is one of the Academy Awards, the most prominent film awards in the United States. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1950. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ... The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation is one of the annual Hugo Award categories, presented by members of the World Science Fiction Convention. ... Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Script. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Horror Film: ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Direction: ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Supporting Actor (in a film): ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Make-up: Category: ...

References

  1. ^ AFI's 100 YEARS...100 LAUGHS. AFI Announces The 100 Funniest American Movies Of All Time. (June 14, 2000). Retrieved on 2006-09-27.
  2. ^ According to Leonard Maltin's annual directory of movies, Gene Hackman was uncredited in the original theatrical run.
  3. ^ http://www.snopes.com/movies/films/blucher.htm
  4. ^ http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/feature/-/1844/
  5. ^ http://www.aeroforceone.com/index.cfm/pk/view/cd/NAA/cdid/312697/pid/302766
  6. ^ The Paramount official site
  7. ^ http://www.playbill.com/news/article/112585.html playbill article, 11/8/07

is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... Eugene Allen Gene Hackman[1] (born January 30, 1930) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Young Frankenstein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1187 words)
Young Frankenstein is a 1974 comedy film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character.
Travelling to said estate in Transylvania, Frankenstein meets his comely new lab assistant Inga, along with the household servants Frau Blücher and Igor (who, after hearing Frederick claim his name is pronounced [fʀɔŋkεnstin] counter-claims that his is pronounced [ajgo:] "eye-gore").
The scene in which Frankenstein's fiancée arrives in a carriage and is helped to the door by Igor is cut several times, unusually as the scene is relatively short and covers little physical or story grounds.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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