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Encyclopedia > Yorkshire
Yorkshire
Flag of Yorkshire
Flag of Yorkshire
Yorkshire in England
Yorkshire within England in 1881
Geography
1831 area 3,669,510 acres (14,850 km²)[1]
1901 area 3,883,979 acres (15,718 km²)[1]
1991 area 2,941,247 acres (11,903 km²)[1]
HQ York
Chapman code YKS
History
Origin Kingdom of Jórvík
Created In antiquity
Succeeded by Various
Demography
1831 population
- 1831 density
1,371,359[1]
0.37/acre
1901 population
- 1901 density
3,512,838[1]
0.9/acre
1991 population
- 1991 density
3,978,484[1]
1.35/acre
Subdivisions
Type Ridings
Ridings of Yorkshire
Units 1 North2 West3 East

Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England and the largest in Great Britain. Because of its great size, over time functions have increasingly been undertaken by its subdivisions, which have been subject to periodic reform. Throughout these changes Yorkshire has continued to function as a recognised territory and cultural region.[2][3] The name is familiar and well-understood across the United Kingdom and is in common use, featuring in the title of current areas of civil administration such as Yorkshire and the Humber. Yorkshire is the name of a traditional county of England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... one of the traditional counties of England File links The following pages link to this file: Yorkshire Long Sword dance Categories: GFDL images ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Chapman codes are largely a superset of the ISO 3166-2:GB and BS 6879 codes identifying administrative divisions in the United Kingdom, Ireland and their surrounding islands, but covering historical divisions. ... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... For the song by Chamillionaire, see Ridin. In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county[1]. The term has similar or analogous meanings in other countries. ... numbered map of the three ridings of Yorkshire File links The following pages link to this file: Yorkshire Traditional counties of England Categories: GFDL images ... The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three traditional subdivisions of Yorkshire, northern England, United Kingdom. ... The West Riding as an administrative county prior to its abolition in 1974. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Cultural region is a term used mainly in the study of geography. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ...


Throughout much of history, Yorkshire has played a prominent role in Great Britain. The Brigantes, who were the largest Celtic Briton tribe held it as their heartland. The Romans made Eboracum, later to be named York, from which the county derives its name, the capital of Britannia Inferior, one of the provinces of Roman Britain.[4] The area was an independent Viking kingdom known as Jórvík for around a century, before being taken by England. Most of the modern day large cities were founded during the Norman period.[5] The Brigantes were a British Celtic tribe which lived between Tyne and Humber. ... This article is about the European people. ... Heartland is a most often a geopolitical term, often used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Britannia Inferior (Lower Britain) was one of the regions of Roman Britain created in the early third century AD by the Roman Emperor Septimus Severus. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... In politics, a country (or in some cases, a group of countries) over which a king or queen reigns, is a kingdom, see: monarchy. ... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ...


The county covered just under 6,000 square miles (15,000 km²) in 1831[6] and the modern day Yorkshire and the Humber region has a population of around five million.[7] Yorkshire is widely considered to be the greenest area in England, due to both the vast rural countryside of the Yorkshire Dales, North York Moors and some of the major cities,[8][9] this has led to Yorkshire being nicknamed God's Own County.[10][11] Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ... The Yorkshire Dales (also known as the Dales) is the name given to an upland area, in Northern England. ... A View of the North York Moors The North York Moors (also known as the North Yorkshire Moors) is a national park in North Yorkshire, England. ...


The emblem of Yorkshire is the White Rose of the House of York, the most common flag representative of Yorkshire is the White Rose on a dark blue background.[12] Yorkshire Day, held on August 1, is a celebration of the general culture of Yorkshire, ranging from its history to its own language.[13] The White Rose of York (Rosa alba) is the symbol of the House of York and latterly of Yorkshire. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Yorkshire Day is celebrated on August 1 to promote the English county of Yorkshire as a good place to be born, to live, to work in and to visit. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The culture of Yorkshire has evolved over the countys long history, taking influences from various sets of cultures who have controlled the land throughout its history including the Celts (Brigantes and Parisii), Romans, Angles, Vikings, Normans and much more. ... Yorkshire is a traditional county of England, centred on the county town of York, and was traditionally split into three Ridings. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Yorkshire

Yorkshire is a traditional county of England, centred on the county town of York, and was traditionally split into three Ridings. ...

Celtic tribes

Early inhabitants of Yorkshire were Celts, who came from two separate tribes, the Brigantes and the Parisii. The Brigantes, who originated in the Alps or Gallaecia, controlled territory which would later become all of the North Riding of Yorkshire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. The tribe controlled most of Northern England and more territory than any other Celtic tribe in England.[14] That they made the Yorkshire area their heartland is evident in that Isurium Brigantum (now known as Aldborough) was the capital town of their territory. Six of the nine Brigantian poleis described by Claudius Ptolemaeus in the Geographia fall within the historic county.[15][16] The Parisii who controlled the area that would become the East Riding of Yorkshire, are thought to have been related to the Parisii of Lutetia Parisiorum, Gaul (known today as Paris, France).[17] The Roman conquest of Britain began in 43 AD, however the Brigantes continued control of their kingdom as a client state of Rome for an extended period, reigned over by the Brigantian monarchs Cartimandua and her husband Venutius. Initially, this situation suited both the Romans and the Brigantes who were known as the most militant tribe in Britain.[18] Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples:  core Hallstatt territory, by the 6th century BC  maximal Celtic expansion, by the 3rd century BC  the six Celtic nations which retained significant numbers of Celtic speakers into the Early Modern period  areas where Celtic languages remain widely spoken today Celts (pronounced or , see pronunciation... The Brigantes were a British Celtic tribe which lived between Tyne and Humber. ... Alp redirects here. ... Celtic Gallaecia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three traditional subdivisions of Yorkshire, northern England, United Kingdom. ... The West Riding as an administrative county prior to its abolition in 1974. ... Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Heartland is a most often a geopolitical term, often used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... Isurium Brigantum was a town in the Roman province of Britannia. ... Aldborough is a village located in the West Riding of Yorkshire, and lies within the Borough of Harrogate in North Yorkshire. ... A polis (πολις) — plural: poleis (πολεις) — is a city, or a city-state. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... The Geographia is Ptolemys main work besides the Almagest. ... This article is about one of the two Celtic peoples called the Parisii. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... Gold coins of the Parisii, 1st century BC, (Cabinet des Médailles, Paris) Coin of the Parisii: obverse with horse, 1st century BC (Cabinet des Médailles, Paris) This article is about Celtic-Gallic people called the Parisii. ... Lutetia (sometimes Lutetia Parisiorum or Lucotecia, in French Lutèce) was a town in pre-Roman and Roman Gaul. ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... According to the notion of client states, just as a client of a corporation remains dependent on the corporation for a continued supply of products, and just as it is in the companys interest to make expendable products which need to be replaced regularly, client states of the two... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Cartimandua (or Cartismandua, ruled ca. ... Venutius was a 1st century king of the Brigantes in northern Britain at the time of the Roman conquest. ... Praetorian Guards, Roman Soldiers Military has two broad meanings. ...


Roman Yorkshire

Statue of Constantine I outside York Minster.
Statue of Constantine I outside York Minster.

Queen Cartimandua left her husband for Vellocatus, setting off a chain of events which would change the ownership of the Yorkshire area. Cartimandua, due to her good relationship with the Romans was able to keep control of the kingdom, however her former husband staged rebellions against her and her Roman allies.[19] At the second attempt Venutius took back the kingdom, but the Romans under general Petillius Cerialis conquered the Brigantes in 71 AD.[20] Under Roman rule, the high profile of the area continued; the fortified city of Eboracum (now known as York) was named as capital of Britannia Inferior and joint-capital of all Roman Britain.[21] For the two years before the death of Emperor Septimus Severus, the entire Roman Empire was run from Eboracum by him.[22] Statue of the roman emperor Constantine File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Statue of the roman emperor Constantine File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... Vellocatus was a 1st century king of the Brigantes tribe of northern Britain. ... For other uses, see Rebel (disambiguation) and Rebellion (disambiguation). ... Quintus Petilius Cerialis Caesius Rufus (born around 30 AD) was a Roman general of the 1st century. ... View of the city looking north-east from the city wall, near the railway station. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Britannia Inferior (Lower Britain) was one of the regions of Roman Britain created in the early third century AD by the Roman Emperor Septimus Severus. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Emperor Septimius Severus Lucius Septimius Severus, (April 11, 146 - February 4, 211) was Roman emperor from April 9, 193 to 211. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


A second Emperor Constantius Chlorus died in Yorkshire during a visit in 306 AD, this saw his son Constantine the Great proclaimed Emperor in the city; he would become renowned due to his contributions to Christianity.[23] In the early 400s the Roman rule ceased with the withdrawal of the last active Roman troops, by this stage the Empire was in heavy decline.[22] However, during the three and a half centuries of Roman rule in Yorkshire they had introduced much to help forward civilisation there, such as; sanitation, irrigation, education, roads, public libraries, cement, bricks, heated baths, coins, art, literature, law, wine, the calendar, glass, shops, public order, cats, various fruits and vegetables (carrots, turnips, apples, peas, cabbage, pears, grapes) and more.[24] On the reverse of this argenteus struck in Antioch under Constantius Chlorus, the tetrarcs are sacrificing to celebrate a victory against the Sarmatians. ... Constantine. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The Roman departure from Britain was nearly completed by 400. ... For other uses, see Civilization (disambiguation). ... Urban areas require some methods for collection and disposal of sewage. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ... For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... See also Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Bricks Masonry Brickwork Ceramics Fire brick In role-playing games, a brick is a character whose main useful skill is being able to take a great deal of damage (usually physical damage) and act as a shield for weaker allies. ... Roman public baths in Bath, England. ... This article is about monetary coins. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... This article is about the material. ... Retail redirects here. ... In urban planning, the notion of public order refers a city containing relatively empty (and orderly) spaces; which allow for flexibility in redesiging the citys layout; such perceptions played an important role in the establishments of suburbs. ... Cats may refer to: Felines, members of the animal family Felidae The domesticated animal, cat The musical, yeah right, I bet that this was really dumb. ... Binomial name Daucus carota A carrot (Daucus Carota) is a root vegetable, typically orange or white in color with a woody texture. ... Binomial name Brassica rapa L. Subsp. ... For other uses, see Apple (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Pisum sativum A pea (Pisum sativum) is the small, edible round green seed which grows in a pod on a leguminous vine, hence why it is called a legume. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Species Pyrus calleryana P. pyrifolia et al Pears are trees of the genus Pyrus and the edible fruit of that tree. ... Species Vitis acerifolia Vitis aestivalis Vitis amurensis Vitis arizonica Vitis x bourquina Vitis californica Vitis x champinii Vitis cinerea Vitis x doaniana Vitis girdiana Vitis labrusca Vitis x labruscana Vitis monticola Vitis mustangensis Vitis x novae-angliae Vitis palmata Vitis riparia Vitis rotundifolia Vitis rupestris Vitis shuttleworthii Vitis tiliifolia Vitis...


Second Celtic period and Angles

After the Romans left, small Celtic kingdoms built up in Yorkshire; the Kingdom of Ebrauc around York and more notably the Kingdom of Elmet around West Yorkshire.[25][26] The Elmet in particular managed to hold out with their Celtic kingdom against the invading Angles for a century and a half, ensuring that the Anglian kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria on either side developed separately. Eventually the Elmet succumbed and became part of the Anglian kingdom of Deira.[27] It should be noted that, although this period is called the Anglo-Saxon period, it was the Angles (from Angeln) who conquered the North, while the Saxons (from Nordalbingia) conquered the South.[28] Under Aethelfrith Deira merged with another Anglian kingdom of Bernicia in the early 600s, to form the Kingdom of Northumbria. At its greatest extent, Northumbria stretched from the Irish Sea to the North Sea and from Edinburgh down to Hallamshire in South Yorkshire.[29] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with York. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Elmet is an area close to Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Deira (perhaps corresponding with the Brythonic kingdom of Ebrauc) was a kingdom in England during the 6th century AD. It later merged with the kingdom of Bernicia (Brythonic, Brynaich) to the north to form the kingdom of Northumbria. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Map of Schleswig-Holstein Modern Angeln, also known as Anglia (German: Angeln, Danish: Angel, Latin: Anglia, English: may follow German or Latin), is a peninsula in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, protruding into the Bay of Kiel. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Æthelfrith (d. ... Bernicia was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now the South-East of Scotland, and the North-East of England. ... Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian or Anglo-Saxon kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ... Relief map of the Irish Sea. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Hallamshire (or Hallam) is the historical name for an area of South Yorkshire, England. ...


Kingdom of Jórvík

Main article: Kingdom of Jórvík
Coin from Eric Bloodaxe's reign.

An army of Danish Vikings invaded Northumbrian territory in 886 AD, with what was named by their enemies as the "Great Heathen Army".[30] The Danes took what is modern day York and renamed it as Jórvík, making it their new capital city of a kingdom under the same name; the area which they took as their kingdom was Southern Northumbria (Yorkshire).[5] The Danes went on to conquer a large area of England which afterwards became known as the Danelaw, but whereas most of the Danelaw was still English land, albeit in submission to Viking overlords, it was in the Kingdom of Jórvík founded by Halfdan Ragnarsson,[31] that the only truly Viking territory on mainland Britain was established. Although it was founded by Danes, the kingdom was passed onto Norwegian kings.[31] Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Danish nation is a concept closely connected to 19th century ethnic nationalism. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... The Great Heathen Army, also known as the Great Army, was a Viking army which pillaged and conquered much of England in the late 9th century. ... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ... Gold: Danelaw The Danelaw, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles also known as the Danelagh, (Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a name given to a part of Great Britain, now northern and eastern England, in which the laws of the Danes[1] held predominance over those of the Anglo... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ... Halfdan was one of the sons of Ragnar Lodbrok. ...


Through the Vikings evolving trade, Jórvík was able to trade with the British Isles, North-West Europe, the Mediterranean and the Middle East.[32] Eric Bloodaxe, who was the last independent Viking king of Jórvík is a particularly noted figure in history.[33] After around 100 years of a Norse-Yorkshire kingdom, the Kingdom of Wessex gained control of Yorkshire and the North in general, placing Yorkshire within Northumbria again - which was now an almost-independent earldom, rather than a separate kingdom. The Wessex Kings of England were reputed to have respected the Norse customs in Yorkshire and left law-making in the hands of the local aristocracy.[34] This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... North-West Europe is not a well defined term. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Eirik Bloodaxe (Old Norse: Eiríkr blóðøx, Norwegian: Eirik Blodøks), (c. ... Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the kingdom of England. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... An Earl as a member of the British peerage ranks below a Marquess and above a Viscount. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain...


Norman conquest

In the weeks immediately leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066 AD, Harold II of England was distracted by events in Yorkshire; his brother Tostig and Harold Hardrada King of Norway were attempting a take over bid in the North, they had already won the Battle of Fulford. The King of England marched North and the two armies met at the Battle of Stamford Bridge, Tostig and Hardrada were both killed and their army was defeated decisively. However, Harold Godwinson was forced immediately to march his army back down to the South where William the Conqueror was landing. The King was defeated at Hastings and this led to the Norman conquest of England. Belligerents Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Flemings, French Anglo-Saxons, the Þingalið Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,400-8,400 (maximum 2,200 cavalry, 1,700 archers, 4,500 men-at-arms) 7,500 (2,000 housecarls, 5,500 fyrd) Casualties... Harold Godwinson (Haraldur Guðinason), or Harold II (c. ... Tostig Godwinson (1026? – September 25, 1066) was an Anglo-Saxon earl of Northumbria and brother of King Harold II of England, the last Anglo-Saxon King of England. ... Harald III Haardraade (1015 — September 25, 1066) was the king of Norway from around 1040 together with the son of Olav Haroldsson (St. ... This article is a list of rulers of Norway up until the present, including: The Norwegian kingdom (with the Faroe Islands) The Union with Iceland and Greenland (1262-1814) The Norwegian kingdom (with Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands 1262-1814) The Union of Sweden and Norway (1319-1343) The... Combatants Norwegians Anglo-Saxon English Commanders Harald Hardrada Tostig Morcar of Northumbria and his brother Edwin, Earl of Mercia Strength unknown, possibly 7000 unknown, probably of about equal size to the norwegians Casualties Unknown Unknown On September 20, 1066, King Harald III of Norway and Tostig, his English ally, fought... Combatants Norwegians, Northumbrian rebels, Scots Anglo-Saxon England, the Þingalið Commanders Harald HardrÃ¥de(Harald Hadrada)† Tostig Godwinson† Harold Godwinson Strength Around 7,500 Around 7,000 Casualties Unknown, around 7,000 Unknown, around 2,000 The Battle of Stamford Bridge in England took place on September 25, 1066, shortly... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ...

The people of the North rebelled again in September 1069 AD, this time against the Normans, enlisting Sweyn II of Denmark; they tried to take back York but the Normans burnt it before they could.[35] What followed was the Harrying of the North ordered by William, from York to Durham all crops, domestic animals and farming tools were scorched. Many villages between the towns were burnt and many local Northerners were indiscriminately murdered.[36] During the winter that followed, whole families starved to death, thousands of peasants died of cold and hunger; Orderic Vitalis put the estimation at "more than 100,000" people from the North dead from hunger.[37] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Cistercians coat of arms The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin: ), otherwise White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which a black scapular or apron is sometimes worn) is a Roman Catholic order of enclosed monks. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, England, is a ruined Cistercian monastery, founded in 1132. ... Studley Royal Park is a park containing, and developed around, the ruins of the Cistercian Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... Coin struck for Sweyn II of Denmark, ca. ... The Harrying (or Harrowing) of the North was a series of campaigns waged by William the Conqueror, King of England, in the winter of 1069–1070 in order to subjugate the north of his newfound English kingdom (primarily Northumbria and the Midlands) as part of the Norman Conquest of England. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... Orderic Vitalis (1075 – c. ...


In the centuries following, many abbeys and priories were built in Yorkshire. The Norman landowners were keen to increase their revenues and established new towns such as Leeds, Hull, Sheffield, Barnsley, Doncaster, Scarborough and others. Of the towns founded before the conquest only York, Bridlington and Pocklington carried on at a prominent level.[38] The population of Yorkshire was booming, until it like the rest of Britain was hit by the Great Famine in the years between 1315 and 1322.[38] In the early 1300s the people of Yorkshire also had to contest with the Battle of the Standard at Northallerton with the Scots, representing the Kingdom of England led by Archbishop Thurstan of York soldiers from Yorkshire defeated the more numerous Scots.[39] The Black Death reached Yorkshire by 1349, killing around a third of the entire population.[38] Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Barnsley (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Bridlington beach, from the North Pier Bridlington is a town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... , Pocklington (pronounced IPA: ) is a small market town and civil parish situated at the foot of the Yorkshire Wolds in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, approximately 13 miles east of York. ... From the Apocalypse in a Biblia Pauperum illuminated at Erfurt around the time of the Great Famine. ... The monument on the battlefield at Grid reference SE360977 The Battle of the Standard took place on 22 August 1138 near Northallerton in Yorkshire. ... , Northallerton is a town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Scots may refer to: people from Scotland (i. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Thurstan, or Turstin (d. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ...


Wars of the Roses

For more information: House of York, Wars of the Roses

When King Richard II was overthrown, antagonism between the House of York and the House of Lancaster, both branches of the House of Plantagenet, began to emerge. Eventually the two houses fought in a series of civil wars for the throne of England, commonly known as the Wars of the Roses. Some of the battles took place in Yorkshire, such as those at Wakefield and Towton, the latter of which is known as the bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil.[40] After a long violent struggle, King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster was deposed and imprisoned on 4 March 1461 by his Yorkist cousin and new King of England, Edward IV.[41] Eight years later hostilities resumed, Edward was forced into exile to Burgundy by Richard Neville and turncoat John Neville as Lancaster's Henry VI was reinstated. The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Wakefield took place at Wakefield, in West Yorkshire, on December 30, 1460, and was one of the major actions of the Wars of the Roses. ... The Battle of Towton in the Wars of the Roses was the bloodiest ever fought on British soil, with casualties believed to have been in excess of 20,000 (perhaps as many as 30,000) men. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... The House of York was a dynasty of English kings. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Coat of arms of the second Duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: ; German: ) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks; the former gave their... Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (1428—April 14, 1471), was also known as Warwick the Kingmaker. ... John Neville, 1st Marquess of Montagu (~1431 - April 14, 1471) was a Yorkist leader in the Wars of the Roses, best-known for eliminating Lancastrian resistance in the north of England during the early part of the reign of Edward IV of England. ...

Yorkist king Richard III grew up at Middleham.[42]
Rose of York.
Rose of York.

Edward would return though, landing in Ravenspurn he eventually went on to defeat the House of Lancaster, as Henry VI had no heirs, he was killed to strengthen Yorkist grip on the throne as Edward was restored as King of England. This was generally considered an end to the most significant hostilities, the rest of Edward's reign was peaceful. After Edward IV suddenly died and his 12 year old son Edward V was proclaimed as heir, a political storm erupted; a family named the Woodvilles had found themselves high up the political hierarchy and were in a position to influence the young Yorkist king. This article is about King Richard III of England. ... Middleham Castle, now in the county of North Yorkshire, was build during the 12th century and later came into the hands of the Neville family, the most famous member of which was Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick - the Kingmaker. Under his ownership, improvements to the castle caused it to become... Image File history File links Yorkshire_rose. ... Image File history File links Yorkshire_rose. ... Ravenspurn was an old Yorkshire town in the United Kingdom which was lost due to coastal erosion. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Edward V (4 November 1470 – 1483?) was the King of England from 9 April 1483 until his deposition two months later. ...


Frictions had developed between Edward IV and the Woodvilles, the family of his wife Elizabeth Woodville, before his death and so Edward IV's brother Richard III (a man who had spent much of his early life at Middleham Castle, Yorkshire),[42] put the young king in the Tower of London along with his younger brother, they became known as the Princes in the Tower.[41] Richard III argued that Elizabeth Woodville's marriage to Edward IV was illegal and thus the two boys were illegitimate, Parliament agreed and Richard was crowned King of England; he would prove to be the last Yorkist king.[41] Henry Tudor of the House of Lancaster, then defeated and killed Richard at the Battle of Bosworth Field, he then became King Henry VII and married Elizabeth of York daughter of Yorkist Edward IV, ending the wars.[43] The two roses were combined to form the Tudor Rose.[a][44] Elizabeth Woodville or Wydville (c. ... This article is about King Richard III of England. ... Middleham Castle, now in the county of North Yorkshire, was build during the 12th century and later came into the hands of the Neville family, the most famous member of which was Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick - the Kingmaker. Under his ownership, improvements to the castle caused it to become... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ... The Two Princes Edward and Richard in the Tower, 1483 by Sir John Everett Millais, 1878, part of the Royal Holloway picture collection The Princes in the Tower, Edward V of England (November 4, 1470 – 1483?) and his brother, Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York (17 August 1473 – 1483... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder of the Tudor dynasty and is generally acknowledged as one of Englands most successful kings. ... Combatants King Richard III of England, Yorkist Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, Lancastrian Commanders Richard III of England† Earl of Richmond (nominally) Earl of Oxford (in practice) Strength 6,000 (king had 15,500 but Lord Stanley with 4,000 and his brother, Sir William Stanley with 2,500 betrayed... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ...


Saints, Civil War and textile industry

The wool industry being centred in West Yorkshire helped a revival in the 16th century. The textile industry in general helped Wakefield and Halifax grow.[45] Changes were afoot outside of employment after Henry VIII closed some monasteries and so 1536 saw the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion. Due to the Protestant Reformation wider England became a Protestant country, however some of the Catholic contingent in Yorkshire continued to practice their religion and those caught were executed during the reign of Elizabeth I, such as York woman Margaret Clitherow who was later canonised.[46] For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Halifax. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The Pilgrimage of Grace was a popular rising in Northern England in 1536, in protest against Englands break with Rome and the Dissolution of the Monasteries, as well as other specific political, social and economic grievances. ... Reformation redirects here. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Saint Margaret Clitherow (1556 – 1586) is a saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ...

Yorkshire was on divided sides during the English Civil War, which started in 1642 between king and parliament; Hull famously shut the gates of the city on the king when he came to enter the city a few months before fighting began, while the North Riding of Yorkshire in particular was strongly royalist.[47][48] York was the base for Cavalier royalist supporters, from there the royals captured Leeds and Wakefield only to have them recaptured a few months later. The royalists won the Battle of Adwalton Moor meaning they controlled Yorkshire (with the exception of Hull). From their base in Hull the Roundhead parliamentarians fought back, town by town re-taking Yorkshire until they had won the Battle of Marston Moor and with it control of all North of England.[49] Leeds and other wool industry centred towns continued to grow, along with Sheffield, Huddersfield and Hull, while coal mining first came into prominence in the West Riding of Yorkshire.[50] Canals and turnpike roads were introduced in the late 1700s. In the following century the spa towns of Harrogate and Scarborough also flourished, due to people believing mineral water had curing properties.[51] Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Belligerents Scottish Covenanters, Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Earl of Leven, Earl of Manchester, Lord Fairfax Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Marquess of Newcastle Strength 22,500+: 7,000+ horse, 500+ dragoons, 15,000+ foot, 30 - 40 guns 17,000: 6,000 horse, 11,000 foot, 14 guns Casualties and losses 300... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three traditional subdivisions of Yorkshire, northern England, United Kingdom. ... °°°°°°°°°°°→→→→→→→→→→→→§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§§ Prince Rupert, an archetypical cavalier For other uses, see Cavalier (disambiguation). ... Look up Royalist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Adwalton Moor was a battle in the English Civil War on 30 June 1643. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... A parliamentarian is a specialist in parliamentary procedure. ... Belligerents Scottish Covenanters, Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Earl of Leven, Earl of Manchester, Lord Fairfax Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Marquess of Newcastle Strength 22,500+: 7,000+ horse, 500+ dragoons, 15,000+ foot, 30 - 40 guns 17,000: 6,000 horse, 11,000 foot, 14 guns Casualties and losses 300... The North of England , also the North country or simply The North, is a term which strictly refers to any part of Northern England north of a line from the Humber to the Dee estuaries. ... Surface coal mining in Wyoming in the United States of America. ... The West Riding as an administrative county prior to its abolition in 1974. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... A spa town is a town frequented, in times past, for health reasons, to take the waters. The name derives from the Belgian town Spa, and in continental Europe, a spa was known as a ville deau (town of water). ... , Harrogate is a large town in North Yorkshire, England. ... In many places, mineral water is often colloquially used to mean carbonated water (which is usually carbonated mineral water, as opposed to tap water). ...


Modern Yorkshire

Main article: History of local government in Yorkshire

The 19th century saw Yorkshire's continued growth, with the population growing and the Industrial Revolution continuing with prominent industries in coal, textile and steel (especially in Sheffield). However, despite the booming industry, living conditions declined in the industrial towns due to overcrowding, this saw bouts of cholera in both 1832 and 1848.[52] Fortunately for the county, advances were made by the end of the century with the introduction of modern sewers and water supplies. Several Yorkshire railway networks were introduced as railways spread across the country to reach remote areas.[53] County councils were created for the three ridings in 1889, but their area of control did not include the large towns, which became county boroughs, and included an increasing large part of the population.[54] A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Distribution of cholera Cholera, sometimes known as Asiatic cholera or epidemic cholera, is an infectious gastroenteritis caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. ... Sewers transport wastewater from buildings to treatment facilities. ... Water supply is the process of self-provision or provision by third parties of water of various qualities to different users. ... This article is a disambiguation list of the railways of Yorkshire, many closed during the Railways Act 1921 grouping. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ...


During the Second World War, Yorkshire became an important base for RAF Bomber Command and brought the county into the cutting edge of the war.[55] In the 1970s there were major reforms of local government throughout the United Kingdom. Some of the changes were unpopular,[56] and controversially Yorkshire and its ridings lost status in 1974[57] as part of the Local Government Act 1972.[58] The East Riding was resurrected with reduced boundaries in 1996 with the abolition of Humberside. With slightly different borders, the government office entity which currently contains most of the area of Yorkshire is the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England.[57] This region includes a northern slice of Lincolnshire, but omits Saddleworth (now in Greater Manchester); the Forest of Bowland (Lancashire); Sedbergh and Dent (Cumbria); Upper Teesdale (County Durham) as well as Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland.[56] Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Bomber Command badge RAF Bomber Command was the organisation that controlled the RAFs bomber forces. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... Government Offices are the primary means by which a wide range of policies and programmes of the Government of the United Kingdom are delivered in the regions of England. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... The Hills in the Forest of Bowland The area known as the Forest of Bowland occupies most of the north east of the county of Lancashire in England. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Sedbergh (pronounced Sedber or even, by the locals, Sebber) is a small town in the county of Cumbria, traditionally part of the West Riding of Yorkshire. ... Dent may mean: In England: Dent, a small fell in the west of Cumbria Dent, a village in the south east of Cumbria Dent Bank, a small village in County Durham In the United States: Dent, Minnesota Dent, Ohio Other: Dent Arthurdent, the principal character in The Hitchhikers Guide... Teesdale is a dale, or valley, of the east side of the Pennines in England. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... This article is about the town in North East England. ... The borough of Redcar & Cleveland is a unitary authority in the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, United Kingdom consisting of Redcar, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Guisborough, and small towns such as Brotton, Skelton, and Loftus. ...


Geography

Physical and geological

Main articles: Geology of Yorkshire and list of places in Yorkshire
Geology of Yorkshire.
Geology of Yorkshire.

Historically, the northern boundary of Yorkshire was the River Tees, the eastern boundary was the North Sea coast and the southern boundary was the Humber Estuary and River Don and River Sheaf. The western boundary meandered along the western slopes of the Pennine Hills to again meet the River Tees.[59] It is bordered by several other historic counties in the form of County Durham, Lincolnshire, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Cheshire, Lancashire and Westmorland.[60] In Yorkshire there is a very close relationship between the major topographical areas and the geological period in which they were formed.[59] The Pennine chain of Hills in the west is of Carboniferous origin. The central vale is Permo-Triassic. The North York Moors in the north-east of the county are Jurassic in age while the Yorkshire Wolds to the south east are Cretaceous chalk uplands.[59] This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the historic English county of Yorkshire. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1817 × 1458 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image Notes Type:Scan of a traced sketch map Source: Self made Author: Harkey Lodger Photographer:N/A Copyright holder: Harkey Lodger Location: Yorkshire, UK... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 747 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1817 × 1458 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image Notes Type:Scan of a traced sketch map Source: Self made Author: Harkey Lodger Photographer:N/A Copyright holder: Harkey Lodger Location: Yorkshire, UK... The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Humber is also the name of one of the ranges of cars manufactured by the Rootes Group Humber is also the name of a river in Newfoundland, Canada, as well as a river and a college, both in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The River Don (also called Dun in some stretches) is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... The River Sheaf is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ... County Durham is a county in north-east England. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Westmorland (formerly also spelt Westmoreland, an even older spelling is Westmerland) is an area of north west England and one of the 39 historic counties of England. ... Topography, a term in geography, has come to refer to the lay of the land, or the physiogeographic characteristics of land in terms of elevation, slope, and orientation. ... The Carboniferous is a geologic period and system that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 359. ... The Triassic is a geologic period that extends from about 251 to 199 Ma (million years ago). ... A View of the North York Moors The North York Moors (also known as the North Yorkshire Moors) is a national park in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Jurassic Period is a major unit of the geologic timescale that extends from about 199. ... The Yorkshire Wolds are an area of low hills and valleys in the East Riding of Yorkshire in North-Eastern England. ... // The Cretaceous Period (pronounced ) is one of the major divisions of the geologic timescale, reaching from the end of the Jurassic Period (i. ...

The main rivers of Yorkshire.
The main rivers of Yorkshire.

Yorkshire is drained by several rivers. In Western and central Yorkshire the many rivers empty their waters into the River Ouse which reaches the North Sea via the Humber Estuary.[61] The most northerly of the rivers in the Ouse system is the Swale, which drains Swaledale before passing through Richmond and meandering across the Vale of Mowbray. Next, draining Wensleydale, is the River Ure, which joins the Swale east of Boroughbridge. The River Nidd rises on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park and flows along Nidderdale before reaching the Vale of York.[61] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 738 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1793 × 1457 pixel, file size: 370 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image Notes Type:Scan of a traced sketch map Source: Self made Author: Harkey Lodger Photographer:N/A Copyright holder: Harkey Lodger Location: Yorkshire, UK Co... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 738 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1793 × 1457 pixel, file size: 370 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image Notes Type:Scan of a traced sketch map Source: Self made Author: Harkey Lodger Photographer:N/A Copyright holder: Harkey Lodger Location: Yorkshire, UK Co... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ... The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... Humber is also the name of one of the ranges of cars manufactured by the Rootes Group Humber is also the name of a river in Newfoundland, Canada, as well as a river and a college, both in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Swaledale is a dale, or valley, of the east side of the Pennines in the North Riding of Yorkshire, in England. ... The town of Richmond as seen from the top of the keep of Richmond Castle Richmond is a market town on the River Swale in North Yorkshire, UK and is the administrative centre of the district of Richmondshire. ... The Vale of Mowbray (sometimes mistakenly referred to as the Vale of York) is a stretch of low lying land between the North Yorkshire Moors and the Cleveland Hills to the east and the Yorkshire Dales to the west. ... Wensleydale is the valley (dale) of the River Ure on the east side of the Pennines in North Yorkshire, England. ... The River Ure rises in the Yorkshire Pennine hills and becomes the River Ouse between Ripon and York, close to Boroughbridge. ... The River Nidd is tributary of the River Ouse in the English county of North Yorkshire. ... A village in the Yorkshire Dales The Yorkshire Dales lie in an area of high ground in North and West Yorkshire, England. ... Upper Nidderdale Nidderdale is one of the Yorkshire Dales (although outside of the formal National Park area) in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Vale of York is the area surrounding the city of York, in the north of England. ...


The Ouse is the name given to the river after its confluence with the Ure at Ouse Gill Beck. The River Wharfe, which drains Wharfedale, joins the Ouse upstream of Cawood.[61] The Rivers Aire and Calder are more southerly contributors to the River Ouse and the most southerly Yorkshire tributary is the River Don, which flows northwards to join the main river at Goole. In the far north of the county the River Tees flows eastwards through Teesdale and empties its waters into the North Sea downstream of Middlesbrough. The smaller River Esk flows from west to east at the northern foot of the North York Moors to reach the sea at Whitby.[61] The River Derwent rises on the North York Moors, flows south then westwards through the Vale of Pickering then turns south again to drain the eastern part of the Vale of York. It empties into the River Ouse at Barmby on the Marsh.[61] To the east of the Yorkshire Wolds the River Hull flows southwards to join the Humber Estuary at Kingston upon Hull. The western Pennines are served by the River Ribble which drains westwards into the Irish Sea close to Lytham St Anne's.[61] The River Wharfe is a river in Yorkshire, England. ... For the Bradford MDC Ward see Wharfedale (ward). ... The River Don (also called Dun in some stretches) is a river in South Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Goole (disambiguation). ... The Tees is a river in Northern England. ... Teesdale is a dale, or valley, of the east side of the Pennines in England. ... River Esk is the name of several rivers. ... River Derwent is the name of several rivers in England: River Derwent, Derbyshire; see also Derwent Reservoir, Derbyshire, also Upper Derwent Valley. ... The Vale of Pickering is a low-lying flat area of land in North Yorkshire, England. ... The River Hull is a river in the East Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... The River Ribble at Ribchester The River Ribble is a river that runs through North Yorkshire and Lancashire, in the North of England. ...


Natural areas

Main article: Topographical areas of Yorkshire

The countryside of Yorkshire has acquired the common nickname of God's Own County.[11][10] In recent times, North Yorkshire has displaced Kent to take the title Garden of England according to The Guardian.[62] Yorkshire has three national parks, in the form of the Peak District, North York Moors and the Yorkshire Dales, and two designated Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty at Nidderdale and the Howardian Hills.[63] The three designated Heritage Coast areas in Yorkshire are Spurn Point, Flamborough Head and coastal North York Moors.[64] These areas of Yorkshire are noted for their scenic views with rugged cliffs[65] such as the jet cliffs at Whitby,[65] the limestone cliffs at Filey and the chalk cliffs at Flamborough Head.[66][67] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 612 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Upper Nidderdale looking up-dale Photo by Chris R Oct 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 612 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Upper Nidderdale looking up-dale Photo by Chris R Oct 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Upper Nidderdale Nidderdale is one of the Yorkshire Dales (although outside of the formal National Park area) in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Yorkshire Dales (also known as the Dales) is the name given to an upland area, in Northern England. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... The Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point of Pen Y Fan (886 m/2907 feet) to Corn Du (873 m/2864 feet). ... The Peak District is an upland area in central and northern England, lying mainly in northern Derbyshire, but also covering parts of Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, and South and West Yorkshire. ... A View of the North York Moors The North York Moors (also known as the North Yorkshire Moors) is a national park in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Yorkshire Dales (also known as the Dales) is the name given to an upland area, in Northern England. ... An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government. ... Upper Nidderdale Nidderdale is one of the Yorkshire Dales (although outside of the formal National Park area) in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Howardian Hills are an area of outstanding natural beauty in North Yorkshire, the United Kingdom. ... A Heritage Coast is a strip of coastline designated by the Countryside Agency in England and Wales. ... A photograph of Spurn in May 2005, showing the lighthouse and sand-dunes. ... The chalk tower near Flamborough Head. ... A View of the North York Moors The North York Moors (also known as the North Yorkshire Moors) is a national park in North Yorkshire, England. ... geography, a cliff is a significant vertical, or near vertical, rock exposure. ... A sample of jet Jet is a geological material that is not considered a mineral in the true sense of the word, but rather, a mineraloid derived from decaying wood under extreme pressure, thus organic in origin. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 6560 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TA115807 Administration Borough: Scarborough Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (East Riding) Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: North Yorkshire Ambulance... For other uses, see Chalk (disambiguation). ...


The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds runs nature reserves such as the one at Bempton Cliffs with coastal wildlife such as the Northern Gannet, Atlantic Puffin and Razorbill.[68] Spurn Point is a narrow, three mile (5 km) long sand spit. It is a National Nature Reserve owned by the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust and is noted for its cyclical nature whereby the spit is destroyed and re-created approximately once every 250 years.[69] There are seaside resorts in Yorkshire with sand beaches; Scarborough is Britain's oldest seaside resort dating back to the spa town-era in the 17th century,[70] while Whitby has been voted as the United Kingdom's best beach, with a "postcard-perfect harbour."[71] The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is Europes largest wildlife conservation charity. ... A nature reserve is an area of importance for wildlife, flora, fauna or features of geological or other special interest, which is reserved and managed for conservation and to provide special opportunities for study or research. ... Bempton Cliffs RSPB Bempton Cliffs is a nature reserve, run by the RSPB, at Bempton in Yorkshire, England. ... Binomial name Morus bassanus Linnaeus, 1758 Northern Gannet range The Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus, formerly Sula bassana) is a large seabird of the gannet family, Sulidae. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) is a seabird in the auk family. ... Binomial name Alca torda Linnaeus, 1758 The Razorbill, Alca torda, is a large alcid, 38-43 cm in length, with a 60-69 cm wingspan. ... A spit is a deposition landform found off coasts. ... National Nature Reserve is a United Kingdom government conservation designation for a nature reserve of national significance. ... The Yorkshire Wildlife Trust is a wildlife trust covering the traditional county of Yorkshire, England. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beach (disambiguation). ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... Taking the waters at Bath became a fashionable means of leisure Lucy, A spa town is a town frequented many Lucys, mainly for health reasons, to take the waters. The often historical term derives from the Belgian town Spa. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ...

Transport

The A1(M) and M62 junction at Ferrybridge, West Yorkshire
The A1(M) and M62 junction at Ferrybridge, West Yorkshire

The most prominent road in Yorkshire, historically called the Great North Road, is known as the A1.[72] This trunk road passes through the centre of the county and is the prime route from London to Edinburgh.[73] Another important road is the more easterly A19 road which is also prominent for travelling up and down England. The M62 motorway crosses the county from east to west from Hull towards Greater Manchester and Merseyside.[74] The M1 carries traffic from London and the south of England to Yorkshire. In 1999 about 8 miles was added to make it swing east of Leeds and connect to the A1.[75] The East Coast Main Line rail link between Scotland and London runs roughly parallel with the A1 through Yorkshire and the Trans Pennine rail link runs east to west from Hull to Liverpool via Leeds.[76] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... , Ferrybridge is a village situated on the A1 in West Yorkshire, England at a historically important crossing of the River Aire. ... This page is about the A1 road in Great Britain. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... The A19 is a major road in England, running parallel to and east of the A1 road. ... The M62 motorway is a west-east trans-Pennine motorway in northern England, connecting the cities of Liverpool and Hull. ... Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ...


Before the advent of rail transport, seaports of Hull and Whitby played an important role in transporting goods. Historically canals were used, including the Leeds and Liverpool Canal, which is the longest canal in England. Nowadays mainland Europe (the Netherlands and Belgium) can be reached from Hull via regular ferry services from P&O Ferries.[77] Yorkshire also has air transport services from Leeds Bradford International Airport. This airport has experienced significant and rapid growth in both terminal size and passenger facilities since 1996, when improvements began, until the present day.[78] South Yorkshire is served by the Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield, based in Finningley.[79] The Leeds and Liverpool Canal is a canal in the north of England running from Liverpool, Merseyside to Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... P&O Ferry Pride of Rotterdam one of the Hull-Rotterdam sister flagships of P&O Ferries P&O Ferries (formerly P&O European Ferries) is a constituent company of DP World (which took over its parent company, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O) in March 2006). ... Aviation or Air transport refers to the activities surrounding mechanical flight and the aircraft industry. ... Leeds Bradford International Airport (IATA: LBA, ICAO: EGNM) is located between the cities of Leeds and Bradford in West Yorkshire, England. ... Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield (IATA: DSA, ICAO: EGCN) is an international airport located at the former RAF Finningley airbase in Finningley, South Yorkshire, England. ... Finningley is a village in the metropolitan borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England), on the border with Nottinghamshire. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Yorkshire

The native people of Yorkshire and their culture is an accumulated product of various different civilisations who have directly controlled its history, including; the Celts (Brigantes and Parisii), Romans, Angles, Norse Vikings and Normans amongst others.[80] Centered on the town Richmond, around half of the historic North Riding had an additional infusion of Breton culture due to the Honour of Richmond.[81] The people of Yorkshire are immensely proud of their county and local culture and it is sometimes suggested Yorkshiremen identify more strongly with their county than they do with their country.[82] The Yorkshire people have their own distinctive dialect known as Tyke, which some have argued is a fully fledged language in its own right.[83] The county has also produced a unique set of Yorkshire colloquialisms, which are in use in the county. Among Yorkshire's unique traditions is the Long Sword dance, a traditional dance not found elsewhere in England. The most famous traditional song of Yorkshire is On Ilkla Moor Baht 'at ("On Ilkley Moor without a hat"), it is considered the unofficial anthem of the county.[84] The culture of Yorkshire has evolved over the countys long history, taking influences from various sets of cultures who have controlled the land throughout its history including the Celts (Brigantes and Parisii), Romans, Angles, Vikings, Normans and much more. ... Diachronic distribution of Celtic peoples:  core Hallstatt territory, by the 6th century BC  maximal Celtic expansion, by the 3rd century BC  the six Celtic nations which retained significant numbers of Celtic speakers into the Early Modern period  areas where Celtic languages remain widely spoken today Celts (pronounced or , see pronunciation... The Brigantes were a British Celtic tribe which lived between Tyne and Humber. ... This article is about one of the two Celtic peoples called the Parisii. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The town of Richmond as seen from the top of the keep of Richmond Castle Richmond is a market town on the River Swale in North Yorkshire, UK and is the administrative centre of the district of Richmondshire. ... The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three traditional subdivisions of Yorkshire, northern England, United Kingdom. ... The Bretons are a distinct celtic ethnic group located in the region of Brittany in France. ... The Honour of Richmond was an honour created by Alain Le Roux, son of Eudes, Count of Penthièvre, grandson of Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Yorkshire colloquialisms, (sometimes referred to as Yorkshireisms), are colloquialisms or slang commonly spoken in Yorkshire, England. ... The Long Sword dance is a hilt-and-point sword dance recorded mainly in Yorkshire in England. ... Ilkley Moor is a part of Rombalds Moor, the moorland between Ilkley and Keighley in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ...


Architecture

Throughout Yorkshire many castles were built, this practice began during the Norman-Breton period after the Harrying of the North with the construction of castles such as York Castle, Richmond Castle, Pickering Castle, Bowes Castle and others.[85] Later castles were built as a means of defence against the invading Scots, such as Helmsley Castle, Scarborough Castle and Middleham Castle.[86] The latter is of particular note due to the fact that Yorkist king Richard III of England spent his childhood there and considered Middleham his favourite residence.[86] Parts of these castles remain to varying extents, with some being English Heritage sites they remain popular tourist destinations.[86] There are some stately homes in Yorkshire which carry the name "castle" in their title, even though they are more akin to a palace.[87] The most notable examples are Allerton Castle and Castle Howard,[88] both linked to the Howard family of Catholic recusants.[89] Castle Howard and the Earl of Harewood's Harewood House are included amongst the Treasure Houses of England, which is a group of nine English stately homes.[90] The garden front of Castle Howard John Vanburghs complete project for Castle Howard, which was not all built. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... The Harrying (or Harrowing) of the North was a series of campaigns waged by William the Conqueror, King of England, in the winter of 1069–1070 in order to subjugate the north of his newfound English kingdom (primarily Northumbria and the Midlands) as part of the Norman Conquest of England. ... A view from the outside of the tower York Castle is part of the city of York. ... The 12th century Keep is 100 feet high The Castle walls and towers seen from the Keep Richmond Castle in North Yorkshire, England, stands in a breathtaking position above the River Swale and close to the centre of the town of Richmond. ... Pickering Castle is a motte-and-bailey fortification in North Yorkshire, England. ... Scots may refer to: people from Scotland (i. ... Helmsley Castle Helmsley Castle is a medieval castle situated in the market town of Helmsley, North Yorkshire. ... The keep of Scarborough Castle Scarborough Castle is a 12th Century[1] fortress on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. ... Middleham Castle, now in the county of North Yorkshire, was build during the 12th century and later came into the hands of the Neville family, the most famous member of which was Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick - the Kingmaker. Under his ownership, improvements to the castle caused it to become... This article is about King Richard III of England. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Allerton Castle is a Grade I listed nineteenth century Gothic house in North Yorkshire, England. ... The garden front of Castle Howard John Vanburghs complete project for Castle Howard, which was not all built. ... The Howard family is called Englands second family. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Throughout English history, Recusancy was generally synonymous with nonconformism. ... The title Earl of Harewood (pronounced Harwood) was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1812 for the 1st Baron Harewood, the second cousin of the 1st Baron Harewood of an earlier creation. ... Harewood House as of 2005, seen from the garden Harewood House from A Complete History of the County of York by Thomas Allen (1828–30), showing the house before Barry altered the facades and added an extra storey to the pavilions. ... The Treasure Houses of England is a heritage consortium founded in the early 1970s by ten of the foremost stately homes in England still in private ownership, with the aim of marketing and promoting themselves as tourist venues. ...

There are numerous other Grade I listed buildings within Yorkshire including areas in public places such as Leeds Town Hall, Sheffield Town Hall, the Yorkshire Museum and Guildhall, as well as large estates Wentworth Castle, Brodsworth Hall and Temple Newsam. In addition to this there are entities which are conserved and managed by the National Trust, such as Studley Royal Park, Nunnington Hall and the Rievaulx Terrace & Temples. Religious places of note such as historic cathedrals as well as the ruins of monasteries and abbeys are in abundance. Many of these prominent buildings suffered from the destruction under Henry VIII; this includes Whitby Abbey, Fountains Abbey, Rievaulx Abbey, St Mary's Abbey, Gisborough Priory, Bolton Abbey amongst numerous others.[91] However, some noted religious buildings of historic origins are still in use, such as York Minster, the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe.[91] Others include Beverley Minster, Ripon Cathedral and Bradford Cathedral.[91] The ruins of Whitby Abbey Illustration of the ruins of Whitby Abbey Whitby Abbey from pond Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitbys East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the north-east coast of England. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Leeds Town Hall - Victorian civic confidence Leeds Town Hall was built in 1858 in Park Lane, Leeds, West Yorkshire to a design by architect Cuthbert Brodrick. ... Sheffield Town Hall is a building in the city of Sheffield in the north of England. ... York Guildhall as seen from the rear of the Mansion House. ... Wentworth Castle was the ancestral home of the former Earls of Stafford. ... Brodsworth Hall, situated 5 miles to the North West of Doncaster, in South Yorkshire in the United Kingdom, is one of the most complete surviving examples of a Victorian Country House in England, and remains virtually unchanged since the 1860s. ... Temple Newsam is an estate in the county in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, is a British preservation organization. ... Studley Royal Park is a park containing, and developed around, the ruins of the Cistercian Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... Nunnington Hall — South Elevation Nunnington Hall is a country house situated in the English county of Yorkshire. ... Rievaulx Terrace & Temples is a site located in North Yorkshire, England overlooking Rievaulx Abbey and owned by the National Trust. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... The ruins of Whitby Abbey Illustration of the ruins of Whitby Abbey Whitby Abbey from pond Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitbys East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the north-east coast of England. ... Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire, England, is a ruined Cistercian monastery, founded in 1132. ... The ruins of the abbey church Rievaulx Abbey is a former Cistercian abbey located in the small village of Rievaulx (pronounced Ree-voh), near Helmsley in North Yorkshire. ... The Abbey of St Mary in York lies in what is now the gardens of the Yorkshire Museum. ... The east end seen from the southwest Gisborough Priory was founded in the town of Guisborough in 1129 by Robert de Brus, an ancestor of Robert the Bruce. ... Bolton Abbey Bolton Abbey is a ruined 12th-century priory in North Yorkshire, England. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... The West front of Beverley Minster. ... The west front of Ripon minster The interior of the cathedral The East end Ripon Cathedral in Ripon was founded in 672, when it is believed to have been the second stone building erected in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria. ... The east end of the cathedral The interior The Altar Bradford Cathedral (Grid reference SE166333) is situated in the heart of Bradford town centre in Yorkshire, England, on a site used for Christian worship since 8th century. ...


Literature and art

The Brontë sisters
The Brontë sisters

During the time of the kingdom Northumbria which Yorkshire made up half, there were several noted exponents who were poets, scholars and ecclesiastics, they included Alcuin, Cædmon and Wilfrid.[92] The most noted literary family from the county are the three Brontë sisters, with part of Yorkshire being nicknamed Brontë Country in their honour.[93] Their novels, written in the mid-1800s, caused a sensation when they were first published, and were subsequently accepted into the canon of great English literature.[94] Amongst the most noted novels credited to the sisters are Anne Brontë's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre and Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights.[93] Bram Stoker authored Dracula while living in Whitby[95] and it includes several parts of local folklore such as the beaching of the Russian ship Dmitri, which became the basis of Demeter in the book.[96] Image File history File links Bronte sisters The Brontë sisters, painted by Patrick Branwell Brontë, c. ... Image File history File links Bronte sisters The Brontë sisters, painted by Patrick Branwell Brontë, c. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... This article is about the scholar Alcuin of York. ... For other uses, see Caedmon (disambiguation). ... Wilfrid (c. ... The Brontë sisters, painted by their brother, Branwell c. ... The Brontë Country is a name given to an area of pennine hills west of Leeds/Bradford in West Yorkshire, England. ... Anne Brontës grave at Scarborough Anne Brontë (IPA: ) (January 17, 1820 – May 28, 1849) was a British novelist and poet, the youngest of the Brontë literary family. ... The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, the second and final novel by Anne Brontë. The novel frames itself as a letter from Gilbert Markham to his friend and brother in law (Halford) about the events leading to his meeting his wife. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... This article is about the Victorian novel. ... Emily Jane Brontë (pronounced ); (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... For other uses, see Wuthering Heights (disambiguation). ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... This article is about the novel. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ...


The novelist tradition in Yorkshire continued on into the 20th century, with authors such as J. B. Priestley, Alan Bennett and Barbara Taylor Bradford being noted examples.[97][98] Taylor Bradford in particular is noted for A Woman of Substance which is one of the top-ten bestselling novels in history.[99] Another noted author was children's writer Arthur Ransome who was the author the Swallows and Amazons series.[98] In terms of poetry exponents include W. H. Auden, William Empson and Andrew Marvell.[98][100][101] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... John Boynton Priestley, OM (born 13 September 1894, Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire, died 14 August 1984, Warwickshire) was an English writer and broadcaster . ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... Barbara Taylor Bradford (born May 5, 1933) is an English novelist. ... A Woman of Substance is a novel by Barbara Taylor Bradford, and was published in 1979. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... Cover of Arthur Ransomes autobiography Arthur Mitchell Ransome (January 18, 1884 – June 3, 1967), was a British author and journalist, best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of childrens books, which tell of school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk... Swallows and Amazons is the first book in the Swallows and Amazons series by Arthur Ransome and was published in 1930. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... William Empson Sir William Empson (27 September 1906 – 15 April 1984) was an English literary critic and poet, reckoned by some to be the greatest English literary critic after Samuel Johnson and William Hazlitt and fitting heir to their mode of witty, fiercely heterodox and imaginatively rich criticism. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Sport

Badge of the world's oldest football club; Sheffield FC.

Yorkshire has a long history in the field of sports, with participation in football, rugby league, cricket and horse racing being the most established sporting ventures.[102][103][104][105] Yorkshire County Cricket Club represents the historic county in the domestic first class cricket County Championship; with a total of 30 championship titles, 12 more than any other county, Yorkshire is the most decorated county cricket club.[104] Some of the most highly regarded figures in the game are Yorkshiremen,[106] amongst them Herbert Sutcliffe and Len Hutton.[106] England's oldest horse race, which began in 1519, is run each year at Kiplingcotes near Market Weighton.[105] Furthermore in the field of horse racing, there are currently nine established racecourses in the county.[107] Yorkshire is officially recognised by FIFA as the birth-place of club football,[108][109] as Sheffield FC founded in 1857 are certified as the oldest association football club in the world.[110] The world's first inter-club match and local derby was competed in the county, at the world's oldest ground Sandygate Road.[111] The Laws of the Game which are now used worldwide were drafted by Ebenezer Cobb Morley from Hull.[112] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... This article is about the sport. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Yorkshire County Cricket Club, who represent the historic county of Yorkshire, are one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure. ... A first-class cricket match is one of three or more days duration between two sides of eleven players officially adjudged first-class. ... This article is about the sport. ... The County Championship is the domestic first class cricket competition in the United Kingdom, mainly in England. ... Herbert Sutcliffe (born November 24, 1894, Summerbridge, Harrogate, Yorkshire, England; died January 22, 1978, Cross Hills, Yorkshire, England) was arguably the greatest opening batsman in cricket history and undoubtedly one of the greatest players of any type the game has known. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... , Market Weighton is a small town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Sheffield F.C. are an amateur English football club, whose main claim to fame is the fact that they are the worlds oldest club, having been established in 1857. ... Sandygate Road is a football and cricket stadium in the Sheffield suburb of Crosspool, Yorkshire. ... The Laws of the Game (also known as the Laws of Football) are the rules governing a game of association football (soccer). ... Only known photograph of EC Morley Ebenezer Cobb Morley was an English sportsman and is regarded as the father of The Football Association and modern Association Football and, to a certain extent, of all organised football. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ...


The most successful football clubs founded in Yorkshire are Sheffield Wednesday, Leeds United, Huddersfield Town and Sheffield United.[113] All four have been the league champions with Huddersfield being the first club to win three consecutive league titles.[114] Noted players from Yorkshire who have had an impact on the game include World Cup-winning goalkeeper Gordon Banks[115] and two time European Footballer of the Year award winner Kevin Keegan,[116] as well as prominent managers Brian Clough, Don Revie and George Raynor.[117] The Rugby Football League and with it the sport of rugby league was founded during 1895 in Huddersfield after a North-South schism within the Rugby Football Union.[118] The top league is the Super League and the most decorated Yorkshire clubs are Huddersfield Giants, Hull FC, Bradford Bulls, Hull KR and Leeds Rhinos.[119] In total six Yorkshiremen have been inducted into the Rugby League Hall of Fame amongst them is Harold Wagstaff, Jonty Parkin and Roger Millward.[120] In the area of boxing "Prince" Naseem Hamed from Sheffield achieved title success and widespread fame,[121] in what the BBC describes as "one of British boxing's most illustrious careers".[121] SWFC redirects here. ... Leeds United Association Football Club are an English professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... Huddersfield Town Football Club is an English football club formed in 1908 and based in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. ... Sheffield United Football Club is a professional English football club based in the city of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ... Qualifying countries The 1966 FIFA World Cup, the eighth staging of the World Cup, was held in England from July 11 to July 30. ... Gordon Banks OBE (born December 30, 1937) is a former English footballer, elected in a poll by the IFFHS as the second best goalkeeper of the 20th Century. ... The Ballon dOr trophy, as awarded to Hristo Stoichkov in 1994. ... Joseph Kevin Keegan, OBE (born 14 February 1951 in Armthorpe, Doncaster, England)[1] is a former footballer, former England national team coach and the current manager of Newcastle United. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ... Donald George Revie, OBE, (10 July 1927 - 26 May 1989), was a football player for Leicester City, Hull City, Sunderland, Manchester City and Leeds United as a deep-lying centre forward. ... George S. Raynor (January 13, 1907 (Wombwell?, Yorkshire) - November 24, 1985) was an English professional footballer and one of the most successful international football managers ever. ... The Rugby Football League (RFL) is the governing body for rugby league in the United Kingdom. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... In the United Kingdom the term North-South divide refers to an economic and cultural divide between the relatively wealthy South East of England and the less affluent industrial areas of Scotland, Wales, Northern England and the Midlands of England. ... The history of rugby league began with the early schism of 1895 in the sport of Rugby football. ... The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is the rugby union governing body in England. ... Super League (Europe) began in March 1996 and is the only full-time professional rugby league competition operating in the northern hemisphere. ... Huddersfield Giants are a professional rugby league club (from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire) who play in the Super League. ... Website Official site Hull FC is a professional rugby league football club formed in 1865 and based in Hull, East Yorkshire, England. ... Website Official site The Bradford Bulls are a professional rugby league club based in the city of Bradford, England. ... Hull Kingston Rovers are a rugby league team currently playing in League One of the National League. ... Leeds Rhinos are a professional rugby league club who are based in Headingley in north-west Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... The British Rugby League Hall of Fame was established by the Rugby Football League in 1988 to commemorate the greatest ever players in British rugby league. ... Harold Wagstaff, nicknamed the Prince of Centres, was an English Rugby League player. ... Jonty Parkin was an English rugby league footballer. ... Roger Millward MBE is a former rugby league player from Castleford, West Yorkshire. ... Naseem redirects here. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Cuisine

Yorkshire puddings, served as part of a traditional Sunday roast.

Foods associated with the county include: Yorkshire curd tart, a curd tart recipe with rosewater;[122][123] Parkin, a sweet ginger cake which is different from standard ginger cakes in that it includes oatmeal and treacle;[124] and Wensleydale cheese, a cheese associated with Wensleydale.[125] The beverage ginger beer, flavoured with ginger, came from Yorkshire and has existed since the mid 1700s. Liquorice sweet was first created in Yorkshire by George Dunhill from Pontefract, who in the 1760s thought to mix the liquorice plant with sugar.[126] Yorkshire and in particular the city of York played a prominent role in the confectionary industry, with chocolate factories or companies such as Rowntree's, Terry's and Thorntons inventing many of Britain's most popular sweets.[127][128] Another traditional Yorkshire food includes pikelets which are similar to a crumpet but much thinner.[129] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, roast potatoes, vegetables and Yorkshire pudding Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Yorkshire Pudding Yorkshire pudding is an English savoury dish made from batter. ... Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, roast potatoes, vegetables and yorkshire pudding The Sunday roast is a traditional British main meal served on Sundays (usually in the early afternoon), and consisting of roasted meat together with accompaniments. ... Curd is a dairy product obtained by curdling (coagulating) milk with rennet or an edible acidic substance such as lemon juice or vinegar and then draining off the liquid portion (called whey). ... A tart is a pastry dish, usually sweet, that is a type of pie, with an open top that is not covered with pastry. ... Rosewater or rose syrup (Persian: Golâb Turkish: Gül suyu) is the hydrosol portion of the distillate of rose petals. ... For other meanings, see Parkin (disambiguation) Parkin is a moist and sticky ginger cake made in Northern England, primarily in Yorkshire. ... Gingerbread cookies Gingerbread in cake form A Lebkuchen house Traditional Toruń gingerbread Gingerbread is a sweet that can take the form of a cake or a cookie in which the predominant flavor is ginger. ... In the United States and Canada, oatmeal means any crushed oats, rolled oats, or cut oats used in recipes such as oatmeal cookies. ... Treacle is an obsolete pharmaceutical term for a medicinal salve, usually given for snakebites, poisons, and various diseases. ... Country of origin England Region, town Wensleydale, North Yorkshire Source of milk Cows and ewes Pasteurized Yes Texture medium, crumbly Aging time 3-6 months Certification None Wensleydale cheese is a cheese produced in the town of Hawes in Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, England. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Wensleydale is the valley (dale) of the River Ure on the east side of the Pennines in North Yorkshire, England. ... Ginger beer is a type of carbonated beverage, flavored primarily with ginger, lemon and sugar. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Pontefract Castle in the early 17th Century Pontefract is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 (or Great North Road), the M62 motorway, and Castleford. ... Chocolate Factory is a R&B album released by R. Kelly on February 28, 2003. ... Rowntrees is a historic brand of Nestlé SA that is used to market a range of fruit gums and pastilles formerly owned by Rowntree Mackintosh. ... Terrys was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. ... Thorntons is a British chocolate company established by Joseph William Thornton in 1911. ... Pikelet can refer to either: In Australia, New Zealand, and the English Midlands and parts of the north, a small, thick colonial-style pancake, known in parts of Britain as a drop-scone or Scotch pancake. ...


Popular music and film

During the 1970s David Bowie, himself of a father from Tadcaster in North Yorkshire,[130] hired three musicians from Hull in the form of Mick Ronson, Trevor Bolder and Mick Woodmansey; together they recorded Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, an album that went on to become widely considered as one of the greatest and most influential of all time.[131] In the following decade, Yorkshire had a very strong post-punk scene which went on to achieve wide spread acclaim and success, including; The Sisters of Mercy, The Cult, Gang of Four, The Human League, New Model Army, Soft Cell, Chumbawamba, The Wedding Present and The Mission.[132] Pulp from Sheffield had a massive hit in the form of Common People during 1995, the song focuses on working-class northern life.[133] The 2000s saw popularity of indie rock and post-punk revival bands from the area with the Kaiser Chiefs and the Arctic Monkeys, the latter of whom hold the record for the fastest-selling debut album in British music history with Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not.[134] David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... Map sources for Tadcaster at grid reference SE4843 Tadcaster is a town in North Yorkshire, England, lying on the River Wharfe and the Great North Road. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire was an English guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ... Trevor Bolder (born June 9, 1950) is an English rock bass guitarist. ... Mick Woody Woodmansey (born c. ... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... For the religious organisation of this name, see Sisters of Mercy. ... The Cult are an English rock band, who appeared in their earliest form in Bradford during 1981. ... Gang of Four is an English post-punk group from Leeds. ... The Human League are a British synthpop/new wave band. ... New Model Army are an English rock band. ... Soft Cell is a Synth-Pop duo formed during the early 1980s. ... Chumbawamba are an English band that started out playing punk rock, but over a 25-year career have gone on to play music ranging from pop influenced dance music and world music to acoustic folk music. ... The Wedding Present is a rock group based in Leeds, England, that was formed in 1985 from the ashes of the Lost Pandas. ... The Mission (known as The Mission UK in the United States [1]) was a gothic rock band formed in 1986 from the splinters of the freshly-dissolved rock band The Sisters of Mercy. ... Pulp were a rock band, formed in Sheffield, England in 1978, by then 15-year-old school boy Jarvis Cocker (vocals, guitar). ... Common People is a song by the band Pulp. ... Statue of a coal miner in Charleston, WV, USA. Working class is a term used in academic sociology and in ordinary conversation. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The post-punk revival is a movement in modern rock music consisting of Indie Rock, Punk Rock, Goth Rock, and Electronic bands that draw from the conventions of the original Post-Punk sound of the early 1980s, as well as the early 90s Britpop, 80s New Wave and... This article is about the band. ... Arctic Monkeys are an English indie rock band from High Green, a suburb of Sheffield. ... Whatever People Say I Am, Thats What Im Not is the debut album by Sheffield band Arctic Monkeys, released on 23 January 2006. ...


The three most prominent British television shows filmed in (and based around) Yorkshire are sitcom Last of the Summer Wine, drama series Heartbeat, and soap opera Emmerdale, the latter two of which are produced by Yorkshire Television. Last of the Summer Wine in particular is noted for holding the record of longest-running comedy series in the world, from 1973 until present.[135] Several noted films are set in Yorkshire, including Kes, This Sporting Life and Room at the Top. A comedy film set in Sheffield named The Full Monty, won an Academy Award and was voted the second best British movie of all-time by ANI.[136] The county is also referenced in Monty Python's The Meaning of Life during a segment on birth where title card read, "The Miracle of Birth, Part II—The Third World". The scene opens into a mill town street, subtitled "Yorkshire".[137] Monty Python were also performed the Four Yorkshiremen sketch live, which first featured on At Last the 1948 Show.[138] A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Last of the Summer Wine (Originally The Last of the Summer Wine in the pilot episode), is a BBC sitcom written by Roy Clarke. ... Heartbeat is a long-running British TV police drama series set in 1960s Yorkshire. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... For the 1994 debut album by The Cardigans, see Emmerdale (album). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... // Kes is a British film from 1969 by director Ken Loach and producer Tony Garnett. ... This Sporting Life is also a radio program in Australia. ... Room at the Top is a 1959 film adapted by Neil Paterson and Mordecai Richler (uncredited) from the novel by John Braine. ... This article is about the film. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Asian News International (ANI) agency provides multimedia news to China and 50 bureaus in India. ... Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life is a musical film comedy made in 1983 by the Monty Python comedy team. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At Last the 1948 Show was a satirical TV show made by David Frosts Paradine Productions (although they werent credited on the actual programmes) in association with Rediffusion London for Britains ITV network during 1967, bringing Cambridge Footlights type-humour to a broader audience. ...


Governance

Politics

William Wilberforce, slavery abolisher, was the MP for Yorkshire in 1784–1812.

Traditionally, Yorkshire was represented by two Members of Parliament of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England from 1290, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832 when the county benefited from the disfranchisement of Grampound by taking an additional two members.[139] Yorkshire was represented during this time period in the form of one single, large, county constituency.[139] Like other counties, there was also some county boroughs within Yorkshire during some of this time, the oldest was the City of York which existed since the ancient De Montfort's Parliament of 1265. After the Reform Act 1832, Yorkshire's political representation in parliament was drawn from a more subdivisional basis, in the form of Member of Parliament represenatives from each three of the historic ridings of Yorkshire; North Riding, East Riding and West Riding constituencies.[139] Yorkshire, was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. ... . ... This is an incomplete list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Yorkshire. ... William Wilberforce (August 24, 1759 – July 29, 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist and slavery abolitionist. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Grampound, was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1821. ... Yorkshire, was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The City of York is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The English parliament of 1265 was instigated by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester without royal approval. ... The Representation of the People Act 1832, commonly known as the Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of the United Kingdom. ... North Riding of Yorkshire was a parliamentary constituency in the North Riding of Yorkshire. ... East Riding of Yorkshire was a parliamentary constituency in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... West Riding of Yorkshire was a former UK Parliament constituency in England, returning two Members of Parliament 1832-1865. ...


For the 1865 general elections onwards, the West Riding was further divided into Northern, Eastern and Southern parliament constituency divisions, though these only lasted until the major Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.[140] This act saw the localisation of government in the United Kingdom, with the introduction of 26 new parliament constituencies within Yorkshire, while the Local Government Act 1888 saw some reforms for the county boroughs, there were 8 within Yorkshire by the end of the 19th century.[141] The 1865 UK general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 (48 & 49 Vict. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


With the Representation of the People Act 1918 there was some reshuffling on a local level for the 1918 general election, revised again during the 1950s.[142] The most controversial reorganisation of local government in Yorkshire was the Local Government Act 1972,[143] put into practice in 1974. Under the act, the ridings lost their lieutenancies, shrievalties, administrative counties, county boroughs and their councils were abolished, followed by metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties with vastly reformed borders.[144] Although some government officials[145] and Prince Charles[146] have asserted such reform isn't meant to alter the ancient boundaries or cultural loyalties, there are pressure groups such as the Yorkshire Ridings Society who want greater recognition for the historic boundaries.[147] In 1996 the East Riding of Yorkshire was reformed as a unitary authority area and a ceremonial county, as well as the insertion of the Yorkshire and the Humber region of government office covering most, but not all of the historic county, with calls for complete reinsertion remaning.[148] The Representation of the People Act 1918 widened suffrage by abolishing practically all property qualifications for men and by enfranchising women over 30 who met minimum property qualifications. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918 was the first election at which women could vote. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... The Yorkshire Ridings Society is a group affiliated to the Association of British Counties calling for the wider recognition of the continuing existence of the traditional county of Yorkshire and its traditional subdivisions, the North, East and West Ridings. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... A unitary authority is a term used in a two-tier local government system to describe a unit of local government that operates as a single tier. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... Government Offices are the primary means by which a wide range of policies and programmes of the Government of the United Kingdom are delivered in the regions of England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ...


Monarchy and peerage

Main articles: Kings of Jórvík, Earl of York, Duke of York, and House of York

When the area of Yorkshire began to take shape as a result of the invasion of the Norse vikings, they inserted a monarchy in the form of a line of Kings of Jórvík who based their capital in the central city of Yorkshire at York.[149] The reign of the Norse royal family came to an end with the last king Eric Bloodaxe dying in 954, this was due to the invasion and conquest by the Kingdom of England from the south. Jórvík was the last of the independent kingdoms to be taken to form part of the Kingdom of England and thus the local monarchal title became defunct.[150] This position was preceded by the Kings of Jorvik and followed by the Dukes of York. ... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Norse is an adjective relating things to Denmark, Norway, Iceland and Sweden. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Eirik Bloodaxe (Old Norse: Eiríkr blóðøx, Norwegian: Eirik Blodøks), (c. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy...

The White Rose of York remains as the prime symbol of Yorkshire identity.

Though the monarchal title became defunct, it was succeeded by the creation of the Earl of York title of nobility (the earldom covered the general area of Yorkshire and is sometimes referred to as the Earl of Yorkshire),[151] by king of England Edgar the Peaceful in 960.[151] The title passed through the hands of various nobles from different areas of England, decided by the current king of the country at the time. The last man to hold the title was William le Gros, however the earldom was abolished by Henry II as a result of a troubled period known as The Anarchy.[152] The White Rose of York (Rosa alba) is the symbol of the House of York and latterly of Yorkshire. ... This position was preceded by the Kings of Jorvik and followed by the Dukes of York. ... An Earl as a member of the British peerage ranks below a Marquess and above a Viscount. ... This article is about the king of England. ... William le Gros (died 1179) was the first Earl of Albemarle. ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... The Anarchy in English history commonly names the period of civil war and unsettled government that occurred during the reign (1135–1154) of King Stephen of England. ...


The title of peerage was recreated by Edward III in 1385, this time in the form of the prestigious title Duke of York which he gave to his son Edmund of Langley. When he gained the title Edmund founded the House of York, later the title would be merged with that of the King of England as there was a line of three Yorkist kings. Much of the modern day symbolism of Yorkshire is derived from the Yorkists, such as the White Rose of York,[153] giving the house a special affinity within the culture of Yorkshire and its identity, especially king Richard III who spent much of his life at Middleham Castle in Yorkshire.[42][154] Since that time the title has passed through the hands of many, being merged with the crown and then recreated several times. Today the title Duke of York is still prestigious and is used by the current United Kingdom royal family, given to the second son of the British monarch.[155] This article is about the King of England. ... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (June 5, 1341 – August 1, 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault, the fourth of the five sons of the Royal couple who lived to adulthood. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... The White Rose of York (Rosa alba) is the symbol of the House of York and latterly of Yorkshire. ... The culture of Yorkshire has evolved over the countys long history, taking influences from various sets of cultures who have controlled the land throughout its history including the Celts (Brigantes and Parisii), Romans, Angles, Vikings, Normans and much more. ... This article is about King Richard III of England. ... Middleham Castle, now in the county of North Yorkshire, was build during the 12th century and later came into the hands of the Neville family, the most famous member of which was Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick - the Kingmaker. Under his ownership, improvements to the castle caused it to become... The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ...


Noted Yorkshire people

For more details on this topic, see List of people from Yorkshire.

Cartimandua (or Cartismandua, ruled ca. ... Saint Paulinus, (?-October 10, 644), was the first bishop of York. ... Saint Edwin (alternately Eadwine or Æduini) (c. ... Wilfrid (c. ... This article is about the scholar Alcuin of York. ... Eirik Bloodaxe (Old Norse: Eiríkr blóðøx, Norwegian: Eirik Blodøks), (c. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see John Fisher (disambiguation). ... Saint Margaret Clitherow (1556 – 1586) is a saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... William Bradford (March 19, 1590 – May 9, 1657) was a leader of the separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected thirty times to be the Governor after John Carver died. ... Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cameron (January 17, 1612 - November 12, 1671), parliamentary general and commander-in-chief during the English Civil War, the eldest son of Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Baron Fairfax of Cameron, was born at Denton, near Otley, Yorkshire. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... John Harrison John Harrison (March 24, 1693–March 24, 1776) was an English clockmaker, who designed and built the worlds first successful chronometer (maritime clock), one whose accuracy was great enough to allow the determination of longitude over long distances. ... Portrait of John Smeaton, with the Eddystone Lighthouse in the background John Smeaton, FRS, (June 8, 1724 – October 28, 1792) was a civil engineer – often regarded as the father of civil engineering – responsible for the design of bridges, canals, harbours and lighthouses. ... This article is about the British explorer. ... Priestley by Ellen Sharples (1794)[1] Joseph Priestley (March 13, 1733 (old style) – February 8, 1804) was an eighteenth-century British natural philosopher, Dissenting clergyman, political theorist, theologian, and educator. ... William Wilberforce (August 24, 1759 – July 29, 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist and slavery abolitionist. ... Sir George Cayley, 6th Baronet (December 27, 1773 – December 15, 1857) was a prolific English engineer from Brompton-by-Sawdon, near Scarborough in Yorkshire. ... Portrait of William Bradley. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... Emily Jane Brontë (pronounced ); (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... Anne Brontës grave at Scarborough Anne Brontë (IPA: ) (January 17, 1820 – May 28, 1849) was a British novelist and poet, the youngest of the Brontë literary family. ... Augustus Henry Lane Fox Pitt Rivers (14th April, 1827–1900) was an English army officer, ethnologist, and archaeologist. ... Monument to Harry Brearley at the former Brown Firth Research Laboratories Harry Brearley (February 18, 1871 – August 12, 1948) was the inventor of rustless steel (later to be called stainless steel). He was born in Sheffield, England. ... Percy Shaw was born in Halifax in West Yorkshire in 1890, the son of Jimmy Shaw, a dyer’s labourer, who worked at a local mill. ... Henry Moore photographed by Lothar Wolleh is in a park in Moores county of Yorkshire. ... Charles Laughton (1 July 1899 – 15 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. ... Hepworths Family of Man in bronze, 1970, at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Sir Leonard Hutton (June 23, 1916 - September 6, 1990) was an English cricketer. ... Asa Briggs was an author of several textbooks including a 4 volume text on the British Broadcasting Company (corporation) from 1922 to present day ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... Gordon Banks OBE (born December 30, 1937) is a former English footballer, elected in a poll by the IFFHS as the second best goalkeeper of the 20th Century. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943) is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ...

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is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... The Geographia is Ptolemys main work besides the Almagest. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Yorkshire Post was founded in 1754, as the Leedes Intelligencer, making it one of Britains first daily newspapers. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Parkinson is a British television chat show presented by Michael Parkinson. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yorkshire Ridings Society is a group affiliated to the Association of British Counties calling for the wider recognition of the continuing existence of the traditional county of Yorkshire and its traditional subdivisions, the North, East and West Ridings. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Notes

a Though the Wars of the Roses were fought between royal houses bearing the names of York and Lancaster, the wars took place over a wide area of England.They were a dynastic clash between cadet branches of the House of Plantagenet.The most prominent family in Yorkshire, below the monarchy, the Nevilles of Sheriff Hutton and Middleham fought for the Yorkists, as did the the Scropes of Bolton, the Latimers of Danby and Snape, as well as the the Mowbrays of Thirsk and Burton in Lonsdale. Yet some fought for the Lancastrians such as the Percies, the Cliffords of Skipton, Ros of Helmsley, Greystock of Henderskelfe, Stafford of Holderness and Talbot of Sheffield.

Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... Sheriff Hutton is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Middleham is a small market town in the North Yorkshire dales. ... Bolton is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... Danby may refer to: Danby, New York Danby, Vermont Danby Township, Michigan Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke of Leeds -- English statesman, commonly known also by his earlier title of Earl of Danby This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Snape may refer to: Places Snape, Suffolk — a small village, the site of: Snape Maltings — the home of part of the annual Aldeburgh Music Festival. ... Thirsk is a small market town in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Burton in Lonsdale is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England, close to the border with Lancashire. ... Skipton is a town in North Yorkshire, England that lies along the River Aire and Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Helmsley Castle Aerial photo of Helmsley Helmsley is a market town in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England on the River Rye. ... Holderness is an area of England on the coast of Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ...

See also

Yorkshire Portal
Find more about Yorkshire on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
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Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources

Image File history File links Portal. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Location of the Dogger Bank The Dogger Bank earthquake of 1931 is the strongest earthquake ever recorded in the United Kingdom since measurements began, and measured 6. ... In 1984, the English county of Yorkshire had a total of 56 collieries. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... One of the major UK mutual building societies remaining today is the Yorkshire Building Society, with headquarters in Yorkshire, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... The Yorkshire Society was formed as a non-political organisation to encourage people born or living in the County of Yorkshire to join to pursue the following objectives:- To improve the beauty, attraction and amenities in the Yorkshire countryside, towns, villages, historic houses and monuments of all kinds by encouraging... The Yorkshire Terrier (often called simply the Yorkie) is a breed of small dog in the terrier category. ... The Yorkshire Wolds are an area of low hills and valleys in the East Riding of Yorkshire in North-Eastern England. ...

External links

  • The History of Yorkshire
  • Samples of Yorkshire Dialect
  • Yorkshire Forum
  • Yorkshire Inquisitions 1275-1295

  Results from FactBites:
 
GENUKI: Yorkshire Genealogy (5132 words)
Yorkshire is the first county of England in point of size, and the third in point of population.
The 1891 census for Yorkshire is being transcribed by volunteers.
The Yorkshire BMD is an on-going project to put on-line the indexes to births, marriages and deaths, based on the original civil registrations from 1837 to 1950, held at the local register offices of Yorkshire.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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