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Encyclopedia > Yoruba religion
"Yoruba legends" redirects here. For the book, see Yoruba Legends.


The Yoruba religion is the religious beliefs and practices of the Yoruba people both in Africa (chiefly in Nigeria and Benin Republic), and in the New World, where it has influenced or given birth to several religions such as Santería in Cuba and Candomblé in Brazil in addition to the transplantation of the homeland religions. The Yoruba (Yorùbá in Yoruba orthography) are a large ethno-linguistic group or ethnic nation in Africa; the majority of them speak the Yoruba language (ede Yorùbá). The Yoruba constitute approximately 21 percent of Nigerias total population,[1] and around 30 million individuals throughout the region of... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, c. ... “Lukumi” redirects here. ... Ilê Axé Iya Nassô Oká - Terreiro da Casa Branca Candomblé is an African religion practiced chiefly in Brazil but also in adjacent countries. ...


Yoruba religius beliefs are part of itan — the complex of songs, histories, stories and other cultural concepts which make up the Yorùbá religion and society. Itan is how the Yorùbá peoples of Africa call the sum total of all the myths, songs, histories and other cultural concepts which make up their religion and society. ...



Yòrùbá deities are called Orishas, literally "owners of heads". Shango is perhaps the most important Orisha; god of thunder and an ancestor of the Yòrùbá. He was the fourth king of the Yòrùbá, and deified after his death. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... An Orisha, also spelled Orisa and Orixa, is a spirit that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba spiritual or religious system. ... In Yorùbá mythology, Shango (Xango, Shango), or Changó in Latin America, is perhaps the most popular Orisha; he is a Sky Father, god of thunder and lightning. ... Thunder is the sound of the shockwave caused when lightning instantly heats the air around it to up to 30 000 °C (54 000 °F). ...


Èshù is another very important Orisha. He is a trickster and very well-respected both by the Yòrùbá themselves and the other Orishas. Eshu represented in concrete with his features made with cowrie shells. ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ...

Contents

In Yoruba mythology, Aja is an Orisha, patron of the forest, the animals within it and herbal healers, whom she taught their art. ... Eshu represented in concrete with his features made with cowrie shells. ... Oba, (pronounced Or-ba), King in Yoruba, is the supreme traditional head of a Yoruba town. ... Ogum In Haitian Vodun and Yoruba mythology, Ogoun (or Ogun, Ogum, Ogou) is a loa and orisha, who presides over fire, iron, hunting, politics and war. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ochun. ... In Yorùbá mythology, Odùduwà was the son of Olorun, sent by him from heaven to create the earth. ... Olokun is considered the patron orisa of the descendants of Africans that were carried away during the Maafa, or what is sometimes referred to as the Transatlantic Slave Trade or Middle Passage. ... In Yoruba mythology, Orunmila is an Orisha (Orisa), and deity of prophecy. ... In Yoruba mythology, Oya, is the Goddess of the Niger River. ... In Yoruban mythology, Shakpana (or Sopono) is an Orisha, a son of Yemaja and Orungan. ... In Yorùbá mythology, Shango (Xango, Shango), or Changó in Latin America, is perhaps the most popular Orisha; he is a Sky Father, god of thunder and lightning. ... ...

Ìyá Nlá

Followers of the Yoruba religion believe that Ìyá Nlá, or "Our Mothers", is a spiritual force that gives them access to the "Forces of Nature" and the wisdom of their ancestors. They believe that this force is the source of life and social harmony. They believe that dedicated followers will gain "Òrìsà status", giving them a connection to their first African ancestors. According to belivers, Ìyá Àjé is able to cure, curse or to cause retributive justice on anyone who disrespects woman and motherhood[1]


Other concepts

The Yòrùbá pantheon includes several other entities besides the Orisha, such as Egbére. A pantheon (Greek: παν, pan, all + θεός, theos, god), is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Greek mythology, Norse mythology, and Egyptian mythology. ...


Ifá dafa as well as merindinlogun or (cowrie shell divination) are important element of Yòrùbá religious practices. Ifá is a system of divination that originated in West Africa among the Yoruba people. ... Merindinlogun is the number 16 in the Yoruba language and literally means twenty less four or four taken from twenty The number sixteen holds important significance in Yoruba mythology as it was the purported number of Yemojas children. ... Cowry or Cowrie (shell) Various species of Cowry from all over the world Cypraea caputserpensis, very common in intertidal rocky areas Cowry shells (also spelled cowrie), are marine snails of the genus Cypraea (family Cypraeidae), found chiefly in tropical regions, especially around the Maldives or the East Indies. ... This article is about the religious practice of divination. ...

  • Eledua

Reincarnation

The Yoruba believe in reincarnation. They sometimes name children Babatunde ("Father returns") and Yetunde ("Mother returns") to signal this belief.[2] Reincarnation, literally to be made flesh again, is a doctrine or mystical belief that some essential part of a living being (in some variations only human beings) survives death to be reborn in a new body. ...


Yoruba religion in the New World

Many ethnic Yoruba were taken as slaves to Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Venezuela and the rest of the New World (chiefly in the 19th century, after the Ọyọ empire collapsed and the region plunged into civil war), and carried their religious beliefs with them. These concepts were combined with preexisting African-based cults, Christianity, Native American mythology, and Kardecist Spiritism into various New World lineages: Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oyo (OÌ£yoÌ£ in Yoruba orthography, pronounced ) is the name of a Yoruba city in modern-day Nigeria and also of the loose empire which that city controlled in the 17th and 18th centuries. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Kardecist Spiritism or Kardecism is a spiritualistic doctrine created in the 19th century by Allan Kardec. ...

The popularly known Vodun religion of Haiti was founded by slaves from a different ethnic group (the Gba speaking peoples of modern day Benin, Togo and Ghana), but shares many elements with the Yoruba-derived religions above. in addition, author Ed Morales has claimed that Yoruba religious beliefs and traditions played a part in early American blues music, citing blues guitarist Robert Johnson's Cross Road Blues as a "thinly veiled reference to Eleggua, the orisha in charge of the crossroads." “Lukumi” redirects here. ... Oyotunji African Village is a village located near Sheldon, Beaufort County, South Carolina that was founded by the late Oba Efuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi I in 1970, as part of a New World Yoruba initiative. ... Ilê Axé Iya Nassô Oká - Terreiro da Casa Branca Candomblé is an African religion practiced chiefly in Brazil but also in adjacent countries. ... Umbanda is a religion that blends Catholicism, Kardecist Spiritualism, and Afro-Brazilian religions . ... Ilê Axé Iya Nassô Oká - Terreiro da Casa Branca Candomblé is an African religion practiced chiefly in Brazil but also in adjacent countries. ... Lukumí or Regla de Ocha, is most widely known as Santeria, (Santería in Spanish) is a set of related religious systems that fuse Catholic beliefs with traditional Yoruba beliefs. ... The term Voodoo (Vodun in Benin; also Vodou or other phonetically equivalent spellings in Haiti; Vudu in the Dominican Republic) is applied to the branches of a West African ancestor-based religious tradition with primary roots among the Fon-Ewe peoples of West Africa, in the country now known as... The Gbe languages (pronounced ) form a cluster of about 20 related languages stretching across the area between eastern Ghana and western Nigeria. ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that typically follows a twelve-bar structure. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Cross Road Blues is one of Robert Johnsons most famous songs. ... In Yoruba mythology, Eshu is an Orisha, and one of the most respected deities of the tradition. ... An Orisha, also spelled Orisa and Orixa, is a spirit that reflects one of the manifestations of Olodumare (God) in the Yoruba spiritual or religious system. ...


See also

// Africa has a wealth of history which is largely unrecorded. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "The Source Iya Nla Primordial Yoruba Mother" Iyalaja Ileana Alcamo ISBN 1-890157-41-4
  2. ^ Murphy, Joseph. Santería. Malaysia: Beacon Press, 1993.
  1. ^ "The Source Iya Nla Primordial Yoruba Mother" Iyalaja Ileana Alcamo ISBN 1-890157-41-4
  2. ^ Murphy, Joseph. Santería. Malaysia: Beacon Press, 1993.

Other references

  • Morales, Ed (2003). The Latin Beat. Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-81018-2. , pg. 277

External links


 
 

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