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Encyclopedia > Yeshiva University
Yeshiva University
Arms of Yeshiva University

Motto: Torah U'Madda
Established: 1886
Type: Private
Endowment: US $1.2 billion[1]
Chancellor: Norman Lamm
President: Richard M. Joel
Faculty: 4,714
Undergraduates: 3,008
Postgraduates: 3,191
Location: Flag of the United States New York, NY
Campus: Urban
Slogan: "Bring Wisdom to Life"
Nickname: Maccabees
Athletics: NCAA Division III, Skyline Conference
Website: www.yu.edu

Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. Yeshiva University's present endowment is over $1.2 billion dollars and is ranked 52nd in the nation among national universities in 2007.[2]. The undergraduate programs operate according to the Modern Orthodox Judaism philosophy of Torah Umadda — meaning "Torah combined with secular studies". Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... Image:YU Shield. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Rabbi Dr. Norman (Nachum) Lamm, (born 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, United States), is a major American Modern Orthodox Jewish communal leader. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Richard M. Joel (b. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Skyline Conference is the name of a conference which is based in the New York City area and competes in the NCAAs Division III. Members of New Yorks Skyline Conference Centenary College (New Jersey) Farmingdale State University Manhattanville College State University of New York Maritime College Mount Saint... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ...

Contents

History

Etz Chaim yeshiva

The Etz Chaim Yeshiva, a cheder-style elementary school, was founded on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in 1886. Prior to its founding, Jewish education in the United States had been limited to supplemental and synagogue affiliated schools. Etz Chaim ("The Tree of Life," a reference to the Torah from the Biblical Book of Proverbs, and a common name for yeshivas and synagogues) was the first yeshiva in America; that is, the first full-time, independent Jewish school focusing on the study of the Talmud. The primary impetus for its establishment was the influx of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe that began in the 1880s; the school was established along the lines of the Eastern European yeshivas, which themselves had begun to be established in the early 19th Century. However, the New York school, unlike its European counterparts, also offered some secular education, including classes in English. These were very limited at first, but eventually (partially due to New York State law) became a full co-curriculum, something almost unprecedented in the history of Jewish education. Cheders (also known as Heders, Hebrew: room) are traditional elementary schools or classes teaching the basics of Judaism and the Hebrew language. ... Categories: Manhattan neighborhoods | Stub ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... This article is about the Jewish male educational system. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR...


Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS)

The graduates of Etz Chaim had no place in the United States to continue their formal Jewish education after they completed elementary school, and some began studying Talmud with Rabbi Moses Matlin in his Lower East Side apartment. Soon, in 1896, this group formally became an advanced yeshiva, covering high school years and beyond. Rabbi Yitzchak Elchanan Spektor, the chief rabbi of Kovno (later the capital of Lithuania), and widely considered the leading rabbi of Eastern Europe at the time, died in that year, and the yeshiva (along with other, European, institutions) was named in his honor, as Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan ("The Yeshiva of our Rabbi, Isaac Elchanan"). A year after it was founded, the yeshiva was formally chartered by New York State in 1897 as the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, which is known to this day by its acronym, RIETS. The first group of rabbis (a class of three) was ordained in 1903. Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Yitzchak Elchanan Spektor (or Isaac Elchonon Spector) (1817-1896) was born in Russia in the Hrodna voblast. ... City Flag Kaunas (Polish: Kowno, often anglicized as Kovno; Russian Каунас, formerly Ковно), is the second largest city in Lithuania with 400,000 inhabitants. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary or RIETS (Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan) is the most important yeshiva component of Yeshiva University. ...


Despite its name, RIETS began as a traditional Lithuanian yeshiva, not a rabbinical seminary, with classes focusing only on the traditional subjects of Talmud and Jewish law. However, many of the students desired careers as rabbis, and found themselves in competition with the graduates of the Jewish Theological Seminary, at that time still seen as an Orthodox school (it would later become the flagship institution of the Conservative movement), which, while not stressing the traditional subjects, taught its students practical rabbinics, homiletics, and related subjects, making them more attractive to synagogues seeking rabbis. The students of RIETS struck several times in the mid-1900s, demanding these subjects be taught. The board of directors eventually acceded to their requests, and RIETS continues, to this day, to have the somewhat unique position of being both a traditional yeshiva, preparing its students for the traditional Orthodox semikha (ordination) by teaching a full curriculum of Talmud and Codes of Law, as well as a rabbinical seminary, teaching various practical rabbinics courses. (Rabbinical students may also take courses, depending on their intended field of practice, leading to degrees in Jewish studies, Jewish education, or pastoral social work at other schools of Yeshiva University, while others, including those who intend to teach, focus more intensely on the traditional subjects such as Talmud.) In the period following these changes, from 1906-1915, such prominent rabbis as Dr. Phillip Hillel Klein, Moses Zebulon Margolies, and Bernard Levinthal served as RIETS president. The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is the academic and spiritual center of Conservative Judaism, and is the movements main rabbinical seminary. ... This article is about Conservative (Masorti) Judaism in the United States. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Etz Chaim and RIETS, while separate schools, always had, as might be expected, a close relationship. There were a number of efforts to unite them, which finally succeeded in 1915, when they merged as the Rabbinical College of America (not to be confused with the modern institution of the same name in New Jersey). Both schools had each occupied a few locations on the Lower East Side, and now moved into a new building in the neighborhood. Shortly after the merger, the name reverted, for legal reasons, to RIETS, although the most common name used was simply "The Yeshiva." As a number of new Jewish elementary schools were opening at this time, Etz Chaim, the elementary division of the yeshiva, was phased out of existence over the course of the 1920s. Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Under Rabbi Dr. Bernard Revel as president

Main article: Bernard Revel

The first president of the newly-merged school was Rabbi Bernard (Dov) Revel. Revel was young- thirty at the time- but already renowned as a scholar; he had been ordained in his teens in Lithuania and received his doctorate in Jewish studies (specifically, the relationship of Karaite Judaism to earlier Jewish groups) from Dropsie College (now merged into the University of Pennsylvania) in Philadelphia. His wife's family worked in the oil industry in Oklahoma, and he spent time managing their interests there as well for some time after he became president of the yeshiva before devoting himself to the latter position full-time. Bernard (Dov) Revel was an Orthodox rabbi and scholar. ... Karaite Judaism or Karaism is a Jewish movement characterized by the sole reliance on the Tanakh as scripture, and the rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmud) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


High school established

In 1916, RIETS established the yeshiva's first high school (and the first Jewish high school in the United States), the Talmudic Academy (now known as the Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy). Along with traditional Talmud and other Jewish classes in the morning, MTA (as it is commonly known) taught- and continues to teach- a full curriculum of secular subjects in the afternoon. Among its prominent graduates are Harav Dr. Koppel Froehlich, Pofessor Ariel "Leg" Levy, Admiral Hillel Klein and The Legendary Danny O'Doul. This not only set the pattern for all Jewish secondary (and even primary) schools that would be founded after it, but was to set the pattern for the Yeshiva as well as it founded new divisions. Later, Yeshiva would establish more high schools, in including the Central Yeshiva for Girls in Brooklyn (the first Jewish high school for girls), as well as another boys' high school in Brooklyn (BTA), and a girls' high school in Manhattan. (High schools, and a higher-level yeshiva, were also founded in Los Angeles, but they are now independent.) In the 1970s, the Brooklyn schools were merged into their Manhattan counterparts, and the girls' school was later moved to Queens, where it remains today. The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy, also known as MTA or TMSTA , is a Modern Orthodox Judaism Jewish day school (or yeshiva), the boys high school of Yeshiva University (YU) in New York City. ... This article is about the New York City borough, or Kings County, New York. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Other founding personalities and growth

Main article: Meir Bar-Ilan

During one of Dr. Revel's absences in Oklahoma, Rabbi Meir Bar-Ilan, then head of the American branch of the Mizrachi religious Zionist movement, served as temporary president. He merged into the Yeshiva the Mizrachi's Teachers Institutes for Men and Women. The men's school eventually evolved into the Erna Michael College, today the Isaac Breuer College, an undergraduate men's Jewish studies division of Yeshiva Meir Berlin, later Hebraized to Meir Bar-Ilan, (1880 - 1949, born Volozhin, Lithuania, died Jerusalem, Israel) was an Orthodox Judaism rabbi and leader of Religious Zionism, Mizrachi movement in USA and British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Mizrachi (acronym for Merkaz Ruchani or religious centre) is the name of the religious Zionist organization founded in 1902 in Vilna at a world conference of religious Zionists called by Rabbi Yitzchak Yaacov Reines. ...


Stern College for women

The women's school was eventually folded into Stern College for Women. In 1922, Rabbi Shlomo Polachek began to teach at RIETS, being recognized as the top Rosh Yeshiva (teacher of Talmud). When he died in 1928, he was succeeded by Rabbi Moshe Soloveichik. Stern College for Women (SCW) is the undergraduate womens college of arts and sciences at Yeshiva University. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Yeshiva College

Main article: Yeshiva College

TA provided a college-preparatory education, but there was no college for its graduates to continue their Jewish educations as well. In 1928, the Yeshiva established Yeshiva College, which provides both an upper-level yeshiva education as well as a secular university curriculum, awarding a Bachelor's degree. It was starting at this time that Revel- and, later, other leaders of Yeshiva- began to develop their philosophy of the integration of religious and secular knowledge. Rabbinic education in RIETS, for those who choose it (most of the undergraduate men do not), now continues for a few years past graduation from college, leading to ordination, and continues further for a select few students. The school now became known as "Yeshiva College and RIETS." Yeshiva College is the undergraduate arts and sciences college affiliated with Yeshiva University. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ...


Expansion

Also in the late 1920s, Yeshiva finally left the Lower East Side and moved to its current location in Washington Heights, in upper Manhattan. The area centered on 185th Street and Amsterdam Avenue continues to be Yeshiva's main campus, containing the central administration offices, the main library, the undergraduate schools for men, the boys' high school, the rabbinical seminary, and other divisions. Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge. ...


The Great Depression began at this time, and Yeshiva was faced with numerous financial difficulties, having to shelve its more extensive building plans in order to stay open. (The campus would not really expand until the 1960s.) Yeshiva established its first graduate school, in Jewish studies, in 1936. At this time, Revel began working to bring over from Europe numerous faculty, in both Jewish and secular subjects, in order to save them from the impending Holocaust. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rabbi Dr. Joseph B. Soloveitchik

The graduate school was named in honor of Revel after his untimely death, at the age of 55, in 1940. Shortly after, Rabbi Moshe Soloveichik died as well; his place was taken by his son, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, who would remain the leading Rosh Yeshiva for over forty years, teaching and ordaining thousands of rabbis, including many of the leading figures in American Modern Orthodoxy today. Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Under Rabbi Dr. Samuel Belkin as president

245 Lexington Avenue is a campus hub of Stern College for Women, home to a beit midrash (study hall), science labs, a library, and other facilities.
245 Lexington Avenue is a campus hub of Stern College for Women, home to a beit midrash (study hall), science labs, a library, and other facilities.

Revel was succeeded in 1943 by Rabbi Dr. Samuel Belkin, also a European-born scholar, a graduate of Brown University, and a professor of Greek at Yeshiva College. Under Belkin, the institution began to expand greatly. University status was obtained in 1945, and over the following decades, many new schools and divisions were opened. Stern College for Women, providing both an advanced Jewish education and full undergraduate curriculum, was established in the 1950s (its campus is in Midtown Manhattan), as was the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx. Also established, among others, were a graduate school of education and the humanities (now the graduate school of psychology) and a graduate school of the sciences (now focusing on biomedical studies), a school of Jewish music for the training of cantors, and a division providing various services to the Jewish community at large. Belkin set in process the foundation of Cardozo Law School, which opened, in Greenwich Village, shortly after his death. Samuel Belkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 393 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (656 × 1000 pixel, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 393 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (656 × 1000 pixel, file size: 209 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Stern College for Women (SCW) is the undergraduate womens college of arts and sciences at Yeshiva University. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... Since its founding in 1976 by Yeshiva University, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law has gained a national reputation for a top-caliber faculty and an innovative academic program. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ...


Diversification

David H. Zysman Hall, on Yeshiva University's Wilf Campus, is home to the main beit midrash (Torah study hall).
David H. Zysman Hall, on Yeshiva University's Wilf Campus, is home to the main beit midrash (Torah study hall).

In 1970, in order to comply with laws regarding government aid to sectarian institutions, Yeshiva, in a move that aroused considerable opposition by some, including Rabbi Soloveitchik, officially became a secular university, changing the status of RIETS (the rabbinical seminary), the high schools, and related divisions to "affiliates." However, the two halves of the institution remain very close, both in practice and officially on paper. In addition, the undergraduate schools, part of the officially secular university, continue to require a full course of Judaic studies from their students. (For the majority of male undergraduates, this means the standard Talmudic yeshiva curriculum, essentially an undergraduate school of RIETS, along with various courses in academic Jewish studies.) As a result of this policy (though not, officially, by design), all of the undergraduate students are Jewish, and overwhelmingly Orthodox. (This is, of course, true of the affiliated schools as well.) Even in its more secular graduate schools, Yeshiva University is identifiably Jewish: Orthodox law is observed- for example, the schools are closed on the Sabbath and Jewish holidays and only kosher food is served. Partly as a result of this, there is a higher than usual proportion of Orthodox students at these schools, although most students are non-Orthodox or non-Jewish. In addition, there are numerous Jewish-related programs and courses of study- for example, Jewish law classes at Cardozo Law School. On the other hand, conflicts have developed over the years of the exact definition of Yeshiva's educational and religious philosophy, and whether or not it is (or should be) skewing too far either in the direction of secularism or fundamentalism, these conflicts often arising as a result of specific actions or events. The institution has thus worked continually to maintain the delicate balance inherent in its existence while advancing in both aspects of its character and synthesizing them. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 482 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 603 pixel, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 482 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 603 pixel, file size: 216 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Beth midrash (or Beit Midrash or Bais Medrash or Bais Medrish, Hebrew בית מדרש) (plural battei midrash) literally means a House [of] Interpretation or House [of] Lecturing or House [of] Learning in Hebrew. ... Torah study is the study by Jews of the Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, responsa, rabbinic literature and similar works, all of which are Judaisms religious texts, for the purpose of the mitzvah (commandment) of Torah study itself, meaning study for religious (as opposed to academic) purposes. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Jewish holiday, (or Yom Tom or chag or taanit in Hebrew) is a day that is holy to the Jewish people according to Judaism and is usually derived from the Hebrew Bible, specifically the Torah, and in some cases established by the rabbis in later eras. ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ...


Under Rabbi Dr. Norman Lamm as president

Main article: Norman Lamm

Belkin retired as president in 1975 and was appointed Chancellor. After Belkin died in 1976, Rabbi Norman Lamm was elected third president of Yeshiva University (and, at the same time, president and Rosh Yeshiva of RIETS). Rabbi Lamm was the first American-born president; furthermore, he was a graduate of Yeshiva himself: He received his undergraduate degree (in chemistry) from Yeshiva College, was ordained by RIETS, and received his doctorate (in Jewish philosophy) from the Revel graduate school. He was, at this time, rabbi in a prominent Manhattan synagogue as well as a professor of philosophy at Yeshiva. Rabbi Dr. Norman (Nachum) Lamm, (born 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, United States), is a major American Modern Orthodox Jewish communal leader. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ...

The women's campus of Sy Syms School of Business is located in Manhattan's Murray Hill neighborhood.
The women's campus of Sy Syms School of Business is located in Manhattan's Murray Hill neighborhood.

Rabbi Lamm took office at a time when Yeshiva was facing a serious financial crisis. As a result, some of the schools had to be consolidated or closed. However, vigorous fundraising efforts ensured the continued viability of the school and placed it on the solid financial footing it is on today. More divisions were added: For example, the Sy Syms School of Business, with divisions for both the undergraduate men and women, was opened in 1988. At this time, many of the undergraduate students began to spend their freshman year (or more) studying in yeshivot (and other schools) in Israel, which has become an almost universal practice, and a Joint Israel Program regulating these studies was established to allow them to receive credit for this year at Yeshiva. RIETS also maintains a campus in Jerusalem, and many of the rabbinic students spend a year studying there as well. Over the course of Rabbi Lamm's tenure, enrollment grew considerably, and Yeshiva University's academic reputation rose as well. There are currently over 2000 undergraduate students, with plans in place to add a thousand more. In addition to its undergraduate schools and affiliates, Yeshiva maintains graduate schools in Jewish studies, Jewish education and administration, social work, psychology, law, and medicine; these are generally regarded as highly ranked in their respective fields. There are over fifteen schools in total. In addition, numerous joint undergraduate-graduate programs with other schools in the New York area and beyond are maintained. The Yeshiva University Museum, an affiliate of the school, is now one of the components of the Center for Jewish History, located in downtown Manhattan. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 667 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 667 pixel, file size: 239 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Department of Communications and Public Affairs, Yeshiva University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... The Sy Syms School of Business is Yeshiva Universitys undergraduate business school for men and women. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


Under Richard M. Joel as president

Main article: Richard M. Joel

In 2002, following Rabbi Lamm's retirement, Richard M. Joel was chosen as Yeshiva's fourth president. Joel, a graduate of MTA, holder of a law degree from New York University School of Law and a former dean of Cardozo, was head of Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life, which coordinates Jewish activities at universities around the United States. (Yeshiva University has no chapter of Hillel.) However, Joel, unlike his predecessors, is, while an Orthodox Jew, not a rabbi or Jewish scholar but a layman. There was some opposition to his selection at the time from the more religiously conservative elements of the school. Later, there was opposition to Joel's introduction of a new logo and mottos for the school; it was felt that these were an attempt to water down the university's mission of Torah U-Madda, synthesizing religious and worldly wisdom, which is the university's motto and is featured on its seal. However, Joel responded that the logo was meant as a supplement to, not a replacement of, the university seal, and that the new mottos were actually slogans; this controversy has diminished as well. Richard M. Joel (b. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Vanderbilt Courtyard The New York University School of Law (NYU Law) is the law school of New York University. ... Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life (Hillel International) is the largest Jewish campus organization in the world. ...


Joel is also the chief executive officer of RIETS (officially known as Chief Executive), but Rabbi Lamm serves as University Chancellor and Rosh Yeshiva of RIETS. While there has never been an official position of "top Rosh Yeshiva" at YU, and, in practice, there has not been an unofficial holder of this position since the death of Rabbi Soloveitchik in 1993, Rabbi Lamm, since his retirement, holds this title. Chief Executive redirects here. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


Joel has announced numerous new initiatives and programs. Most notably, he has created the Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future, folding other programs, both from within and from outside YU, into it. The goal of the Center is to provide greater services to the entire Orthodox and Jewish communities, continuing Yeshiva's role as the central institution of Modern Orthodox Judaism as well as that of a leading institution of both Jewish and general studies. Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ...


Schools, affiliates, and divisions

Undergraduate Schools

Separate undergraduate programs for men and women combine traditional liberal arts and sciences studies with extensive Jewish studies programs. Jewish studies also known as Judaic studies is a subject area of study available at many colleges and universities in the Western World. ...

For undergraduate men (Yeshiva College and uptown branch of Sy Syms School of Business), there exist four separate tracks for Judaic studies: The Mechina Program (formerly JSS), Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies (IBC), Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program (SBMP), and Mazer Yeshiva Program of Talmudic Study (MYP). They offer varied approaches to the study of Torah, catering to the students with different levels of ability and areas of interest in Judaic studies. Yeshiva College is the undergraduate arts and sciences mens college affiliated with Yeshiva University. ... Stern College for Women (SCW) is the undergraduate womens college of arts and sciences at Yeshiva University. ... The Sy Syms School of Business is Yeshiva Universitys undergraduate business school for men and women. ... SBMP (Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program), or BMP for short, is the name of one the four Judaic Studies tracks offered at Yeshiva University. ...


Graduate and Professional Schools

Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... The Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, a Yeshiva University professional school, was established in 1945 and named in 1983 for Montréal architect and philanthropist David J. Azrieli. ... The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law is the law school of Yeshiva University, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... The Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies was Yeshiva University’s first graduate school. ... The Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is a division of Yeshiva University. ... The Wurzweiler School of Social Work at Yeshiva University was founded in 1957. ...

Affiliates

Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary or RIETS (Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan) is the most important yeshiva component of Yeshiva University. ... Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary or RIETS (Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan) is the most important yeshiva component of Yeshiva University. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... The Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls (YUHSG) offers college preparatory curricula and Jewish studies programs leading to an academic diploma endorsed by the New York State Board of Regents. ... The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy, also known as MTA or TMSTA , is a Modern Orthodox Judaism Jewish day school (or yeshiva), the boys high school of Yeshiva University (YU) in New York City. ...

Scholarly and cultural resources

The Yeshiva University Museum is a teaching museum and the cultural arm of Yeshiva University. ...

Academic centers and institutes

The Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs of Yeshiva University seeks to promote international understanding and cooperation by providing an educational forum for the exchange of ideas related to critical international issues. ... The Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University, located on Yeshiva University’s Wilf Campus in New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood, fosters research on ethical issues and the integration of discourse on ethics into the curriculum among Yeshiva University’s schools. ... The Institute for Public Health Sciences at Yeshiva University provides research and training opportunities for faculty, students, and researchers interested in public health and preventive medicine, consolidating university resources in these areas and creating new programs, including a Master of Public Health degree. ...

In Israel

  • S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program
  • Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem

Community

Yeshiva University maintains four campuses in New York City: New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

  1. The Resnick Campus in the Morris Park neighborhood of the eastern Bronx contains the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, along with dormitories, a library, a hospital and other medical facilities.
  2. The Brookdale Center in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of downtown Manhattan contains the Benjamin Cardozo School of Law, law clinics and office, and a dormitory. The Center for Jewish History, which includes the Yeshiva University Museum along with other institutions, is nearby in the Chelsea neighborhood.
  3. The Beren Campus in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Midtown Manhattan is home to the undergraduate schools for women, including Stern College for Women and the Midtown branch of the Sy Syms School of Business, along with dormitories and other facilities. The Azrieli School has classes on this campus as well.
  4. The Wilf Campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of upper Manhattan is considered the main campus; it is home to the undergraduate schools for men, the rabbinical seminary, the Belz School of Jewish Music, the high school for boys, the Azrieli Graduate School for Jewish Education and Administration, the Wurzweiler School for Social Work, and the Bernard Revel Graduate school, along with other divisions, offices, libraries, dormitories, and other facilities.

The high school for girls is located in New York City as well, in the Holliswood neighborhood of eastern Queens. Morris Park is a residential, working, middle-class, Italian-American neighborhood in the Bronx, New York City. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The Murray Hill neighborhood of Manhattan extends south from 42nd street to meet the neighborhood of Gramercy (or Rose Hill/Curry Hill as the northern half of Gramercy is often referred to) at 29th street. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


The campus in Jerusalem, in the Bayit VeGan neighborhood, contains a branch of the rabbinical seminary and an office coordinating undergraduate study by YU students at various schools throughout Israel. For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Bayit Vegan (Hebrew: ), which translates from Hebrew as house and garden, is an upscale neighborhood in southwest-central Jerusalem, Israel. ...


Student Government

Numerous clubs and activities are maintained by the students in each school, generally under the auspices of a student government. Activities are funded by a student activities fee collected by the school but freely distributed by the elected council. (Athletics are usually an academic department.) Each graduate school maintains a student council, such as the Student Bar Association at Cardozo, which, in turn, supports the many clubs and publications in each school.


At the undergraduate level, there are separate student governments on the two campuses, although the two work closely in coordinating joint events. The men's schools are represented overall by the Yeshiva Student Union, and specifically by the Yeshiva College Student Association, the Sy Syms Student Council, the Student Organization of Yeshiva (SOY, which represents both undergraduate MYP students as well as RIETS students), and student councils for SBMP, IBC, and JSS. The latter four run most Jewish-related activities on campus, including holiday celebrations and the famed SOY Seforim (Jewish book) sale annually around February, which is open to the general public and attracts large crowds from near and far. There are also individual councils for each class, council committees, a Student Court, and clubs.


The women's schools are represented by the Stern College and Sy Syms Student Councils; there are also a Torah Activities Council, which coordinates Jewish-related events, and individual class councils, along with various clubs.


The various positions on all councils are chosen by elections open to all students (both as voters and candidates) generally held in the Spring (for the following year's councils), although Freshman and Sophomore class councils are elected in the Fall, the latter owing to the large number of students spending the freshman year abroad in Israel.


The undergraduate men's newspaper is The Commentator, and the undergraduate women's The Observer; there is also a student newspaper (in addition to a number of law journals) at Cardozo. There are numerous other publications on a wide range of topics, both secular and religious, produced by the various councils and academic clubs, along with many official university publications and the university press. The call letters of the student radio station are WYUR.


Dormitories and student housing

There are dormitory and dining facilities on each campus. Cardozo has a single dormitory building a block south of the classroom building, while Einstein has a number of student housing buildings on campus for single and married students.


Approximately 90% of the undergraduate student populations live on campus.


The Wilf Campus includes three main dormitory buildings: Morgenstern, nicknamed the "Morg", Rubin, and Muss. Many upperclassmen and some graduate students live in the surrounding independent housing that is run by the university or in other nearby buildings; there is also a small high school dormitory on campus, Strenger Hall, which houses some older students as well who serve as counselors.


The Beren campus includes four dormitory buildings: Brookdale, Schottenstein, 36th Street and 35th Street Residence Halls. Many students live in university-administered independent housing nearby.


Sports Clubs and Teams

The winningest team in Yeshiva College sports history is the fencing team, known as the "Tauberman", named after the illustrious and beloved coach of the team, Professor Arthur Tauber, who served as the head coach of the team from 1949 through 1985. Team members practiced three nights a week from 8-11PM and participated in matches and tournaments with many of the area's collegiate teams. One of the highlights of the season was the match against MIT on a Sunday morning in the spring semester. The members of the team were hosted for Shabbat by the local Jewish community of Brookline, MA, with the match taking place the following day.


Rankings

Yeshiva University has been recognized for academic excellence throughout the state, country, and the world at large.


The U.S. News and World Report's 2008 "America's Best Colleges" ranked Yeshiva University as the 52th best national university tied with the University of Miami. It also placed among the three top universities in the New York area, together with New York and Columbia universities. YU was also cited as one of the top 50 "best value" schools, 20th in faculty resources, and in the top 25 for its high graduation rate of 82 percent (7 percentage points above the average for universities with similar student bodies).[3] The Washington Monthly 2007 College Rankings placed Yeshiva University 94th nationally. [4] In a similar list, The Center for Measuring University Performance found Yeshiva University 45th nationally among the Top American Research Universities. [5] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ...


YU has also received worldwide recognition. The Times Higher Education Supplement of the UK put Yeshiva University as the 172th top world university of 2006; a substantial jump from the 254th ranking the school received in 2005.[6] According to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the university is ranked in the 151-200 category among world universities and 76-98 among universities in the Americas.[7] The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ...


Notable faculty and Alumni

Notable faculty

Rabbi Saul J. Berman is a prominent member of the Modern Orthodox community. ... Professor Joshua Aaron Fishman is an American social scientist and linguist at Stanford University. ... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ...

Notable Alumni

  • Rabbi Seth Farber
  • Rabbi Barry Freundel
  • Professor Ari L. Goldman
  • Matthew Levitt
  • Chaim Potok
  • Rabbi Shlomo Riskin
  • Joseph Markovitz, founder of OnlySimchas.com
  • Harav Dr. Koppel Froehlich - Author of "Darchei HaShinayim"
  • Pofessor Ariel "Leg" Levy - Inventor of the "ORI-2000" strobe-sonic musical tuning device.
  • Admiral Hillel Klein - Inventor of ship-based alpha-radar cryptographical descrambler ("Arc-D") and advanced nautical logarithims.
  • The Legendary Danny O'Doul- legendary singer, masterchef, celebrity metallurgist and Friend of the American Indians.

Barry Freundel is the rabbi of Kesher Israel congregation in Washington DC, and a leading rabbi in the Modern Orthodox Jewish world. ... Ari L. Goldman is a journalist and currently a professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism along with his colleague and friend, Samuel G. Freedman. ... Rabbi Dr. Chaim Potok (February 17, 1929 - July 23, 2002) was an American author and rabbi. ... Shlomo Riskin (born 1940) is the American founder of the Lincoln Square Synagogue in New York City. ...

See also

Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Ramat Gan (רמת-גן) is a city in Israel, on the central coastal strip, just east of Tel Aviv, and part of the metropolis known as Gush Dan, in the Tel Aviv District. ... Hebrew Theological College The Hebrew Theological College, also known as Beit HaMidrash LaTorah, also colloquially known as Skokie Yeshiva, is a private university located in Skokie, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Lander College for Men (LCM) is a private, mens honors division of Touro College located in Kew Gardens Hills, New York, known for its programs in accounting, biology, computer science, political science, and rabbinical ordination. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Touro College is a Jewish-sponsored independent institution of higher and professional education, in New York City, New York, United States. ... The Jerusalem College of Technology (JCT), (Hebrew:בית הספר הגבוה לטכנולוגיה בירושלים), is a religious Orthodox Jewish academic college in the Givat Mordechai neighbourhood of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Benjamin Blech, author (also alumnus) Shalom Carmy, theologian and Jewish Historian (also alumnus) Paul Greengard, Nobel Prize winner Norman Lamm, chancellor (also alumnus) Mayer Twersky, rabbi Hershel Schachter, rabbi (also alumnus) Oliver Sacks, neurologist Barry Scheck, lawyer Joseph Soloveitchik (deceased), rabbi and talmudist Moshe Tendler, rabbi and medical ethics authority... Education in New York City is provided by a vast number of public and private institutions. ...

References

  1. ^ America's Best Colleges 2008. US News. Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  2. ^ Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2006 Market Value of Endowment Assets, 2006 NACUBO Endowment Study, National Association of College and University Business Officers. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  3. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities: Top Schools, U.S. News & World Report. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  4. ^ The Washington Monthly College Rankings, Washington Monthly. Accessed April 14, 2008.
  5. ^ The Top American Research Universities: 2006 Annual Report, The Center for Measuring University Performance. Accessed July 29, 2007.
  6. ^ THES - QS World University Rankings 2006 - Top 200 Universities, The Times Higher Education Supplement. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  7. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities 2006 Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Accessed July 29, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Yeshiva University
  • Belz School of Music

Undergraduate schools

  • Yeshiva College
  • Stern College for Women
  • Sy Syms School of Business

Graduate schools

  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration
  • Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
  • Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies
  • Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology
  • GPATS - Graduate Program for Women in Advanced Talmudic Studies
  • Wurzweiler Graduate School of Social Work

Affiliates and centers

Scholarly and cultural resources

  • Yeshiva University Center for the Jewish Future

Student organizations

  • YU Maccabees Athletics
  • WYUR:Yeshiva University Radio
  • The Commentator (YU's student newspaper)
  • MacsLive, Online Home of Macs Basketball and the Red Sarachek Tournament

Other YU resources

Yeshiva College is the undergraduate arts and sciences mens college affiliated with Yeshiva University. ... Stern College for Women (SCW) is the undergraduate womens college of arts and sciences at Yeshiva University. ... The Sy Syms School of Business is Yeshiva Universitys undergraduate business school for men and women. ... Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary or RIETS (Yeshivat Rabbeinu Yitzchak Elchanan) is the most important yeshiva component of Yeshiva University. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... The Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law is the law school of Yeshiva University, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... The Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies was Yeshiva University’s first graduate school. ... The Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration, a Yeshiva University professional school, was established in 1945 and named in 1983 for Montréal architect and philanthropist David J. Azrieli. ... The Wurzweiler School of Social Work at Yeshiva University was founded in 1957. ... The Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology is a division of Yeshiva University. ... The Yeshiva University Museum is a teaching museum and the cultural arm of Yeshiva University. ... The Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs of Yeshiva University seeks to promote international understanding and cooperation by providing an educational forum for the exchange of ideas related to critical international issues. ... The Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University, located on Yeshiva University’s Wilf Campus in New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood, fosters research on ethical issues and the integration of discourse on ethics into the curriculum among Yeshiva University’s schools. ... The Institute for Public Health Sciences at Yeshiva University provides research and training opportunities for faculty, students, and researchers interested in public health and preventive medicine, consolidating university resources in these areas and creating new programs, including a Master of Public Health degree. ... Bernard (Dov) Revel was an Orthodox rabbi and scholar. ... Samuel Belkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Rabbi Dr. Norman (Nachum) Lamm, (born 1927 in Brooklyn, New York, United States), is a major American Modern Orthodox Jewish communal leader. ... Richard M. Joel (born 1950) is the fourth president of Yeshiva University, a Modern Orthodox Judaism Jewish university with a network of schools, colleges, and universities in New York City. ... Rav Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov, Yoshe Ber) Soloveitchik (Hebrew: ) () was an American Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Rabbi Yosef Blau Yosef Blau is an Orthodox rabbi. ... Rabbi Dr. J. (Judah) David Bleich (pronounced Blikhe) is an authority on Jewish law and ethics and bioethics. ... Aharon Lichtenstein (born 1933) is a noted Orthodox Jewish rabbi and rosh yeshiva. ... Rabbi Dovid Lifshitz Rabbi Dovid Lifshitz (1906-1993) was a distinguished Rosh yeshiva in the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) for almost fifty years. ... Not to be confused with Rabbi Herschel Schacter Rabbi Hershel Schachter (born 1941) is a Rosh Yeshiva at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS), Yeshiva University, in New York City. ... (Left to right) Rabbi Shlomo Shapira, Professor Setsuzo Kotsuji (Abraham Kotsuji), the Amshinover Rebbe and Rabbi Moshe Shatzkes, in Japan Rabbi Moshe Shatzkes (1881-1958) was a renowned Rabbi, Talmudic scholar and noted genius, commonly known as the Lomza Rov. He was one of the pre-eminent Roshei Yeshiva (yeshiva... Rabbi Ahron Soloveichik;(May 1, 1917 - October 4, 2001) was a scholar of Halakha and a Rosh Yeshiva; known especially within circles of Orthodox Judaism. ... Rabbi Moshe Soloveitchik (1879 - 1941), son of the renowned Reb Chaim Soloveitchik famous for his unparalled talmudic methodology (1853-1918) and grandson of the Beit HaLevi - Rav Yosef Baer Soloveitchik (1820 - 1892) was the younger of Reb Chaims two sons. ... Moshe David Tendler is the rabbi of The Community Synagogue of Monsey. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym pronounced ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Pace redirects here. ... St. ... Touro College is a Jewish-sponsored independent institution of higher and professional education, in New York City, New York, United States. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... Boricua College is a post-secondary educational institution located in New York City. ... The Kings College is a small Christian institution of higher education, founded by Percy Crawford in Briarcliff Manor, Westchester, in 1938. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... Marymount Manhattan College is a liberal arts college located in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... The main entrance of the College of Mount Saint Vincent The College of Mount Saint Vincent is a Catholic liberal arts college located in the Riverdale section of The Bronx, New York. ... St. ... Saint Josephs College, New York is a private Roman Catholic College in New York, with its main campus located in the borough of Brooklyn, and a branch campus located in Suffolk County, Patchogue, New York. ... Wagner College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located on Staten Island in New York City. ... The American Musical and Dramatic Academy, or AMDA, is a school for the performing arts located New York City, New York, with a satellite campus in Los Angeles, California. ... The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Juilliard School is one of the worlds premier performing arts conservatories, in New York City. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... The New York Institute of Technology (also known as NYIT and New York Tech) is a private, co-educational college in New York in the USA. The college has three New York campuses, two on Long Island and one on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, as well as global... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as in Utica, New York. ... The School of Visual Arts (SVA), is an art school in Manhattan, New York City and is one of the nations leading independent colleges of art and design. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... Brooklyn Law School Brooklyn Law School (BLS) is a law school located in downtown Brooklyn, New York. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ... Beth Israel Medical Center is a hospital in New York. ... New York Law School is a private law school in Lower Manhattan in New York City. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... The State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, better known as SUNY Downstate Medical Center, is an academic medical center and is the only one of its kind in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City. ... The Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, formerly named the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University and abbreviated to Weill Cornell, is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Berkeley College is a private college specializing in business, with five campuses in New York and New Jersey. ... Bramson ORT College is an undergraduate college in New York City operated by the American branch of the Jewish charity World ORT. Its main campus is in Forest Hills, Queens, with a satellite campus in Brooklyn. ... Briarcliffe College consists of a pair of for-profit career colleges in Bethpage and Patchogue on Long Island, New York. ... Founded in 1964,[1] Metropolitan College of New York is comprised of the School for Business, the Audrey Cohen School for Human Services and Education, and the School for Public Affairs and Administration. ... Monroe College is a private college with campuses in the Bronx and New Rochelle, New York. ... SUNY Maritime College SUNY Maritime College Seal SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York City in historic Fort Schuyler on the Throggs Neck peninsula where the East River meets Long Island Sound. ... Formerly known as the College of Aeronautics, Vaughn College of Aeronautics & Technology is a specialized college located in Queens County, New York in New York City. ... The Bank Street College of Education is located in upper Manhattan in New York City. ... For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church is located in Chelsea, Manhattan in New York. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ... The Skyline Conference, also known as the Mountain States Conference, was a college athletic conference based in the western United States. ... For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Farmingdale State College is a coeducational, public college with over 6,200 students pursuing degrees in one of 31 programs in the areas of business, applied arts and sciences, health sciences and engineering technologies. ... Mount Saint Mary College is a private, independent, Judeo-Christian college, in Newburgh, New York. ... The main entrance of the College of Mount Saint Vincent The College of Mount Saint Vincent is a Catholic liberal arts college located in the Riverdale section of The Bronx, New York. ... Purchase College, State University of New York Purchase College, also known as SUNY Purchase or State University of New York College at Purchase, is a public liberal, visual, and performing arts college in Purchase, New York, United States, a part of the State University of New York system. ... Polytechnic University (Brooklyn Poly, Poly, or Polytech), located in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City, is the United States second oldest private technological university, founded in 1854. ... Saint Josephs College, New York is a private Roman Catholic College in New York, with its main campus located in the borough of Brooklyn, and a branch campus located in Suffolk County, Patchogue, New York. ... SUNY Maritime College SUNY Maritime College Seal SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York City in historic Fort Schuyler on the Throggs Neck peninsula where the East River meets Long Island Sound. ... The State University of New York College at Old Westbury is a university college that is part of the State University of New York system. ... // Organization Three women collegiate fencers, Julia Jones and Dorothy Hafner of New York University and Elizabeth Ross of Cornell University, founded the NIWFA in 1929. ... USMA redirects here. ... “City College” redirects here. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Drew University is a small, private university located in Madison, New Jersey. ... Fairleigh Dickinson University is a American private university founded in 1942. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... This article is about Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... New Jersey Institute of Technology is a public research university in Newark, New Jersey. ... Queens College is one of the senior colleges of the City University of New York. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Stevens Institute of Technology is a technological university located on a 55 acre (223,000 m²) campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, founded in 1870 on the basis of an 1868 bequest from Edwin A. Stevens. ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... The term Torah Judaism is a term used by a number of Orthodox Jews to describe themselves. ... Haredi or chareidi Judaism is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism. ... This article is about the Hasidic movement originating in Poland and Russia. ... Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ... Religious Zionism, or the Religious Zionist Movement, a branch of which is also called Mizrachi, is an ideology that claims to combine Zionism and Judaism, to base Zionism on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ... A Hasidic dynasty is a dynasty of Hasidic spiritual leaders known as rebbes, and usually has some or all of the following characteristics: Each member of the dynasty is a spiritual leader, often known as an ADMOR (abbreviation for ADireinu MOreinu Rabeinu (our master, our teacher and our rabbi) or... Torah study is the study by Jews of the Torah, Tanakh, Talmud, responsa, rabbinic literature and similar works, all of which are Judaisms religious texts, for the purpose of the mitzvah (commandment) of Torah study itself, meaning study for religious (as opposed to academic) purposes. ... This article is about the Jewish male educational system. ... Bais Yaakov or Beit Yaakov or Beth Jacob (literally House [of] Jacob in Hebrew) is a loosely-organized group of Orthodox Jewish day schools throughout the world for young Jewish females from religious families. ... Torah Umesorah - National Society for Hebrew Day Schools (or Torah Umesorah תורה ומסורה) is an Orthodox Judaism organization that fosters and promotes Torah-based Jewish religious education in North America by supporting and developing a loosely affiliated network of independent private Jewish day schools, yeshivas and kollelim in every city with a... Chinuch Atzmai was founded in 1953 by the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah (Council of Torah Sages of Agudath Israel in Israel) to serve as an alternate school system for Orthodox children in Israel. ... Agudath Israel can refer to any of several related organizations, including: an international movement, the World Agudath Israel an American organization, Agudath Israel of America an Israeli political party, Agudat Israel This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Shas (Hebrew: ) is an political party in Israel, primarily representing Ultra-orthodox Sephardi and Mizrahi Judaism. ... United Torah Judaism (In Hebrew: יהדות התורה which translates as Judaism [of the] Torah) (UTJ) is a small Haredi political party in the Israeli Knesset. ... Mafdal party logo The National Religious Party (Hebrew: Mafdal, מפדל) is an Israeli political party representing the religious Zionist movement. ... The Kotel is under the supervision of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel The Chief Rabbinate of Israel is the supreme Jewish religious governing body in the state of Israel. ... The Edah HaCharedis (Hebrew: העדה החרדית HaEdah HaCharedis), also written Edah Haredit, is a prominent Haredi rabbinical body in present-day Jerusalem. ... The Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah (Council of Torah Sages) serves as the highest ranking rabbinic policy board of the Agudath Israel organization. ... The Rabbinical Council of America (RCA) is one of the worlds largest organizations of Orthodox Jewish rabbis; it is affiliated with The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, more commonly known as the Orthodox Union, or OU. History The roots of the organization go back to 1923 when... The Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the United States and Canada also known as the Agudas HaRabbanim (or Agudath Harabonim) (union of rabbis), and sometimes as the UOR, was established in 1901 in the United States and is among the oldest organizations of Orthodox rabbis which could be described as... United Synagogue is an organization of London Jews that was founded with the sanction of an act of parliament, in 1870. ... UOHC logo (2007) The Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations was founded in 1926 to protect traditional Judaism[1]. It acts as an umbrella organisation for the chareidi Jewish community in London and comprises over a hundred synagogues and and educational institutions. ... OU logo. ... Agudath Israel can refer to any of several related organizations, including: an international movement, the World Agudath Israel an American organization, Agudath Israel of America an Israeli political party, Agudat Israel This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Mizrachi (acronym for Merkaz Ruchani or religious centre) is the name of the religious Zionist organization founded in 1902 in Vilna at a world conference of religious Zionists called by Rabbi Yitzchak Yaacov Reines. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה ; alternate transliterations include Halocho and Halacha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law, as well as customs and traditions. ... Responsa constitute a special class of rabbinic literature. ... The term Torah Judaism is a term used by a number of Orthodox Jews to describe themselves. ... Hasidic Philosophy or Chassidic philosophy (Hebrew: חסידות, also Hassidism, Chassidus or Chassidut or Chasidut) is the teachings and philosophy underlying Hasidic Judaism. ... Torah im Derech Eretz (Hebrew תורה עם דרך ארץ - Torah with the way of the land) is a philosophy of Orthodox Judaism articulated by Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch (1808-1888), which formalizes a relationship between traditionally observant Judaism and the modern world. ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... Daas Torah (or Daat Torah, Daas Toyreh) (Hebrew: דעת תורה. Literally, Knowledge of Torah) is an important basic concept in present-day Jewish Haredi society. ...

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Yeshiva University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (854 words)
The University is also affiliated with two yeshiva high schools, Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls, located in Queens, and The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy Yeshiva University High School for Boys, located on the school's Wilf Campus.
Yeshiva College was founded in 1928 as an expansion to stem the tide of TA graduates to secular colleges.
In 1970, Yeshiva revised its charter to become a secular university, changing the status of RIETS (the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary) and its high schools to "affiliates", despite vigorous student and faculty protest.
Yeshiva - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1419 words)
Yeshiva or yeshivah (Hebrew: ישיבה pl. yeshivot or yeshivos) is an institution for Torah study and the study of Talmud primarily within Orthodox Judaism attended by males.
Yeshiva is the "generic" name for the entire system of schools that teach Torah, Mishanh and Talmud, to all ages.
A yeshiva for male married students is known as a kollel ("gathering").
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