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Encyclopedia > Yemen
الجمهورِيّة اليَمَنيّة
Al-Jumhūriyyah al-Yamaniyyah
Republic of Yemen
Flag of Yemen
Flag Coat of arms
Motto
"Allah, al-Watan, at-Thawra, al-Wehda"
"God, Nation, Revolution, Unity"
Anthem
United Republic
Capital
(and largest city)
Sanaa
15.8°′N, 47.9°′E
Official languages Arabic
Demonym Yemeni
Government Republic
 -  President Ali Abdullah Saleh
 -  Prime Minister Ali Mohammed Mojawar
Establishment
 -  Unification May 22, 1990 
Area
 -  Total 527,968 km² (49th)
203,849 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  July 2005 estimate 22,230,53[3] (51st)
 -  Density 40/km² (160th)
104/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2005 estimate
 -  Total $19.480 billion (110th)
 -  Per capita $900 (175th)
HDI (2004) 0.492 (low) (150th)
Currency Yemeni rial $1 = 198.13 Rials (YER)
Time zone (UTC+3)
Internet TLD .ye
Calling code +967

Yemen (Arabic: اليَمَن AL-Yaman), officially the Republic of Yemen (Arabic: الجمهورية اليمنية al-Jumhuuriyya al-Yamaniyya) is a Middle Eastern country located on the Arabian Peninsula in Southwest Asia. With a population of about 20 million people, Yemen is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the North, the Red Sea to the West, the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden to the South, and Oman to the east. Yemen's territory includes over 200 islands, the largest of which is Socotra, about 415 kilometres (260 miles) to the south of Yemen, off the coast of Somalia. Image File history File links Flag_of_Yemen. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_Arm_of_Yemen. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The national flag of Yemen was adopted on May 22, 1990, the same day that North Yemen and South Yemen unified. ... The Coat of Arms of Yemen depict a golden eagle with a scroll between its claws. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogising the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognised either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... United Republic is the national anthem of Yemen. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Unlike other people of the Arabian Peninsula who have historically been nomads or semi-nomads, Yemenis are almost entirely sedentary and live in small villages and towns scattered throughout the highlands and coastal regions. ... Sanaá (Arabic صنعاء, romanized as Ṣanʻāʼ, and also known as Sana or Sanaa), population 1,303,000 (2000), is the capital of Yemen. ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Arabic redirects here. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ali Abdullah Saleh (1990-present) See also: President of North Yemen, President of South Yemen Categories: Government stubs | Lists of office-holders | Yemen ... Field Marshal Ali Abdullah Saleh (Arabic: علي عبد الله صالح), born March 21, 1942, is the current President of Yemen. ... The Prime Minister of the Republic of Yemen is the head of government in that country. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP The purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (2006). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (2006) (colour-blind compliant map) This is a list of countries by Human Development Index as included in the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Report 2006, compiled on the basis of 2004 data. ... 1000 Yemeni Rial The rial or riyal is the currency of Yemen. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... “UTC” redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .ye is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Yemen. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Country Code: 967 The Telephone numbering plan in Yemen is as follows: (The 0 prefix for area codes is used when dialing locally within Yemen (01-xxx-xxxx), and omitted when calling from outside Yemen (+967-1-xxx-xxxx)) 01 Sanaa 02 Aden 03 Hodaidah 04 Ibb, Taiz 05... Arabic redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Arabia redirects here. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... The Arabian Sea (Arabic: بحر العرب; transliterated: Bahr al-Arab) is a region of the Indian Ocean bounded on the east by India, on the north by Pakistan and Iran, on the west by Arabian Peninsula, on the south, approximately, by a line between Cape Guardafui, the north-east point of Somalia... Gulf of Aden in 1860 The Gulf of Aden (Arabic: خليج عدن; transliterated: Khalyj Adan) is located in the Indian Ocean between Yemen on the south coast of the Arabian Peninsula and Somalia in Africa. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; ) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Horm Africa some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... “Miles” redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Yemen

Yemen is one of the oldest centers of civilization in the world. Between the ninth century BC and the sixth century AD, it was part of the Sabaean, Awsanian, Minaean, Qatabanian, Hadhramawtian, Himyarite, and some other kingdoms, which controlled the lucrative spice trade. It was known to the Ancient Romans as Arabia Felix ("Happy Arabia") because of the riches its trade generated. Augustus Caesar attempted to annex it, but the expedition failed. The Ethiopian Kingdom of Aksum annexed it by around 520, and it was subsequently taken by the Sassanids Persians around 570. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ... AD redirects here. ... The Sabaeans were a people who lived in what is today Yemen in the final millennium BCE. They may be the same nation as the biblical Sheba. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Minaean was a kingdom in Southwestern Arabia from approximately 1200 BC until 650 bc, centred on what is now Yemen. ... Hadhramaut, (also Hadramawt) now part of Yemen, is the coastal region of the south Arabian peninsula on the Gulf of Aden in the Arabian Sea, extending eastwards from Yemen to the Dhofar region of Oman. ... A state in ancient Yemen dating from 115 BCE. Conquered neighbouring Saba in 25 BCE, Qataban in 50 CE and Hadramaut 100 CE. It was the dominant state in Arabia until the sixth century. ... Spices at the central market of Agadir, Morocco in May 2005 The spice trade has been of major economic importance throughout human history and it particularly helped spur the Age of Exploration. ... Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin: IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS)¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ... The Kingdom of Aksum (or Axum, Geez አክሱም), was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from the proto-Aksumite period ca. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... The Persians of Iran (officially named Persia by West until 1935 while still referred to as Persia by some) are an Iranian people who speak Persian (locally named Fârsi by native speakers) and often refer to themselves as ethnic Iranians as well. ...


In the 3rd century and again in the late sixth and early seventh centuries AD, many Sabaean and Himyarite people migrated out of the land of Yemen following the destructions of the Ma'rib Dam (sadd Ma'rib) and migrated to North Africa and northern part of the Arabian Peninsula. In the 7th century, Islamic caliphs began to exert control over the area. After this caliphate broke up, the former North Yemen came under control of Imams of various dynasties usually of the Zaidi sect, who established a theocratic political structure that survived until modern times. (Imam is an Arabic term meaning religious leader). Egyptian Sunni Caliphs occupied much of North Yemen throughout the eleventh century. By the sixteenth century and again in the nineteenth century, north Yemen was part of the Ottoman Empire, and in some periods its Imams exerted control over south Yemen. One of the engineering wonders of the old world and an icon for the ancient south arabian civilization. ... For main article see: Caliphate The Caliph (pronounced khaleef in Arabic) is the head of state in a Caliphate, and the title for the leader of the Islamic Ummah, an Islamic community ruled by the Sharia. ... Imam is an Arabic word meaning Leader. The ruler of a country might be called the Imam, for example. ... Zaiddiyah (also: Zaidi, Zaydi, or in the West Fivers) refers to a sect within Shia Islam. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ottoman redirects here. ...


North Yemen became independent of the Ottoman Empire in 1918 and became a republic in 1962. In 1839, the British occupied the port of Aden and established it as a colony in September of that year. They also set up a zone of loose alliances (known as protectorates) around Aden to act as a protective buffer. In 1967, the British withdrew and gave back Aden to Yemen due to extreme pressure of battles with the North and Egyptian allies. After the British withdrawal, this area became known as South Yemen. The two countries were formally united as the Republic of Yemen on May 22, 1990. North Yemen is a term currently used to designate both the Yemen Arab Republic (1962-1990) and its predecessor, the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen (1918-1962), that exercised sovereignty over the territory that is now the northern part of the state of Yemen in southern Arabia. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Port of Aden (around 1910). ... Capital Aden Language(s) Arabic Government Socialist republic President Sam Hazlewood al-Attas Prime Minister Yasin Said Numan Historical era Cold War  - Independence November 30, 1967  - UN membership December 14, 1967  - Constitution October 31, 1978  - Reunification May 22, 1990 Area  - 1990 332,970 km² Population  - 1990 est. ... A Political Union is a type of state which is composed of smaller states. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Yemen

Yemen is a republic with a bicameral legislature. Under the constitution, an elected president, an elected 301-seat House of Representatives, and an appointed 111-member Shura Council share power. The president is head of state, and the prime minister is head of government. The constitution provides that the president be elected by popular vote from at least two candidates endorsed by Parliament; the prime minister is appointed by the president. The presidential term of office is seven years, and the parliamentary term of elected office is six years. Suffrage is universal over 18 years of age. Country name: conventional long form: Republic of Yemen conventional short form: Yemen local long form: ‫ﺍﻟﺠﻤﻬﻮﺭﯾّﺔ ﺍﻟﯿﻤﻦ‬ (Al-Jumhuriyyah al-Yamaniyah) local short form: ‫ﺍﻟﯿﻤﻦ‬ (Al-Yaman) Data code... Image File history File links Vice President Dick Cheney and President Ali Abdulla Salih of Yemen discuss joint efforts to fight terrorist activity at a press conference in Sanaa, Yemen, March 14, 2002. ... Image File history File links Vice President Dick Cheney and President Ali Abdulla Salih of Yemen discuss joint efforts to fight terrorist activity at a press conference in Sanaa, Yemen, March 14, 2002. ... Field Marshal Ali Abdullah Saleh (Arabic: علي عبد الله صالح), born March 21, 1942, is the current President of Yemen. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... Shura is an Arabic word for consultation. It is believed to be the method by which pre-Islamic Arabian tribes selected leaders and made major decisions. ...


President Ali Abdullah Saleh became the first elected President in reunified Yemen in 1999 (though he had been President of unified Yemen since 1990 and President of North Yemen since 1978) and most recently was re-elected in September of 2006 after an initial reluctance to run once more. His victory was marked by an election that international observers judged to be "generally free and fair."[citation needed] Popular demonstrations and editorials of support in major papers helped change his mind to run again. In April 2003 parliamentary elections were held, and the General People's Congress (GPC) maintained an absolute majority. There was a marked decrease from previous years in election-related violence; however, there were some problems with underage voting, confiscation of ballot boxes, voter intimidation, and election-related violence.[citations needed] Ali Abdullah Saleh (1990-present) See also: President of North Yemen, President of South Yemen Categories: Government stubs | Lists of office-holders | Yemen ... Field Marshal Ali Abdullah Saleh (Arabic: علي عبد الله صالح), born March 21, 1942, is the current President of Yemen. ... The General Peoples Congress is the ruling political party in Yemen. ...


The constitution calls for an independent judiciary. The former northern and southern regal codes have been unified. The legal system includes separate commercial courts and a Supreme Court based in Sanaá. Since the country is an Islamic state, the Islamic holy book, the Qur'an, is the basis for all laws, and no law may contradict the Qur'an. Indeed many court cases are debated by the religious basis of the laws i.e. by interpretations of the Qur'an. For this reason, many Judges are religious scholars as well as legal authorities. Unlike Saudi Arabia and other Islamic states, the consumption of alcohol by foreigners is tolerated, and the mild stimulant Qat is chewed by Yemenis of all strata of society, despite being banned or frowned upon by other Islamic countries and groups. Sana (Arabic: , romanized as , and also known as Sanaa or Sanaa), population 1,747,627 (2004 census), is the capital of Yemen and the center of Sana Governorate. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Stimulants are drugs that temporarily increase alertness and wakefulness. ... Binomial name (Vahl) Forssk. ...


The political elites of Yemen are the Hashid tribe and the Bakeel tribe. President Ali Abdullah Saleh and the Speaker of the Parliament are from the Hashid Tribe.


Governorates and districts

Main articles: Governorates of Yemen and Districts of Yemen
Further information: Historic Governorates of Yemen and List of cities in Yemen

As of February 2004, Yemen is divided into twenty governorates (muhafazah) and one municipality.[1] The population of each governorate is listed in the table below. Yemen is divided into 19 governorates (muhafazat, singular - muhafazah): Abyan Adan Ad Dali Al Bayda Al Hudaydah Al Jawf Al Mahrah Al Mahwit Amran Dhamar Hadhramaut Hajjah Ibb Lahij Marib Sadah Sanaá Shabwah Taizz note: there may be one additional governorate of the capital city of Sana... The governorates of Yemen are divided into 333 districts (muderiah). ... Before 1990, the Republic of Yemen did not exist. ... This is a list of cities in Yemen. ... A governorate is a country subdivision. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Governorate. ...

Governorates of Yemen
Governorates of Yemen
Division Capital City Pop (2004) [2] Key
'Adan Aden 589,419 1
'Amran 'Amran 877,786 2
Abyan Zinjibar 433,819 3
Ad Dali' 470,564 4
Al Bayda' Al Bayda 577,369 5
Al Hudaydah Al Hudaydah 2,157,552 6
Al Jawf Al Jawf 443,797 7
Al Mahrah Al Ghaydah 88,594 8
Al Mahwit Al Mahwit 494,557 9
Amanat Al Asimah 1,747,834 10
Dhamar Dhamar 1,330,108 11
Hadramaut Al Mukalla 1,028,556 12
Hajjah Hajjah 1,479,568 13
Ibb Ibb 2,131,861 14
Lahij Lahij 722,694 15
Ma'rib Ma'rib 238,522 16
Raymah 394,448 17
Sa'dah Sa`dah 695,033 18
Sana'a San`a' 919,215 19
Shabwah `Ataq 470,440 20
Ta'izz Ta`izz 2,393,425 21


The governorates are subdivided into 333 districts (muderiah), which are subdivided into 2,210 sub-districts, and then into 38,284 villages (as of 2001). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 513 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,601 × 1,027 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: image/png) Updated map of the governorates of Yemen. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 513 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,601 × 1,027 pixels, file size: 38 KB, MIME type: image/png) Updated map of the governorates of Yemen. ... Media:Example. ... Port of Aden (around 1910). ... Amran (Arabic: عمران) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Amran (Arabic: عمران) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Abyan (Arabic: ) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Zinjibar (Arabic: ‎) a coastal town in south-central Yemen. ... Ad Dali (Arabic: الضالع) is a governorate of Yemen. ... The governorate (arab. ... Al Bayda (also transliterated as Al-Baidhah, El-Beda or Beida) can mean: Al Bayda, Libya, a city Al Bayda, Yemen, a town Al Bayda Governorate, Yemen Beida (Sudan), a town in Darfur, Sudan In addition, Beida is also the colloquial name for Peking University. ... Al Hudaydah (Arabic: الحديدة) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Al Hudaydah (also written as Hodeidah) (Arabic: الحديدة) It is the fourth largest city in Yemen with a population of one million. ... Al Jawf (Arabic: الجوف) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Al Jawf is the name of several places: Al-Jawf, Saudia Arabia is a city known for its major prison. ... Al Mahrah or Mahra (Arabic: ) is a governorate of Yemen in the southern Arabian Peninsula in the area of the former Mahra Sultanate. ... Al Ghaydah (Arabic: الغيضة) is a capital city of Al Mahrah Governorate, southeastern Yemen. ... Al Mahwit (Arabic: المحويت) is one of the governorates of Yemen. ... Al Mahwit (Arabic: المحويت) is a capital city of Al Mahwit Governorate, Yemen. ... Sanaá (Arabic صنعاء, romanized as , and also known as Sana or Sanaa), population 1,303,000 (2000), is the capital of Yemen. ... Dhamar (Arabic: ذمار) is one of the governorates of Yemen. ... A dhrupad set to the 14-beat time signature dhamar tal is called a dhamar. ... Hadhramaut or Hadramawt (Arabic: []) is a governorate of Yemen lying within the large historical region of Hadhramaut. ... Al Mukalla is a city in the southern part of Yemen on the Gulf of Aden 480 km (300 mi) east of Aden. ... Hajjah (Arabic: حجة) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Hajjah (Arabic: حجة) is the capital city of Hajjah Governorate, northwestern Yemen. ... Ibb (Arabic: إب) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Ibb (or Abb) (Arabic: إب) is a town in Yemen, the capital of Ibb Governorate, situated on a mountain ridge, surrounded by fertile land. ... Lahij (Arabic: لحج) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Lahij or Lahej (Arabic: لحج []) is a city and an area located between Taizz and Aden in Yemen. ... Marib (Arabic: مأرب) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Marib is a governorate of Yemen. ... Raymah (Arabic: ريمه) is a Governorate in Yemen. ... Sadah (Arabic: صعدة) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Sadah (Arabic: صعدة) is a capital city of Sadah Governorate, northwestern Yemen. ... (Arabic: ‎ ) is a governorate of Yemen. ... For other uses, see Sana (disambiguation). ... Shabwah (Arabic: شبوة) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Taizz (Arabic: تعز) is a governorate of Yemen. ... Taizz or Taiz (تعز) is a city in the Yemen Highlands that is about an hour away from the famous Mocha port on the Red Sea, lying at an elevation of about 1,400 metres above sea level, with 460,000 inhabitants (2003 estimate). ...


Before 1990, Yemen existed as two separate entities. For more information, see Historic Governorates of Yemen. Before 1990, the Republic of Yemen did not exist. ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Yemen
Map of Yemen

Yemen is in the Middle East, in the south of the Arabian Peninsula, bordering the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Red Sea, west of Oman and south of Saudi Arabia. Location: Southwest Asia, in the south of Arabia, bordering the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Red Sea, west of Oman and south of Saudi Arabia. ... Map of Yemen from World Factbook File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Map of Yemen from World Factbook File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Arabia redirects here. ... The Arabian Sea (Arabic: بحر العرب; transliterated: Bahr al-Arab) is a region of the Indian Ocean bounded on the east by India, on the north by Pakistan and Iran, on the west by Arabian Peninsula, on the south, approximately, by a line between Cape Guardafui, the north-east point of Somalia... Gulf of Aden in 1860 The Gulf of Aden (Arabic: خليج عدن; transliterated: Khalyj Adan) is located in the Indian Ocean between Yemen on the south coast of the Arabian Peninsula and Somalia in Africa. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ...


A number of Red Sea islands, including the Hanish Islands, Kamaran and Perim, as well as Socotra in the Arabian Sea belong to Yemen. Many of the islands are volcanic, for example Jabal al-Tair had a volcanic eruption in 2007 and before that in 1883. Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... The Hanish Islands are an island group in the Red Sea. ... Kamaran Island (Arabic: []; located at ) is the largest Yemen-controlled island in the Red Sea. ... Perim (Arabic: [Barīm]) is a volcanic island in the Strait of Mandeb off the southwestern coast of Yemen. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; ) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Horm Africa some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... The Arabian Sea (Arabic: بحر العرب; transliterated: Bahr al-Arab) is a region of the Indian Ocean bounded on the east by India, on the north by Pakistan and Iran, on the west by Arabian Peninsula, on the south, approximately, by a line between Cape Guardafui, the north-east point of Somalia... Jabal al-Tair Island (Jebel Teir, Tair Island, Al-Tair Island, Jazirat at-Tair; Arabic: , literally, Bird Island) is a roughly circular volcanic island, which lies in the Red Sea, about half way between Yemen and Eritrea. ...


At 527,970 km² (203,837 mi²), Yemen is the world's 49th-largest country (after France). It is comparable in size to Thailand, and somewhat larger than the U.S. state of California. Yemen is found at 15° N 48° E. Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Until recently its northern border was undefined because the Arabian Desert prevented any human habitation there. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The country can be divided geographically into four main regions: the coastal plains in the west, the western highlands, the eastern highlands, and the Rub al Khali in the east. The Rub al Khali (الربع الخالي), or Empty Quarter, is the largest sand desert in the world, encompassing the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula, including southern Saudi Arabia, and areas of Oman, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. ...


The Tihamah ("hot lands") form a very arid and flat coastal plain. Despite the aridity, the presence of many lagoons makes this region very marshy and a suitable breeding ground for malarial mosquitoes. There are also extensive crescent-shaped sand dunes. The evaporation in the Tihama is so great that streams from the highlands never reach the sea, but they do contribute to extensive groundwater reserves; today these are heavily exploited for agricultural use. This mid bay barrier in Narrabeen, a suburb of Sydney (Australia), has blocked what used to be a bay to form a lagoon. ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... For other uses, see Mosquito (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sand formations, for other meanings see Dune (disambiguation) Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian (wind-related) processes. ... Missing main definition------ someone add if you know it please. ...

The town of Hajarin
The town of Hajarin

The Tihamah ends abruptly at the escarpment of the western highlands. This area, now heavily terraced to meet the demand for food, receives the highest rainfall in Arabia, rapidly increasing from 100 mm (4 inches) per year to about 760 mm (30 inches) in Ta'izz and over 1,000 mm (40 inches) in Ibb. Agriculture here is very diverse, with such crops as sorghum dominating, but cotton and many fruit trees are also grown, with mangoes being the most valuable. Temperatures are hot in the day but fall dramatically at night. There are perennial streams in the highlands but these never reach the sea because of high evaporation in the Tihama. Image File history File linksMetadata Hajarin. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hajarin. ... Look up terrace on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Taizz or Taiz (تعز) is a city in the Yemen Highlands that is about an hour away from the famous Mocha port on the Red Sea, lying at an elevation of about 1,400 metres above sea level, with 460,000 inhabitants (2003 estimate). ... Ibb (or Abb) (Arabic: إب) is a town in Yemen, the capital of Ibb Governorate, situated on a mountain ridge, surrounded by fertile land. ... Species About 30 species, see text Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are utilised as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... Species About 35 species, including: Mangifera altissima Mangifera applanata Mangifera caesia Mangifera camptosperma Mangifera casturi Mangifera decandra Mangifera foetida Mangifera gedebe Mangifera griffithii Mangifera indica Mangifera kemanga Mangifera laurina Mangifera longipes Mangifera macrocarpa Mangifera mekongensis Mangifera odorata Mangifera pajang Mangifera pentandra Mangifera persiciformis Mangifera quadrifida Mangifera siamensis Mangifera similis Mangifera...


The central highlands are an extensive high plateau over 2,000 metres (6,560 feet) in elevation. This area is drier than the western highlands because of rain-shadow influences, but still receives sufficient rain in wet years for extensive cropping. Diurnal temperature ranges are among the highest in the world: ranges from 30 °C (86 °F) in the day to 0 °C (32 °F) at night are normal.[citation needed] Water storage allows for irrigation and the growing of wheat and barley. Sana'a is located in this region. The highest point in Yemen is Jabal an Nabi Shu'ayb, at 3,760 meters (12,336 ft). This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... Sanaá (Arabic صنعاء, romanized as , and also known as Sana or Sanaa), population 1,303,000 (2000), is the capital of Yemen. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


The Rub al Khali in the East is much lower, generally below 1,000 metres, and receives almost no rain. It is populated only by Bedouin herders of camels. The Rub al Khali (الربع الخالي), or Empty Quarter, is the largest sand desert in the world, encompassing the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula, including southern Saudi Arabia, and areas of Oman, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen. ... Binomial name Camelus dromedarius Linnaeus, 1758 The Arabian Camel (Camelus dromedarius) is a large even-toed ungulate native to northern Africa and western Asia, and the best-known member of the camel family. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Yemen
Further information: Communications in YemenTransportation in Yemen, and Internet usage in Yemen
Sana'a, the capital of the Republic of Yemen Sana'a, is an ancient walled city of 6,500 houses and more than 100 mosques, and is a living museum of traditional styles
Sana'a, the capital of the Republic of Yemen Sana'a, is an ancient walled city of 6,500 houses and more than 100 mosques, and is a living museum of traditional styles
Sana'a, Yemen in Assab'en Street. Memorial of the September 26,1962 revolution. Photo by Aymx
Sana'a, Yemen in Assab'en Street. Memorial of the September 26,1962 revolution. Photo by Aymx
Buildings in Sana'a - Yemen. Photo by Aymx
Buildings in Sana'a - Yemen. Photo by Aymx

In terms of GDP per capita, Yemen is the poorest country in the Arab world. Remittances from Yemenis working abroad and foreign aid paid for perennial trade deficits. Substantial Yemeni communities exist in many countries of the world, including Yemen's immediate neighbors on the Arabian Peninsula, Indonesia, India, East Africa, and also the United Kingdom, and the United States, especially in the area around Detroit, Michigan and in Lackawanna, NY. Beginning in the mid-1950s, the Soviet Union and China provided large-scale assistance. For example, the Chinese are currently involved with the expansion of the International Airport in Sanaa. At unification, both the Yemen Arab Republic and the Peoples Democratic Republic of Yemen were struggling underdeveloped economies. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 188,000 (1998) Telephones - mobile cellular: 8,250 (1995) Telephone system: since unification in 1990, efforts have been made to create a national telecommunications network domestic: the network consists of microwave radio relay, cable, and tropospheric scatter international: satellite earth stations - 3 Intelsat (2 Indian... Railways 0 km Railway links with adjacent countries Saudi Arabia - no - maybe planned Oman - no one Highways total: 67,000 km paved: 7,700 km unpaved: 59,300 km (1996 est. ... The internet was introduced to Yemen in 1996[1] through the ISP TeleYemen and the Public Telecommunications Corporation. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 532 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 902 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 532 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 902 pixel, file size: 246 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sanaá (Arabic صنعاء, romanized as , and also known as Sana or Sanaa), population 1,303,000 (2000), is the capital of Yemen. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1207x850, 108 KB) Sanaa Yemen - in Assabain Street. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1207x850, 108 KB) Sanaa Yemen - in Assabain Street. ... Sanaá (Arabic صنعاء, romanized as , and also known as Sana or Sanaa), population 1,303,000 (2000), is the capital of Yemen. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1115x433, 99 KB) Sanaa, Yemen - The photo was taken by Aymx. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1115x433, 99 KB) Sanaa, Yemen - The photo was taken by Aymx. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Development aid. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Lackawanna is a city in Erie County, New York, USA, located just south of the city of Buffalo in the western part of New York state. ...


In the south, pre-independence economic activity was overwhelmingly concentrated in the port city of Aden. The seaborne transit trade, which the port relied upon, collapsed with the closure of the Suez Canal and Britain's withdrawal from Aden in 1967. For other uses, see Suez (disambiguation). ...


Since unification, the government has worked to integrate two relatively disparate economic systems. However, severe shocks, including the return in 1990 of approximately 850,000 Yemenis from the Gulf states, a subsequent major reduction of aid flows, and internal political disputes culminating in the 1994 civil war hampered economic growth. Yemen, the fastest growing democracy in the Middle East, is attempting to climb into the middle human development region through ongoing political and economic reform.


Since the conclusion of the war, the government entered into agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to implement a structural adjustment program. Phase one of the IMF program included major financial and monetary reforms, including floating the currency, reducing the budget deficit, and cutting subsidies. Phase two will address structural issues such as civil service reform. IMF redirects here. ...


In early 1995, the government of Yemen launched an economic, financial and administrative reform program (EFARP) with the support of the World Bank and the IMF, as well international donors. The First Five-Year Plan (FFYP) for the years 1996 to 2000 was introduced in 1996. The World Bank has focused on public sector management,including civil service reform, budget reform and privatization. In addition, attracting diversified private investment, water management and poverty-oriented social sector improvements has been made a priority for the implementation of the programs in Yemen. These programs had a positive impact on Yemen’s economy and led to the reduction of the budget deficit to less than 3% of GDP during the period 1995-99 and the correction of macro-financial imbalances.[4]


In 1997, IMF and the government began medium-term economic reform programs under the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility (ESAF) and Extended Fund Facility (EFF). This reform program was aimed at reducing dependence on the oil sector and establishing a market environment for real non-oil GDP growth and investment in the non-oil sector. Increasing the growth rate in the non-oil sector was one of the most important problems to be tackled by the government. These programs included reducing unemployment, strengthening the social safety net and increasing financial stability. To achieve these reforms, the government and IMF implemented containment of government wages, improvements in revenue collection with the introduction of reforms in tax administration, and a sharp reduction in subsidies bills by increasing prices on subsidized goods. As a result, the fiscal cash deficit was reduced from 16 percent of GDP to 0.9 percent from 1994 to 1997. This was supported by aid from oil export countries despite the wide-ranging fluctuations in world oil prices. The real growth rate in the non-oil sector rose by 5.6 percent during 1995-97. [5]


The World Bank is active in Yemen, with twenty-two active projects in 2004, including projects to improve governance in the public sector, water, and education. In 1996 and 1997, Yemen has lowered its debt burden through Paris Club agreements and restructuring U.S. foreign debt. In 2003, government reserves reached $5 billion. The government has recently done a number of regulatory reforms and Yemen now ranks 113 on the World Bank's "Ease of Doing Business" index[6]. The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... The Paris Club is an informal group of financial officials from 19 of the worlds richest countries, which provides financial services such as debt restructuring, debt relief, and debt cancellation to indebted countries and their creditors. ...


Foreign relations

The geography and ruling Imams of North Yemen kept the country isolated from foreign influence before 1962. The country's relations with Saudi Arabia were defined by the Taif Agreement of 1934, which delineated the northernmost part of the border between the two kingdoms and set the framework for commercial and other intercourse. The Taif Agreement has been renewed periodically in 20-year increments, and its validity was reaffirmed in 1995. Relations with the British colonial authorities in Aden and the south were usually tense. North Yemen The geography and ruling Imams of north Yemen kept the country isolated from foreign influence before 1962. ... North Yemen is a term currently used to designate both the Yemen Arab Republic (1962-1990) and its predecessor, the Mutawakkilite Kingdom of Yemen (1918-1962), that exercised sovereignty over the territory that is now the northern part of the state of Yemen in southern Arabia. ... Port of Aden (around 1910). ...


The Soviet and Chinese Aid Missions established in 1958 and 1959 were the first important non-Muslim presence in North Yemen. Following the September 1962 revolution, the Yemen Arab Republic became closely allied with and heavily dependent upon Egypt. Saudi Arabia aided the royalists in their attempt to defeat the Republicans and did not recognize the Yemen Arab Republic until 1970. Subsequently, Saudi Arabia provided Yemen substantial budgetary and project support. At the same time, Saudi Arabia maintained direct contact with Yemeni tribes, which sometimes strained its official relations with the Yemeni Government. Hundreds of thousands of Yemenis found employment in Saudi Arabia during the late 1970s and 1980s. National motto: None Official language Arabic Capital Sanaa Area 195,000 km² Population  - Total (July 1990) -Density   7,160,981 36/km² Currency 1 Yemeni riyal = 100 fils (1975-1990); 1 Yemeni riyal = 40 buqshas (bogaches) (1963-1975) Time zone UTC +3 National anthem Royal Salute The Yemen Arab Republic...


In February 1989, North Yemen joined Iraq, Jordan, and Egypt in forming the Arab Cooperation Council (ACC), an organization created partly in response to the founding of the Gulf Cooperation Council, and intended to foster closer economic cooperation and integration among its members. After unification, the Republic of Yemen was accepted as a member of the ACC in place of its YAR predecessor. In the wake of the Gulf crisis, the ACC has remained inactive. Yemen is not a member of the Gulf Cooperation Council. The Arab Cooperation Council (ACC) was founded in February 1989 by North Yemen, Iraq, Jordan, and Egypt. ... ...


British authorities left southern Yemen in November 1967 in the wake of an intense rebellion. The People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, the successor to British colonial rule, had diplomatic relations with many nations, but its major links were with the Soviet Union and other Marxist countries. Relations between it and the conservative Arab states of the Arabian Peninsula were strained. There were military clashes with Saudi Arabia in 1969 and 1973, and the PDRY provided active support for the Dhofar rebellion against the Sultanate of Oman. The PDRY was the only Arab state to vote against admitting new Arab states from the Persian Gulf area to the United Nations and the Arab League. The PDRY provided sanctuary and material support to various insurgent groups around the Middle East.   Capital Aden Language(s) Arabic Government Socialist state President Haidar Abu Bakr al-Attas Prime Minister Yasin Said Numan Historical era Cold War  - Independence November 30 1967  - UN membership December 14, 1967  - Constitution October 31, 1978  - Reunification May 22 1990 Area  - 1990 332,970 km2 Expression error: unrecognised punctuation character... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... The Dhofar (Arabic ظفار Ẓufār) region lies in Oman, east of Yemen. ...


Yemen is a member of the United Nations, the Arab League, and the Organization of the Islamic Conference. Yemen participates in the nonaligned movement. The Republic of Yemen accepted responsibility for all treaties and debts of its predecessors, the YAR and the PDRY. Yemen has acceded to the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. The Gulf crisis dramatically affected Yemen's foreign relations. As a member of the UN Security Council (UNSC) for 1990 and 1991,Yemen abstained on a number of UNSC resolutions concerning Iraq and Kuwait and voted against the "use of force resolution." Western and Gulf Arab states reacted by curtailing or canceling aid programs and diplomatic contacts. At least 850,000 Yemenis returned from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf.


Subsequent to the liberation of Kuwait, Yemen continued to maintain high-level contacts with Iraq. This hampered its efforts to rejoin the Arab mainstream and to mend fences with its immediate neighbors. In 1993, Yemen launched an unsuccessful diplomatic offensive to restore relations with its Persian Gulf neighbors. Some of its aggrieved neighbors actively aided the south during the 1994 civil war. Since the end of that conflict, tangible progress has been made on the diplomatic front in restoring normal relations with Yemen's neighbors. The Omani-Yemeni border has been officially demarcated. In the summer of 2000, Yemen and Saudi Arabia signed an International Border Treaty settling a fifty year-old dispute over the location of the border between the two countries. Yemen settled its dispute with Eritrea over the Hanish Islands in 1998. The Hanish Islands are an island group in the Red Sea. ...


After the departure from the gulf states as many as 15,000 Yemenis migrated to the U.S. Many Yemenis can be found in the south end of Dearborn, Michigan. In the early 90s Yemenis came in search of manufacturing jobs. They continue to work in the U.S. and send money back to their families.


Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Yemen

Yemen has one of the world's highest birth rates; the average Yemeni woman bears seven children. Although this is similar to the rate in Somalia to the south, it is roughly twice as high as that of Saudi Arabia and nearly three times as high as those in the more modernized Arab Gulf states. Unlike other people of the Arabian Peninsula who have historically been nomads or semi-nomads, Yemenis are almost entirely sedentary and live in small villages and towns scattered throughout the highlands and coastal regions. ...

View from Hajjah Citadel

Unlike most other people of the Arabian Peninsula who have historically been nomads or semi-nomads, Yemenis are almost entirely sedentary and live in small villages and towns scattered throughout the highlands and coastal regions. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hajjah (Arabic: حجة) is the capital city of Hajjah Governorate, northwestern Yemen. ... Arabia redirects here. ... Communities of nomadic people move from place to place, rather than settling down in one location. ...


Yemenis are mainly of Arab origin.[citation needed] Arabic is the official language, although English is increasingly understood by citizens in major cities. In the Mahra area (the extreme east) and the island Soqotra, several ancient south-Arabic languages are spoken.[citation needed] When the former states of north and south Yemen were established, most resident minority groups departed.[citation needed]Yemenite Jews once formed a sizeable Jewish minority in Yemen with a distinct culture. They also occupied key industries including silver smiths and their influence on Yemeni culture is still discussed within the souks. However, most of them immigrated to Israel in the mid 20th century, following the Jewish exodus from Arab lands and Operation Magic Carpet (Yemen). In the early 20th century they had numbered about 50,000; they currently number only a few hundred individuals and reside largely in Sada. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Al Mahrah or Mahra (Arabic: ‎) is a governorate (muhafazah) of Yemen in the southern Arabian Peninsula in the area of the former Mahra Sultanate. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; Suquá¹­ra) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast Somalia some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... Yemenite Jews (Hebrew: תֵּימָנִים, Standard Temanim Tiberian ; singular תֵּימָנִי, Standard Temani Tiberian ) are those Jews who live, or whose recent ancestors lived, in Yemen (תֵּימָן, Standard Teman Tiberian ; far south), on the southern tip of the Arabian peninsula. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Jewish exodus from Arab lands refers to the 20th century expulsion and emigration of Jews, primarily of Sephardi and Mizrahi background, from majority Arab lands. ... Most of Yemenite Jews had never seen an aircraft before, but they believed in the Biblical prophecy: according to the Book of Isaiah (40:31), God promised to return the Children of Israel to Zion with wings. Operation Magic Carpet was an operation between June 1949 and September 1950 that...

High-rise architecture at Shibam, Wadi Hadramawt
High-rise architecture at Shibam, Wadi Hadramawt

Arab traders have long operated in Southeast Asia, trading in spices, timber and textiles. Most of the prominent Indonesians, Malaysians and Singaporeans of Arab descent have their origins in southern Yemen in the Hadramawt coastal region. As many as 4 million Indonesians are of Hadrami descent and today there are almost 10,000 Hadramis in Singapore.[3] 50 years ago there were Hadramis who emigrated from Yemen to Africa but this emigration has stopped now. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 594 pixel, file size: 137 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 594 pixel, file size: 137 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Hadhramaut, (also Hadramawt) now part of Yemen, is the coastal region of the south Arabian peninsula on the Gulf of Aden in the Arabian Sea, extending eastwards from Yemen to the Dhofar region of Oman. ...


Yemenis are divided into two principal Islamic religious groups: 50-55% Sunni and 42-48% Shi'a.[4] Sunnis are primarily Shafi'i, but also include significant groups of Malikis, Salafis and Hanbalis. About 35% of Yemenis are Shafi'i Sunnis, 5% are Maliki Sunnis, 15% are Salafis.[citation needed] Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... A Salafi (Arabic سلفي lit. ...


Shi'is are primarily Zaidis, and also have significant minorities related to Jaffari Twelver Shias [5] and Musta'ali Western Isma'ili Shias. About 32-38% of Yemenis are Zaidi Shias, 4% are Jaffaris Shias and 6% are Musta'ali Ismaili Shias. Zaiddiyah (also: Zaidi, Zaydi, or in the West Fivers) refers to a sect within Shia Islam. ...


The Sunnis are predominantly in the south and southeast. The Zaidis are predominantly in the north and northwest whilst the Jafaris and Ismailies are in the main centers such as Sana'a and Ma'rib. There are mixed communities in the larger cities. About 2% of Yemenis are non-Muslim, adhering to Hinduism, Christianity and Judaism.[citations needed]

A non-operational old church in Aden.
A non-operational old church in Aden.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (743x704, 140 KB) Old church in Aden, Yemen. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (743x704, 140 KB) Old church in Aden, Yemen. ... Port of Aden (around 1910). ...

Human rights

Main article: Human rights in Yemen

The human rights situation of Yemen has been subject to criticism in the past, but in recent years has seen significant improvement, with the government signing several international human rights treaties, and even appointing a woman, Dr. Wahiba Fara’a, to the role of Minister of the State of Human Rights.[6] However, many problems persist alongside allegations that these reforms have not been fully implemented and that abuses still run rampant, especially in the areas of women's rights, freedom of the press, torture and police brutality.[7] Human rights in Yemen has improved in many ways over the years, signing several international human rights treaties and even appointing a woman, Dr. Wahiba Fara’a, the role of Minister of the State of Human Rights[1]. However, many problems persist alongside allegations that these reforms have not been... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Wahiba Fara’a is a Yemeni politician. ... The term women’s rights typically refers to freedoms inherently possessed by women and girls of all ages, which may be institutionalized or ignored and/or illegitimately suppressed by law or custom in a particular society. ... Freedom of the Press (or Press Freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... January 31 1919: David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by batons of the Glasgow police Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ...


Languages

While the national language is Arabic (spoken in several regional dialects), Yemen is one of the main homelands of the South Semitic family of languages, which includes the non-Arabic language of the ancient Sabaean Kingdom. Its modern Yemeni descendants are closely related to the modern Semitic languages of Eritrea and Ethiopia. However, only a small remnant of those languages exists in modern Yemen, notably on the island of Socotra and in the back hills of the Hadhramaut coastal region. Modern South Arabian languages spoken in Yemen include Mehri, with 70,643 speakers, Soqotri, with an estimated 43,000 speakers in the Socotra archipelago (2004 census) and 67,000 worldwide, and Bathari (with an estimated total of only 200 speakers). South Semitic is one of the three macro-classifications in Semitic linguistics, the other two being North Semitic (e. ... For the language, see Sabaean language. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; ) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Horm Africa some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... Region close to Sayun in the Hadhramaut Valley An ancient sculpture of a griffon from the royal palace at shabwa, the capital city of Hadhramaut Hadhramaut, Hadhramout or Hadramawt (Arabic: ‎ []) is a historical region of the south Arabian Peninsula along the Gulf of Aden in the Arabian Sea, extending eastwards... South Arabian is a technical designation within Semitic linguistics for one of two main branches of South Semitic. ... Mehri or Mahri is a Semitic language spoken by minority populations in the eastern part of Yemen and western Oman and is a remnant of the ancient indigenous language group spoken in the southern Arabian Peninsula before the spread of Arabic along with the Islamic religion in the 7th century... Soqotri is the native language of the island of Socotra off the southern coast of Yemen. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; ) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Horm Africa some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... Bathari is a language spoken in Yemen and Oman by about 200 speakers. ...


Foreign language in public schools is taught from grade seven on, though the quality of public school instruction is low. Private schools using a British or American system teach English and produce proficient speakers, but Arabic is the dominant language of communication. The number of English speakers in Yemen is small compared to other Arab countries such as Egypt, Lebanon, the UAE and Saudi Arabia. Private schools have also started to teach French alongside Arabic and English.


Culture

Khat

Main article: Khat

Khat is a large, slow growing, evergreen shrub, reaching a height of between 1 and 5 metres, in equatorial regions it may reach a height of 10 meters.[8] Its scientific name is Catha edulis. This plant is widely cultivated in Yemen and is generally used for chewing. When Khat juice is swallowed, its leaf juice has a caffeine-like effect. It is deeply rooted in Yemeni culture. Khat is not just chewed by men and women, but by children as well. It is addictive and has many side effects to it, and has been linked to various types of mouth and throat cancer. The cost of Khat is significant to the Yemeni economy for it both consumes a significant amount of water to grow and is seen by many to reduce the productivity of the people.[citations needed] Binomial name (Vahl) Forssk. ... Binomial name (Vahl) Forssk. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


Cinema

Main article: Cinema of Yemen

West Asian cinema refers collectively to the film output and film industries of the West Asia. ...

Holidays

Date Holiday Notes
May 22 National Unity Celebrates the unification of the Republic of Yemen
September 26   1962 Revolution Day   Celebrates the revolution against the northern Imams
October 14 1964 Revolution Day Celebrates the revolution against the British in the south
November 30 Evacuation Day Evacuation of the last British soldier from southern Yemen

is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Dates following the lunar Islamic calendar

Date Holiday/Festival
Dhul Hijjah 10   Eid al-Adha
Shawwal 1 Eid al-Fitr
Muharram 1 (Islamic New Year)

Dhul Hijjah (ḏū-l-ḥiǧǧatu ذو الحجة) is the 12th month on the Islamic calendar. ... Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى) is second in the series of Eid festivals that Muslims celebrate. ... Shawwal is the tenth month on the Islamic calendar. ... The Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر) marks the end of Ramadan. ... Muharram (Arabic: محرم ) is the first month of the Islamic calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Governorates of Yemen.
  2. ^ Central Statistical Organisation of Yemen. General Population Housing and Establishment Census 2004 Final Results [1], Statistic Yearbook 2005 of Yemen [2]
  3. ^ Hadramis in Singapore, by Ameen Ali Talib
  4. ^ Yemen Embassy in Canada
  5. ^ i=768&p=community&a=2 Yemen Times
  6. ^ Embassy of Yemen: Human Rights and Women's issues accessed 9-8-2006
  7. ^ Human Rights Watch: World Report 2001 on Yemen accessed 9-8-2006
  8. ^ Catha Edulis (Khat plant)

Human Rights Watch Banner Human Rights Watch is a United States-based international non-government organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. ...

See also

Military branches: Army (includes Special Forces, established in 1999), Navy, Air Force, Air Defense Forces, Republican Guard (includes Police) Military manpower - military age: 14 years of age Military manpower - availability: males age 15-49: 4,443,312 (2003 est. ... Jambiya (Arabic script جمبية or جنبية) is the Arabic term for dagger, but it is generally used to describe a specific type of dagger with a short curved blade that is worn on a belt. ... This is a list of topics related to Yemen. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Sunni Islam, Shia Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism Arab diaspora refers to the numbers of Arab immigrants, and their descendants, who voluntarily or as refugees emigrated from their native countries and now reside in non-Arab nations, primarily in Western countries as well... Most Arab Singaporeans have come in the past from Hadhramaut region in Yemen and are Muslim. ...

External links

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Preceded by
North Yemen concurrent with South Yemen
Government of Yemen
1990 to date
Succeeded by
current
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Yemen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2448 words)
The Republic of Yemen (Arabic: الجمهورية اليمنية), composed of former North and South Yemen, is a country on the Arabian Peninsula in Southwest Asia and is a part of the Middle East, bordering the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden on the south and the Red Sea on the west.
Yemen is a republic with a bicameral legislature.
Yemen is in the Middle East, in the south of Arabia, bordering the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Red Sea, west of Oman and south of Saudi Arabia.
Yemen. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (2426 words)
Yemen is bordered on the north by Saudi Arabia, on the east by Oman, on the south by the Gulf of Aden, and on the west by the Red Sea.
One of the principal reasons for Southern Yemen’s merger with (Northern) Yemen in 1990 was the steady decline of its economy and the loss of Soviet political and economic support.
Yemen is governed under the constitution of 1991, as amended in 1994 and 2001.
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