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Encyclopedia > Yonkers, New York
Yonkers, New York
Flag of Yonkers, New York
Flag

Seal
Nickname: The Terrace City
Location in the State of New York
Coordinates: 40°56′29″N 73°51′52″W / 40.94139, -73.86444
Country United States
State New York
County Westchester
Founded 1646
Incorporated 1872
Government
 - Mayor Philip A. Amicone
Area
 - Total 20.3 sq mi (52.6 km²)
 - Land 18.1 sq mi (46.8 km²)
 - Water 2.2 sq mi (5.8 km²)
Elevation 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 196,086
 - Density 10,833.5/sq mi (4,189.9/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 10701-10710
Area code(s) 914
FIPS code 36-84000[1]
GNIS feature ID 0971828[2]
Website: http://www.cityofyonkers.com

Yonkers is the fourth largest city in the U.S. State of New York (it falls behind New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester), and the largest city in Westchester County, with a population of 196,086 (according to the 2000 census). More recent estimates put the population at 197,234 in 2002, 197,126 in 2004 and 196,425 in 2005. Yonkers borders the New York City borough of The Bronx and is 2 miles (3 km) north of Manhattan at the cities' two respective closest points. Image File history File links Yonkers_flag. ... Image File history File links Yonkers_seal. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the state. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the state. ... List of New York counties Map of the counties of New York State (click for larger version) Albany County: formed in 1683 as one of the original 12 counties. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Philip A. Amicone is the forty first Mayor of the City of Yonkers, NY. He took office January 1, 2004 after serving eight years as Deputy Mayor. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... 914 is the area code for Westchester County, New York. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... This article is about the state. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Bronx redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


The city is home to several attractions, an example of which is Yonkers Raceway, a harness racing track that has renovated its grounds and clubhouse and added legalized video slot machine gambling in 2006. There is also a large shopping area along Central Park Avenue (NY 100), informally called "Central Avenue" by area residents, a name it takes officially a few miles north in White Plains, New York. Yonkers Raceway is a harness racing track located at the intersection of Central Park Avenue and Yonkers Avenue (between exits 1 and 2 of the New York State Thruway) in Yonkers, New York near New York City border. ... A trotter training at Vincennes hippodrome Harness racing is a form of horse-racing in which the horses race in a specified gait. ... Slot machines in the Trump Taj Mahal A slot machine (American English), poker machine (Australian English), or fruit machine (British English) is a certain type of casino game. ... Gamble redirects here. ... Junction Location I-87 0. ... For other places with the same name, see White Plains (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Geography

The city is spread out over hills rising from near sea level at the eastern bank of the Hudson River to 416 feet (126 m) at Sacred Heart Church, whose spire can be seen from Long Island, New York City, and New Jersey. The landscape of the city has been compared to that of San Francisco and Sarajevo. , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... This article is about the island in New York State. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Map of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Sarajevo) Coordinates: , Country Entity Canton Sarajevo Canton Government  - Mayor Semiha Borovac (SDA) Area [1]  - City 141. ...


Yonkers is located at 40°56′29″N, 73°51′52″W (40.941478, -73.864365).[3]


The city occupies 20.3 square miles (52.6 km²), including 46.8 km² (18.1 sq mi) of land and 5.8 km² (2.2 sq mi) (11.02%) of water, according to the United States Census Bureau. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


The Bronx River separates Yonkers from Mount Vernon, Tuckahoe, Eastchester, Bronxville, and Scarsdale to the east. The towns of Greenburgh and Hastings-on-Hudson are to the north, and on the western border is the Hudson River. Bronx River in Westchester County, NY The Bronx River is a river, approximately 24 mi (38 km) long, in southeast New York in the United States. ... For other places with the same name, see Mount Vernon (disambiguation). ... Tuckahoe is the name of some places in the U.S. state of New York: Tuckahoe, Suffolk County, New York Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article contains census data on the entire town of Eastchester, including its two villages. ... Bronxville is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... Scarsdale could be Scarsdale, New York in Westchester County Scarsdale, an ancient hundred of Derbyshire, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Greenburgh is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ... Hastings-on-Hudson is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and...


On the south, Yonkers borders the Riverdale, Woodlawn, and Wakefield sections of the Bronx. In addition, the southernmost point of Yonkers is only 2 miles (3 km) north of the northernmost point of Manhattan when measured from Broadway & Caryl Avenue in Yonkers to Broadway & West 228th Street in the Marble Hill section of Manhattan. Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... Woodlawn Woodlawn (population 7,741) is a neighborhood in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. ... Wakefield is a residential and middle-class section of the northern borough of the Bronx in New York City, bounded by the New York city line with Westchester County to the north, 222nd Street to the south, and the Bronx River, Bronx River Parkway and Metro-North Railroad tracks to... Bronx redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Marble Hill is the northernmost section of the borough of Manhattan in New York, New York. ...


Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there are 196,086 people, 74,351 households, and 49,294 families residing in the city. The population density is 10,847.5 people per square mile (4,187.5/km²). There are 77,589 housing units at an average density of 4,292.2/sq mi (1,656.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 56.18% White, 16.61% African American, 0.44% Native American, 4.86% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 13.44% from other races, and 4.42% from two or more races. 25.93% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. 19.9% were of Italian and 11.6% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000. 61.3% spoke English, 22.7% Spanish, 3.9% Italian, 6% Arabic and 1.3% Portuguese as their first language. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Languages Italian, Sicilian, Neapolitan, Corsican, Sardinian, Emiliano-Romagnolo, Ligurian, Lombard, Piedmontese, Venetian, Ladin, Friulian Religions predominantly Roman Catholic      The Italians are a Southern European ethnic group found primarily in Italy and in a wide-ranging diaspora throughout Western Europe, the Americas and Australia. ... The United States 2000 Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Arabic redirects here. ...


There are 74,351 households out of which 30.9% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.2% are married couples living together, 17.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 33.7% are non-families. 29.2% of all households are made up of individuals and 11.9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.61 and the average family size is 3.23. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 24.3% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 30.6% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 36 years. For every 100 females there are 88.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 84.2 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $44,663, and the median income for a family is $53,233. Males have a median income of $41,598 versus $34,756 for females. The per capita income for the city is $22,793. 15.5% of the population and 13.0% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 24.8% of those under the age of 18 and 9.9% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


History

The land on which the city is built was once part of a 24,000 acre (97 km²) land grant that ran from the current Manhattan/Bronx border at Marble Hill northwards for 12 miles (19 km), and from the Hudson River eastwards to the Bronx River. This grant was given in July of 1645 by New Netherland Director-General Willem Kieft to Adriaen van der Donck, originally named Colen Donck. Van der Donck was known locally as the Jonkheer or Jonker (etymologically, "young gentleman"; in effect, "Esquire"), a word from which the name "Yonkers" is directly derived. Van der Donck built a saw mill near where the Nepperhan Creek met the Hudson; the Nepperhan is now also known as the Saw Mill River. Marble Hill is the northernmost section of the borough of Manhattan in New York, New York. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... Bronx River in Westchester County, NY The Bronx River is a river, approximately 24 mi (38 km) long, in southeast New York in the United States. ... States which were part of New Netherlands Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... Willem Kieft (1597-1647) was a Dutch merchant and director-general of New Netherland (of which New Amsterdam, later New York City, was the primary settlement), from 1638 until 1647. ... Portrait of Adriaen van der Donck Adriaen Cornelissen van der Donck (ca. ... Colen Donck was the title of a large Dutch-American owned estate of of 24,000 acres (a patroonship) originally owned by Adriaen van der Donck in New Netherland, located in present day New York City on the mainland north of Manhatten. ... Jonkheer (female equivalent: Jonkvrouw) is a Dutch predicate of nobility. ... This article is about the title. ... For the 1922 film starring Oliver Hardy, see The Sawmill. ... The Saw Mill River is a 20 mile (32 km) long tributary of the Hudson River that flows from Chappaqua to Yonkers, where it empties into the Hudson. ...

Near the site of van der Donck's mill is Philipse Manor Hall, a Colonial-era manor house which today serves as a museum and archive, offering many glimpses into life before the American Revolution. The original structure (later enlarged) was built around 1682 by Frederick Philipse, a wealthy Dutchman who, by the time of his death, had amassed an enormous estate which encompassed the entire modern City of Yonkers, as well as several other Hudson River towns. Philipse's great-grandson, Frederick Philipse III, was a prominent Loyalist during the American Revolution, who, because of his political leanings, was forced to flee to England. Image File history File links Summary Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site. ... Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site. ... Philipse Manor Hall State Historic Site. ... Frederick Philipse (1626-1702) Frederick Philipse I, Lord of Philipse Manor, owned the vast stretch of land spanning from Spuyten Duyvil in the Bronx to the Croton River. ... Britannia offers solace and a promise of compensation for her exiled American born Loyalists. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen...


For its first two hundred years, Yonkers was a small farming town with an active waterfront. Yonkers's later growth rested largely on developing industry. In 1853, the Otis Elevator Company, opened the first elevator factory in the world on the banks of the Hudson. Around the same time, the Alexander Smith and Sons Carpet Company (in the Saw Mill River Valley) expanded to 45 buildings, 800 looms, and over 4,000 workers and was known as one of the premier carpet producing centers in the world. In 1892, Smith carpets were sent to Moscow for the czar's coronation. Bakelite, the first completely synthetic plastic, was invented in Yonkers circa 1906, and manufactured there until the late 1920s. The Otis Elevator Company is the worlds largest manufacturer of vertical transportation systems, principally elevators and escalators. ... Bakelite is a material based on the thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin, polyoxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride developed in 1907–1909 by Belgian-American Dr. Leo Baekeland. ...


Early in the 20th Century, Yonkers also hosted a brass era automobile maker, Colt Runabout Company;[4] despite the car's seemingly glowing performance, the company went under. Car redirects here. ...


Yonkers was also the headquarters of the Waring Hat Company, at the time the nation's largest hat manufacturer. World War II saw the city's factories manufacture such items as tents and blankets in the Alexander Smith and Sons Carpet Factory and tanks in the Otis Elevator factory. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


After World War II, however, with increased competition from less expensive imports, Yonkers lost much of its manufacturing activity. The Alexander Smith Carpet mill fell on hard times and ceased operation on June 24, 1954. In 1983, the Otis Elevator Factory finally closed its doors. With the loss of jobs in the city itself, Yonkers followed the trend of many suburban cities after World War II, becoming primarily a commuter city. Yonkers' excellent transportation infrastructure, including three commuter railroad lines (now two) and five parkways and freeways, as well as its 15-minute drive from Manhattan, made it a desirable city to live in. Yonkers' manufacturing sector, however, has recently shown a resurgence. A Kawasaki railroad cars assembly plant opened in 1986 in the former Otis plant, producing the new R142A and R160B cars for the New York City Subway, and the PA4 and upcoming PA5 series for PATH. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Kawasaki Heavy Industries Rolling Stock Company ) is the rolling stock production division of Kawasaki Heavy Industries. ... A R142A trainset on the 6 line approaches Parkchester station in the Bronx. ... The R160B is a class of New York City Subway cars. ... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ...


Aside from being a manufacturing center, Yonkers also played a key role in the development of entertainment in the United States. In 1888, Scottish immigrant John Reid founded the first golf course in the United States, St. Andrew's Golf Club, in Yonkers. On January 4, 1940, Yonkers resident Edwin Howard Armstrong transmitted the first FM radio broadcast (on station W2XCR) from the Yonkers home of C.R. Runyon, a co-experimenter. Yonkers also had the longest running pirate radio station, owned by Allan Weiner during the 70s through the 80s. In spite of this historic broadcast, Yonkers has the dubious distinction of being the largest city in the United States to not have a broadcast station licensed to it, but WVIP / WRTN 93.5 FM has been in Yonkers, NY since the 1950s. One of the main reasons for this is its central location in the New York City market, with many nearby stations crowding the airwaves. John Reid may refer to: John Reid (UK politician) (born 1947), British politician, cabinet minister and current Home Secretary. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 – January 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ... Allen H. Weiner (born June 12, 1953, Yonkers, New York) is a long-time pirate radio operator and activist. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The Irish-American community plays a prominent role in Yonkers, and the city hosts one of the oldest St. Patrick's Day parades in the country. St. ...


The city is also home to a large Italian-American community, many of whom moved to the city after originally settling in the Bronx and in Brooklyn. The city hosts a large Columbus Day festival with a Miss Italian-American pageant. An Italian American is an American of Italian descent and/or dual citizenship. ... Columbus Day is a holiday celebrating the anniversary of Christopher Columbuss arrival in the Americas, which happened on the October 12, 1492 in the Julian calendar, or October 21, 1492 in the modern Gregorian calendar. ...


There also once was a significant Jewish population (the Broadway plays Hello Dolly! and Lost in Yonkers both take place within the Yonkers Jewish community). However, its size has dwindled (but not vanished) as the older generation dies off and the younger generation moves to the Sunbelt or to other (usually more affluent) parts of metropolitan New York City, with the trend accelerating after the housing integration court battles (see below). However, in recent years, some areas bordering similar neighborhoods in Riverdale are seeing an influx of Orthodox Jews. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Hello, Dolly! is a musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilders 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. ... Image used on the Playbill for Lost in Yonkers Lost in Yonkers is a play by Neil Simon that opened on Broadway in 1991. ... Categories: Stub | Belt regions of the United States ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... Orthodox Judaism is one of the three major branches of Judaism. ...


There was a years-long battle over housing integration in the 1980s and 1990s, which ended only after a court ruling nearly bankrupted the city government, by imposing exponentially increasing contempt of court penalties after the then-mayor refused to build public housing outside of the traditionally black and Latino neighborhoods downtown. (See "Image", below.)


Neighborhoods

Though Yonkers contains many small residential enclaves and communities, it can conveniently be divided into four quarters, demarcated by the Saw Mill River. There are roughly 37 or more distinct neighborhoods, but these names are out of date only being used by Real Estate Agents, along with a few other natives.


Northeast Yonkers

This is a heavily Irish-American and Italian-American area. Though suburban, it is noticeably less so than the Town of Greenburgh to the north. House sizes vary widely, from small houses set close together, to some larger houses in areas like Lawrence Park. Tuckahoe Road, which intersects Central Avenue, contains many stores as well. Notable former residents include Steven Tyler of the rock band Aerosmith (born Steven Tallarico), whose childhood home was just off Central Avenue. Northeastern Yonkers contains the Crestwood section of Yonkers, as well as several other enclaves. Landmarks include St Vladimir's Seminary, the Tanglewood Shopping Center (one-time home of the Tanglewood Boys gang), as well as Sarah Lawrence College. The Lawrence Park and Cedar Knolls sections are unique in many ways from the rest of Northeast Yonkers. These two neighborhoods include more upscale housing and residents are generally commuters to Manhattan. This is mostly due to the promixity of various nearby Metro-North commuter railroad stations. Both sections are heavily white but unlike most other Yonkers neighborhoods are not dominated by any particular ethnicity. Because they share the zip code of the neighboring upscale village of Bronxville, many residents feel they are more a part of Bronxville than Yonkers even though they still pay taxes to and get services from the latter. Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánach) are citizens of the United States who can claim ancestry originating in the west European island of Ireland. ... An Italian American is an American of Italian descent and/or dual citizenship. ... Greenburgh is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ... Stephen Victor Tallarico (born March 26, 1948 in Yonkers, New York),[1] better known as Steven Tyler (and often nicknamed The Demon of Screamin) is an American musician and songwriter. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... Crestwood is a neighborhood in Yonkers, New York. ... Saint Vladimirs Orthodox Theological Seminary is an Orthodox Christian seminary located in Crestwood, New York. ... The Tanglewood Boys is an Italian-American gang from Yonkers, New York. ... Sarah Lawrence is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Metro-North (officially MTA Metro-North Railroad) is a suburban commuter railroad running service from New York City to the northern suburbs in New York State and Connecticut. ... Bronxville is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... Bronxville is a village located in Westchester County, New York. ... Yonkers, just north of New York City in Westchester County, is the fourth largest city in the U.S. state of New York, with a population of 196,086 (according to the 2000 census). ...


Northwest Yonkers

Northwest Yonkers is a collection of widely varying neighborhoods, spanning from the Hudson River to around the New York State Thruway/I-87 and from Ashburton Avenue north to the Hastings-on-Hudson border. With the Hudson River bordering it to the west, this area has many beautiful Victorian-era homes with panoramic views of the Palisades. An interest in historic preservation has taken hold in this neighborhood in recent years, as demonstrated on streets like Shonnard Terrace, Delavan Place and Hudson View Terrace. The population of northwestern Yonkers is probably the most ethnically diverse in the city. , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... Hastings-on-Hudson is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ...


Landmarks include the Hudson River Museum, Untermyer Park and the Lenoir Nature Preserve. The significant amount of surviving Victorian architecture and 19th century estates in northwest Yonkers has attracted many filmmakers in recent years. The Hudson River Museum, located in Yonkers, New York, is the oldest and largest museum in Westchester County. ...


The two block section of Palisade Ave between Chase and Roberts Ave in northwest Yonkers is colloquially known as the "end" of Yonkers. It was and still is the only retail and food shopping area in the neighborhood, and was well known by the local kids for an original soda fountain store "Uricks". It was once the end of the # 2 trolley line. The # 2 bus replaced the trolley line. One part of Yonkers that is sometimes overlooked is Nepera Park. This is a small section at the northern part of Nepperhan Avenue on the Hastings-on-Hudson border.

#4 Beeline bus heading west on McLean Ave. at Central Ave. in southeast Yonkers
#4 Beeline bus heading west on McLean Ave. at Central Ave. in southeast Yonkers

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1143x789, 157 KB) Neoplan USA AN-460 as Bee-Line 530 on 4 Route on McLean Avenue, Yonkers I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1143x789, 157 KB) Neoplan USA AN-460 as Bee-Line 530 on 4 Route on McLean Avenue, Yonkers I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Southeast Yonkers

Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church
Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church

Southeast Yonkers is mostly Irish-American (a lot of the Irish being native born) and a good amount of Italian-Americans. Much of the architecture and types of stores in the area cause southeastern Yonkers to bear a greater resemblance to certain parts of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, or Staten Island than to points north. This is not surprising as southeastern Yonkers is largely within walking distance of the Riverdale, Woodlawn, and Wakefield sections of the Bronx. Many residents regard eastern McLean Avenue, home to a vibrant Irish community shared with the Woodlawn section of the Bronx, to be the true hub of Yonkers. Similarly, a portion of Midland Avenue in the Dunwoodie section has been called the "Little Italy" of Yonkers. Landmarks of southeastern Yonkers include the Cross County Shopping Center, Yonkers Raceway, and St. Joseph's Seminary in the Dunwoodie neighborhood, which was visited by Pope John Paul II in October of 1995 and later by Pope Benedict XVI in April of 2008. Bronx redirects here. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... Woodlawn (population 7,741) is a neighborhood in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. ... Wakefield is a residential and middle-class section of the east Bronx in New York City, bounded by the New York city line with Westchester County to the north, Edenwald and Laconia Avenues to the east, 224th Street to the south, and the Bronx River, Bronx River Parkway, Metro-North... Dunwoodie is a neighborhood in Yonkers, New York, noted for being the home of St. ... Cross County Shopping Center logo The Cross County Shopping Center is an open-air shopping mall located in the Dunwoodie section of Yonkers, New York at the crossroads of the New York State Thruway/Central Park Avenue and the Cross County Parkway. ... St. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...


Southwest Yonkers

Riverdale Avenue looking north from the Bronx line
Riverdale Avenue looking north from the Bronx line

This area in Yonkers has suffered from past economic, political, and social challenges that hindered many positive social changes. However, the area presently reveals a decrease in crime rate and a juxtaposition of poverty and revitalization that mirrors newly gentrified neighborhoods of New York City's Harlem and Brooklyn. Off of South Broadway (a major thoroughfare) one can find residential neighborhoods, such as Nodine Hill, Park Hill, and Hudson Park (off the Hudson River) with residential streets of turn-of-the-century mansions, and upscale luxury rentals and condominiums. Other upscale neighborhoods are Ludlow Park, Hudson Park & Van Cortlandt Crest, off Riverdale Avenue, right over the Riverdale border - the former alongside the Hudson River. The area is also home to the historic Phillips Manor, the Hudson River Museum[1] with its Andrus Planetarium and a state of the art Yonkers Public Library[2] with panoramic Hudson River views. Image File history File linksMetadata Yonkers_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Yonkers_800. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Park Hill is a neighborhood in southwestern Yonkers, New York. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and...


Many southwesterners are of African, Caribbean, Italian, or Hispanic decent while an influx those from other cultural backgrounds has continued to shape a culturally diverse community. Some neighborhoods right on the Riverdale border are increasingly becoming home to Orthodox Jews. The revitalization of the downtown Yonkers/Getty Square area has helped to nurture growth for Southwest Yonkers. In the early 2000s several new luxury apartment buildings were built along the Hudson, as well as a new monument park, renovation of a Victorian-era pier, a new public library housed in the remodeled Otis elevator factory. Many new projects are intended to revitalize downtown Yonkers. World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... West Indies redirects here. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... Riverdale Riverdale (population approximately 45,000, according to the 2000 U.S. Census) is a middle- and upper-class residential neighborhood in the northwest Bronx, New York City. ... Orthodox Judaism is one of the three major branches of Judaism. ...


Transportation

Mass transit

The Yonkers Metro-North train station.
The Yonkers Metro-North train station.

Yonkers is among the cities with the highest transit ridership. It has four Hudson-Line Metro-North Railroad stations providing commuter service to New York City: Ludlow, Yonkers, Glenwood and Greystone. The Yonkers station is also served by Amtrak. Several Harlem-Line stations are on or very near the city's eastern border. These include Wakefield, Mt. Vernon West, Fleetwood, Bronxville, Tuckahoe and Crestwood. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 507 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographed by Daniel Case 2007-03-22. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 496 pixelsFull resolution (818 × 507 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographed by Daniel Case 2007-03-22. ... The following is a list of United States cities of 100,000+ inhabitants with the 50 highest rates of public transit commuting, according to data from the 2000 Census. ... The Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, or MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by an authority of New York State, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or, more simply, the MTA. Metro-North runs service between New York... The Ludlow train station serves the residents of the Ludlow neighborhood of Yonkers, New York via Metro-North Railroads Hudson Division line. ... The Yonkers, New York train station serves the residents of downtown Yonkers via Metro-North Railroads Hudson Division line. ... The Glenwood train station serves the residents of the Glenwood neighborhood of Yonkers, New York via Metro-North Railroads Hudson Division line. ... The Greystone train station serves the residents of the Greystone neighborhood of Yonkers, New York via Metro-North Railroads Hudson Division line. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The Wakefield Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the Wakefield section of The Bronx via the Harlem Line, and it is the last station on the line before it crosses into Westchester County, New York. ... The Mount Vernon West Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of Mount Vernon, New York via the Harlem Line. ... The Fleetwood Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the Fleetwood section of Mount Vernon, New York via the Harlem Line. ... The Bronxville Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the village of Bronxville, New York via the Harlem Line. ... The Tuckahoe Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the village of Tuckahoe, New York via the Harlem Line. ... The Crestwood train station in Yonkers, New York is 16. ...


Bus service is provided by the Westchester County Bee-Line Bus System, and an MTA Bus Company express route to Manhattan. The Bee-Line Bus System, branded on the buses in lowercase as the bee-line system, is a bus system serving Westchester County, New York. ... MTA Bus Company[1]) is brand of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority providing service on routes formerly controlled by the New York City Department of Transportation. ...


Recently, New York Water Taxi has started a ferry service from downtown Yonkers to Manhattan's Financial District. As of January 4, 2008, this service runs four times a day.[5] A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... A view up Broad Street in the Financial District in Manhattan Federal Hall The Financial District of New York City is a neighborhood on the southernmost section of the borough of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the citys major financial institutions, including the New... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Roads and paths

Major limited-access roads in Yonkers include Interstate 87 (the New York State Thruway), the Saw Mill, Bronx River, Sprain Brook and Cross County parkways. US 9, NY 9A and 100 are important surface streets. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Interstate 87 (abbreviated I-87) is a 346 mile (558 km) intrastate interstate highway located entirely within the state of New York. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Saw Mill River Parkway is a part of the New York State highway system. ... The Bronx River Parkway was one of the earliest limited access automobile highways. ... The Sprain Brook Parkway is a part of the New York State highway system. ... Cross County Parkway shield The Cross County Parkway is a parkway which runs east-west across the southern portion of Westchester County, New York. ... Harden Parkway in Salinas, CA. For other uses, see Parkway (disambiguation). ... At 325 miles (523 km), U.S. Route 9s New York segment accounts for more than half the highways total length. ... Route 9A is a 47. ... Junction Location I-87 0. ...


The former New York and Putnam Railroad running through the middle of Yonkers has been converted into bicycling and walking paths going north along the Saw Mill River to Elmsford and south to Van Cortlandt Park. The New York and Putnam Railroad (nicknamed Old Put) was the final name for a railroad line heading north from New York City, halfway between the Hudson River Railroad and New York and Harlem Railroad. ... The Saw Mill River is a 20 mile (32 km) long tributary of the Hudson River that flows from Chappaqua to Yonkers, where it empties into the Hudson. ... Elmsford is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Van Cortlandt Park is a large urban park in the Bronx, NY. It has an area of 1,146 acres (4. ...


Image

Yonkers fares well in most measures of crime. According to a 2003 report by the city it ranked well ahead of other suburbs around New York City, such as Newark, New Jersey, and Paterson, New Jersey, as well as similarly-sized New York cities like Buffalo and Rochester.[6] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... “Paterson” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie First Settled 1789 Founded 1801 Incorporated (City) 1832 Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ...


In the 1980s and 1990s, Yonkers developed a national reputation for racial tension, based on a long-term battle between the City of Yonkers and the NAACP over the building of subsidized low-rent housing. The City wanted to use federal funds to create or expand high-rise housing projects in southwest Yonkers; other groups, led by the NAACP, felt that concentrating subsidized housing in traditionally poor neighborhoods perpetuated poverty. The climax of the battle came when United States district court Judge Leonard Sand imposed a fine on Yonkers which started at $1 and doubled every day until the City capitulated to the federally mandated plan. A history of this battle can be found in Lisa Belkin's 1999 book Show Me a Hero. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...


Education

Public schools in Yonkers are operated by Yonkers Public Schools [3]. Yonkers Public Schools is a school district that serves all of Yonkers, New York. ...


Libraries are operated by the Yonkers Public Library [4].


Revitalization

New Yonkers Public Library
New Yonkers Public Library

Amidst a growing need for increased economic viability in Yonkers, a vast revitalization project proposal, promising to add luxury housing, waterfront development, commercial and retail space, has been designed for the city. With hopes of increasing the city's tourism and economic importance in the state and county, the project is one of the largest revitalization projects ever proposed for any locality within the New York Metropolitan Area, totaling more than $3 billion[5]. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 2920 KB) Yonkers Library, Yonkers, NY. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 2920 KB) Yonkers Library, Yonkers, NY. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Drawing of a self-service store. ... Tourist redirects here. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ...


The project is headed by Westchester County's Louis R. Cappelli, Struever Bros. of Baltimore, and New Jersey's Fidelco Realty. The project is expected to include a controversial Minor League Baseball stadium, and an expansive retail and residential project, adding approximately 800 residential units throughout the downtown area and the waterfront. The community's strong opposition to plans for high rise buildings along their waterfront is so far being ignored by both developers and city government. Westchester County is a suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Louis R. Cappelli is a real estate developer most active in Westchester County, NY. Sometimes called The Donald Trump of Westchester, Cappelli has developed more than four million square feet of mixed use, retail, waterfront, residential, office building, laboratory and parking facilities with a portfolio value exceeding $2 billion. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ...


The project has as its catalyst the "daylighting" of the now buried Saw Mill River, an idea championed by community-based organizations like Groundwork Yonkers [6] and its Saw Mill River Coalition. The Pataki Administration at Scenic Hudson's urging contributed $34 million in funds for daylighting. The concept of a river accompanied by a natural greenway path and commercial development has been successful in the revitalization of downtowns in San Antonio, Texas and Providence, Rhode Island. The Saw Mill River is a 20 mile (32 km) long tributary of the Hudson River that flows from Chappaqua to Yonkers, where it empties into the Hudson. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... The term greenway was coined by taking the green from green belt and adding it to the way from parkway. ... San Antonio redirects here. ... Providence redirects here. ...


Although many city officials and residents find much need for city revitalization and urban redevelopment efforts, controversy has surfaced over the major project. A number of residents feel the project is an insidious attempt by the city government and project officials to enforce a policy of outright gentrification. Due to the use of eminent domain and other methods, some residents are fearful that they will ultimately be the victims in the redevelopment battle. In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... Eminent domain (United States), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Republic of Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate property, or rights in property, without the owner...


Others, however, are staunch proponents of the multi-billion dollar redevelopment effort, foreseeing the transition of Yonkers from a suburban city in the shadows of New York City, to a tourist attraction of economic importance. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Although no official time table has been proposed for the redevelopment project, it will likely take several years before the completion of the project.


Notable people

Raymond Aker (March 10, 1920– January 4, 2003) was a U.S. historian who was noted as an authority on the voyages of Francis Drake in the late 16th century. ... Nancy Allen is the name of: an actress best known for her roles in films including Dressed to Kill and Blow Out,formerly married to Brian De Palma. ... Edwin Howard Armstrong Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 - March 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor. ... Son of Sam redirects here. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... David Falco Berkowitz (born June 1, 1953), better known by his nickname Son of Sam, is an infamous 1970s New York City serial killer who killed six people and wounded several others. ... For other persons named James Blake, see James Blake (disambiguation). ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Mary Jane Blige (born January 11, 1971) is an American R&B, soul, and hip hop soul singer-songwriter, occasional rapper, record producer, actress, and hip hop icon who has sold more than 40 million records and over 10 million singles worldwide. ... Bronx redirects here. ... Lillo Brancato, Jr. ... This article is about the 1993 film. ... Billy Burch (November 20, 1900 in Yonkers, New York - December 30, 1950) was a Americans professional ice hockey forward who played for the Hamilton Tigers, New York Americans, Chicago Blackhawks and Boston Bruins in the National Hockey League. ... The Hamilton Tigers were a National Hockey League (NHL) team that was originally based in Quebec City, Quebec and called the Quebec Bulldogs (1888-1920). ... The New York Americans were a NHL hockey team, the third expansion team in league history and the second to play in the United States. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Chicago Blackhawks are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Sid Caesar (born September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning American comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television series Your Show of Shows, and to younger generations as Coach Calhoun in Grease and Grease 2. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Doug DeWitt (born Douglas Anthony Ittaglio on September 14, 1959) was a middle-weight boxer. ... Earl Simmons (born on December 18, 1970 in Baltimore, Maryland), better known by his stage name DMX is an American rapper and actor who rose to popularity in the late 1990s. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dale Connelly is co-host (with Tom Keith, aka Jim Ed Poole) of The Morning Show on Minnesota Public Radio. ... James Jim Cronin MBE (15 November 1951 - 17 March 2007) was the founder of Monkey World in Dorset. ... Monkey World Logo A Ring-tailed lemur from the walkthrough Monkey World is a 65-acre (0. ... Immolation is a death metal band from Yonkers, New York. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Thomas Laughlin (born February 14, 1971),[2] is an American professional wrestler better known by his ring name, Tommy Dreamer. ... Michel Fokine or Mikhail Mikhailovich Fokin (Михаил Михайлович Фокин) (April 23 [O.S. April 11] 1880) – August 22, 1942) was a groundbreaking Russian choreographer and dancer. ... Lawrence Ferlinghetti Lawrence Ferlinghetti (born Lawrence Ferling[1] on March 24, 1919) is an American poet who is known as the co-owner of the City Lights Bookstore and publishing house, which published early literary works of the Beats, including Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... Daniel Carleton Gajdusek in 1976 when he won the Nobel Prize in Medicine. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Roger Hill is the actor who played Cyrus in the 1979 cult classic The Warriors. ... Gene Krupa (January 15, 1909 – October 16, 1973) was a famous and influential American jazz and big band drummer, known for his highly energetic and flamboyant style. ... The grave of Joe Lapchick in Oakland Cemetery in Yonkers, NY Joseph Bohomiel Lapchick (b. ... Linda Susan Boreman (January 10, 1949 – April 22, 2002), better known by her stage name Linda Lovelace, became famous after starring in the 1972 hardcore porn film Deep Throat. ... Deep Throat is an American pornographic movie released in the summer of 1972, written and directed by Gerard Damiano and starring Linda Lovelace (the pseudonym of Linda Susan Boreman). ... Larry Mann (Unknown - September 14, 1952) was an American stock car driver. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Steve Meretzky Steven Eric Meretzky (born May 1, 1957) is an American computer game designer, with dozens of titles to his credit. ... Zork universe Zork games Zork Anthology Zork trilogy Zork I   Zork II   Zork III Beyond Zork   Zork Zero Enchanter trilogy Enchanter   Sorcerer   Spellbreaker Other games Wishbringer   Return to Zork Zork: Nemesis   Zork Grand Inquisitor Zork: The Undiscovered Underground Topics in Zork Encyclopedia Frobozzica Characters   Kings   Creatures Timeline   Magic   Calendar Zorkmid... Salvatore Giovanni Martirano (b. ... Cathy Moriarty (born November 29, 1960, in New York City) is an American actress. ... John Howard Northrop (July 5, 1891 – May 27, 1987) was an American biochemist who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1946 (with James Batcheller Sumner and Wendell Meredith Stanley) for purifying and crystallizing certain enzymes. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Erik Palladino (born May 10, 1968 in Yonkers, New York) is an American actor, best known for his portrayal of Dr. Dave Malucci in the NBC drama series ER. Born to Peter (a heating contractor) and Queenie (a junior high school teacher) Palladino, he is the youngest of three sons... ER is an Emmy-winning American serial medical drama created by novelist Michael Crichton and set primarily in the emergency room of fictional County General Hospital in Cook County, Chicago, Illinois. ... Patrick Quinlan, born August 28, 1970 in the Bronx, New York, and raised in Yonkers, New York is an American freelance writer, political activist, and novelist. ... This article is about the sport. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Adam Rodriguez (born April 2, 1975 in Yonkers, New York) is an American actor of Puerto Rican and Cuban descent. ... A native of Yonkers, NY, Mark Saltzman began his career in New York City as a script writer and songwriter for Sesame Street, where he earned seven Emmy awards. ... An Emmy Award. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... Andrea Stewart-Cousins is a New York State Senator for the 35th district representing Yonkers, Pleasantville, Dobbs Ferry, Sleepy Hollow, Tarrytown, Elmsford, Irvington, Ardsley and Hastings-on-Hudson. ... Paul Teutul Sr. ... Orange County Choppers store near Montgomery, New York. ... Charles Lewis Tiffany (b. ... The outside of a Tiffany & Co. ... Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) circa 1908 Louis Comfort Tiffany (February 18, 1848 – January 17, 1933) was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass and is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau and... Stephen Victor Tallarico (born March 26, 1948 in Yonkers, New York),[1] better known as Steven Tyler (and often nicknamed The Demon of Screamin) is an American musician and songwriter. ... This article is about the band Aerosmith. ... John Vincent Voight (born December 29, 1938) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Jay S. Walker is a United States entrepreneur who founded Priceline. ... Priceline. ... Richard Yates (February 3, 1926 - November 7, 1992) was an American novelist and short story writer, a chronicler of mid-20th century mainstream American life, often cited as artistically residing somewhere between J.D. Salinger and John Cheever. ... Allen H. Weiner (born June 12, 1953, Yonkers, New York) is a long-time pirate radio operator and activist. ... ... Jayson T. Phillips (born May 27, 1975), also known by his stage name Jadakiss, is an American rapper. ... David Styles (born November 28, 1974), better known as Styles P is an American based rapper. ... Sean D. Jacobs (born November 9, 1976 in Brooklyn, New York), better known as Sheek Louch, is a rapper and member of D-Block, the group formerly known as The Lox, which includes Jadakiss and Styles P. He was born in Brooklyn, although, raised in Yonkers, NY. // After appearing on... W.C. Handy photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 - March 28, 1958) was an African American blues composer, often known as The Father of the Blues. ... Blues music redirects here. ...

Miscellaneous

Some residents call the city "the sixth borough" referring to Yonkers' location on the New York City border, its urban character, and an unsupported vote to be included in the incorporations of boroughs to form New York City. A subway connection was planned between Getty Square and the New York City subway line, but when Yonkers residents voted against the incorporation, the project was abandoned.


In Max Brooks's second novel, World War Z, Yonkers was the setting for the first major confrontation between the US armed forces and a massive army of zombies that had already overwhelmed New York City and much of the Northern United States and Canada; the Battle of Yonkers. It was a spectacular defeat and demoralized the entire country for years afterwards. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War (abbreviated WWZ) is a novel by Max Brooks which chronicles a theoretical zombie apocalypse, specifically the titular Zombie World War, as a series of after-the-fact oral history interviews with prominent survivors. ... Combatants Zombies United States Armed Forces Commanders None President of the United States Strength 10,000,000 50,000 Casualties 1,000,000+ Unknown, heavy casualties. ...


Steve Meretzky created several Infocom games, such as Sorcerer. One of the spells in that game, "Yonk", is named after Yonkers. Zork universe Zork games Zork trilogy Zork I Zork II Zork III Enchanter trilogy Enchanter Sorcerer Spellbreaker Wishbringer Beyond Zork Zork Zero Return to Zork Zork: Nemesis Zork Grand Inquisitor Encyclopedia Encyclopedia Frobozzica Miscellaneous Timeline   Calendar   Magic Double Fanucci Companies Infocom   Activision This article is about the computer game. ...


Dunder Mifflin, the fictional paper supply company from NBC's The Office has a branch in Yonkers. Dunder-Mifflin, Inc. ... This article is about the television network. ... The Office is a television show, broadcast by NBC and co-produced by Deedle-Dee Productions and Reveille Productions, in association with NBC Universal Television Studio. ...


Yonkers is one of the settings in the musical Hello Dolly. Hello, Dolly! is a Broadway musical with a book by Michael Stewart and a score by Jerry Herman. ...


Consumers Union, non-profit publisher of Consumer Reports, is headquartered in Yonkers. Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports, is an independent, nonprofit testing and information organization serving only consumers. ... Consumer Reports is an American magazine published monthly by Consumers Union. ...


References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ No apparent relation to Colt's Patent Firearms. Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (New York: Bonanza Books, 1950), p.63.
  5. ^ New York Water Taxi. "nywatertaxi Yonkers Route", New York Water Taxi. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  6. ^ - 2004 Morgan Quitno Crime Survey accessed February 6, 2006

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Westchester County is a primarily suburban county located in the U.S. state of New York with about 950,000 residents. ... Jonkheer (female equivalent: Jonkvrouw) is a Dutch predicate of nobility. ...

External links

  • Yonkers, New York is at coordinates 40°56′29″N 73°51′52″W / 40.941478, -73.864365 (Yonkers, New York)Coordinates: 40°56′29″N 73°51′52″W / 40.941478, -73.864365 (Yonkers, New York)

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Yonkers is the fourth largest city in the State of New York (it falls behind New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester), and the largest city in Westchester County, with a population of 196,086 (according to the 2000 census).
Yonkers borders the New York City borough of The Bronx and is 2 miles (3 km) north of Manhattan at cities' two respective closest points.
Northwest Yonkers is a collection of widely varying neighborhoods, spanning from the Hudson River to around the New York State Thruway/I-87 and from Ashburton Avenue north to the Hastings-on-Hudson border.
Yonkers, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3425 words)
Yonkers is the fourth-largest city in the U.S. state of New York (behind New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester) and the largest city in Westchester County, with a population of 196,086 (according to the 2000 census).
Yonkers borders the New York City borough of The Bronx and is 2 miles (3 km) north of Manhattan.
Yonkers borders the Riverdale, Woodlawn, and Wakefield sections of the Bronx.
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