FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "York" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > York
City of York
An aerial view of York, with York Minster in the centre
An aerial view of York, with York Minster in the centre

Arms of City of York Council
York shown within England
Coordinates: 53°57′30″N 1°5′48″W / 53.95833, -1.09667
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Ceremonial county North Yorkshire
Admin HQ York City Centre
Settled by Romans as Eboracum c. AD 71
Government
 - Type Unitary Authority, City
 - Governing body City of York Council
 - Leadership: Leader and Executive
 - Executive: Liberal Democrat
 - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L)
John Greenway (C)
John Grogan (L)
Anne McIntosh (C)
Area
 - Total 105 sq mi (271.94 km²)
Population (2005 est / Urban 2006)
 - Total 191,800 (Ranked 74th)
 - Density 1,779.3/sq mi (687/km²)
 - Ethnicity
(2001 Census)
97.8% White
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
 - Summer (DST) British Summer Time (UTC+1)
Postcode YO
Area code(s) 01904
ISO 3166-2 GB-YOR
ONS code 00FF
OS grid reference SE603517
NUTS 3 UKE21
Website: www.york.gov.uk

York (pronunciation ) is a historic walled city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss. The city is noted for its rich history, playing an important role throughout much of its existence; it is nearly 2,000 years old. York may refer to a large number of places, as well as having other uses. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... Image File history File links York_City_Council. ... The arms as used in the Councils current logo The Coat of arms of York is the official symbol of the local government of the city of York. ... map of County of York within England File links The following pages link to this file: York Categories: GFDL images ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... AD redirects here. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Hugh Bayley (born January 9, 1952 in Oxford) is a British politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... John Robert Greenway (born February 15, 1946) is a British politician and Conservative Member of Parliament for Ryedale. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... John Timothy Grogan (born 24 February 1961) is a British politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Anne Caroline Ballingall McIntosh (born 20 September 1954) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving British Summer Time (BST) is the changing of the clocks in effect in the United Kingdom and Irish Summer Time (IST) in Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... The YO postcode area, also known as the York postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Bridlington, Driffield, Filey, Malton, Pickering, Scarborough, Selby, Thirsk, Whitby and York in England. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ...


The city was founded as Eboracum in AD 71 by the Romans and was made one of the two capitals of all Roman Britain.[1] During this period influential historical figures, such as Constantine the Great, became associated with the city. The entire Roman Empire was governed from York for two years by Septimus Severus.[2] This article is about the English city. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Constantine. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Emperor Septimius Severus Lucius Septimius Severus, (April 11, 146 - February 4, 211) was Roman emperor from April 9, 193 to 211. ...


After the Angles moved in, the city was renamed Eoferwic, and served as the capital of the Kingdom of Northumbria.[3] The Vikings captured the city in 866, renaming it Jórvík, the capital of a wider kingdom of the same name covering much of Northern England. Around the year 1000, the city became known as York.[3] White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ...


Richard II wished to make York the capital of England, but before he could effect this he was deposed.[3] After the Wars of the Roses, York housed the Council of the North and was regarded as the capital of the North. It was only during the 1660s that the political importance of the city began to decline. Nevertheless, York was the county town of Yorkshire, to which it lent its name.[3] The Province of York is one of the two English ecclesiastical provinces, alongside that of Canterbury. Richard II (January 6, 1367 – February 14, 1400) was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. ... Deposition by political means concerns the removal of a politician. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... The Council of the North was an administrative body set up by Richard III of England in 1484 to improve government control over the northern counties. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... The Province of York consists of the following dioceses of the Church of England: Their archbishop is the Archbishop of York. ... An ecclesiastical province is a unit of religious government existing in certain Christian churches. ...


From 1996, the term City of York describes a unitary authority area which includes rural areas beyond the old city boundaries. The urban area has a population of 137,505, while the entire unitary authority has 184,900 people. Currently, the core of the city within the walls is a major tourist destination, attracting visitors from all over the world. A unitary authority is a term used in a two-tier local government system to describe a unit of local government that operates as a single tier. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... View of the city looking north-east from the city wall, near the railway station. ... A tourist destination is a city, town or other area the economy of which is dependent to a significant extent on the revenues accruing from tourism. ...

Contents

Etymology

The name 'York' ultimately derives from the Latin name for the city, variously rendered as Eboracum, Eburacum or Eburaci. The first known recorded mention of York by this name is dated circa 95-104 AD and is an address on a wooden stylus tablet from the Roman fortress of Vindolanda in Northumbria.[4] Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... For the online music and film magazine, see Stylus Magazine. ... Vindolanda was a Roman auxiliary fort located at Chesterholm, just south of Hadrians Wall in northern England, near the border with Scotland, guarding the Roman road from the River Tyne, to the Solway Firth, now known as the Stanegate. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and...


The etymology of Eboracum is uncertain as the language of the indigenous population of the area was never recorded. One theory is that Eboracum is derived from the Proto-Brythonic word Eborakon which can mean "place of the yew trees" or "the field of Eburos". Efrog in Welsh, Eabhrac in Irish Gaelic, Iorc in Scottish Gaelic.The name is then thought to have been Latinised by replacing -akon with -acum. Another theory is that the language of the indigenous population was a Germanic language similar to Old English and so Eboracum is derived from *eburaz meaning a boar.[5][6] On the other hand as the invasion was performed by the IX legio Hispania, name given to all Iberian peninsula, so the roman Ebora city, now Évora, and conii people, so Eboracum may came from the city Evora and the Konii people Eborakon. Etymologies redirects here. ... The term indigenous peoples has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... The Brythonic languages (or Brittonic languages) form one of the two branches of the Insular Celtic language family. ... Binomial name L. Taxus baccata is a conifer native to western, central and southern Europe, northwest Africa, northern Iran and southwest Asia. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Old English redirects here. ... Iberia can mean: The Iberian peninsula of southwest Europe; That part of it inhabited by the Iberians, speaking the Iberian language. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Alentejo  - Subregion Alentejo Central  - District or A.R. Évora Mayor Ernesto Oliveira  - Party PS Area 1,307. ... Ancient map of the Golf of Cadis, showing part of the Roman Provinces of Lusitania and Betica. ...


The Anglo-Saxons who inhabited York in the 7th century knew it as Eoferwic. Two centuries later, as a Viking trading centre, the city was known as Jórvík.[7] For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Jórvík was the Viking name for the English city of York and the kingdom centred there. ...


This was reduced to York in the centuries after the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk to Yourke in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York is first found in the 13th century.[8] Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the...


History

Roman wall and the west corner tower of the fort at York, the top half being medieval
"The Shambles," a medieval street in York
"The Shambles," a medieval street in York
Main article: History of York

There is archaeological evidence that Mesolithic people settled in the region where York now is from 8000/7000 BC, although it is not known if these were permanent or temporary settlements. By the time of the Roman conquest of Britain, the area was occupied by tribes known to the Romans as the Brigantes. The Brigantes initially became a Roman client state but later became more hostile to Rome. As a result the Roman Ninth Legion was sent north of the Humber.[9] York Minster File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... York Minster File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 596 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (960x1280, 596 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Shambles - now a popular tourist destination The Shambles is an old street in York, England, with overhanging timber-built shops, now occupied by souvenir shops as opposed to the original butchers (see Slaughterhouse). ... York is a city in Yorkshire, in the North East of England. ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age[1]) was a period in the development of human technology between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age. ... Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... The Brigantes were a British Celtic tribe which lived between Tyne and Humber. ... Legio VIIII Hispana (from Hispania) was a Roman legion probably levied by Julius Caesar before 58 BC, for his Gallic wars. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ...


The city itself was founded in AD 71, when the Ninth Legion conquered the Brigantes and constructed a military fortress (castra) on flat ground above the River Ouse near its junction with the River Foss. The fortess was later rebuilt in stone, covered an area of 50 acres, and was inhabited by 6,000 soldiers. Much of the Roman fortress now lies under the foundations of York Minster, and excavations in the Minster's undercroft have revealed some of the original walls.[7][10] Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ... The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ...


The Emperors Hadrian, Septimius Severus and Constantius I all held court in York during their various campaigns. During his stay, the Emperor Severus proclaimed York capital of the province of Britannia Inferior, and it is likely that it was he who granted York the privileges of a colonia or city. Constantius I died during his stay in York, and his son Constantine the Great was proclaimed Emperor by the troops based in the fortress.[10] Publius Aelius Traianus Hadrianus (January 24, 76 –– July 10, 138), known as Hadrian in English, was emperor of Rome from 117 A.D. to 138 A.D., as well as a Stoic and Epicurean philosopher. ... Lucius Septimius Severus (or rarely Severus I) (b. ... Gaius Flavius Valerius Constantius (March 31, 250–July 25, 306) was an emperor of the Western Roman Empire (305–306). ... Britannia Inferior (Lower Britain) was one of the regions of Roman Britain created in the early third century AD by the Roman Emperor Septimus Severus. ... A Roman colonia (plural coloniae) was originally a Roman outpost established in conquered territory to secure it. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ...


In the 7th century York became the chief city of the Angle King Edwin of Northumbria.[11] The first Minster church was built at this time, for the baptism of Edwin in 627. Edwin ordered that this small wooden church should be rebuilt in stone, but he was killed in 633 and the task of completing the stone Minster fell to his successor Oswald.[7][12] White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Saint Edwin (alternately Eadwine or Æduini) (c. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Oswald (c. ...


In 866, Northumbria was in the midst of civil war when the Vikings raided and captured York. Under Viking rule the city became a major river port, part of the extensive Viking trading routes throughout northern Europe. The last ruler of an independent Jorvik, Eric Bloodaxe, was driven from the city in the year 965 by King Edred, completing the unification of England.[13] For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Eirik Bloodaxe (Old Norse: Eiríkr blóðøx, Norwegian: Eirik Blodøks), (c. ... “Eadred” redirects here. ...


In 1069, York was ravaged by William the Conqueror as part of the harrying of the North.[14] The old ancient Minster was badly damaged by fire at this time, and the Normans took the decision to build a new Minster on a fresh site. Around the year 1080 Archbishop Thomas started building a cathedral that in time became the current Minster. York started to prosper again, becoming a profitable port and centre of trade, particularly in wool. King Henry I granted the city's first charter, confirming trading rights in England and Europe.[12][15] William I of England (c. ... The Harrying (or Harrowing) of the North was a series of campaigns waged by William the Conqueror, King of England, in the winter of 1069–1070 in order to subjugate the north of his newfound English kingdom (primarily Northumbria and the Midlands) as part of the Norman Conquest of England. ... Thomas (d. ... Henry I (c. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


In 1190, York was the site of an infamous pogrom of its Jewish inhabitants. The Jews sought sanctuary in Clifford's Tower, one of the city's fortifications. The mob besieged the trapped Jews for some days while preparations were made to storm the castle. Eventually a fire was started, whether by the Jews or their persecutors is uncertain, and 150 Jews lost their lives.[16] Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... York Castle is an area of York near the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and the Foss. ...


The city underwent a period of decline during Tudor times. Under Henry VIII, the dissolution of the monasteries saw the end of the monastic houses of York, most Northerners were Catholics and were upset with this, leading to the Pilgrimage of Grace in York. Henry VIII eventually reinstated the Council of the North in York, and this increased in importance under Elizabeth I, leading to a revival in the city's influence.[17][18] Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... The Pilgrimage of Grace was a popular rising in Northern England in 1536, in protest against Englands break with Rome and the Dissolution of the Monasteries, as well as other specific political, social and economic grievances. ... The Council of the North was an administrative body set up by Richard III of England in 1484 to improve government control over the northern counties. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


In 1644, during the Civil War, the Parliamentarians besieged York, but with the arrival of Prince Rupert, with an army of 15,000 men, the siege was lifted. The Parliamentarians retreated some six miles from York with Rupert in pursuit, before turning on his army and devastatingly defeating it at the Battle of Marston Moor. Of Rupert's 15,000 troops, no fewer than 4,000 were killed and 1,500 captured. The siege was renewed, but the city could not hold out for long, and on July 15 the city surrendered to Sir Thomas Fairfax.[17] For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to supporters of the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War. ... The Siege of York in 1644 was a prolonged contest for York during the English Civil War, between the Scottish Army of the Solemn Oath and Covenant and the Parliamentarian Armies of the Northern Association and Eastern Association on the one hand, and the Royalist Army under the Marquess of... for the city in British Columbia, see Prince Rupert, British Columbia Prince Rupert of the Rhine (1619-1682), soldier and inventor, was a younger son of Frederick V, Elector Palatine and Elizabeth Stuart, and the nephew of King Charles I of England. ... Belligerents Scottish Covenanters, Parliamentarians Royalists Commanders Earl of Leven, Earl of Manchester, Lord Fairfax Prince Rupert of the Rhine, Marquess of Newcastle Strength 22,500+: 7,000+ horse, 500+ dragoons, 15,000+ foot, 30 - 40 guns 17,000: 6,000 horse, 11,000 foot, 14 guns Casualties and losses 300... Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron Fairfax of Cameron (January 17, 1612 - November 12, 1671), parliamentary general and commander-in-chief during the English Civil War, the eldest son of Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Baron Fairfax of Cameron, was born at Denton, near Otley, Yorkshire. ...


Following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and the removal of the garrison from York in 1688, the city was gradually dominated by the local aristocracy and gentry. Competition from the nearby cities of Leeds and Hull resulted in York losing its preeminent position as a trading centre, but the city's role as the social and cultural centre for wealthy northerners was on the rise. York's many elegant townhouses date from this period, as do the Assembly Rooms, the Theatre Royal, and the Racecourse.[18][19] For other uses, see Restoration. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... Leinster House, 18th century Dublin townhouse of the Duke of Leinster. ... The York Assemby Rooms is a building in the city of York, UK which was used a place for high class social gatherings in the city. ... A view of the Ebor stand at York Racecourse York Racecourse is one of the premier horse racing tracks in Europe having won the Racecourse of the Year title in 2003 and come out on top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain’s racecourses. ...


George Hudson was responsible for bringing the railway to York in 1839. Although Hudson's career as a railway entrepreneur eventually ended in disgrace, by this time York was a major railway centre. By the turn of the century the railway accommodated the headquarters and works of the North Eastern Railway, which employed over 5,500 people in York. The railway was also instrumental in the expansion of Rowntree's Cocoa Works and Terry's Confectionery Works, who were major employers in the city.[18][20] George Hudson George Hudson (probably March 10, 1800 - December 14, 1871), English railway financier, known as the Railway King, was born in Howsham, in the parish of Scrayingham in the East Riding of Yorkshire, north of Stamford Bridge, east of York. ... The North Eastern Railway (NER), unlike many other of the pre-Grouping companies, had a relatively compact territory, having the district it covered to itself. ... Rowntrees is a historic brand of Nestlé SA that is used to market a range of fruit gums and pastilles formerly owned by Rowntree Mackintosh. ... Terrys was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. ...


With the emergence of tourism as a major industry, the historic core of York became one of the city's major asset, and in 1968 it was designated a conservation area. The existing tourist attractions were supplemented by the establishment of the National Railway Museum in York in 1975. The opening of the University of York in 1963 added to the prosperity of the city. The fast and frequent railway service, which brings York within two hours journey time of London, has resulted in a number of companies opening offices in the city.[20] Tourist redirects here. ... A conservation area is a tract of land that has been awarded protected status in order to ensure that natural features or biota are safeguarded. ... Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ... This article is about the British university. ...


Geography

The King's Arms pub during floods
The King's Arms pub during floods
Barker's Tower on the Ouse at Lendal Bridge.
Barker's Tower on the Ouse at Lendal Bridge.
The Millennium Bridge from South Bank
The Millennium Bridge from South Bank
Elvington - located on the edge of the City of York
Elvington - located on the edge of the City of York

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 442 KB) Summary Photograph of the famous Kings Arms pub in York during the floods. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 442 KB) Summary Photograph of the famous Kings Arms pub in York during the floods. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 822 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 822 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... York Millennium Bridge. ... York Millennium Bridge. ... A street in South Bank The Millennium Bridge from South Bank South Bank is an area to the south of the River Ouse in York. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

Location

York lies within the Vale of York, a flat area of arable land bordered by the Pennines, the North York Moors and the Yorkshire Wolds, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss on a terminal moraine left by the last Ice Age.[21] The Vale of York is the area surrounding the city of York, in the north of England. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ... A View of the North York Moors The North York Moors (also known as the North Yorkshire Moors) is a national park in North Yorkshire, England. ... The Yorkshire Wolds are an area of low hills and valleys in the East Riding of Yorkshire in North-Eastern England. ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


During Roman times, the land surrounding the rivers Ouse and Foss was very marshy, making it easier to defend. The city is prone to flooding from the River Ouse, and has an extensive (and mostly effective) network of flood defences. These include walls along the Ouse, and a liftable barrier across the River Foss where it joins the Ouse. In October and November 2000 York experienced the worst flooding in 375 years with over 300 homes being flooded. [22] Much land in and around the city has always been too flood-prone for development. The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ...


Demographics

At the time of the 2001 UK census the population of York was 181,094 and its ethnic composition was 97.84% White, compared with the English average of 90.92%. York's population has a slightly higher elderly population than the national average.[23][24] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ...


City districts and surrounding villages

The ings are flood meadows along the River Ouse, while the strays are scattered around the city in marshy, low-lying places. Acaster Malbis is a village in the unitary authority called City of York, England, on the River Ouse, south of York, Yorkshire and Bishopthorpe. ... Acomb is the largest suburb in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, to the western side of York, south of Upper Poppleton and north of Bishopthorpe. ... Askham Bryan is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south west of York, Yorkshire, west of Bishopthorpe, and close to Askham Richard. ... Askham Richard is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south west of York, Yorkshire, close to Copmanthorpe and Askham Bryan. ... Statistics Population: 3,802 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE590473 Administration District: City of York Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: North Yorkshire Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: Yorkshire Post office... District located near the centre of the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Cawood (Other names: Carwood, Thorpe Lane) is a large village in North Yorkshire. ... Clifton is a suburb of the unitary authority of City of York, in the north of England. ... Moor Lane, location of the Copmanthorpe rail crash Copmanthorpe is a large village and civil parish in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south west of York, west of Bishopthorpe and close to Acaster Malbis, Askham Bryan and Askham Richard. ... Derwenthorpe is a controversial housing development planned to be built in the edge of York, England. ... Dringhouses is a suburb, formerly a village, in York, England. ... Dunnington is a village in North Yorkshire, approximately 6 km (4 mi) east of the city of York, with a pleasant older centre surrounded by a modern development, that has become a sprawling commuter satellite village. ... Elvington is a village southwest of City of York, east of Bishopthorpe and on the banks of the River Derwent, Yorkshire. ... Escrick is a small village situated between the historical city of York and Selby. ... Fishergate is one of the centre wards of York, England. ... Fulford is a historic village and civil parish on the outskirts of York, England. ... The Groves is an area of York, England, covering the area between Huntington Road and Haxby Road. ... Haxby is a town in the unitary authority of City of York, on the River Foss, to the north of York and south of Strensall, in the country of England. ... Heslington is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south east of the centre of York. ... Hessay is a village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England about five miles west of York. ... Heworth is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, approximately 1 mile to the East of the centre of York, Yorkshire and North West of Osbaldwick. ... Holtby is a small village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Huntington is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, on the River Foss, north of York and south of Haxby. ... Kexby is a village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Middlethorpe is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England. ... Murton is a small village located on the outskirts of York. ... Naburn is a small village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Nether Poppleton is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, on the River Ouse, west of York, Yorkshire and north of Upper Poppleton. ... New Earswick is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, near the River Foss, north of York and south of Haxby. ... Osbaldwick is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, east of York. ... Rawcliffe is a village and civil parish in the city of York district of North Yorkshire, England. ... Rufforth is a village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Skelton is a village in the unitary authority of the City of York, England. ... A street in South Bank The Millennium Bridge from South Bank South Bank is an area to the south of the River Ouse in York. ... Stockton-on-the-Forest is a village in the unitary authority of York. ... Strensall is a village and civil parish in the unitary authority of the City of York in the north of England, on the River Foss north of York and north-east of Haxby. ... , Stamford Bridge is a village and civil parish on the River Derwent in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, approximately 7 miles east of York. ... Tang Hall is an area of the city of York in the United Kingdom. ... Towthorpe is a village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ... Upper Poppleton is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, by the River Ouse south of Nether Poppleton, and west of York, Yorkshire. ... Wheldrake is a small Yorkshire village located seven miles south-east of York. ... Wigginton is a village six miles north of York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom and a civil parish. ... Woodthorpe is an affluent suburb of south west of the city of York, North Yorkshire England. ... The Strays of York is a collective name for four areas of open land, comprising in all over 800 acres (325 hectares), within the City of York. ...


Economy

Offices of Norwich Union in York
Offices of Norwich Union in York

York's economy is based on the service industry with 87.1% of employment in the city in 2006 being in this area. The service industries in York include public sector employment, health, education, finance, IT and tourism that accounts for 10.9% of employment. Unemployment in York is low at 1.9% in 2007 compared to the United Kingdom national average of 3%.[25] The three biggest employers in York are the City of York Council with over 6,500 employees, Norwich Union Life and North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust both with between 3000 and 5000 employees. Other major employers include Card Protection Plan, Nestlé, Shepherd Building Group and British Telecom as well are a number of different railway companies.[26] The tertiary sector of industry, also called the service sector or the service industry, is one of the three main industrial categories of a developed economy, the others being the secondary industry (manufacturing and primary goods production such as agriculture), and primary industry (extraction such as mining and fishing). ... Tourist redirects here. ... CIA figures for world unemployment rates, 2006 Unemployment is the state in which a person is without work, available to work, and is currently seeking work. ... Norwich Union is an insurance company in the UK. It is the biggest life-insurer in the UK, and has a strong position in motor insurance. ... This article is about the company. ... BT Group plc (which trades as just BT, and is commonly known by its former name, British Telecom) is the privatised former British state telecommunications operator. ...


This is very different from the position of the economy as recently as the 1950s, when York's prosperity was based on chocolate manufacturing and the railways. This position continued until the early 1980s when 30% of the workforce were employed by just five employers and 75% of manufacturing jobs were in four companies[27]. Most of the industry around the railway has gone, including the carriage works (known as ABB at the time of closure) which at its height in 1880s employed 5,500 people but closed in the mid 1990s.[27] York is the headquarters of the confectionery manufacturer Nestlé Rowntree, and home to the KitKat, Smarties (though not for much longer) and eponymous Yorkie bar chocolate brands. Terry's chocolate factory, makers of the Chocolate Orange, was also located in the city; but it closed on 30 September 2005, when production was moved by its owners, Kraft Foods, to Poland. However, the historic factory building can still be seen, situated next to the Knavesmire racecourse. Rowntrees is a historic brand of Nestlé SA that is used to market a range of fruit gums and pastilles formerly owned by Rowntree Mackintosh. ... Original Kit Kat (USA) Original Kit Kat (USA) A KitKat is a confection manufactured by Nestlé. It consists of thin bars composed of several layers of chocolate-soaked wafer, covered in an outer layer of chocolate. ... Nestlé Smarties are a colourful sugar-coated chocolate confectionery popular in Europe and the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Nestlé® Yorkie® bar with its current slogan Its not for girls! Yorkie is a chocolate bar made by Nestlé. It was originally branded by Rowntrees of York, hence the name. ... Terrys was a chocolate and confectionery maker in York, England. ... Packaging of the Chocolate Orange Terrys Chocolate Orange is a popular chocolate product manufactured by Kraft Foods, originally sold only in the United Kingdom, but now sold all across the world. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kraft Foods Inc. ...


It was announced on the 20 September 2006 that Nestlé would be cutting 645 jobs at the Rowntree's chocolate factory in York.[28] This came after a number of other job losses in the city at Norwich Union, British Sugar and Terry's chocolate factory.[29] Despite this, the employment situation in York remains fairly buoyant, with at least one major employer (NU) still employing more people in the city than it did five years ago.[citation needed]. Since the closure the site has been developed into the headquarters for CPP and two housing schemes, one of which was a Self-build project. York's economy has been developing in the areas of science, technology and the creative industries with the creation of a science park near University of York and the city becoming a founding National Science City. Between 1998 and 2008 York has gained 80 new technology companies and 2,800 new jobs in the sector.[30] is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Norwich Union is an insurance company in the UK. It is the biggest life-insurer in the UK, and has a strong position in motor insurance. ... In 1936 the United Kingdom parliament nationalised the entire UK sugar beet crop processing industry to form the British Sugar Corporation. ... Self-build is the practice of creating an individual home for yourself through a variety of different methods. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Creative Industries (or sometimes Creative Economy) refers to a set of interlocking industry sectors, and are often cited as being a growing part of the global economy. ... A science park is a property development designed for a concentration of high tech or science related businesses. ... This article is about the British university. ...


Regional gross value figures added for York, at current basic prices in pounds sterling, are:[31] For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ...

Year Agriculture Industry Services Total
1995 30 579 1,443 2,052
2000 13 782 2,168 2,963
2003 16 779 2,505 3,299

Governance

Local government

The Guildhall where members of the City of York Council meet.
The Guildhall where members of the City of York Council meet.

York is the traditional county town of Yorkshire, to which it lends its name. Because of this, it did not form part of any of the three historic ridings, or divisions, of Yorkshire. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 722 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kaly99 19:19, 30 May 2007 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 794 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1232 pixel, file size: 722 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kaly99 19:19, 30 May 2007 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under... York Guildhall as seen from the rear of the Mansion House. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... For the song by Chamillionaire, see Ridin. In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county[1]. The term has similar or analogous meanings in other countries. ...


York is an ancient borough, and was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835 to form a municipal borough. It gained the status of a county borough in 1889, under the Local Government Act 1888, and existed so until 1974, when, under the Local Government Act 1972, it became a non-metropolitan district in the county of North Yorkshire. Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils (municipal corporations) to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ...


In the 1990s UK local government reform, York became one of the many boroughs to regain unitary status, but was the only one to see a substantial alteration in its borders, taking in parts of Selby and Harrogate districts, and about half the population of Ryedale district. Unsurprisingly, this caused tension with its neighbours. Ironically, the new boundary had not been promoted by the council, which had proposed the area contained within the A64/A1237 ring road. The current boundary was imposed after central Government had rejected the council's proposal. The structure of local government in the United Kingdom underwent large changes in the 1990s. ... Selby is a local government district in North Yorkshire, England. ... Harrogate is a local government district and borough of North Yorkshire, England. ... Ryedale is a local government district in North Yorkshire in England. ... The A64 is a dual carriageway in the United Kingdom, which carries much of the commuter traffic between Leeds and York, continuing on to Scarborough. ... The numbering zones for A-roads in Great Britain List of A roads beginning with 1 in Great Britain beginning north of the Thames, east of the A1. ... For the American political term, see Inside the Beltway and Beltway bandits. ...


The City of York Council has 47 councillors. As a result of the 2007 local elections (and a By-election in September 2007), no party has an absolute majority, resulting in no overall control. The Liberal Democrats have 20 councillors and in May 2007 they formed a minority administration, and an executive of 9 councillors, to lead the Council for the next 12 months. The Labour Party formed the Opposition with 18 councillors. The Conservative Party has 7 councillors and the Greens have 2.[32] Entrance to a polling station in the market town of Haverhill, Suffolk on 3 May 2007. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Absolute majority is a supermajoritarian voting requirement which is stricter than a simple majority. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Green Party of England and Wales (GPEW) is the principal Green political party in England and Wales. ...


In 2007, Councillor Irene Waudby was appointed York’s Lord Mayor and Councillor Keith Hyman York’s Sheriff with both appointments lasting a year. Although York’s Sheriff office is the oldest in England it is now a purely ceremonial post. The Lord Mayor also carries out civic and ceremonial duties in addition to chairing full meetings of the council. Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard, Lord Mayor of Oxford (2004). ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A ceremony is an activity, infused with ritual significance, performed on a certain occasion. ... A chair or seat is also a seat of office, authority, or dignity, such as the chairperson of a committee, or a professorship at a college or university, or the individual that presides over business proceedings. ...


National government

Most of York is covered by the City of York constituency of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, though the outer parts of the city and local authority area presently fall within the Selby, Vale of York and Ryedale constituencies. The City of York is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Selby is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Vale of York is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Ryedale is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


The whole of the city and local authority area lies within the Yorkshire and the Humber constituency of the European Parliament. Yorkshire and the Humber is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Law courts

York Crown Court
York Crown Court

The city has its own Magistrates' Court, and more unusually also a Crown Court and County Court. It is served by the North Yorkshire Police Force. This article is about Magistrates Courts in England and Wales. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... Crown Court and County Court in Oxford. ... North Yorkshire Police is the police force covering the non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire and the unitary authority of York in northern England. ...


Twin cities

York is twinned with:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the French commune. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ghana. ... The Fanteakwa District is a district of Ghana in the Eastern Region. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other places with the same or similar names, and other uses of the word, see Munster (disambiguation) Münster is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. ...

Education

University of York, view across the lake to Central Hall
University of York, view across the lake to Central Hall

The University of York is on the outer edge of the city at Heslington. It was York's only institution with university status until 2006, when the centrally located York St. John University College, formerly an autonomous college of the University of Leeds, attained full university status as York St John University. The city also hosts a branch of The College of Law. The Central Hall at the University of York. ... The Central Hall at the University of York. ... This article is about the British university. ... Heslington is a village in the unitary authority of City of York in the north of England, south east of the centre of York. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... York St John University (formerly known variously as York St John University College, College of Ripon and York St John, York St John College or Ripon and York St John College of the University of Leeds) is located in York, England. ... The College of Law (CoL) is a registered charity in the United Kingdom which provides legal training for students and professionals. ...


The University of York also boasts one of the most highly rated medical schools, Hull York Medical School. The Hull York Medical School (HYMS) is a medical school in the United Kingdom which took its first intake of students in 2003. ...


The city has two major further education institutions. York College is an amalgamation of York Technical College and York Sixth Form College. Students there study a very wide range of academic and vocational courses, and range from school leavers and sixth formers to people training to make career moves. Askham Bryan College offers further education courses, foundation and honours degrees, specialising in more vocational subjects such as Horticulture, Agriculture, Animal Management and even Golf Course Management. York College is a further and higher education college in York, United Kingdom. ... Horticulture (Latin: hortus (garden plant) + cultura (culture)) are classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ...


There are over 55 schools in the City of York area. The Local Education Authority is the City of York Council, who manage most primary and secondary schools within the city. About 40 primary schools cover education from ages 5-11, with some offering early years education from age three. From 11-16 education is then provided by 11 secondary schools, four of which offer additional education up to the age of 18. The following is a partial list of currently operating schools in the Yorkshire and Humber region of England. ... A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ...


York also has several private schools. St Peter's School is famous as the school attended by Guy Fawkes. Two others have Quaker origins: Bootham School is co-educational and The Mount School is all-girls. On the outskirts of the city is Queen Margaret's School. One other is The Minster School. Founded in the English City of York by St Paulinus of York in 627, St. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Bootham School is an independent Quaker boarding school in the city of York in North Yorkshire, England. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... The Mount is a boarding school in York. ... Queen Margarets School is an independent day and boarding school for girls aged 11-18 in Escrick Park near York. ...


On September 10th 2007 Oaklands Sports College and Lowfield Comprehensive School merged to become one school. The new school is known as York High School, and the headteacher is David Ellis, who was previously headteacher at Oaklands. In January 2009 the school hopes to move back to the Oaklands site on Cornlands Road.


Transport

York's location on the River Ouse and in the centre of the Vale of York means that it has always had a significant position in the nation's transport system.


River transport

Boats on the River Ouse
Boats on the River Ouse

The city grew up as a river port at the confluence of the River Ouse and the River Foss. The Ouse was originally a tidal river, accessible to sea-going ships of the time. Today both of these rivers remain navigable, although the Foss is only navigable for a short distance above the confluence. A lock at Naburn on the Ouse to the south of York means that the river in York is no longer tidal.[33] The River Ouse in York The River Ouse (pronounced ooze) in North Yorkshire, England flows through York and Selby. ... The River Foss is an improved river in the unitary authority of City of York and a tributary of the River Ouse. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Canal locks in England. ... Naburn is a small village and civil parish in the City of York, North Yorkshire, England. ...


Until the end of the 20th century, the Ouse was used by barges to carry freight between York and the port of Hull. The last significant traffic was the supply of newsprint to the local newspaper's Foss-side print works, which continued until 1997. Today navigation is almost exclusively leisure-oriented. YorkBoat provides cruises on the river.[33] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... Newsprint is low-cost, low-quality, non-archival paper. ...


Road transport

Street unsuitable for modern traffic
Street unsuitable for modern traffic

Like most cities founded by the Romans, York is well served by long distance trunk roads. The city lies at the intersection of the A19 road from Doncaster to Tyneside, the A59 road from Liverpool to York, the A64 road from Leeds to Scarborough, and the A1079 road from York to Hull. The A64 road also provides the principal link to the motorway network, linking York to both the A1(M) and the M1 motorways at a distance of about 10 miles from the city. The A19 is a major road in England, running parallel to and east of the A1 road. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... For the 1885–1918 parliamentary constituency, see Tyneside (UK Parliament constituency). ... The A59 is a major road, in the United Kingdom running from Liverpool in Merseyside to York in Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... The A64 is a dual carriageway in the United Kingdom, which carries much of the commuter traffic between Leeds and York, continuing on to Scarborough. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... A1079 (Beverley bypass), looking westbound (to York) A1079 (Beverley bypass), looking eastbound (to Kingston upon Hull) The A1079 is a major road in northern England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... Motorway symbol in UK, Australia, Spain, France and Ireland. ... This page is about the A1 road in Great Britain. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ...


The city is surrounded on all sides by an outer ring road, at a distance of some 3 miles from the centre of this city, which allows through traffic to by-pass the city. The street plan of the historic core of the city dates from mediaeval times and is not suitable for modern traffic. As a consequence much of the area inside the city walls is either car free or traffic is heavily restricted. To alleviate this situation, five bus based park and ride sites operate in York. The sites are located towards the edge of the city, with easy access from the ring road, and allow out of town visitors to complete their journey into the city centre by bus.[34] Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ...


Rail transport

York railway station and Royal York Hotel
York railway station and Royal York Hotel

York has been a major railway centre since the beginning of the railway age, with the first line arriving in 1839. For many years the city hosted the headquarters and works of the North Eastern Railway.[20] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1585x913, 289 KB)York railway station and Royal York Hotel - April 10 2005 By & copyright --Tagishsimon (talk) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1585x913, 289 KB)York railway station and Royal York Hotel - April 10 2005 By & copyright --Tagishsimon (talk) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The North Eastern Railway (NER), unlike many other of the pre-Grouping companies, had a relatively compact territory, having the district it covered to itself. ...


York railway station is a principal stop on the East Coast Main Line from London to Newcastle and Edinburgh. It takes less than two hours to get to York from London by rail, with at least 25 direct trains each weekday. The station is also served by long distance trains on Cross Country services linking Edinburgh and Newcastle with destinations in south and west England via Birmingham.[35] The approach to York station and the Royal York hotel York railway station is a main-line railway station in the historic city of York. ... The East Coast Main Line viaduct at Durham. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Cross Country services on the UK Rail Network are those which, by definition, carry passengers on routes other than the main lines radiating from the principal hubs. ... This article is about the British city. ...


TransPennine Express provide a frequent service of semi-fast trains linking York to Newcastle, Scarborough, Leeds, Manchester, Manchester Airport, and Liverpool. Local stopping services connect York to Harrogate, Hull, Leeds, Sheffield, Bridlington and many intermediate points.[35] First TransPennine Express (FTPE) is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For City Airport Manchester, UK, see City Airport Manchester. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... , Harrogate is a large town in North Yorkshire, England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Bridlington beach, from the North Pier Bridlington is a town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ...


Air transport

York has an airfield at the former RAF Elvington, some 7 miles south-east of the city centre, which is also the home of the Yorkshire Air Museum. Despite having the longest runway in the county, at present Elvington is only open to private aviation. Plans sometimes surface to open it to other traffic, either for business aviation or a full service airport.[36] RAF Elvington was the only airfield in the United Kingdom used by the remainder of the Free French Air Force, flying Halifax heavy bombers, during World War II. After the war the airfield was extended for use by the United States Air Force but was never used. ... The Yorkshire Air Museum, (RAF Elvington airfield during the World War II), is an air museum in the United Kingdom. ... Private Aviation Private aviation encompasses everything from large corporate jets all the way down to the individual who owns and operates their own small aircraft, such as a Cessna or Cirrus SR-22. ...


York is linked to Manchester Airport by an hourly direct TransPennine Express train, giving access to the principal airport serving the north of England, with connections to many destinations in Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia. The nearer Leeds-Bradford Airport is linked to York by the hourly York Air Coach service operated by First York.[35][37] For City Airport Manchester, UK, see City Airport Manchester. ... First TransPennine Express (FTPE) is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Leeds Bradford International Airport (IATA airport code: LBA, ICAO airport code: EGNM) is located between the cities of Leeds and Bradford in West Yorkshire, England. ... First York is the largest bus operator in York, England. ...


Local public transport

A York 'ftr' bus
A York 'ftr' bus

Public transport within the city is largely bus based. The principal bus operator is First York, a part of FirstGroup plc. First York operates the city's local bus services, as well as the park and ride services. York is also the location of the first implementation of FirstGroup's experimental, and controversial, ftr bus concept, which seeks to confer the advantages of a modern tramway system at a lower cost.[38] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixelsFull resolution (2289 × 1131 pixel, file size: 569 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 395 pixelsFull resolution (2289 × 1131 pixel, file size: 569 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Autobus redirects here. ... First York is the largest bus operator in York, England. ... FirstGroup plc (LSE: FGP) is a Scottish transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen. ... A York FTR bus // The FTR system is an example of the public transport concept of bus rapid transit. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...


Longer distance bus services in York are provided by Yorkshire Coastliner, which operates routes linking Leeds via York with Scarborough, Filey, Bridlington and Whitby. East Yorkshire Motor Services, Arriva Yorkshire, and a number of independent operators, provide rural services linking local towns and villages with York.[38] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is on the English seaside resort. ... Statistics Population: 6560 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TA115807 Administration Borough: Scarborough Shire county: North Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: North Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (East Riding) Services Police force: North Yorkshire Police Fire and rescue: North Yorkshire Ambulance... Bridlington beach, from the North Pier Bridlington is a town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ... East Yorkshire Motor Services (EYMS) operates a fleet of approximately 350 buses and coaches throughout Kingston Upon Hull, East Yorkshire, the North Yorkshire coast and North York Moors. ... Arriva Yorkshire is a division of Arriva. ...


Several competing companies, including City Sightseeing, provide open top bus tours. The City Sightseeing Logo City Sightseeing bus in Stratford-upon-Avon City Sightseeing in Newcastle is operated by Stagecoach North East Stonehenge Tour livery bus, in Brighton on a rail replacement service Hippo Tours operation in Singapore A Leyland Atlantean AN68/1R with ECW bodywork, built in 1978, later converted...


Sites of interest

See also: York sites of interest and medieval churches of York

York Minster, the second largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe, stands at the city's centre. York's centre is enclosed by the city's medieval walls. The entire circuit (including parts where walls never existed) is about 3 miles (5 km). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1645 KB)Cliffords Tower, York. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1645 KB)Cliffords Tower, York. ... York Castle is an area of York near the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and the Foss. ... A list of most of the tourist attractions in York. ... York had around forty-five parish churches in 1300. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... View of the city looking north-east from the city wall, near the railway station. ...


Clifford's Tower, a quatrefoil keep built on top of a Norman motte, was the site of a massacre in 1190 when the small Jewish community of York sought protection in the tower on the feast of Shabbat ha-Gadol. Many Jews took their own lives rather than face a violent mob in an event regarded as one of the most notorious examples of antisemitism in medieval England.[39] A view from the outside of the tower York Castle is part of the city of York. ... The word quatrefoil etymologically means four leaves, and applies to general four-lobed shapes in various contexts. ... For other uses, see Keep (disambiguation). ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Special Sabbaths are a number of fixed Jewish Shabbat days that precede certain Jewish holidays during each year. ... Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ...


The Shambles is a narrow medieval street, lined with shops, boutiques and tea rooms. Most of these premises were once butchers' shops, and the hooks from which carcasses were hung and the shelves on which meat was laid out can still be seen outside some of them. The street also contains the Shrine of Margaret Clitherow, although it is not located in the house where she lived. Shambles - now a popular tourist destination The Shambles is an old street in York, England, with overhanging timber-built shops, now occupied by souvenir shops as opposed to the original butchers (see Slaughterhouse). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For tea rooms used in Japanese tea ceremony, see Japanese tea house The gallery in The Willow Tearooms. ... Saint Margaret Clitherow (1556 – 1586) is a saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Looking towards the Minster from the city walls
Looking towards the Minster from the city walls

Another feature of central York is the Snickelways, narrow pedestrian routes, many of which led towards the former main market-place. The city has many museums, including the Castle Museum, Yorkshire Museum & Gardens, JORVIK Viking Centre, the York Art Gallery, Richard III Museum and the Merchant Adventurers' Hall. The National Railway Museum is situated just beyond the station, and is home to a vast range of transport material and the largest collection of railway locomotives in the world. Included this collection are the world's fastest steam locomotive LNER 4468 Mallard and the world famous 4472 Flying Scotsman, which is being overhauled in the Museum.[40] City of York File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... City of York File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... View of the city looking north-east from the city wall, near the railway station. ... The Snickelways of York (often misspelt Snickleways) are a collection of small streets and footpaths in the city of York, England. ... York Castle Museum is a museum located in York on the site of York Castle, originally built by William the Conqueror in 1086. ... The York Museum Gardens are part of the Yorkshire Museum and lie on the banks of the River Ouse in York, England. ... Modern day Viking coin making at the Jórvík Viking Centre The JORVIK Viking Centre is a museum and visitor attraction in York, England. ... The Richard III Museum is located in the tallest of the four gatehouses, Monk Bar, in Yorks city walls. ... The back of the medieval Merchant Adventures Hall showing the timber frame construction The Merchant Adventurers Hall is a medieval guild–hall in the city of York. ... Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ... Mallard at York Number 4468 Mallard is a London and North Eastern Railway Class A4 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive built in the 1930s by the LNER and designed by Sir Nigel Gresley in England. ... This article is about the locomotive the Flying Scotsman. For the passenger service, see Flying Scotsman (train). ...


York is also noted for its wealth of churches and pubs. Many of the remaining churches in York are from the medieval period. It is said that York contains one church for every week of the year and one pub for every day of the year, and that there is no point within the city walls where one can stand and not be able to see at least one pub and at least one church, but these claims are exaggerated.


Culture

See also: List of people associated with York

Theatre

The Theatre Royal
The Theatre Royal

York has a number of theatres, the Theatre Royal, the Grand Opera House and Joseph Rowntree Theatre. It also has many amateur companies, and is home to the Riding Lights Theatre Company. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 129 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Theatre Royal, York, England in March 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 129 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Theatre Royal, York, England in March 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert... The York Theatre Royal is a theatre in St. ... The Grand Opera House [York]was not originally built as a theatre. ... Riding Lights is a British independent theatre company who have been touring shows nationally and internationally since 1977. ...


Music

A former church, St Margaret's, Walmgate, is now the National Centre for Early Music, host to concerts, broadcasts, competitions and events through the year, especially during the York Early Music Festival. York had around forty-five parish churches in 1300. ...


Media

The York area is served by a local newspaper, The Press (known as the Evening Press until April 2006) and two local radio stations Minster FM and BBC Radio York. It is also served by [email protected], a local free-to-air television station. The Press is the local daily paper for for a substantial area of North and East Yorkshire, based on the city of York. ... Minster FM Minster FM is a local radio station based in Dunnington near York, Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... BBC Radio York is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of North Yorkshire. ...


The University of York has its own television broadcasting channel York Student Television (YSTV) and two campus newspapers nouse and Vision, with Vision currently holding the title of Guardian Student Newspaper of the Year - a position that either one of the two newspapers have held for 4 out of the last 6 years.[citation needed] Its radio station URY is the longest running legal independent radio station in the UK, and was voted BBC Radio 1 Student Radio Station of the Year 2005. This article is about the British university. ... YSTV logo York Student Television (YSTV) is the University of Yorks student television station. ... Nouse is a student newspaper at the University of York, the primary competitor to and rival of Vision. ... Vision (also known as yorkVision and formerly York Student Vision) is one of two student newspapers at the University of York. ... URY redirects here; for other meanings, see URY (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ...


Sports

Kit Kat Crescent is the home ground of York City F.C.
Kit Kat Crescent is the home ground of York City F.C.

The city's football team is York City, currently playing in the Football Conference. York have played as high as the old Second Division but are best known for their "giant killing" status in cup competitions, having reached the FA Cup semi-final in 1955 and beaten Manchester United 3-0 during the 1995 League Cup. Their matches are played at Bootham Crescent. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 378 pixelsFull resolution (2047 × 966 pixel, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 378 pixelsFull resolution (2047 × 966 pixel, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... York City Football Club is an English football club based in York, North Yorkshire. ... Soccer redirects here. ... York City Football Club is an English football club based in York, North Yorkshire. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... From 1892 until 1992, the Football League Second Division was the second highest division overall in English football. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... MUFC redirects here. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... Bootham Crescent (now called Kit-Kat Crescent) is the stadium of English football team York City F.C.. The ground first staged league football in 1929, but York were relegated from the Football League in 2004 and now play in the Nationwide Conference. ...


York also has a strong rugby league history. York F.C., later known as York Wasps were one of the oldest Rugby teams in the country but the effects of a move to the out of town Huntington Stadium, poor results and falling attendances led to their bankruptcy in 2002. The supporters formed a new club, York City Knights, who now play at the same stadium in National League Two. An open rowing club York City Rowing Club is located underneath Lendal Bridge. York Racecourse was established in 1731 and from 1990 has been awarded Northern Racecourse of the Year for 17 years running. This major horseracing venue is located on the Knavesmire and sees thousands flocking to the city every year for the 15 race meetings. The Knavesmire Racecourse also hosted Royal Ascot in 2005. In August racing takes place over the three day Ebor Festival that includes the Ebor Handicap dating from 1843. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... York City Knights are a British rugby league team hailing from York. ... The Huntington Stadium (formerly Ryedale Stadium) is the stadium of English rugby league team York City Knights. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... York City Knights Rugby League Club are a British rugby league team hailing from York. ... The Rugby League National Leagues (currently known as the LHF Healthplan National Leagues as a result of sponsorship) form the basis for rugby league competition in Great Britain below Super League. ... A view of the Ebor stand at York Racecourse York Racecourse is one of the premier horse racing tracks in Europe having won the Racecourse of the Year title in 2003 and come out on top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain’s racecourses. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... The Knavesmire is one of a number of large, marshy undeveloped areas within the city of York, England. ... Ascot Racecourse is a racecourse, located in the village of Ascot in the English county of Berkshire used for thoroughbred horse racing. ... The Ebor festival The Ebor festival is a three day race meeting held at York Racecourse in Great Britain during the month of August. ...

A view of the Ebor Stand at York Racecourse
A view of the Ebor Stand at York Racecourse

The most notable sportsmen to come from York in recent years are footballer Marco Gabbiadini and former England manager Steve McClaren, who both attended Nunthorpe Grammar School (now called Millthorpe School). A view of the Ebor stand at York Racecourse. ... A view of the Ebor stand at York Racecourse. ... A view of the Ebor stand at York Racecourse York Racecourse is one of the premier horse racing tracks in Europe having won the Racecourse of the Year title in 2003 and come out on top in The Times newspaper survey of all Britain’s racecourses. ... Marco Gabbiadini (born 20 January 1968 in Nottingham, England) is a former English-Italian football player whose career lasted 18 years from 1985 to 2003. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... For the ice hockey player, see Steve McLaren. ... Nunthorpe Grammar School was one of two single sex male state grammar schools in the City of York, until the change to a comprehensive system in 1985. ...


Motorbike speedway took place at York. The track in the Burnholme Estate was completed in 1930 and a demonstration event staged. In 1931 the track staged team and open events and the York team took part in the National Trophy.


York International 9s is a rugby league nines tournament which takes place in York each year. York International 9s is an international rugby league nines tournament taking place in York, England. ... Rugby league nines is a version of rugby league played with 9 players on each side. ...


Religion

Religion in York 2001[41]
UK Census 2001 York Yorkshire England
Christian 74.42% 73.07 71.74%
No religion 16.57% 14.09% 14.59%
Muslim 0.58% 3.81% 3.1%
Buddhist 0.21% 0.14% 0.28%
Hindu 0.19% 0.32% 1.11%
Jewish 0.11% 0.23% 0.52%
Sikh 0.05% 0.38% 0.67%
Other religions 0.30% 0.19% 0.29%
Religion not stated 7.57% 7.77% 7.69%
Main article: Religion in York

Christianity is the religion with the largest following in York with 74.4% residents reporting themselves as Christian in the 2001 census. These census figures show no other single religion returned affiliation, as a percentage of population, above the national average for England. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


There are 32 active Anglican churches in York which is home to the Archbishop of York and the Mother Church, York Minster, and administrative centre of the Diocese of York.[42] York is in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Middlesbrough, has eight Roman Catholic churches and a number of different Catholic religious orders.[43] The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... This article is about the Christian buildings of worship. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... The Diocese of York is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Middlesborough redirects here. ...


Other Christian denominations that are active in York include Religious Society of Friends who have three meeting houses in York,[44] Methodists with the York North and York South circuits of The Methodist Church York and Hull District,[45] and Unitarians. There is one Mosque in York which also contains a UK Islamic Mission Islamic centre.[46] Quaker redirects here. ... Sydney Friends meeting house A Friends meeting house is a place of worship for the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ...


Noted York people

For more details on this topic, see List of people from York.

This article is about the scholar Alcuin of York. ... Saint William of York, (died 1154) also known as William FitzHerbert, William I FitzHerbert and William of Thwayt, was an English bishop and Archbishop of York. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... John Ball (d. ... Saint Margaret Clitherow (1556 – 1586) is a saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For other uses, see Guido Fawkes (disambiguation). ... John Earle (c. ... John Aislabie (December 4, 1670- June 18, 1742) was a British politician, notable for his involvement in the South Sea Bubble and for creating the water garden at Studley Royal. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Sir Richard Hotham Richard Hotham was born the youngest of five children in York in October 1722, but otherwise very little is known about his childhood. ... John Flaxman (July 6, 1755 - December 7, 1826), was an English sculptor and draughtsman. ... Nathan Drake (1766–1836), English essayist and physician, son of Nathan Drake, an artist, was born at York. ... William Etty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... George Hennet supplied the atmospheric traction pipes to the South Devon railway, then brought them back for scrap when the system was removed. ... Lord Rosse William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse KP (June 17, 1800 – October 31, 1867) was born in Monkstown, County Cork and was an Irish astronomer. ... George Hudson George Hudson (probably March 10, 1800 - December 14, 1871), English railway financier, known as the Railway King, was born in Howsham, in the parish of Scrayingham in the East Riding of Yorkshire, north of Stamford Bridge, east of York. ... A Hansom cab. ... William Hepworth Thompson (27 March 1810 - 1 October 1886) was an English classical scholar and Master of Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Dr. John Snow John Snow (16 March 1813 – 16 June 1858) was a British physician and a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene. ... Joseph Rowntree (24 May 1836 – 24 February 1925) was a Quaker philanthropist and businessman. ... Albert Joseph Moore (1841-1893), English decorative painter, was born at York on the 4th of September 1841. ... Silvanus Phillips Thompson (June 19, 1851 – June 12, 1916). ... James Hack Tuke (September 13, 1819 - January 13, 1896) was born at York, the son of Samuel Tuke. ... Henry Scott Tuke Henry Scott Tuke (12 June 1858–13 March 1929), British painter, is best remembered for his paintings of naked boys, which have earned him the status of a pioneer of gay male culture. ... Benjamin Seebohm Rowntree often known simply as Seebohm Rowntree (7 July 1871–7 October 1954) was a British sociological researcher, social reformer and industrialist. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... John Edward Christopher Hill (February 6, 1912 - February 23, 2003) was an English Marxist historian and the author of many history textbooks. ... Frankie Howerd OBE (born Francis Alick Howard, 6 March 1917 – 19 April 1992), was a distinctive English comedian and comic actor whose career spanned six decades. ... Charles Whiting (December 18, 1926 – July 24, 2007[1]), was a British writer and military historian and with some 350 books of fiction and non-fiction to his credit, under his own name and a variety of pseudonyms. ... John Barry, OBE (born John Barry Prendergast on 3 November 1933 in York, England) is a renowned Golden Globe and five-time Academy Award-winning English film score composer. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... For the ice hockey player, see Steve McLaren. ...

Photo gallery

See also

The York Mystery Plays refers to a cycle of forty-eight Mystery Plays based on stories taken from the Bible, performed around Corpus Christi day in the city of York, England from the Middle Ages until 1569. ...

References

  1. ^ "Lower (Britannia Inferior) and Upper Britain (Britannia Superior)", VanderBilt.edu, 24 October 2007. 
  2. ^ "Roman York - a brief introduction to York's Roman History", YorkRomanFestival.com, 25 October 2007. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Timeline", VisitYork.org, 25 October 2007. 
  4. ^ Hall, Richard [1996] (1996). English Heritage: Book of York, 1st Ed., B.T.Batsford Ltd, 13. ISBN 0-7134-7720-2. 
  5. ^ Roman Place-Names. Win Scutt (2006). Retrieved on 2007-09-25.
  6. ^ Hall, Richard [1996] (1996). English Heritage: Book of York, 1st Ed., B.T.Batsford Ltd, 27. ISBN 0-7134-7720-2. 
  7. ^ a b c York's history. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  8. ^ Willis, Ronald (1988). The illustrated portrait of York, 4th Ed, Robert Hale Limited, 35. ISBN 0-7090-3468-7. 
  9. ^ Willis, Ronald (1988). The illustrated portrait of York, 4th Ed, Robert Hale Limited, 26-27. ISBN 0-7090-3468-7. 
  10. ^ a b Shannon, John; Tilbrook, Richard (1990). York - the second city. Jarrold Publishing, 2. ISBN 0 7117 0507 0. 
  11. ^ York history timeline. YorkHistory.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  12. ^ a b York Minster: a very brief history. The Dean and Chapter of York (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  13. ^ Jorvik: Viking York. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  14. ^ York. 1911Encyclopedia.org. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  15. ^ Norman and Medieval York. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
  16. ^ Death in York. BBC (2006-09-28). Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  17. ^ a b The Age of Decline. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  18. ^ a b c Post-medieval York. York Archaeological Trust. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  19. ^ Georgian York. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  20. ^ a b c The Railway Age to the present day. City of York Council (2006-12-20). Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  21. ^ Hall, Richard [1996] (1996). English Heritage: Book of York, 1st Ed., B.T.Batsford Ltd, 25. ISBN 0-7134-7720-2. 
  22. ^ Dennis, Ian A.; Macklin, Mark G.; Coulthard, Tom J.; Brewer, Paul A. (2002). The impact of the October–November 2000 floods on contaminant metal dispersal in the River Swale catchment, North Yorkshire, UK 1. Wiley InterScience. Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  23. ^ Welcome to York - York at a Glance. York Tourism Board (2005). Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  24. ^ Neighbourhood Statistics - York (Local Authority). Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  25. ^ Labour Market Profile York. NOMIS - official labour market statistics (2006). Retrieved on 2008-02-19.
  26. ^ The Major Employers in the City of York Council area.. City of York Council (2006). Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  27. ^ a b The Future York Group Report: An Independent Strategic Review of the York Economy (PDF). The Future York Group Report (June 2007). Retrieved on 2008-01-22.
  28. ^ More jobs lost at chocolate firm. BBC (2006). Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  29. ^ Job losses 'bitter blow' for city. BBC (2006). Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  30. ^ About Science City York. Science City York (2006). Retrieved on 2008-01-19.
  31. ^ Regional Gross Value AddedPDF (1.79 MB) Office of National Statistics (2005) (pp.240-253)
  32. ^ English local elections 2007 - York. BBC (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  33. ^ a b History along the River Ouse. British Waterways. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  34. ^ Park & Ride. City of York Council (2007-08-31). Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  35. ^ a b c Trains. City of York Council (2007-08-31). Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  36. ^ Up in the air for Elvington. Evening Press (2003-09-09). Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  37. ^ York Air Coach. First Group plc. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  38. ^ a b York. First Group plc. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  39. ^ Dickinson, David (1997). Clifford's Tower: Massacre at York (1190). Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  40. ^ Flying Scotsman. National Railway Museum. Retrieved on 2007-09-03.
  41. ^ United Kingdom Census 2001 (2001). York (Local Authority). neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  42. ^ Welcome, The Diocese of York (2007), retrieved on 6 November 2007
  43. ^ Parishes, Middlesbrough Diocese (2007), retrieved on 5 November 2007
  44. ^ Home, Quakers in the York area, retrieved on 6 November 2007
  45. ^ Circuits & Churches, The Methodist Church York and Hull District, retrieved on 5 November 2007
  46. ^ UKIM Educational Centre Project, UK Islamic Mission Islamic (2007), retrieved on 5 November 2007

is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The River Swale is a river in Yorkshire, England and a major tributary of the River Ure, which itself becomes the River Ouse, emptying into the North Sea via the Humber Estuary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Locomotives arranged around the turntable in the Great Hall. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Guides and maps

  • Where In York Local independent website for events, business listings, clubs and societies, weddings, jobs and useful information.
  • York travel guide from Wikitravel
  • York Guide by NorthYorks.com
  • York Tourism, the official site of York
  • York Pass
  • York Attractions Places of interest in York
  • Virtual Tour of York Tour the City by hundreds of panoramic views from 2000 to the present day.
  • York Guide Online since 2001 studies of York by independent York residents
  • York Insiders' City Guide York Insiders' City Guide
  • York Pub Guide York Pub Listings
  • Essential York Essential Guide to York
  • York Virtual Tour
  • Staal, Maria, Romans, Vikings, Churches and Chocolate: The History of York in a Nutshell (2007, FTK Publishing ISBN 9780955734403 Paperback)

Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

Local media

  • The Press The local newspaper's site with news, sport, what's on and tourism information.
  • York Student Television England's oldest student TV station
  • [email protected], Independent TV station

Academic

  • The University of York
  • York St John University
  • The National Centre for Early Music
  • The National Science Learning Centre

History

  • Large site dedicated to the History of York
  • Timeline of York's history and a few articles.

Photos and images

  • Imagine York: Historic Photographs Online Council Library Archive of historic photographs of York, searchable by keyword.
  • The Evelyn collection of picture of York from the early 1900s [1]
  • City of York Council's flood 2000 archive
  • Pictures of York by people in York
  • Red Hot Chilli Project - Gallery - York
  • Pictures of Steam Locos in York
  • York stories and walks

The Evelyn collection is a collection of images of York from the early 1900s taken by Dr William Arthur Evelyn. ...

Weather

  • Average weather condition

Coordinates: 53°57′30″N, 1°04′48″W This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
York Official site for visitors, Book hotels in York, B&Bs, Camping - Search events, attractions and transport ... (0 words)
York is a compact walled riverside city and home to countless world-class attractions, museums and galleries.
York is a year round destination offering a lively café bar and restaurant culture and vibrant entertainment and festivals.
Experience a new side to York after dark with cutting-edge outdoor artwork, exhibitions, site-specific performances and tours in some of the ancient city’s many special places at Illuminating York.
Lewis and Clark . Inside the Corps . The Corps . York | PBS (1849 words)
That York had sincere concern for the safety of the expedition members, particularly Clark, is illustrated in an episode involving Clark, Sacgawea, her son, and her husband, Toussaint.
York is not mentioned during the 11-day period the explorers spent struggling to survive while passing through the Bitterroot Mountains along the ancient Lolo trail.
York is not mentioned again until the party returned to the villages of the Nez Perce Indians along today’s Clearwater River, Idaho.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m