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Encyclopedia > York, Upper Canada
Town of York
Nickname: Muddy York
Country British North America
Province Upper Canada
Established August 27, 1793
Elevation 76 m (249 ft)
Population (1834)
 - Total 9,250

York was the name of Toronto, Ontario, between 1793 and 1834 and second captial of Upper Canada. EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council...

Contents

History

The town was established in 1793 by Governor John Graves Simcoe, on the site of an existing settlement named Toronto. He believed it would be a superior location for the capital of Upper Canada, which was then at Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake), as the new site would be less vulnerable to attack by the Americans. He renamed the location York after Frederick, Duke of York, George III's second son. York became the capital of Upper Canada on February 1, 1796. John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the watersheds of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Niagara-on-the-Lake in the Niagara Region Niagara-on-the-Lake Niagara-on-the-Lake (2001 population 13,839) is a town where the Niagara River meets Lake Ontario in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his own death in 1827, he was the heir... George III redirects here. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Demographics

York's population prior to the 1830s was primarily British (from Scotland, England, Wales) and a few other European settlers (French, German, Dutch, Irish). African slaves likely were found in the town, although slavery was abolished by Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe. Beyond the town proper, aboriginals dominated the area. A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the watersheds of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ...


Population

The population figures for York from 1796 to 1834 include people living in the surrounding areas of the town centre:

  • 1793 - 3 and unknown number of aboriginals
  • 1796 - 200 soldiers and 400 civilians
  • 1812 - 1460
  • 1813 - 720
  • 1825 - 1,600
  • 1832 - 5,550
  • 1834 - 9,250

Source:Statistics Canada[1] Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


Geography

See Geography and climate of Toronto Torontos skyline from its harbour The City of Toronto covers an area of 641 km² (247 square miles) and is bounded by Lake Ontario to the south, Etobicoke Creek and Highway 427 to the west, Steeles Avenue to the north, and the Rouge River to the east. ...


Much of early York was heavily wooded with the town developed along shoreline of Lake Ontario and the Don River. Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ... The Don River is one of two rivers bounding the original settled area of Toronto along the shore of Lake Ontario, the other being the Humber River to the west. ...


The climate of York is similar to that of Toronto, but a bit cooler given the lack of human influence on the state of the environment.


Townscape

York was surveyed by the British Army with roads in a box grid format, while others conform to the geography of the town. To the west, north and east the town was surround by forests. The shoreline along Lake Ontario was gravel or clay. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


Government

Home District Council was responsible for municipal matters for York. In early years of the town matters was likely directed to the Executive Council of Upper Canada or the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada. The Home District Council was the municipal governing body for Toronto or York prior to 1834. ... The Executive Council of Upper Canada had a similar function to the Cabinet in England but was not responsible to the Legislative Assembly. ... The flag of the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Ontario. ...


Fire and Police Services

Fire services did not exist in York, so it was likely provided by local residents with buckets of water.


As for policing, there was no official police force. Public order was provided by able bodied male citizens were required to report for night duty as special constables for a fixed number of nights a year on the pain of fine or imprisonment in a system known as "watch and ward.")[1]


Architecture

There was a wide variety of building styles in York, but most were of English influence in reflecting the origins of the settlers at the time.


Military

The first buildings in York were built by the British Army and was more or less utilitarian. With ample supply of trees from the surrounding area, they were all made of wood. The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ...

  • Town Block House 1799-1812
  • Fort York
  • York Gaol - wooden log stockade built, circa 1798
  • Castle Frank
  • Naval Shipyards, York (Upper Canada) - destroyed during the war
  • Government House Battery 2 18 pounders
  • Gibraltar Point Battery (1798, with two blockhouses)
  • Blockhouse Battery (two guns) at the Town Blockhouse 1798
  • Government House Battery (two guns)
  • Half-Moon Battery (not armed in 1813)
  • Western Battery (two guns, with blockhouse)
  • Ravine Blockhouse 1814
  • new blockhouse on Gibraltar Point 1814

Blockhouses at Fort York Fort York National Historic Site is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Naval Shipyards, York (Upper Canada) was one of the shipyards of the Royal Navy on Lake Ontario. ...

First Buildings

Early buildings in town were made of wood and lacked any architectural style. European influence began to impact York's buildings after the War of 1812 and when more permanent structures were built to serve the residents of the town:

A list of some of the structures built in York: Palladian architecture is a European style of architecture derived from the designs of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580). ...

  • Home District Gaol 1837-1840; 5 storey limestone building consisted of a central block and two wings; built on site of original parliament buildings; cease in 1865;demolished 1887 by Consumer’s Gas as Station A Gasworks Building; demolished 1960s; became a Fina Gas Station /Dash Car Wash, Dimont T Trucks and Front Truck Servicentre Ltd.; Atlas Auto Leasing and the Addison Chevrolet Olds Ltd; Fuhrman Auto Body (Fuhrman Autocentre)
  • Gibratar Light House

Industrial

Industrial architecture in York began with large wood structures with agricultural influences (barn like). Towards the 1830, brick and stone became the choice of building materials. A list of industrial buildings of this era:

  • Freeland's Soap and Candle Factory - foot of Yonge Street
  • Sheldon, Dutcheer and Co Foundry
  • James Gooderham Windmill
  • Enoch Turner Brewery and Home

Places of Worship

The early church architecture varied from various styles of the 19th Century:

Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ... The Tower of the Winds, Athens from The Antiquities of Athens, 1762. ... The Tower of the Winds, Athens from The Antiquities of Athens, 1762. ...

Government

  • Court of the Quarter Sessions of the Home District

Businesses

  • Market Block
  • York's 5th (Toronto's second) Custom House - 1 storey Georgian building
  • Coffin Block - Georgian
  • Ontario House Hotel - Georgian
  • Jesse Ketchum Tannery - Colonial
  • 1st Engine House
  • York Fire Company
  • Hook and Ladder Fire Company
  • Fish Market
  • City Hotel
  • Farmers’ Storehouse Company
  • Crown Inn and Mirror Printing Office
  • William Henderson’s Grocery Store
  • William Proudfoot Wines and Spirits
  • Bank of Upper Canada Georgian
  • Daniel Brooke Buidling
  • Canada Land Company
  • York 3rd Post Office
  • Duke St Post Office

St. ...

Schools

Children in York whom could afford an education likely went to grammar schools. Public education was not available until the 1840s. The first post-secondary institution, King's College opened in 1827.

  • Home District Grammar School - Blue School
  • Upper Canada Central School -founded as Andrew Bell Monitorial School Colonial

In general, the word colonial means of or relating to a colony. In United States history, the term Colonial is used to refer to the period before US independence. ...

Residences

Most of the more elegant homes in Toronto were built for the wealthy and powerful elite of the town.

  • Widmer House
  • Berkeley House
  • Maryville Lodge
  • St George's House - later as Baldwin House Georgian
  • Ketchum Family Home - Colonial
  • Joseph Cawthra Home
  • Russel Abbey - Colonial
  • John Sleigh House
  • Ridout Home Georgian
  • Arnold House Georgian
  • McGill Cottage
  • Hazelburn
  • Moss Park
  • Simon Washburn Residence

Source: The Town of York Historical Society [2]


Economy

The economy of the town was limited to servicing the needs of the the residents of York. Some shops and business did exists after 1800. The town likely was involved in trade of resources like wood and fur. Food was produced locally, but some had to be shipped in from outside of York. Light industries also began to appear in the town:

  • Freeland's Soap and Candle Factory - foot of Yonge Street
  • Jesse Ketchum Tannery
  • Sheldon, Dutcheer and Co Foundry
  • William Proudfoot Wines and Spirits
  • Enoch Turner Brewery and Home
  • Gooderham Distillery James Gooderham Windmill

War

York was attacked by American forces during the War of 1812, pillaged, and partially burned down on April 27, 1813. (For details, please see Battle of York.) This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Battle of York was a battle of the War of 1812 on April 27, 1813, at York, Upper Canada, which was later to become Toronto, Ontario. ...


Infrastructure

Transportation

Water

The most important and reliable form transporation in York was by water.


Wharfs were built along the shore to service boats carrying goods and people to and from the town:

  • Cooper
  • Feighan
  • Maitland

Land

Transport to nearby towns and village was by horse and carriage or sleighs during the winter period. Few roads were built in the town and fewer leading out of the town. Most were very poor and was not preferred by travellers.


With the town a number of roads were built along the grid pattern in which York was laid out. For the most part unpaved as transportation was by horse and carriage. There were planked roads from the city built in the latter years.


Most of York's roads went as far east as the Don River and west to what is today's Dufferin Street, but the key streets were to east of Yonge. The nothern boundary was originally Lot Street, unilt Dundas Street and Bloor Street were built. The southern boundry was Palace Street (Front Street). Dufferin Street is a north-south route in Toronto and York Region. ... Dundas Street showing the 506 Carlton Streetcar (the 505 Dundas Street streetcar also runs along Dundas), with Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in background. ... Bloor Street is a major east-west commercial thoroughfare in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... It has been suggested that Front Street Extension be merged into this article or section. ...


Most of York's street still exists today, a number have been renamed since:

List of streets in York
 Name of Street   Name for   Name changed to   Notes 
Bay Street Toronto Bay
Berkeley Street home of Sir John Small Small was Clerk of the Executive Council of Upper Canada, whom lived on Berkerley ; his home in Gloucestershire, England and in York where named Berkeley[3]
Caroline Street wife of George IV, Caroline of Brunswick Sherbourne Avenue
Court Street York County Court House
Church Street street was home to several churches
Duchess Street wife of the Duke of York and Albany, Princess Frederica Charlotte of Prussia Richmond Street
Duke Street named for Duke of York, Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany Adelaide Street
Frederick Street German name of George IV, George Augustus Frederick
George Street German name of George IV, George Augustus Frederick
Hospital Street Richmond Street ran south of Lot Street from Peter Street to Yonge Street
King Street George III of the United Kingdom
Leader Lane name for newspaper, York Leader, located nearby
Lot Street Queen Street
March Street Lombard Street
Upper George Street Victoria Street
Toronto Street former and future name of York, Toronto
Ontario Street Ontario
Parliament Street Parliament of Upper Canada (1797)
Chapel Street named after Wolford Chapel, where Simcoe is buried? now Power Street
Mill Street site of Gooderham and Worts mill Trinity Street another street bears the name today
Market Street St. Lawrence Market Wellington Street the current Market Street located to the west of St. Lawrence Market
Newgate Street named for street in London, England Adelaide Street
New Street Jarvis Street
Palace Street Palace of Parliament Front Street
Peter Street Peter Russell (politician)?
Prince's Street Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany? Princess Street
Yonge Street Sir George Yonge

Public transportation in York was in the form of horse drawn stagecoaches. Torontos Bay Street in the heart of the financial district. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (later Queen Caroline; 17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821) was the queen consort of George IV of the United Kingdom from 29 January 1820 to her death. ... View of Church Street looking north from Maitland Street Church and Wellesley is an LGBT-oriented community located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Princess Frederica Charlotte of Prussia (7 May 1767 – 6 August 1820) was the only daughter of Frederick William II of Prussia and his first wife Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg. ... HRH The Prince Andrew, the current Duke of York For the nursery rhyme see The Grand Old Duke of York. ... The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son, of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... King Street is a major road in Alexandria, Virginia, USA, and the heart of Old Town Alexandria. ... George III redirects here. ... Queen Street West refers to both a major east-west downtown street and a series of neighbourhoods or commercial districts within the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... St. ... Wellington Street is an important street in Ottawa, Canada most notable for being the street upon which the Parliamentary Precinct is located. ... St. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... It has been suggested that Front Street Extension be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about Peter Russell the Canadian government official, not the present day futurist Peter Russell. ... The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son, of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder... Yonge Street at North York Centre. ... Sir George Yonge, 5th Baronet (1731–1812) was a British Secretary at War (1782-1783 and 1783-1794) and the namesake of Toronto, Canadas Yonge Street, which was named by the Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada John Graves Simcoe, in 1793. ...


A few operaters during the period were:

  • Samuel D. Purdy 1816 - founder of first stagecoach line in Upper Canada from York to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake)
  • William Weller 1832 - from Coffin Block to Kingston, Ontario and also operated services in Cobourg, Port Hope, Peterborough, Kingston-Prescott; mayor of Cobourg, Ontario
  • John Playter 1828-1832 from York to Newmarket

Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Cobourg (2001 population 17,172) is a town some 75 km east of Toronto. ... The Playter Estates is an area in the east end of Toronto bounded by Jackman Avenue in the east, Broadview Avenue in the west, Danforth Avenue in the south, and Fulton Avenue in the north. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Healthcare

Prior to 1829 there was not formal hospital in York. Doctors were available, but more comprehensive medical care was limited. The only medical facility was at St. James’ Church or the military services at For York. Plans for a general hospital began in 1817, but it was not until 1829 did the town have hospital (York General Hospital).


Water Supply and Sewage

Prior the mid-19th Century, Toronto's water supply came via wells, not Lake Ontario. It was not until after the founding of the City of Toronto did residence have an option for water from the lake and a fully public water system unitl 1872. Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ...


As for sewage and waste, they were likely disposed of into the lake or landfills.


Culture

Little is known what entertainment or cultural events were available to the residents of York.


There were no music or theatres in those days as the population was small. Church-based events, lectures, concerts, travelling performers and other visiting personalities were likely the only source of culture outside of the home. Unofficially taverns, gambling, and racing was available to residents. Public hangings at the Gaol likely a crude form of entertainment.


Sports

There was no professional sports events or clubs in York.


Sporting activities were amateur and seasonal (mostly winter):

  • skating
  • sleighing
  • ice-boating
  • curling

Public Library

The Mechanics' Institutes opened in 1830 and was the town's first library. Historically, Mechanics Institutes were educational establishments formed to provide adult education, particularly in technical subjects, to working men. ...


Media

York boast many newspapers, but most folded in a few years of operation[4]

  • The Upper Canada Gazette, or American Oracle 1798-1807
  • York Gazette 1807-1816
    • Upper Canada Gazette 1821-1826
    • York Weekly Post 1821-1822, then Weekly Register 1822-1826
    • United Empire Loyalist 1826-1828
    • Upper Canada Gazette 1841-1849
  • The Observer 1820-?
  • The Colonial Advocate 1824-1833
    • Advocate 1833-1834
    • merged with Canadian Correspondent to for Correspondent and Advocate 1834
  • The Canadian Freeman 1825-1834
  • Patriot and Farmer's Monitor 1832-1854
    • merged with Leader 1854
  • Toronto Daily Express
    • merged to form Toronto Family Patriot and Express 1850
    • Patriot bought leader and continue to publish until 1855
    • as Patriot 1834, then Toronto Patriot 1839
    • cease publication 1878
  • Courier of Upper Canada 1829-1837
    • bought by Paladium of British North America
  • Christian Guardian 1829-1925
    • absorbed by Guardian 1925
  • Sapper and Miner 1832-1833
  • Canadian Correspondent 1832-1834
    • merged with Colonial Advocate 1834
    • bought out by Paladium of British North America 1838
  • U.C. Land, Mercantile, and General Advertiser 1834-1835
  • Toronto Recorder and General Mercantile Advertiser 1834-1835
  • Examiner 1830-1855

End of York

On March 6, 1834, York was incorporated as the City of Toronto. The first mayor of Toronto was William Lyon Mackenzie. However, Toronto was part of the regional division of York County from the late 18th century until the establishment of Metro Toronto in 1954. After 1954, York County was the area north of Steeles Avenue and later renamed York Region in 1971. is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This is a list of mayors of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 – August 28, 1861) was a Scottish-Canadian journalist, politician, and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion. ... York County is a historic county in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... The Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto was the name of the highest level of municipal government in the Toronto, Ontario area from 1954 to 1997. ... Steeles Avenue, near its intersection with Warden Avenue. ... Motto: Ontarios Rising Star Area: 1,761. ...


Legacy of the name "York"

The York name continues in Toronto. Several neighborhoods or larger districts of the City of Toronto still use the names of former municipalities all named directly or indirectly after the original Town of York:

And in addition to a host of minor businesses and street names, these "York" names are well known: The term township generally means the district or area associated with a town. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... North York forms the central part of the northern half of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... York is a very diverse and vibrant community in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1967 Amalgamation 1998 with Toronto Government  - Mayor David Miller (Toronto Mayor)  - Governing Body Toronto City Council  - MPs Jack Layton, Maria Minna  - MPPs Michael Prue, Peter Tabuns Area  - Borough 21. ... Bloor Street Bloor Street Yorkville is an affluent neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...

Outside of Toronto, major roads and highways in neighboring communities that lead to Toronto still bear the name 'York,' such as Highway 7 in Guelph, called York Road within the city limits York University (French: Université York), located in Toronto, Ontario, is Canadas third-largest university and has produced several of the countrys top leaders in the fields of law, politics, literature, philosophy, journalism, management, meteorological, chemical, and space sciences, and fine arts including film, theatre, jazz and experimental music... The Royal York Hotel opened in 1929 as the tallest building in the British Commonwealth. ... Royal York is a station on the Bloor-Danforth line of the Toronto subway. ... York Mills Road is a short east-west route in Toronto, Canada and named for the community of York Mills or Hoggs Hollow. ... York Mills is a station on the Yonge-University Spadina line of the Toronto subway. ... Yorkdale Shopping Centre is an upscale shopping mall located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in the former City of North York, and in the community of Downsview. ... A subway train arriving at Yorkdale station Yorkdale is a station on the Yonge-University Spadina line of the Toronto subway. ... North York Centre is a station on the Yonge-University-Spadina line of the Toronto subway. ... Blockhouses at Fort York Fort York National Historic Site is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Faith, Fidelity and Progress Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Ontario County Wellington County City Wards There are 6 Wards Founded April 23, 1827 Incorporated April 23, 1879 Government  - Mayor Karen Farbridge (elected November 2006)  - Governing Body Guelph City Council  - MPs Brenda Chamberlain (LPC)  - MPPs Liz Sandals (OLP) Area  - City...


See also

  • York United Kingdom

York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John...

References

  1. ^ List of E-STAT Census Tables and number of geographic areas by province Upper Canada / Ontario
  2. ^ Toronto: 1837 Model City
  3. ^ Berkeley Street
  4. ^ Early Toronto Newspapers II
Image File history File links Toronto_Flag. ... // Crime Torontos violent crime rates are low compared to its neighbouring US cities. ... The Flag of the City of Toronto was adopted in October, 1999. ... The Coat of Arms of Toronto, Ontario, Canada were designed by the Chief Herald of Canada, Mr. ... Toronto is geographically and politically twinned with other cities who have the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... This is a list of notable people who are from Toronto, Ontario, or have spent a large part or formative part of their career in that city. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fort Rouillé was a French trading post located in Toronto, Ontario, which was established around 1750 but abandoned in 1759. ... Blockhouses at Fort York Fort York National Historic Site is a historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Toronto Purchase was an agreement between the British crown and the Mississaugas of New Credit in 1787. ... The Battle of York was a battle of the War of 1812 on April 27, 1813, at York, Upper Canada, which was later to become Toronto, Ontario. ... Combatants Republican rebels United Kingdom, Canadian Loyalists Commanders Anthony Van Egmond Allan MacNab Strength 210 militia 1,000 regulars and militia 1 gun Casualties 3 dead 5 wounded 1 dead 5 wounded The Battle of Montgomerys Tavern, also known as the Bar Fight on Yonge Street and the Confrontation... The Great Toronto Fire of 1904 was a fire that destroyed a large section of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada on April 19, 1904. ... The Centennial of the City of Toronto was celebrated in 1934. ... This is a list of the oldest extant buildings and structures in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Metro Council redirects here. ... A map of Torontos Census Metropolitan Area, which contains a large portion of the Greater Toronto Area. ... Toronto, Ontario, Canada is called the city of neighbourhoods because of the strength and vitality of its many communities. ... Downtown Toronto is the heart of the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Toronto has almost 1,500 parks (spanning 80 km²). This is a list of parks in Toronto. ... Toronto Waterfront as seen from the CN Tower (looking south east) Toronto Waterfront at Humber Bay The Toronto waterfront is the lakeshore of Lake Ontario in the Municipality of Toronto, Canada. ... Toronto Harbour at dusk, facing North. ... The Humber, as seen from a point near the northern border of Toronto. ... The Rouge River The Rouge River is a two river system Little Rouge and Rouge River in the east and the northeast parts of Toronto and begins at the Oak Ridges Moraine near Richmond Hill. ... Toronto Islands as seen from CN Tower. ... The Outer Harbour East Headland, more commonly known as the Leslie Street Spit, is a man-made peninsula in Toronto, Canada, extending from the citys east end in a roughly southwesterly direction into Lake Ontario. ... The Scarborough Bluffs are an escarpment in Scarborough, Ontario along the shoreline of Lake Ontario. ... Yellow Creek running through a ravine near Rosedale The Toronto ravine system is one of the most distinctive features of the geography of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Torontos Bay Street in the heart of the financial district. ... “TSX” redirects here. ... The Toronto Board of Trade is Torontos chamber of commerce, the largest local chamber of commerce in Canada, with over 10,000 members. ... First Canadian Place, the tallest skyscraper in Toronto and in Canada. ... Old City Hall Toronto City Hall Metro Hall Citizens of Toronto elect representatives to the federal, provincial, and municipal levels of government. ... Logo of The City of Toronto The municipal government of Toronto consists of 44 elected councillors (representing around 55,000 people each), who along with the mayor, make up the Toronto City Council. ... The following is a list of articles on municipal elections in the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada: City of Toronto - pre-amalgamation Toronto municipal election, 1978 Toronto municipal election, 1981 Toronto municipal election, 1991 Toronto municipal election, 1994 Toronto municipal election, 1997 City of Toronto - post-amalgamation Toronto municipal election... Since Torontos original incorporation as a city in 1834, a series of different acts of parliament have governed the organization and political powers of the city. ... This is a list of mayors of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Toronto City Council is the governing body of the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Toronto Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provides ambulatory and paramedic care for the city of Toronto. ... The Toronto Fire Services is part of the Emergency Services that respond to 911-calls in the City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The following is a list of hospitals in Toronto: Toronto General Hospital Toronto Grace Hospital Toronto Western Hospital St. ... This division took over the responsibility of hostels and shelter system from the former Toronto Community Services department in 2005. ... Toronto Water was created to run and maintain Torontos water supply network ofr: pumping stations: John Street 5 water towers: Warden, Morningside, Richview, Rosehill, Leslie Reservoirs: G. Lord Ross, Clairville filtration plants: R.C. Harris, Island, Easterly Toronto Water was created from the Toronto Works and Emergency Services and... The works department was responsible for a variety of services: filtration plants: R.C. Harris, Island, Easterly sewage treatment plants: Ashbridges Bay public works projects Solid Waste Management and Transfer Stations: Sanitation Dumps - mostly closed and shipped to Michigan Recycling System salting and plowing in winter - 600 snowplows and... Toronto District School Board, also known as TDSB, is the English-language public school board for Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The Toronto Catholic District School Board (TCDSB) is one of three school boards in the city of Toronto. ... Logo of the Toronto Public Library Toronto Reference Library The Toronto Public Library is the largest public library system in Canada and the second busiest (by number of visits) in the world after the Hong Kong Public Library. ... Toronto, Canada, is a city of many museums, theatres, events and sports. ... CN Tower Prominent Toronto shopping centre; The Eaton Centre Torontos most famous landmark is the CN Tower, a 553 metres (1,815 ft) tall steel and concrete transmission tower and observation deck, the tallest freestanding structure in the world. ... This is a list of media outlets in Toronto, Canada. ... Toronto, the largest city in Canada, is one of the most multicultural cities in the world. ... Toronto, Canada, is home to several professional, semi-professional, and university sports teams. ... The following is a list of malls in Toronto. ... Numerous festivals, shows and exhibitions are held annually in Toronto. ... A list of movies set in Toronto: Ararat Black Christmas (Not really set in Toronto, all the scenes are in Toronto but the film is set in the fictional town of Bedford. ... Films shot in Toronto: Note: Due to a similar cityscape, many movies set in Chicago or New York are actually filmed in Toronto. ... Hollywood North, an allusion to Hollywood, California, the most notable film centre in the world, is a colloquialism used to describe film production locations and or film gatherings located north of its namesake. ... The Toronto-Montreal rivalry is a rivalry that exists between the Canadian cities of Toronto and Montreal. ... Toronto Port Authority (TPA) is a Port Authority responsible for all activities in the Port of Toronto, including the Toronto City Centre Airport. ... YYZ redirects here. ... The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is a public transport authority that operates buses, streetcars, subways, and rapid transit lines in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... // GO Transit (AAR reporting marks GOT), officially known as the Greater Toronto Transit Authority (GTTA), is Canadas first, and Ontarios only, interregional public transit system, established to link Toronto with the surrounding regions of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). ... Ferry service to Toronto Islands is provided by the City of Toronto Parks and Recreation Department (formerly Metro Toronto Parks and Culture Department). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
York, Upper Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (216 words)
York became the capital of Upper Canada on February 1, 1796.
York was attacked by American forces during the War of 1812, pillaged, and partially burned down on April 27, 1813.
However, Toronto was part of the regional division of York County from the late 1700s until the establishment of Metro Toronto in 1954.
Historical Summary - Canada (3007 words)
Upper Canada's European colonization has continued since the American Revolution with Late Loyalists now settling the Niagara peninsula, the Bay of Quinte on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, and lower Ottawa valley, with many aboriginal peoples receiving new lands along the Grand River.
John Strachan (York's Anglican parish minister and school board organizer) argues that the overabundant clergy reserves be sold to profit the church and that dissenting assemblymen, and especially non-Anglican church leaders, are disloyal to the crown.
Their destinations are York, London, Bytown (Ottawa), Hamilton, Cobourg and Kingston, and by the end of the decade, Upper Canada's population soars beyond 450,000 -- five times what it was a generation ago.
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