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Encyclopedia > Yorker

In cricket, a yorker is a delivery where the cricket ball bounces on the cricket pitch on or near the batsman's popping crease. Since a batsman in a normal stance has his feet on the popping crease, this means the ball is bouncing very near his feet, which makes the ball difficult to hit with the bat.


Bowling yorkers is a tactic used most often by fast bowlers. A fast yorker is one of the most difficult types of delivery in cricket to play successfully, as the bat must be swung down right to the pitch to intercept the ball—if any gap remains between the bat and the pitch, the ball can squeeze through and potentially go on to hit the wicket, getting the batsman out. A bowler who achieves swing when bowling yorkers can be even more dangerous, as the ball will deviate sideways as it travels towards the batsman, making it even harder to hit.


Yorkers can also be aimed directly at the batsman's feet, making the batsman have to shift his feet while attempting to play the ball, or risk being hit. Inswinging yorkers have a reputation for being particularly nasty to defend and probably unlikely to score runs off. Such a delivery is colloquially known as a sandshoe crusher or a toe crusher.


Despite the effectiveness of yorkers, bowlers will usually only attempt to bowl a handful of yorkers during a sequence of several overs. The main strength of the yorker is as a surprise weapon, when the batsman has become accustomed to hitting shorter-pitched balls and not using the bat with the speed necessary to defend against a yorker. Yorkers are also notoriously difficult to bowl correctly, as a slight variation in length can mean the yorker will pitch just short of the batsman—making the ball into a half volley that is easy to hit—or will reach the batsman without bouncing—which makes the ball a full toss, that is also easy to hit. The margin for error is slim, which is why bowlers do not bowl yorkers more frequently.


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Yorker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (563 words)
In cricket, a Yorker is a delivery where the cricket ball bounces on the cricket pitch on or near the batsman's popping crease.
The main strength of the yorker is as a surprise weapon, when the batsman has become accustomed to hitting shorter-pitched balls and not using the bat with the speed necessary to defend against a yorker.
Yorkers are also notoriously difficult to bowl correctly, as a slight variation in length can mean the yorker will pitch just short of the batsman—making the ball into a half volley that is easy to hit—or will reach the batsman without bouncing—which makes the ball a full toss, that is also easy to hit.
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