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Encyclopedia > Yes Minister
Yes Minister
Yes, Prime Minister

The title card of Yes Minister
Genre Situation comedy
Created by Antony Jay
Jonathan Lynn
Starring Paul Eddington
Nigel Hawthorne
Derek Fowlds
Theme music composer Ronnie Hazlehurst
Country of origin Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Language(s) English
No. of series 5
No. of episodes 38[1][2] (List of episodes)
Production
Producer(s) Stuart Allen
Sydney Lotterby
Peter Whitmore
Location Whitehall, London
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 30 minutes (with 60 min special and short specials)[1]
Broadcast
Original channel BBC Two
Picture format 576i (SDTV)
Original run 25 February 1980[1]28 January 1988[2]
External links
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Yes Minister is a satirical British sitcom written by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn that was first transmitted by BBC television and radio between 1980 and 1984, split over three seven-episode series. The sequel, Yes, Prime Minister, ran from 1986 to 1988. In total this made 38 episodes, all but one of which last half an hour. Image File history File links Yes_Minister_opening_titles. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ... Sir Antony Rupert Jay CVO (born 20 April 1930) was the co-author, with Jonathan Lynn of the successful British political comedies, Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (1980-88). ... Jonathan Lynn (born April 3, 1943), is a British actor and comedy writer. ... Paul Eddington playing Jim Hacker in Yes, Prime Minister. ... Sir Nigel Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was a renowned English actor. ... Derek Fowlds (born 2 September 1937 in Balham, London) is an English actor. ... Ronnie Hazlehurst (GR) (born Dukinfield, Cheshire, in ?1931) is a composer and jazz musician, and after joining the BBC in 1961, was BBC Light Entertainment Musical Director. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This is a list of Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister episodes. ... Sydney Lotterby is a British television producer and director with the BBC. Television comedy series of which he was producer or director included: As Time Goes By, May to December, Yes, Prime Minister, Ever Decreasing Circles, Brush Strokes, Open All Hours, Butterflies, Ripping Yarns, Porridge, Going Straight, Broaden Your Mind... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Pioneered by Desi Arnaz with three cameras, commonly now four, the multicamera setup is used to shoot most studio-produced television programs such as situation comedies, soap operas, news programs, game shows, and talk shows. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Antony Rupert Jay CVO (born 20 April 1930) was the co-author, with Jonathan Lynn of the successful British political comedies, Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (1980-88). ... Jonathan Lynn (born April 3, 1943), is a British actor and comedy writer. ... BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ...


Set in the private office in Whitehall of a British government cabinet minister (and, in the sequel, in 10 Downing Street), the series follows the ministerial career of James Hacker MP, played by Paul Eddington. His various struggles to formulate and enact legislation or effect departmental changes are opposed by the will of the British Civil Service, in particular his Permanent Secretary (senior civil servant), Sir Humphrey Appleby, played by Nigel Hawthorne. His Principal Private Secretary Bernard Woolley, played by Derek Fowlds is usually caught between the two, although heavily influenced by Sir Humphrey. Almost every programme ends with the line "Yes, Minister" (or "Yes, Prime Minister"), uttered (usually) by Sir Humphrey as he quietly relishes his victory over his "political master" (or, occasionally, acknowledges defeat). Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government. ... Information Occupation Minister/Prime Minister Title The Right Honourable Relationships Anne Annie Hacker Children Lucy Hacker Portrayed by Paul Eddington The Right Honourable James (Jim) George Hacker, Baron Hacker of Islington KG PC, BSc (Lond. ... Type Lower House Speaker of the House of Commons Leader of the House of Commons Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Harriet Harman, QC, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader of the House of Commons Theresa May, PC, (Conservative) since December 6, 2005 Members 646 Political groups... Paul Eddington playing Jim Hacker in Yes, Prime Minister. ... The British civil service is the permanent bureaucracy that supports the Government Ministers responsible to the Sovereign and Parliament in administering the United Kingdom. ... The Permanent Secretary, in most departments officially titled the Permanent Under-Secretary of State (although the full title is rarely used), is the most senior civil servant of a British Government ministry, charged with running the department on a day-to-day basis. ... Sir Humphrey Appleby, on the left, giving directions to the Minister as usual Sir Humphrey Appleby is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... Sir Nigel Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was a renowned English actor. ... In the British Civil Service the Principal Private Secretary is the Civil Servant who runs a ministers private office. ... Bernard Woolley in Yes, Prime Minister Bernard Woolley (born September 2, 1937) is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... Derek Fowlds (born 2 September 1937 in Balham, London) is an English actor. ...


A huge critical and popular success, the series received a number of awards, including several BAFTAs and in 2004 came sixth in the Britain's Best Sitcom poll. It was the favourite television programme of the then British Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.[3] The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... Britains Best Sitcom was a poll conducted in 2003 and 2004 by the BBC to identify the United Kingdoms best situation comedy. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first (and, to date, only) woman to hold either post. ...

Contents

Situation

As the series revolves around the inner workings of central government, most of the scenes take place in private locations, such as offices and exclusive lounges. Lynn says "here was not a single scene set in the House of Commons because...government does not take place in the House of Commons; some politics...and much theatre takes place there. Government happens in private. As in all public performances, the real work is done in rehearsal, behind closed doors. Then the public, and the House, are shown what the government wishes them to see."[4] British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliament in the United Kingdom and Canada. ...


The dominant running theme is the struggle between (The Rt Hon.) James "Jim" Hacker, the newly-appointed Minister in the (fictional) Department of Administrative Affairs, and his civil servants and ministerial colleagues. Chief among his officials are Sir Humphrey Appleby, KCB, MVO, MA (Oxon), who is the department's Permanent Secretary, and Bernard Woolley, Hacker's Principal Private Secretary. "Behind the scenes" influence is also exerted when Sir Humphrey consults (or is summoned by) the Cabinet Secretary (or, in the second series, ex-Secretary) at their St James's Gentlemen's club. The Right Honourable (abbreviated Rt Hon, The Rt Hon, The Right Hon, Right Hon) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... Information Occupation Minister/Prime Minister Title The Right Honourable Relationships Anne Annie Hacker Children Lucy Hacker Portrayed by Paul Eddington The Right Honourable James (Jim) George Hacker, Baron Hacker of Islington KG PC, BSc (Lond. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Sir Humphrey Appleby, on the left, giving directions to the Minister as usual Sir Humphrey Appleby is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... Queen Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... The degree of Master of Arts degree is an undergraduate degree awarded by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge as well as by the University of Dublin. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Bernard Woolley in Yes, Prime Minister Bernard Woolley (born September 2, 1937) is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... A Gentlemens club is a members club, originally for male members of the English gentry. ...


The different ideals and self-interested motivations of the characters are frequently contrasted. Whilst Hacker occasionally approaches an issue from a sense of idealism and a desire to be seen to improve things, he ultimately sees his re-election as the only endorsement of his success. In order to achieve this he must appear to the voters to be effective and responsive to the public will. To his party (and, in the first series, the Prime Minister) he must act as a loyal and effective party member. Sir Humphrey, on the other hand, genuinely believes (along with most of the other civil servants who are depicted) that it is the Civil Service that knows what is best for the country, which is usually "coincidentally" what is best for the Civil Service. Most of Sir Humphrey's actions are motivated by his wish to maintain the prestige, power, and influence he enjoys inside a large, bureaucratic organisation, and also to preserve the numerous perks of his position: automatic honours, a substantial income, a fixed retirement age and a large index-linked pension, and the practical impossibility of being made redundant or being sacked. In fact, a good deal of the tension in their relationship comes from Hacker's awareness that it is the politicians who are liable to lose their jobs if civil service ineptitude comes to public attention. In "Doing the Honours" he notes: "In private industry if you screw things up you get the boot; in the civil service if you screw things up I get the boot." This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Doing the Honours is the ninth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 2 March 1981. ...


Hacker, then, sees his task as the initiation of departmental reforms and economies, a reduction of the level of bureaucracy and staff numbers in the Civil Service, and the government of the country according to his party's policies. To do so, or to at least look as if he has, would be a vote-winner. Conversely, Sir Humphrey sees his role as ensuring that politics is kept out of government as much as possible, and that the status quo is upheld as a matter of principle. He will block any move that seeks either to prevent the further expansion of the civil service or to reduce the complexity of its bureaucracy. This article is about the English rock band. ...


Much of the show's humour thus derives from the antagonism between Cabinet ministers (who believe they are in charge) and the members of the British Civil Service who really run the country. A typical episode centres on Jim Hacker's suggesting and pursuing a reform, and Sir Humphrey's ingenious blocking of all Hacker's lines of approach. More often than not Sir Humphrey prevents him from achieving his goal, while mollifying Hacker with some positive publicity, or at least a means to cover up his failure. Occasionally, however, Hacker does get his way, as in "The Greasy Pole." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “UK” redirects here. ... The Greasy Pole is the eleventh episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 16 March 1981. ...


Initially Woolley naïvely sees his job as the disinterested implementation of the Minister's policies, but he gradually finds that this conflicts with his institutional duty to the department and sometimes, since Sir Humphrey is responsible for formally assessing Woolley's performance, his own potential career development.[1]


The first series featured Frank Weisel, Hacker's political advisor, played by Neil Fitzwiliam. While his name is pronounced W-"eye"-sel, Sir Humphrey and Bernard persistently call him "Mr Weasel". Weisel does not appear after the first series, following his convenient acceptance of a position on a quango (Quasi-Autonomous Non-Governmental Organisation) tasked, appropriately, with investigating the appointment of other quangos.[1] After the third series, following Sir Humphrey's promotion to Cabinet Secretary, Hacker becomes Prime Minister and requests that Bernard Woolley continue as his Principal Private Secretary. The first series of Yes, Prime Minister introduced Dorothy Wainwright (played by Deborah Norton) as a highly able Special Political Advisor to the Prime Minister. Her experience and insight into many civil service tricks ensures a lasting mutual distrust between her and Sir Humphrey and an invaluable second opinion for Hacker.[5] Neil Fitzwiliam was an English actor, making several appearances in theatre, film and television productions. ... The acronyms Qango and Quango, variously spelt out as QUAsi Non Governmental Organisation, Quasi-Autonomous Non-Governmental Organisation, and Quasi-Autonomous National Government Organisation have been used, notably in the United Kingdom, but also in Australia, Ireland and other countries, to describe a range of organisations to which governments have... In the British Government, the Cabinet Secretary, or more formally Secretary of the Cabinet, is the senior civil servant in charge of the Cabinet Office, a department that provides administrative support to the Prime Minister, the Cabinet, and the government as a whole. ... Deborah Norton is a British actress best known for her appearances in Yes, Prime Minister and A Bit of Fry and Laurie. ...


Hacker's home life is shown occasionally throughout the series. His wife, Annie (Diana Hoddinott), is clearly frustrated by the disruptions caused by her husband's political career and is at times somewhat cynical about her husband's politics. Meanwhile, his sociology student daughter, Lucy (Gerry Cowper), becomes an environmental activist in one episode (her only on-screen appearance, despite several other mentions), campaigning against one of her father's departmental policies. Diana Hoddinott appeared as Annie Hacker, the wife of Jim Hacker, in Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister. Categories: | | ... hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi ...


Sir Humphrey's personal characteristics include his complicated sentences, his cynical views on government, and his superciliousness. Hacker's attributes include occasional indecisiveness, and a tendency to launch into ludicrous Churchillian speeches. Bernard is apt to linguistic pedantry. Sir Humphrey often discusses matters with other Permanent Secretaries, who appear similarly sardonic and jaded, and the Cabinet Secretary (whom he will eventually succeed in Yes, Prime Minister), Sir Arnold Robinson (John Nettleton) an archetype of cynicism, haughtiness and conspiratorial expertise. This fairly counter-intuitive view of government administration is not only Sir Humphrey's: it is completely taken for granted by the civil service. Logorrhoea or logorrhea (Greek λογορροια, logorrhoia, “word-flux”) is defined as an “excessive flow of words” and, when used medically, refers to incoherent talkativeness that occurs in certain kinds of mental illness, such as mania. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... John Nettleton in Yes, Prime Minister John Nettleton (born 5 February 1929 in London) is a British actor. ...


The Yes, Prime Minister episode "The Bishop's Gambit" parodied liberal theology and politics in the Church of England. Hacker thought that the church is a Christian institution, but Sir Humphrey gleefully informed him that most of the bishops do not believe in God, and that a theologian's job is partly to explain why an agnostic or atheist can be a church leader. The Bishops Gambit is the seventh episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 20 February 1986. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Liberal Christianity, sometimes called... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... The term agnosticism and the related agnostic were coined by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1869. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ...


Almost all the episodes end with one of the characters (usually Sir Humphrey) saying "Yes, Minister" or "Yes, Prime Minister". Each episode of the former series was more or less self-contained, but Yes, Prime Minister had a loose story arc. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Politics

Lynn joined the union society in his first year at the University of Cambridge because he thought that he might like to enter politics. "All of the main debaters there, aged twenty, were the most pompous, self-satisfied, self-important bunch of clowns that I've ever clapped eyes on. They were all behaving as if they were on the government front bench, and twenty years later they all were: Michael Howard; John Selwyn Gummer; Kenneth Clark. I thought at that point that the only that I could ever contribute to politics is making fun of the politicians."[5] The coat of arms for the Cambridge Union Society, which shares much in common with the coat of arms for the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Right Honourable John Selwyn Gummer is a British politician, and Conservative member of Parliament for Suffolk Coastal. ... Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation. ...


The series, then, intended to satirise politics and government in general, rather than any specific party. The writers placed Hacker at the centre of the political spectrum, and were careful to identify his party headquarters as "Central House" (a combination of Conservative Central Office and Labour's Transport House). The terms "Labour" and "Conservative" are scrupulously avoided throughout the series, favouring terms such as "the party" or "the Government" and "the opposition."[1] In the first scene of the first episode, "Open Government", Hacker is shown at the declaration of his constituency result wearing a white rosette, with other candidates sporting the red and blue rosettes associated with the two leading British parties. The one exception to this neutrality occurs very briefly in "The National Education Service", when Sir Humphrey explains to Bernard how the policy of comprehensive education is retained through successive governments, using different arguments according to which party is in power. Despite this, the overall thrust was towards government reduction rather than expansion. The episode "Jobs for the Boys", for example, rejected corporatism. Conservative Central Office (CCO) is the headquarters of the British Conservative Party, housing its central staff and committee members. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the Yes Minister episode. ... Rosettes can refer for: A small, circular, device that can be awarded with medals (see: Rosette (decoration)). A type of plant with their leaves at an upset stem in a typical form. ... The National Education Service is the fifteenth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 21 January 1988. ... A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England or Wales. ... Jobs for the Boys is the seventh episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 7 April 1980. ... Historically, corporatism or corporativism (Italian: corporativismo) refers to a political or economic system in which power is given to civic assemblies that represent economic, industrial, agrarian, social, cultural, and professional groups. ...

Jim Hacker
Don't tell me about the press. I know exactly who reads the papers: The Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country; The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Times is read by people who actually do run the country; The Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country; The Financial Times is read by people who own the country; The Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; And The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is.

Sir Humphrey Appleby
Prime Minister, what about the people who read The Sun?
Bernard Woolley
Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits.
"A Conflict of Interest" Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a British tabloid daily newspaper. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... For other uses, see Morning Star. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ... A Conflict of Interest is the twelfth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 31 December 1987. ...

In a 2004 documentary, Armando Iannucci compared Yes Minister to George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four in how it has influenced the public's view of the state. Although Lynn comments that the word "spin" has "probably entered the political vocabulary since the series,"[4] Iannucci suggests that the show "taught us how to unpick the verbal tricks that politicians think they can get away with in front of the cameras."[5] The series depicted the media-consciousness of politicians, reflecting the public relations training they undergo to help them deal with interviews and reading from autocue effectively. This is particularly evident in the episode "The Ministerial Broadcast," in which Hacker is advised on the effects of his clothes and surroundings. The episode "A Conflict of Interest" humorously lampoons the various political stances of Britain's newspapers through their readership. Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Schematic representation: A teleprompter (also known as an autocue) is a display device that prompts the person speaking with an electronic visual text of a speech or script. ... The Ministerial Broadcast is the second episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 16 January 1986. ... A Conflict of Interest is the twelfth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 31 December 1987. ...


Inspirations

The writers were inspired by a variety of sources, including sources inside government, published material and contemporary news stories. Some situations were conceived as fiction, but were later revealed to have real-life counterparts. The episode "The Compassionate Society" depicts a hospital with five hundred administrative staff but no doctors, nurses or patients. Lynn recalls that "after inventing this absurdity, we discovered there were six such hospitals (or very large empty wings of hospitals) exactly as we had described them in our episode."[4] The Compassionate Society is the eighth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 23 February 1981. ...


In a programme screened by the BBC in early 2004, paying tribute to the series, it was revealed that Jay and Lynn had drawn on information provided by two insiders from the governments of Harold Wilson and James Callaghan, namely Marcia Williams and Bernard Donoughue.[5] The published diaries of Richard Crossman[6] also provided inspiration.[4] James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... Marcia Matilda Falkender, Baroness Falkender (born March 10, 1932) is a British Labour politician, being first the private secretary for, and then the political secretary and head of political office to, Harold Wilson. ... Bernard Donoughue, Baron Donoughue, (born 8 September 1934) is a British politician, businessman and author. ... Richard Howard Stafford Crossman (15 December 1907 to April 1974) was a British politician and writer. ...


The episode entitled "The Moral Dimension", in which Hacker and his staff engage in the scheme of secretly consuming alcohol on a trade mission to the fictional Islamic state of Qumran, was based on a real incident that took place in Pakistan. Jay says that "I can't tell you where, I can't tell you when and I can't tell you who was involved; all I can tell you is that we knew that it had actually happened. That's why it was so funny. We couldn't think up things as funny as the real things that had happened."[7] Media historian Andrew Crisell suggests that the show was "enriched by the viewers' suspicion that what they were watching was unhealthily close to real life."[8] The Moral Dimension is the eighteenth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 2 December 1982. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Qumran is a fictional country in the 1980s sitcoms Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister. ...


Fusing inspiration and invention, Lynn and Jay worked on the story "for anything from three days to two weeks," and only took "four mornings to write all the dialogue. After we wrote the episode, we would show it to some secret sources, always including somebody who was an expert on the subject in question. They would usually give us extra information which, because it was true, was usually funnier than anything we might have thought up."[4] Designers Valerie Warrender and Gloria Clayton were given access to the Cabinet Rooms and the State Drawing Rooms. For security purposes, the arrangements of the rooms were altered, and the views from the windows were never shown, in order to conceal the layout of the buildings.[9]


Main characters

The three main characters in the Minister's Office at the Department of Administrative Affairs: from left, Sir Humphrey Appleby, Bernard Woolley and Jim Hacker.
The three main characters in the Minister's Office at the Department of Administrative Affairs: from left, Sir Humphrey Appleby, Bernard Woolley and Jim Hacker.

Jim Hacker (Paul Eddington) was an academic political researcher, polytechnic lecturer and editor of a newspaper, Reform, before entering Parliament, where he apparently spent a good deal of time in Opposition before his party won the general election. In Yes Minister he is the Minister for Administrative Affairs (a fictitious ministry of the British government) and a cabinet minister. Hacker received his degree from the London School of Economics, for which he is frequently derided by the Oxford-educated Sir Humphrey. His early character is that of a gung-ho, but naïve, politician, bringing sweeping changes to his department. Before long, Hacker begins to notice that Civil Service tactics are preventing his planned changes being put into practice. As he learns he becomes more sly and cynical, and uses some of the Civil Service ruses himself. While Sir Humphrey initially held all the aces, Hacker now and again plays a trump card of his own. Image File history File links The main figures of the ficticious Department of Administrative Affairs in the British sitcom Yes, Minister. ... Image File history File links The main figures of the ficticious Department of Administrative Affairs in the British sitcom Yes, Minister. ... Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister are British sitcoms about the struggle between (Dr) James Jim Hacker (played by Paul Eddington), the government minister of the (fictional) Department of Administrative Affairs (and later as Prime Minister) and his civil servants and ministerial colleagues. ... Paul Eddington playing Jim Hacker in Yes, Prime Minister. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ... A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle G5 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Throughout Yes Minister, Hacker is often portrayed as a publicity-mad bungler, incapable of making a firm decision, prone to potentially embarrassing blunders, and who elicits bad press and stern lectures from the party apparatus, particularly the Chief Whip. In Yes, Prime Minister Hacker quickly develops statesmanlike skills. He practises more grandiose speeches, dreams up his "grand design", and hones his diplomatic skills, and these nearly all land him in trouble. In a Radio Times interview to promote Yes, Prime Minister, Paul Eddington stated, "He's beginning to find his feet as a man of power, and he's begun to confound those who thought they'd be able to manipulate him out of hand."[10] The Chief Whip is a political office in some legislatures assigned to an elected member whose task is to administer the whipping system that ensures that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ...


Sir Humphrey (Nigel Hawthorne) serves throughout the series as Permanent Secretary under the ministry of James Hacker at the Department of Administrative Affairs. He is appointed Cabinet Secretary just as Hacker's party enters a leadership crisis, and is instrumental in Hacker's elevation to Prime Minister. He is committed to maintaining the status quo for the country in general and for the Civil Service in particular.[5] Sir Humphrey is a master of obfuscation and manipulation, baffling his opponents with technical jargon and circumlocutions, strategically appointing allies to supposedly impartial boards, and setting up interdepartmental committees to smother his Minister's proposals in red tape. Sir Humphrey Appleby, on the left, giving directions to the Minister as usual Sir Humphrey Appleby, GCB (April 5, 1929 – December 26, 2001)[1] is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel, Yes, Prime Minister. ... Sir Nigel Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was a renowned English actor. ... The Permanent Secretary, in most departments officially titled the Permanent Under-Secretary of State (although the full title is rarely used), is the most senior civil servant of a British Government ministry, charged with running the department on a day-to-day basis. ... This article is about the English rock band. ... The British civil service is the permanent bureaucracy that supports the Government Ministers responsible to the Sovereign and Parliament in administering the United Kingdom. ... Obfuscation refers to the concept of concealing the meaning of communication by making it more confusing and harder to interpret. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Red tape (or sometimes paperwork) is a derisive term for excessive regulation or rigid conformity to formal rules that is considered redundant or bureaucratic and hinders or prevents action or decision-making. ...

Audio sample:
  • "Sir Humphrey's big speeches"
    An example of Hawthorne's performance of the "big speeches," from the episode "Man Overboard"
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

In Britain's Best Sitcom, Stephen Fry comments that "we love the idea of the coherence and articulacy of Sir Humphrey... it's one of the things you look forward to in an episode of Yes Minister... when's the big speech going to happen? And can I see if he's reading it from an idiot board... he's really learned it, and it's superb."[5] Derek Fowlds posited to a concerned Eddington that these speeches were the reason why Hawthorne won a BAFTA for Best Comedy Performance four times in a row, while Eddington didn't win at all.[5] Image File history File links Yes_Minister_-_Sir_Humphrey_speech. ... Man Overboard is the ninth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 3 December 1987. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker and television personality. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into teleprompter. ...


Loquacious and verbose, he frequently uses both his mastery of the English language and even his superb grasp of Latin and Greek grammar both to perplex his political master and to obscure the relevant issues. In a Radio Times interview to promote the second series of Yes, Prime Minister, producer Sydney Lotterby stated that he always tried to give Eddington and Hawthorne extra time to rehearse as their scenes invariably featured lengthy dialogue exchanges.[11] For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ...


Bernard Woolley (Derek Fowlds) is Jim Hacker's Principal Private Secretary. His loyalties are therefore split between his Minister and his Civil Service boss, Humphrey Appleby: while he is theoretically responsible to Hacker personally, it is Sir Humphrey who writes his performance reviews and influences Bernard's Civil Service career. This leads to difficult situations for the young civil servant. He usually handles these situations well, and maintains his reputation in the Civil Service as a "high flier". Bernard Woolley in Yes, Prime Minister Bernard Woolley (born September 2, 1937) is one of the three main characters of the 1980s British sitcom Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister. ... Derek Fowlds (born 2 September 1937 in Balham, London) is an English actor. ... In the British Civil Service the Principal Private Secretary is the Civil Servant who runs a ministers private office. ...


Woolley is always quick to point out the physical impossibilities of Sir Humphrey's or Hacker's mixed metaphors, with almost obsessive pedantry. He can occasionally appear rather childlike, by making animal noises and gestures or by acting out how such an analogy cannot work. In language, a metaphor is a rhetorical trope where a comparison is made between two seemingly unrelated subjects. ... Look up pedant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In a 2004 retrospective, Armando Iannucci commented that Fowlds had a difficult task because he had to "spend most of his time saying nothing but looking interested in everyone else's total and utter guff" but "his one line frequently had to be the funniest of the lot." Iannucci suggests that Bernard is essential to the structure of the show because both Hacker and Appleby confide in him, "which means we get to find out what they're plotting next."[5] Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ...


Other characters

The series featured a cast of recurring characters. Frank Weisel, played by Neil Fitzwiliam, was Hacker's political advisor in the first series. It was not until Yes, Prime Minister that another such character appeared regularly: Dorothy Wainwright, special advisor to the Prime Minister, who was played by Deborah Norton. Hacker also had a Press Secretary, Bill Pritchard, played by Antony Carrick. Meanwhile, Sir Humphrey's civil service colleagues were regularly featured. They included Sir Arnold Robinson (played by John Nettleton), Cabinet Secretary in Yes Minister and later President of the Campaign for Freedom of Information; Sir Frederick Stewart (played by John Savident), Permanent Secretary of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, known as "Jumbo" to his friends; and Sir Frank Gordon, who appeared in both series as Permanent Secretary to the Treasury (played by Peter Cellier). Sir Humphrey also had an old acquaintance: Sir Desmond Glazebrook (played by Richard Vernon), who was Board member, then Chairman, of Bartlett's Bank. He became Governor of the Bank of England in the Yes, Prime Minister episode "A Conflict of Interest". (Bizarrely, this was to avoid, as one possibility, Britain's expulsion from the Commonwealth!) Neil Fitzwiliam was an English actor, making several appearances in theatre, film and television productions. ... Deborah Norton is a British actress best known for her appearances in Yes, Prime Minister and A Bit of Fry and Laurie. ... John Nettleton in Yes, Prime Minister John Nettleton (born 5 February 1929 in London) is a British actor. ... Over seventy countries around the world have implemented some form of freedom of information legislation. ... John Savident (born 1938) is a well-known British actor. ... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Whitehall, seen from St. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... Peter Cellier is an English actor who has appeared in film, stage and television. ... Richard Vernon as Sir Desmond Glazebrook, who appears in various episodes of Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister Richard Vernon (March 7, 1925 – December 4, 1997) was a British actor. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... A Conflict of Interest is the twelfth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes, Prime Minister and was first broadcast 31 December 1987. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


Hacker's family comprised his wife, Annie (played by Diana Hoddinott), who appeared in several episodes, and his daughter, Lucy (played by Gerry Cowper), who only featured on-screen in one, "The Right to Know", but is referred to intermittently throughout. At one point (in "Party Games") it is suggested that the Hackers have more than one child, but as this occurs when stating a well-rehearsed rebuttal, this could be seen as one more instance where the Minister has become "house trained" to conform to departmental convenience (even though the Minister is in the running for the leadership). Diana Hoddinott appeared as Annie Hacker, the wife of Jim Hacker, in Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister. Categories: | | ... hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi hi ... The Right to Know is the sixth episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister and was first broadcast 31 March 1980. ... Party Games is the twenty-second and final episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister. ...


Hacker's chauffeur, George (Arthur Cox), appeared in five episodes. He is a character who is always more in touch with current events than the Minister—anything from empty NHS hospitals to Cabinet reshuffles. This often irritates Hacker, who when asking George where he got the information, is usually told that it is common knowledge among the Whitehall drivers. Well-known broadcasters who played themselves included Robert McKenzie, Ludovic Kennedy and Sue Lawley. Robert Dougall regularly played a newsreader, which was his own real life profession. Arthur Cox is a British actor of television and film. ... “NHS” redirects here. ... In the parliamentary system a cabinet shuffle is an informal term for an event that occurs when a Head of Government rotates or changes the composition of ministers in his or her cabinet. ... Robert Trelford McKenzie (September 11, 1917–October 12, 1981) was a Vancouver, Canada-born professor of Politics and a psephologist. ... Sir Ludovic Kennedy shown on the cover of his book All In The Mind: A Farewell To God Sir Ludovic Henry Coverley Kennedy (born 3 November 1919) is a British journalist, broadcaster, and author. ... Sue Lawley (born July 14, 1946) is a English broadcaster. ... Robert Dougall (27 November 1913 - 19 December 1999) was a British broadcaster and ornithologist, mainly known as a newsreader and announcer. ...


Episodes

A total of thirty-eight episodes were made, and all but one are of 30 minutes' duration. As was standard BBC practice for situation comedies at the time, they were videotaped in front of a studio audience. The actors did not enjoy filming as they felt that the studio audience added additional pressure. Lynn, however, posits that the studio audience on the soundtrack was necessary because laughter is a "communal affair." The laughter also acted as insurance: Jay observes that politicians would be unable to put pressure on the BBC not to "run this kind of nonsense" if "200–250 people were falling about with laughter."[5] There were occasionally film inserts of any location sequences, and some shots of Hacker travelling in his car were achieved by means of chroma key. Each instalment usually comprised around six scenes. This is a list of Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister episodes. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ...


The pilot was produced in 1979 but not transmitted until 1980 in fear that it could influence the results of the 1979 UK General Election.[5] Yes Minister ran for three series, each of seven episodes, between 1980 and 1982. These were followed by two Christmas specials: one 10-minute sketch as part of an anthology presented by Frank Muir,[12] and then the hour-long "Party Games", in 1984. The latter's events led to Hacker's elevation to Prime Minister, dovetailing into the sequel, Yes, Prime Minister. This ran for two series, each of eight episodes, from 1986 to 1988. The United Kingdom general election of 1979 was held on 3 May 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... A Christmas television special is typically a one_time, 30 minute animated program aired during the Christmas season. ... Frank Muir (5 February 1920 - 2 January 1998) was an English comedy writer, radio and television personality, and raconteur. ... Party Games is the twenty-second and final episode of the BBC comedy series Yes Minister. ...


Opening titles and music

Gerald Scarfe's caricature of Paul Eddington as Hacker
Gerald Scarfe's caricature of Paul Eddington as Hacker

The opening titles were drawn by artist Gerald Scarfe, who provided distinctive caricatures of Eddington, Hawthorne and Fowlds in their respective roles to represent distortion.[5] He animated them as 'self-drawing' by positioning the camera above his paper, adding parts of lines, and then photographing two frames at a time. The sequence ended with the title of the episode superimposed on a blank 'government memo'. Scarfe created a second set of graphics for Yes, Prime Minister, including a different title card for each episode. Derek Fowlds wanted to buy an original drawing but was unable to afford it.[5] The series' performance credits typically only featured those of the actors who appeared in the particular episode, not the names of characters. Image File history File links Scarfejh. ... Gerald Scarfe (born 1936) is a British cartoonist and illustrator whose work is characterised by an apparent obsession with the grotesque and diseased, perhaps a result of an asthmatic, bed-ridden childhood. ... For the book of comics by Daniel Clowes see Caricature (Daniel Clowes collection) A caricature of film comedian Charlie Chaplin. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


The theme music was composed by Ronnie Hazlehurst and is largely based on the Westminster Quarters: the chimes of Big Ben. When asked in an interview about its Westminster influence, Hazlehurst replied, "That's all it is. It's the easiest thing I've ever done."[13] Scarfe's and Hazlehurst's work was not used for the first episode, "Open Government". The final version of the titles and music had yet to be agreed, and both differ substantially from those used for subsequent instalments. The opening and closing title caption cards feature drawings of most of the cast, but are less exaggerated than those of Scarfe, while the unaccredited music is a more up-tempo piece for brass band. The Scarfe and Hazelhurst credits were used for some repeat broadcasts of the first episode, but the original pilot credits were retained for the DVD release. The theme music of a radio or television program is a piece that is written specifically for that show and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ... Ronnie Hazlehurst (GR) (born Dukinfield, Cheshire, in ?1931) is a composer and jazz musician, and after joining the BBC in 1961, was BBC Light Entertainment Musical Director. ... The Westminster Quarters is the most common name for a melody used by a set of clock bells to strike the hour. ... The Clock Tower, often mistakenly known as Big Ben (the nickname of the Great Bell housed within the Clock Tower) The Clock Tower is the worlds largest four-faced, chiming turret clock. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... This article is about the Yes Minister episode. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...


Reception

The series gained high audience figures, and 90+ on the audience appreciation index.[9] Critics, such as Andrew Davies in the Times Educational Supplement and Armando Iannucci, have noted that the show demanded high expectations from its audience.[9] Lynn posits that the public are more intelligent than most situation comedies, which often patronise, give them credit. Jay believes that the audience was just as intelligent as the writers, but there were some things that they didn't know that they ought to.[5] BARB, the Broadcasters Audience Research Board, is the organisation that compiles television ratings in the UK. It was created to replace a previous system, where the BBC and ITV companies compiled their own ratings. ... The Times Educational Supplement (TES) is a weekly UK publication covering the world of primary, secondary and further education, as well as teaching job vacancies. ...


Yes Minister won the BAFTA award for Best Comedy Series for 1980, 1981 and 1982, and the "Party Games" special was nominated in the Best Light Entertainment Programme category for 1984. Yes, Prime Minister was short-listed for Best Comedy Series for both 1986 and 1987. Nigel Hawthorne's portrayal of Sir Humphrey Appleby won the BAFTA Award for Best Light Entertainment Performance four times (in 1981, 1982, 1986 and 1987). Eddington was also nominated on all four occasions.[14] Yes Minister came sixth in a 2004 BBC poll to find 'Britain's Best Sitcom'.[15] In a list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes drawn up by the British Film Institute in 2000, voted by industry professionals, Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister were jointly placed ninth. They were also placed 14th in Channel 4's The Ultimate Sitcom, a poll conducted by people who work in sitcoms.[16] BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Britains Best Sitcom was a poll conducted in 2003 and 2004 by the BBC to identify the United Kingdoms best situation comedy. ... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... This article is about the British television station. ... This article is about a genre of comedy. ...


The series have been cited by political scientists for their accurate and sophisticated portrayal of the relationships between civil servants and politicians,[17] and are quoted in some textbooks on British politics.[4] The series was highly rated by critics and politicians. The shows were very popular in government circles. The Guinness Television Encyclopedia suggests that "real politicians ... enjoyed the show's cynical dismissal of Whitehall intrigue and its insights into the machinations of government."[18] They were the favourite programme of then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. She told The Telegraph that "its clearly-observed portrayal of what goes on in the corridors of power has given me hours of pure joy."[9] Gerald Kaufman described it as "The Rt. Hon. Faust MP, constantly beset by the wiles of Sir Mephistopheles."[9] As a supporter of Thatcher, Jay embraced her appreciation, although the more leftist Lynn was concerned.[5] The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Whitehall, London, looking south towards the Houses of Parliament. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Gerald Kaufman is passionate about Palestine The Right Honourable Sir Gerald Bernard Kaufman (born June 21, 1930) is a British Labour Member of Parliament who was a government minister during the 1970s. ... Faust depicted in an etching by Rembrandt van Rijn (circa 1650) Faust or Faustus (the Latin for auspicious or lucky) is the protagonist of a popular German legend in which a mediæval scholar makes a pact with the Devil. ... Mephistopheles flying over Wittenberg, in a lithograph by Eugène Delacroix. ...

Hawthorne and Eddington performing the sketch with Thatcher in January 1984.
Hawthorne and Eddington performing the sketch with Thatcher in January 1984.

Thatcher performed a short sketch with Eddington and Hawthorne on 20 January 1984 at a ceremony where the writers were presented with an award from Mary Whitehouse's NVLA.[19] Various sources attribute authorship of the sketch. In Britain's Best Sitcom, Bernard Ingham says that he wrote it; other sources give Thatcher sole credit, while Michael Cockerell says that she wrote it with Ingham's help.[3] Another source gives renegade credit to Charles Powell.[9] The actors, who were both starring in separate West End plays at the time, were not enthusiastic at the idea and asked Lynn to "get them out" of it. The writer, however, was not in a position to help. Hawthorne says he and Eddington resented Thatcher's attempts to "make capital" from their popularity.[7] Ingham says that it "went down a bomb", while Lynn brands it a "dreadful sketch" that was only funny because Thatcher was doing it.[5] Accepting the award from the NVLA, Lynn thanked Thatcher "for taking her rightful place in the field of situation comedy." Everyone, except the Prime Minister, laughed.[7] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... mediawatch-uk, formerly the National Viewers and Listeners Association (NVALA) is a controversial special interest pressure group in the United Kingdom, which seeks to highlight what it sees as regulatory failure on harmful and offensive broadcast content violence, bad language, sex, homosexuality and blasphemy in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Bernard Ingham (born June 21, 1932) is a journalist best known as Margaret Thatchers former press secretary. ... Michael Cockerell is the BBCs most established political documentary maker, with a long, award-winning career of political programming across television and radio. ... Charles Powell I (born April 5, 1963, in Houston, Texas) is an actor, known for his role as President Harold Bates in TV show 15/Love. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre...


When Paul Eddington visited Australia during the 1980s, he was treated as a visiting British PM by the then Australian leader, Bob Hawke, who was obviously a great fan of the show. At a rally, Hawke said "You don't want to be listening to me; you want to be listening to the real Prime Minister", forcing Eddington to improvise.[20] In an interview to promote the first series of Yes, Prime Minister, Derek Fowlds said that "both political sides believe that it satirises their opponents, and civil servants love it because it depicts them as being more powerful than either. And of course, they love it because it's all so authentic."[10] Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) is a former Australian trade union leader turned politician who became the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia. ...


Legacy

The show has been remade several times. The first was the Canadian remake in 1987 Not My Department, which only lasted one season. Rosenbaddarna (from 1990) was the Swedish unofficial remake. The title of the Portuguese remake, Sim, Sr. Ministro (from 1996), is a direct translation of the original's title. Ji, Mantriji (2001) was the remake in Hindi (with the BBC's permission) by STAR Plus, Rupert Murdoch's Indian satellite TV channel. Both Sir Humphrey and Jim Hacker are portrayed there by the same actors who dubbed them on TV. A computer game version of Yes Minister was released in 1987 for the Commodore 64, Amstrad CPC and ZX Spectrum. The premise was to survive one week in office as Jim Hacker.[21] Not My Department was a Canadian television sitcom, which aired on the CBC in 1987. ... Ji, Mantriji literally translates to Yes, Minister in Hindi. ... Hindi ( , Devanagari: or , IAST: , IPA: ), an Indo-European language spoken mainly in northern and central India, is one of the two official languages of India, the other being English. ... STAR Plus is Indias most watched Hindi language based general entertainment television channel. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... The Amstrad CPC was a series of 8-bit home computers produced by Amstrad during the 1980s and early 1990s. ... The ZX Spectrum is a home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ...


In 2005, BBC Four launched The Thick of It, described by director Armando Iannucci as "Yes Minister meets Larry Sanders",[22] and The Telegraph called it "a Yes, Minister for the New Labour years."[23] The style shows many identifiable hallmarks of Yes Minister, namely the blundering politician virtually entirely dependent on those whose presentational and political nous greatly eclipse his own personal experience. For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... The Thick of It is a British comedy television series, which satirises the inner workings of modern British government. ... Armando Iannucci (born 1964, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish comedian, satirist and radio producer. ... The Larry Sanders Show is a satirical television sitcom that originally aired from 1992 to 1998 on the HBO cable television network in the USA. It starred stand-up comedian Garry Shandling as vain, neurotic talk show host Larry Sanders. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ...


Radio

Sixteen episodes[24] of Yes Minister were adapted and re-recorded for broadcast by BBC Radio 4, with the principal cast reprising their roles. Produced by Peter Atkin, they were broadcast across two seasons, each with eight episodes.[25] The first series aired 18 October to 7 December 1983, with the second originally transmitted 8 October to 27 November 1984.[1] The complete set was released on cassette in February 2000, and on compact disc in October 2002. The series was repeated on the digital radio station BBC 7 in early 2007. old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... BBC Radio 7 is a digital radio station broadcasting comedy, drama, and childrens programming 24 hours a day. ...


In 1997, Derek Fowlds reprised the role of Bernard Woolley to read Antony Jay's How To Beat Sir Humphrey: Every Citizen's Guide To Fighting Officialdom. It was broadcast in three daily parts by Radio 4 from 29 September to 01 October 1997[1] and released by BBC Audiobooks on cassette in October 1997. is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in Leap years). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Merchandise

Video and DVD releases

The BBC issued some episodes of Yes Minister, and all of Yes Prime Minister on VHS.[26] They were re-released and repackaged at various points. The complete collection was released by the BBC through Warner Home Video on Region 1 DVD in October 2003. Warner appears to have added RCE to the individual release of the second series of Yes Minister, but there are no similar reported problems on playing the complete collection.[26] The BBC, through 2 Entertain Video, also issued several Region 2 DVDs: This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with DVD-Video. ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ...

  • Yes Minister: Series One (BBCDVD1047), released 1 October 2001
  • Yes Minister: Series Two (BBCDVD1120), released 30 September 2002
  • Yes Minister: Series Three & "Party Games" (BBCDVD1188), released 29 September 2003
  • The Complete Yes Minister (BBCDVD1462), released 15 November 2004
  • Yes, Prime Minister: Series One (BBCDVD1365), released 4 October 2004
  • Yes, Prime Minister: Series Two (BBCDVD1729), released 9 May 2005
  • The Complete Yes Minister & Yes, Prime Minister, released 16 October 2006

is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Books

Several books have been published surrounding the series. The scripts were edited and transformed into prose, and published by BBC Books in the form of diaries. Scenes that did not involve Hacker took the form of private memos between civil servants, or 'interviews' and written correspondence from other characters.


The three series of Yes Minister were published as paperbacks in 1981, 1982 and 1983 respectively before being combined into a revised hardback omnibus edition, The Complete Yes Minister: The Diaries of a Cabinet Minister, in 1984. Two volumes of Yes, Prime Minister: The Diaries of the Right Hon. James Hacker were published in 1986 and 1987, before being made available as an omnibus edition in 1988. Both series were published as omnibus paperback editions in 1989:

  • The Complete Yes Minister ISBN 0-563-20665-9
  • The Complete Yes, Prime Minister ISBN 0-563-20773-6

Antony Jay's How to Beat Sir Humphrey: Every Citizen's Guide to Fighting Officialdom was published in April 1997. It was illustrated by Gerald Scarfe and Shaun Williams. It was read by Derek Fowlds on Radio 4 later that year.


See also

This is a list of political office holders from works of fiction. ... The Hacker Ministry is the fictional British governing administration of the Right Honourable James Hacker, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, as portrayed in the classic British sitcom, Yes, Prime Minister. ... The West Wing is an American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin that was originally broadcast from 1999 to 2006. ... This is a list of fictional stories in which politics features as an important plot element. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Lewisohn, Mark. Yes Minister. BBC Comedy Guide. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  2. ^ a b Lewisohn, Mark. Yes, Prime Minister. BBC Comedy Guide. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  3. ^ a b Cockerell, Michael (1988). Live From Number 10: The Inside Story of Prime Ministers and Television. London: Faber and Faber, 288. ISBN 0-571-14757-7. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f Yes Minister Questions & Answers. Jonathan Lynn Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-09-06.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Yes Minister". Written by Armando Iannucci; prod. Verity Newman. Britain's Best Sitcom. BBC. BBC Two. 2004-01-17.
  6. ^ Crossman, Richard (1979). Diaries of a Cabinet Minister: Selections, 1964–70. London: Hamish Hamilton Ltd. ISBN 0-241-10142-5. 
  7. ^ a b c "Part 3: Modern Times". Prod. Paul Tilzey; Dir. Gabrielle Osrin. Omnibus: Laughter in the House. BBC. 1999-04-09.
  8. ^ Crisell, Andrew (2002). An Introductory History of British Broadcasting, 2nd ed, London: Routledge, 201. ISBN 0-415-24792-6. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Cornell, Paul.; Martin Day, Keith Topping (1993). The Guinness Book of Classic British TV. Guinness, 113–6. ISBN 0-85112-543-3. 
  10. ^ a b Radio Times: 4–10 January 1986
  11. ^ Radio Times 28 November04 December 1987
  12. ^ Yes Minister and Yes, Prime Minister. The British Comedy and Drama Website. Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  13. ^ BBC New Talent: Advice for new TV composers. bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2006-09-02.
  14. ^ Awards for "Yes Minister". IMDb.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-01.
  15. ^ Britain's Best Sitcom: The Final Top 10 Sitcoms. bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2006-08-30.
  16. ^ Frasier is The Ultimate Sitcom. paramountcomedy.com (2006-01-03). Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  17. ^ Fiftieth Anniversary Award Winners. The Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom. Retrieved on 2006-08-30.
  18. ^ Evans, Jeff (1995). The Guinness Television Encylopedia. Middlesex: Guinness, 586. ISBN 0-85112-744-4. 
  19. ^ Stringer, Robin. "Thatcher stars in "Yes Minister"" (Reprint on website), Daily Telegraph, 1984-01-21. Retrieved on 2006-08-30. 
  20. ^ Hacker in Australia: footage of Paul Eddington visiting Australia. yes-minister.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-02.
  21. ^ Scott, Steve (1987). Yes, Prime Minister. lemon64.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-30.
  22. ^ The Thick of It: Interview: Armando Iannucci, Chris Langham & Peter Capaldi. BBC Four website (2005-04-19). Retrieved on 2006-09-07.
  23. ^ Sylvester, Rachel. "New TV satire puts Labour in the thick of it" (Reprint on telegraph.co.uk), Daily Telegraph, April 30, 2005. Retrieved on 2006-09-07. 
  24. ^ Episodes included "Open Government", "Big Brother", "The Economy Drive", "The Writing on the Wall", "The Smoke Screen", "The Ministerial Broadcast", "Official Secrets" and "A Conflict of Interest", "The Quality of Life", (vol.3) "The Compassionate Society", "The Greasy Pole", "The Skeleton in the Cupboard", "A Question of Loyalty" (vol.4) "The Whisky Priest", "The Death List" and "The Moral Dimension"
  25. ^ Taylor, Rod (1994). The Guinness Book of Sitcoms. Middlesex: Guinness, 278. ISBN 0-85112-638-3. 
  26. ^ a b video/dvd. The Yes (Prime) Minister Files. Retrieved on 2006-08-31.

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Yes Minister

  Results from FactBites:
 
Yes, Minister - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2136 words)
Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister are British sitcoms that were transmitted by the BBC between 1980 and 1988.
Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister have been cited by political scientists for their accurate and sophisticated portrayal of these relationships.
The fundamental plot of a minister being frustrated by the Civil Service was inspired by the published diaries of Richard Crossman after 1964, which are dominated by Crossman's constant struggle with Dame Evelyn Sharp, the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Housing and Local Government.
Yes, Minister - definition of Yes, Minister in Encyclopedia (865 words)
Yes, Minister and its sequel Yes, Prime Minister are British sitcoms about the struggle between James "Jim" Hacker (played by Paul Eddington), the government minister of the (fictional) Department of Administrative Affairs (and later as Prime Minister) and his civil servants and ministerial colleagues.
Much of the humour of the show derives from the conflict between the British Cabinet ministers (who believe they are in charge) and the members of the British Civil Service who are really running the country.
The shows were very popular in governmental circles and it was the favourite programme of then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, leading to her staging a 4 minute sketch with the two principal actors of the show.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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