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Encyclopedia > Yesterday (song)
"Yesterday"
"Yesterday" cover
Single by The Beatles
from the album Help! in the UK, and later on "Yesterday" ... and Today in the U.S.
B-side(s) "Act Naturally" (U.S.-1965)
"I Should Have Known Better" (UK-1976)
Released 13 September 1965 (U.S.)
4 March 1966 (UK - as part of an EP)
8 March 1976 (UK)
Format vinyl record (7" & 12")
Recorded 14 June 1965
Genre Pop
Length 2:03
Label Capitol Records (USA)
Parlophone/EMI (UK)
Writer(s) Lennon/McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin
Peak chart positions
The Beatles singles chronology
"Let it Be
(1970)
--------------
"Help!"
(1965)
"Yesterday"
(UK-1975)
---
Yesterday
(U.S.-1965)
"Back in the USSR"
(1976)"
------------
"Day Tripper" / "We Can Work It Out""
(1965)
Music sample
" Yesterday"
Problems? See media help.
Help! track listing
Side one
  1. "Help!"
  2. "The Night Before"
  3. "You've Got to Hide Your Love Away"
  4. "I Need You"
  5. "Another Girl"
  6. "You're Going to Lose That Girl"
  7. "Ticket to Ride"
Side two
  1. "Act Naturally"
  2. "It's Only Love"
  3. "You Like Me Too Much"
  4. "Tell Me What You See"
  5. "I've Just Seen a Face"
  6. "Yesterday"
  7. "Dizzy Miss Lizzy"

"Yesterday" is a pop song originally recorded by The Beatles for their album Help! (1965). According to the Guinness Book of Records, "Yesterday" has the most cover versions of any song ever written (although there is strong evidence to suggest that Gershwin's aria "Summertime" is in fact that most widely covered song, with in excess of seven thousand recorded covers in existence). In defense of the "Yesterday" claim, however, BMI asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone, probably cementing the song as the most performed composition of all time. The song remains popular today with more than 3000 recorded cover versions, the first hitting the United Kingdom top 10 three months after the release of Help!. The U.S. single cover for the Beatles album Yesterday. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Help! is the fifth album released by The Beatles, the soundtrack album from their film Help!. Produced by George Martin for EMI Records, the album (in its original British form) contains seven songs that appeared in the movie of the same name, and seven that did not, including the most... Yesterday ... and Today, was the ninth Capitol release by the Beatles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Act Naturally is a song originally recorded by Buck Owens and covered by The Beatles on the album Help! The Beatles version is sung by Ringo Starr and was performed by the band on The Ed Sullivan Show. ... A Hard Days Night track listing Side one A Hard Days Night I Should Have Known Better If I Fell Im Happy Just to Dance with You And I Love Her Tell Me Why Cant Buy Me Love Side two Any Time at All Ill... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... The songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, usually referred to as Lennon/McCartney (sometimes McCartney/Lennon), is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations of all time. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... The CHUM CHART was a ranking of Top 40 songs on CHUM 1050 AM, from 1957 to 1986, and was the longest-running Top 40 chart in the world. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Let It Be track listing Dig It (5) Let It Be (6) Maggie Mae (7) Let It Be is a song written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon/McCartney), released by The Beatles as a single in March 1970 and later the same year as the title track of their... Help! is a song by The Beatles. ... Back in the U.S.S.R. is a song by The Beatles written by Paul McCartney (John Lennon shares songwriting credits), and which opens the double-disc album The Beatles (a. ... A day-tripper is a person who visits a tourist destination, tourist attraction, or visitor attraction from home and returns there on the same day - in other words this excursion does not involve a night away from home. ... We Can Work It Out is a song written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon and released by The Beatles as a double A-sided single with Day Tripper. The song is a classic instance of true Lennon-McCartney collaboration, its authors meeting more closely in a single song only... Image File history File links Yesterdaysample. ... Help! is the fifth album released by The Beatles, the soundtrack album from their film Help!. Produced by George Martin for EMI Records, the album (in its original British form) contains seven songs that appeared in the movie of the same name, and seven that did not, including the most... Help! is a song by The Beatles. ... The Night Before is a song by The Beatles from the album Help!. It was written by Paul McCartney. ... Youve Got to Hide Your Love Away is a song by the English 1960s rock band The Beatles. ... I Need You is a Beatles song on the album Help! (see 1965 in music). ... Another Girl is a song by the Beatles from the album Help!. It is performed in The Bahamas in the film Help!. The track was recorded on Febuary 15, 1965, with the guitar outro overdubbed Febuary 16. ... Youre Going to Lose That Girl is a song by the Beatles from the album Help!, written by John Lennon (and credited to Lennon-McCartney) for the film of the same name. ... Ticket to Ride is a song by The Beatles from their 1965 album, Help!. It was recorded 15 February 1965 at Abbey Road Studios and released as a single in 1965. ... Act Naturally is a song originally recorded by Buck Owens and covered by The Beatles on the album Help! The Beatles version is sung by Ringo Starr and was performed by the band on The Ed Sullivan Show. ... Its Only Love refers to one of the following songs: a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and released by the Beatles in 1965 (on the Help! album in the U.K., and on the Rubber Soul album in the U.S.). a song released as a... You Like Me Too Much is a song by The Beatles written by George Harrison. ... Tell Me What You See is a song by The Beatles from the UK album Help! and the US album Beatles VI. Cover Versions The song has been covered by other artists, including Jacobs Trouble. ... Ive Just Seen a Face is a song by The Beatles. ... Dizzy Miss Lizzy is a song composed and sung by Larry Williams. ... For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Help! is the fifth album released by The Beatles, the soundtrack album from their film Help!. Produced by George Martin for EMI Records, the album (in its original British form) contains seven songs that appeared in the movie of the same name, and seven that did not, including the most... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


"Yesterday" takes the form of an acoustic ballad about a lost loved one. It was the first official recording by The Beatles that relied upon a performance by a single member of the band: McCartney was accompanied solely by a string quartet. The final recording differed so greatly from other works by The Beatles that the other three members of the band vetoed the song's release as a single in the United Kingdom. Although credited to "Lennon/McCartney", as were all Beatles songs written by either member of the pair, the song was written solely by McCartney. A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... In music accompaniment is the art of playing along with a soloist or ensemble, often known as the lead, in a supporting manner as well as the music thus played. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ... The songwriting partnership of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, usually referred to as Lennon/McCartney (sometimes McCartney/Lennon), is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations of all time. ...

Contents

Origins

According to biographers of McCartney and The Beatles, McCartney composed the entire melody in a dream one night in his room at the Wimpole Street home of his then girlfriend Jane Asher and her family. Upon waking, he hurried to a piano, turned on a tape recorder, and played the tune to avoid letting it slip into the recesses of his mind.[1] Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jane Asher (born 5 April 1946) is an English film and television actress and the author of several full-length novels as well as a former girlfriend of Paul McCartney. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Sony reel-to-reel tape recorder. ... For other uses, see Mind (disambiguation). ...


McCartney's initial concern was that he had subconsciously plagiarised someone else's work (known as cryptomnesia). As he put it, "For about a month I went round to people in the music business and asked them whether they had ever heard it before. Eventually it became like handing something in to the police. I thought if no-one claimed it after a few weeks then I could have it."[1] Plagiarism (from Latin plagiare to kidnap) is the practice of claiming, or implying, original authorship or incorporating material from someone elses written or creative work, in whole or in part, into ones own without adequate acknowledgement. ... Cryptomnesia, or concealed recollection, is the name for a theoretical phenomenon involving suppressed or forgotten memories. ...


Upon being convinced that he had not robbed anybody of his melody, McCartney began writing lyrics to suit it. As Lennon and McCartney were known to do at the time, a substitute working lyric, entitled "Scrambled Eggs", was used for the song until something more suitable was written. In his biography, "Many Years From Now", McCartney recalled: "So first of all I checked this melody out, and people said to me, 'No, it's lovely, and I'm sure it's all yours.' It took me a little while to allow myself to claim it, but then like a prospector I finally staked my claim; stuck a little sign on it and said, 'Okay, it's mine!' It had no words. I used to call it 'Scrambled Eggs'."[2] Lyrics are the words in songs. ... Scrambled eggs Scrambled eggs is a dish made from beaten whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken). ...


During the shooting of Help!, a piano was placed on one of the stages where filming was being conducted. McCartney would take advantage of this opportunity to perform "Scrambled Eggs" accompanied by the piano. Richard Lester, the director, was greatly annoyed by this, and eventually lost his temper, telling McCartney to finish writing the song, or he would have the piano removed.[1] McCartney's original lyrics were, "Scrambled eggs, Oh, baby how I love your legs." Help! is a 1965 film starring the The Beatles and featuring Leo McKern, Eleanor Bron, Victor Spinetti, John Bluthal and Roy Kinnear. ... Richard Lester (born January 19, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a UK based film director famous for his work with The Beatles. ...


McCartney originally claimed he had written "Yesterday" during The Beatles' tour of France in 1964; however, the song was not released until the summer of 1965. During the intervening time, The Beatles released two albums, Beatles for Sale and A Hard Day's Night, both of which could have included "Yesterday". Although McCartney has never elaborated his claims, it is likely that the reason for such a long delay, if it existed, was a disagreement between McCartney and George Martin regarding the song's arrangement, or, equally likely, the distaste of the other Beatles for the song.[1] Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A Hard Days Night by the Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night is the third album by The Beatles, released in the UK on 10 July 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... In music, an arrangement loosely describes rewriting a piece of pre-existing music for a specific set of instruments or voices, often in harmony or with additional original material. ...


Lennon later indicated that the song had been around for a while before:

"The song was around for months and months before we finally completed it. Every time we got together to write songs for a recording session, this one would come up. We almost had it finished. Paul wrote nearly all of it, but we just couldn't find the right title. We called it 'Scrambled Eggs' and it became a joke between us. We made up our minds that only a one-word title would suit, we just couldn't find the right one. Then one morning Paul woke up and the song and the title were both there, completed. I was sorry in a way, we'd had so many laughs about it."[3]

McCartney said the breakthrough with the lyrics came during a trip to Portugal in May 1965:

"I remember mulling over the tune 'Yesterday', and suddenly getting these little one-word openings to the verse. I started to develop the idea ... da-da da, yes-ter-day, sud-den-ly, fun-il-ly, mer-il-ly and Yes-ter-day, that's good. All my troubles seemed so far away. It's easy to rhyme those a's: say, nay, today, away, play, stay, there's a lot of rhymes and those fall in quite easily, so I gradually pieced it together from that journey. Sud-den-ly, and 'b' again, another easy rhyme: e, me, tree, flea, we, and I had the basis of it."[4]

On 27 May 1965, McCartney and Asher flew to Lisbon for a holiday in the Algarve, and he borrowed an acoustic guitar from Bruce Welch—whose house they were staying in—and completed the work on "Yesterday".[5] is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Lisboa  - Subregion Grande Lisboa  - District or A.R. Lisbon Mayor Carmona Rodrigues  - Party PSD Area 84. ... Algarve NUTS II region, and the district of Faro in Portugal. ... Bruce Welch (born Bruce Cripps, 2 November 1941 in Bognor Regis, Sussex, England) is an English guitarist, songwriter, producer and singer, best known as a member of The Shadows. ...


The song was offered as a demo to Chris Farlowe prior to The Beatles recording it, but he turned it down as he considered it "too soft."[6] Chris Farlowe is an English pop singer and one-time amateur boxer. ...


Recording

Two days after returning home, the track was recorded at Abbey Road Studios on the 14 June and 17 June 1965. There are conflicting accounts of how the song was recorded, the most quoted one being that McCartney recorded the song by himself, without bothering to involve the other band members.[7] Alternative sources, however, state that McCartney and the other Beatles tried a variety of instruments, including drums and an organ, and that George Martin later persuaded them to allow McCartney to play his acoustic guitar, later on editing in a string quartet for backup. If so, none of the other band members were included in the final recording.[8][9] However, the song was played with the other members of the band in a 1966 Tokyo concert. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany The organ is a keyboard instrument played using one or more manuals and a pedalboard. ... A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ...


McCartney performed two takes of "Yesterday" on 14 June 1965.[10][11] Take 2 was deemed best and used as the master take. A string quartet was overdubbed on take 2 and that version was released.[11] Take 1 was later released on the Anthology 2 compilation without the string overdub. On take 1, McCartney can be heard giving chord changes to George Harrison before starting, but George does not appear to actually play. Take 2 had two lines transposed from the first take: "There's a shadow hanging over me"/"I'm not half the man I used to be,"[10] though it seems clear that their order in take 2 was the correct one, because McCartney can be heard, in take 1, suppressing a laugh at his mistake. This article needs cleanup. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Mastering, a form of audio post-production, is the process of preparing and transferring recorded audio from a source containing the final mix to a data storage device (the master); the source from which all copies will be produced (via methods such as pressing, duplication or replication). ... Overdubbing is a technique used by recording studios to add a supplementary recorded sound to a previously taped musical recording. ... The Beatles Anthology 2 is a compilation album released in March 1996 by Apple Records as part of The Beatles Anthology series. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ...


Release

Eleven years after the U.S. release, EMI released "Yesterday" in the UK
Eleven years after the U.S. release, EMI released "Yesterday" in the UK

Although McCartney had fallen in love with the song, he had a much harder time convincing the other members of the band that it was worthy of an album place, the main objection being that it did not fit in with their image, especially considering that "Yesterday" was extremely unlike other Beatles' songs at the time. This feeling was so strong that the other Beatles—Lennon, Harrison and Ringo Starr—refused to permit the release of a single in the United Kingdom.[1] This did not prevent Matt Monro from recording the first of many cover versions of "Yesterday" to come. His version made it into the top ten in the UK charts soon after its release in the autumn of 1965.[9] Other artists to perform cover versions of this song include Ray Charles, McFly and Sting. The UK single cover for Yesterday. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award and Grammy Award winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... Matt Monro (December 1, 1932- February 7, 1985) was a ballad singer of the 1960s and one of great international postwar entertainers. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... McFly can refer to: McFly (band) Marty McFly, fictional character from the Back to the Future film trilogy, and his family, the McFly family. ... This article is about the musician. ...


The Beatles' influence over their U.S. record label, Capitol, was not as strong as it was over EMI's Parlophone in Britain. A single was released in the U.S., pairing "Yesterday" as the B-Side of "Act Naturally", a track which featured vocals by Ringo, the most popular Beatle in the States at that time. After the tremendous success of "Yesterday", the order in which the songs appeared on the sleeves was changed. The single was charting by 29 September 1965, and topped the charts for a full month, beginning on October 9. The song spent a remarkable total of 11 weeks in the American charts, selling a million copies within five weeks. "Yesterday" was the most-played song on American radio for eight consecutive years, its popularity refusing to abate.[12] Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... Act Naturally is a song originally recorded by Buck Owens and covered by The Beatles on the album Help! The Beatles version is sung by Ringo Starr and was performed by the band on The Ed Sullivan Show. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ...


Meanwhile, in the UK, Help! debuted at number one on August 14, 1965 (the first album ever to do so), and continued to top the charts for nine weeks.[13] According to a website, "Yesterday" was dedicated to Iris Caldwell[14] on the show "Blackpool Night Out". Her mother, Violet, told McCartney that her daughter didn't want to speak to him again because he "didn't have any feelings".[15] During this performance, McCartney sang the song and played acoustic guitar, backed by a string quartet, but not by his fellow Beatles. When The Beatles played "Yesterday" during their 1966 world tour, however, the band played the song in an alternate key of G, with their usual live instrumental lineup of McCartney on electric bass guitar, Harrison and Lennon on electric guitars, and Starr on drums. is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


On 4 March 1966, "Yesterday" was released as an EP in the UK, joined by "Act Naturally" on the A-side with "You Like Me Too Much" and "It's Only Love" on the B-side. By 12 March it had begun its run on the charts. On 26 March 1966, the EP went to number one, a position it held for two months.[16] is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Act Naturally is a song originally recorded by Buck Owens and covered by The Beatles on the album Help! The Beatles version is sung by Ringo Starr and was performed by the band on The Ed Sullivan Show. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... You Like Me Too Much is a song by The Beatles written by George Harrison. ... Its Only Love refers to one of the following songs: a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and released by the Beatles in 1965 (on the Help! album in the U.K., and on the Rubber Soul album in the U.S.). a song released as a... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Later that same year, "Yesterday" was repackaged as the title track for the U.S.-only "Yesterday and Today", the now famous (or infamous) "Butcher Baby" album. 750,000 copies of the album, featuring as its cover a conceptual photo of the band dressed in butcher smocks and draped with pieces of meat and body parts from plastic baby dolls, were printed and stored in Capitol's various U.S. warehouses. Similar photos had already been used early as the cover to the British release of the "Paperback Writer" single and as the cover to a popular music magazine. Initial reactions by disk jockeys and store managers, who were given early release copies, was so negative that Capitol destroyed a portion of the discs and pasted new, less controversial cover photos over the remainder before the album’s release on June 14. Copies of the album with its original "Butcher Baby" cover intact or restored are highly sought-after by collectors. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ... {{Infobox Single | Name = Paperback Writer | Cover = Paperrain. ... Disc jockey at a nightclub. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ten years later on 8 March 1976, "Yesterday" was released by Parlophone as a single in the United Kingdom, featuring "I Should Have Known Better" on the B-side. Entering the charts on 13 March, the single stayed there for seven weeks, but it never rose higher than number 8. The release came about due to the expiration of The Beatles' contract with EMI, Parlophone's parent. EMI released as many singles by The Beatles as they could on the same day, leading to 23 of them hitting the top 100 in the United Kingdom charts, including six in the top 50.[17] is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... A Hard Days Night track listing Side one A Hard Days Night I Should Have Known Better If I Fell Im Happy Just to Dance with You And I Love Her Tell Me Why Cant Buy Me Love Side two Any Time at All Ill... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ...


Awards, accolades and brickbats

"Yesterday" has achieved recognition as being the most recorded song in the history of popular music; its entry in the Guinness Book of Records suggests over 3000 different cover versions to date, by an eclectic mix of artists including Joan Baez, Liberace, Frank Sinatra, Ray Charles, Wet Wet Wet, Plácido Domingo, The Head Shop, and Boyz II Men.[18] In 1976, David Essex did a cover version of the song for the ephemeral musical documentary All This and World War II. After Muzak switched in the 1990s to programs based on commercial recordings, Muzak's inventory grew to include about 500 "Yesterday" covers.[19] At the 2006 Grammy Awards, McCartney performed the song live as a mash-up with Linkin Park and Jay-Z's Numb/Encore. Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Wladziu Valentino Liberace (May 16, 1919 – February 4, 1987), better known by only his last name Liberace (LIB-ber-RAH-chee), was an American entertainer. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Wet Wet Wet are a successful Scottish pop band of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. ... Plácido Domingo José Plácido Domingo Embil KBE (born January 21, 1941[1]), better known as Plácido Domingo, is the world renowned operatic tenor. ... The Head Shop is a psychedelic rock band from New York that released a one-shot, eponymous album on Epic Records in 1969. ... Boyz II Men is an American R&B/soul singing group from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... All This and World War II (1976) is a musical documentary. ... Muzak Holdings LLC is a company, founded in 1934, that is best known for distribution of music to retail stores and other companies. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Linkin Park is a rock band from Agoura Hills, California. ... Jay-Z (aka the Jigga, HOV and Hova, born Shawn Carter on December 4, 1970 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American rapper/hip hop artist and record label executive; one of the most popular and successful rappers of the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Linkin Park singles chronology Breaking the Habit (2004) Numb/Encore (2004) Dirt Off Your Shoulder/Lying From You (2005/2006) Numb/Encore is a Grammy Award-winning song by the rock band Linkin Park and rapper Jay-Z from their 2004 mash-up album Collision Course. ...


"Yesterday" won the Ivor Novello Award for 'Outstanding Song of 1965', and came second for 'Most Performed Work of the Year', losing out to another McCartney composition, "Michelle". The song has received its fair share of acclaim in recent times as well, ranking 13th on Rolling Stone's 2004 list The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.[20] In 1999, Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) placed "Yesterday" third on their list of songs of the 20th century most performed on American radio and television, with approximately seven million performances. "Yesterday" was surpassed only by The Association's "Never My Love" and the Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Loving Feeling".[21] The Ivor Novello Awards, named after the entertainer Ivor Novello, are awards awarded for songwriting and composing. ... Michelle is the title of a love ballad by The Beatles, mainly written by Paul McCartney, which is featured on their Rubber Soul album. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2004. ... This article is about the year. ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ... Cover from 1966s And Then. ... The Righteous Brothers were the musical duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. ... Youve Lost That Lovin Feelin is a 1965 No. ...


"Yesterday," however, has also been criticised for being mundane and mawkish; Bob Dylan had a marked dislike for the song, stating that "If you go into the Library of Congress, you can find a lot better than that. There are millions of songs like 'Michelle' and 'Yesterday' written in Tin Pan Alley". Ironically, Dylan ultimately recorded his own version of "Yesterday" four years later, but it was never released.[8] This article is about the recording artist. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ...


Shortly before his death in 1980, Lennon explained that he thought the lyrics didn't "resolve into any sense... They're good — but if you read the whole song, it doesn't say anything; you don't know what happened. She left and he wishes it were yesterday — that much you get — but it doesn't really resolve. ... Beautiful — and I never wished I'd written it."[22] Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Music and lyrics

The tonic key of the song is F major (although, since McCartney tuned his guitar down a whole step, he was playing the chords as if it were in G), where the song begins before veering off into the relative minor key of D minor. It is this frequent use of the minor, and the ii-V7 chord progression (Em7 and A7 chords in this case) leading into it, that gives the song its melancholy aura. The A7 chord is an example of a secondary dominant, specifically a V/vi chord. The G7 chord in the bridge is another secondary dominant, in this case a V/V chord, but rather than resolve it to the expected chord, as with the A7 to Dm in the verse, McCartney instead follows it with the IV chord, a Bb. This motion creates a descending chromatic line of C B Bb A to accompany the title lyric. The tonic is the first note of a musical scale, and in the tonal method of music composition it is extremely important. ... In music, the relative minor of a particular major key (or the relative major of a minor key) is the key which has the same key signature but a different tonic, as opposed to parallel minor or major, respectively. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in order. ... Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ... Secondary dominants are a kind of chord used in musical harmony. ... Resolution in western tonal music theory is the need for a sounded note and/or chord to move from a dissonance or unstable sound to a more final or stable sounding one, a consonance. ... In music, chromatic indicates the inclusion of notes not in the prevailing scale and is also used for those notes themselves (Shir-Cliff et al 1965, p. ...


The string arrangement supplements the song's air of sadness, especially in the groaning cello melody that connects the two halves of the bridge (on the line, "I don't know / she wouldn't say") as well as the descending line by the viola that segues the chorus back into the verses. This simple idea is so striking, McCartney mimics it with his vocal on the second pass of the chorus.[23] This viola line and the high A sustained by the violin over the final verse are the only elements of the string arrangement attributable to McCartney rather than George Martin. The violoncello, usually abbreviated to cello, or cello (the c is pronounced as in the ch of check), is a bowed stringed instrument, a member of the violin family. ... In popular music, especially occidental, a bridge is a contrasting section which also prepares for the return of the original material section. ... The viola (French, alto; German Bratsche) is a bowed string instrument. ... The violin is a bowed string instrument with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. ...


An unusual aspect of this song is that its first phrase is only seven measures instead of the customary eight measures found in most all popular music. The use of the IV to I cadence (called a plagal or "Amen" cadence) at the end of this first phrase results in the seven measure phrase sounding perfectly natural and almost religious in nature.[citation needed] In Western musical theory a cadence (Latin cadentia, a falling) is a particular series of intervals or chords that ends a phrase, section, or piece of music. ... Religious music (also sacred music) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. ...


McCartney's eventual lyric for the song was sombre and fitted the reflective melody. Although the lyric is rather vague, it could be interpreted to reveal sadness about a lost loved one. Most believe that it revealed sadness about a breakup, while some believe that there is an obscure connection to this song with the death of his mother when he was a teenager. When the song was written, the lyric was considered unusual for a McCartney composition. Until then, most of McCartney's songs had been positive and upbeat; Lennon was considered the Beatle with the more introspective and sad lyrics. This article is about the psychological process of introspecting. ...


When the song was performed on The Ed Sullivan Show, it was done in the above-mentioned key of F, with McCartney as the only Beatle to perform, and the studio orchestra providing the string accompaniment. However, all of The Beatles played in a G-major version which was used in the Tokyo concerts during their 1966 tours. The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ...


When McCartney appeared on "The Howard Stern Show", he stated that he owns the original lyrics to "Yesterday" written on the back of an envelope. This article is about the radio show hosted by Howard Stern. ... Front of an envelope mailed in the U.S. in 1906 contains postage stamp and address. ...


In July 2003, British musicologists stumbled upon similarities between the lyric and rhyming schemes of "Yesterday" and Nat King Cole's "Answer Me", leading to speculation that McCartney had been influenced by the song. McCartney's publicists denied any resemblance between "Answer Me" and "Yesterday".[24] From the story: Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Musicology (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason) is the scholarly study of music. ... Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a popular American singer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ...

["Yesterday"] begins with the line: "Yesterday, all my troubles seemed so far away/Now I need a place to hide away". Answer Me has the line: "Yesterday, I believed that love was here to stay, won't you tell me where I've gone astray."[24]

Ian Hammond speculated that McCartney subconsciously based "Yesterday" on Ray Charles' version of "Georgia On My Mind," but closed his article by saying that despite the similarities"Yesterday" is a "completely original and individual [work]."[3] For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Georgia on My Mind is a song written in 1930 by Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) and Hoagy Carmichael (music). ...


In 2006, Italian producer and songwriter Lilli Greco claimed "Yesterday" to be a cover of a 19th century Neapolitan song called Piccere' Che Vene a Dicere'. In the same article, Greco claimed that McCartney and Lennon had an "encyclopaedic knowledge" of world music and were particularly fond of Neapolitan songs.[25] Neither Lennon nor McCartney could read sheet music, and the article does not indicate when—or if—McCartney or Lennon heard a performance of the song.

Preceded by
"Hang On Sloopy" by The McCoys
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
October 9, 1965
(4 weeks)
Succeeded by
"Get Off of My Cloud" by The Rolling Stones

Hang on Sloopy is a hit song by the pop group The McCoys which was #1 in America in October 1965 and is the official rock song of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... The McCoys are pop group started in Union City, Indiana, USA in 1962. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... This is a list of number-one hits in the United States by year from the Billboard Hot 100. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Get Off Of My Cloud is a song by the british rock n roll band The Rolling Stones. ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Cross, Craig (2004). BEATLES SONGS - Y. Retrieved on 2004-12-09. (broken link as of 2007-03-09)
  2. ^ Miles, Barry (1997). Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now. New York: Henry Holt & Company, 201–202. ISBN 0-8050-5249-6. 
  3. ^ a b Hammond, Ian (2001). Old sweet songs. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  4. ^ Miles, Barry (1997). Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now, 204. 
  5. ^ Miles, Barry (1997). Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now, 204–205. 
  6. ^ Simon Napier-Bell, Black Vinyl, White Powder, 100.
  7. ^ Ortiz, Marcos (2005). Marcos' Beatles Page - Yesterday. Retrieved on 2006-01-14.
  8. ^ a b Mallick, Heather (2000-11-22). Past Perfect. The Globe and Mail.
  9. ^ a b Unterberger, Richie. Review of Yesterday. Retrieved on 2006-01-14.
  10. ^ a b (1994) Album notes for Anthology 2 by The Beatles, 10 [booklet]. London: Apple Records (31796).
  11. ^ a b Lewisohn, Mark (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions. New York: Harmony Books, 59. ISBN 0-517-57066-1. 
  12. ^ Cross, Craig (2004). AMERICAN SINGLES. Retrieved on 2004-12-09. (broken link as of 2007-03-09)
  13. ^ Cross, Craig (2006). BRITISH ALBUMS. Retrieved on 2004-01-14. (broken link as of 2007-03-09)
  14. ^ Iris Caldwell was a girlfriend of McCartney from several years before "Yesterday" was written
  15. ^ Iris Caldwell. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  16. ^ Cross, Craig (2004). BRITISH EPS. Retrieved on 2006-01-14. (broken link as of 2007-03-09)
  17. ^ Cross, Craig (2004). BRITISH SINGLES. Retrieved on 2004-12-09. (broken link as of 2007-03-09)
  18. ^ Most Recorded Song. Guiness World Records. Retrieved on 2006-10-14.
  19. ^ The Soundtrack of Your Life. The New Yorker (2006-04-10). Retrieved on 2006-04-18.
  20. ^ The RS 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  21. ^ BMI Announces Top 100 Songs of the Century. BMI. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  22. ^ The Beatles Interview Database. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  23. ^ Pollack, Alan W (1993). Notes on "Yesterday". Retrieved on 2006-01-14.
  24. ^ a b King Cole 'influenced' Beatles hit. BBC News (2003-07-07).
  25. ^ McCartney's 'Yesterday' a cover of a 19th century Neapolitan song?. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.

Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... In the music business, Simon Napier-Bell (born 1939) has been bandboy, manager, producer, songwriter, journalist and author. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Beatles Anthology 2 is a compilation album released in March 1996 by Apple Records as part of The Beatles Anthology series. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Beatles - Yesterday song facts and lyric meanings (700 words)
For years, it was also the song with the most radio plays, but in 1999 BMI music publishing reported that "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" had passed it.
In addition to the strings, this is notable as one of the first Pop songs to use elements of Classical Music.
This was the first Beatles song that could not be reproduced live without additional musicians.
Yesterday (song) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2147 words)
Although written solely by McCartney, the song was credited to both himself and John Lennon as "Lennon/McCartney", as were all Beatles songs written by either of the pair (although they were sometimes credited in the opposite order as "McCartney/Lennon").
McCartney originally claimed he had written "Yesterday" during the Beatles' tour of France in 1964; however, the song was not released until the summer of 1965.
The tonic key of the song is F major (although, since McCartney tuned his guitar down a whole step, he was playing the chords as if it were in G), where the song begins before veering off into the relative minor key of D minor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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