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Encyclopedia > Yellow journalism
Nasty little printer's devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. 21, 1888.
Nasty little printer's devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. 21, 1888.
Topics in journalism
Professional issues

NewsReportageWriting
EthicsObjectivityValues
AttributionDefamation
EducationOther topics Image File history File links Puck112188c. ... Image File history File links Puck112188c. ... The cover of the April 23, 1884 issue. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Professional Journalism is a form of news reporting which developed in the United States at the beginning of the 20th century, along with formal schools of journalism which arose at major universities. ... For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... Reportage can be a single journalists report of news (especially when witnessed first-hand), distributed through the media. ... News style is the prose style of short, front-page newspaper stories and the news bulletins that air on radio and television. ... Journalism ethics and standards include principles of ethics and of good practice to address the specific challenges faced by professional journalists. ... Objectivity is frequently held to be essential to journalistic professionalism (particularly in the United States); however, there is some disagreement about what the concept consists of. ... News values determine how much prominence a news story is given by a media outlet. ... It has been suggested that Attribution (journalism) be merged into this article or section. ... Slander and Libel redirect here. ... List of journalism topics This page aims to list all topics related to the field of journalism. ...

Fields

Arts Business Environment Fashion Music Science Sports Trade Video games Weather Arts journalism is a branch of journalism concerned with the reporting and discussion of the arts. ... Business journalism includes coverage of companies, the workplace, personal finance, and economics, including unemployment and other economic indicators. ... Fashion journalism is an umbrella term used to describe all aspects of published fashion media. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Music critic. ... Science journalism is a relatively new branch of journalism, which uses the art of reporting to convey information about science topics to a public forum. ... Trade Journalism reports on the movements and developments of the business world by way of articles or analysis. ... Video game journalism is a branch of journalism concerned with the reporting and discussion of video games. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ...

Genres

Advocacy journalism
Citizen journalism
Civic journalism
Gonzo journalism
Investigative journalism
Literary journalism
Narrative journalism
New Journalism
Visual journalism
Watchdog journalism
Advocacy journalism is a genre of journalism which is strongly fact-based, but may seek to support a point-of-view in some public or private sector issue. ... Citizen journalism, also known as participatory journalism, or people journalism is the act of citizens playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information, according to the seminal report We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne... The Civic Journalism movement (also known as Public Journalism) is an attempt to abandon the notion that journalists and their audiences are spectators in political and social processes. ... Hunter S. Thompsons famous Gonzo logo. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ... Creative nonfiction is a genre of literature, also known as literary journalism, which uses literary skills in the writing of nonfiction. ... This is the interpretation of a story and the way in which the journalist portrays it, be it fictional or non-fictional. ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Social impact

Fourth Estate
Freedom of the press
Infotainment
Media bias
News propaganda
Public relations
Yellow journalism
In modern times, television reporters are part of the fourth estate. ... Freedom of the Press (or Press Freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... Infotainment (a portmanteau of information and entertainment) refers to a general type of media broadcast program which provides a combination of current events news and feature news, or features stories. Infotainment also refers to the segments of programming in television news programs which overall consist of both hard news segments... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // Dictionary. ...

News media

Newspapers
Magazines
News agencies
Broadcast journalism
Online journalism
Photojournalism
Alternative media News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Definition A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Assault landing One of the first waves at Omaha Beach as photographed by Robert F. Sargent. ... Alternative media are defined most broadly as those media practices falling outside the mainstreams of corporate communication. ...

Roles

Journalist Reporter Editor Columnist Commentator
Photographer News presenter Meteorologist For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... This article is about journalistic reporters. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A photographer at the Calgary Folk Music Festival Paparazzi at the Tribeca Film Festival A photographer is a person who takes a photograph using a camera. ... “Anchorman” redirects here. ... Meteorology is the scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ...


 v  d  e 

Yellow journalism is a pejorative reference that is to much of unrelaistic stuff and it should not be able to use it it is a horrible kind of journalism to journalism that features scandal-mongering, sensationalism, or other unethical or unprofessional practices by news media organizations or journalists. It has been loosely defined as "not quite libel". Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ... Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


The term originated during the Gilded Age with the circulation battles between Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal. They ran from 1895 to about 1898 and can refer specifically to this period. Both papers were accused by critics of sensationalizing the news in order to drive up circulation, although the newspapers did serious reporting as well. The New York Press coined the term yellow kid journalism in early 1897 after a then-popular comic strip to describe the down-market papers of Pulitzer and Hearst, which both published versions of it during a circulation war.[1] This was soon shortened to yellow journalism: "We called them Yellow because they are Yellow."[2] <math> </math></math> The Breakers, a gilded-age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Joseph Pulitzer Joseph Pulitzer (April 18, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a Hungarian-American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. ... The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The New York Journal American was a newspaper purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895 (at the time called the New York Morning Journal, then the New York Journal). ... The New York Press was a New York City newspaper that began publication in December, 1887 and continued publication until July 2, 1916. ... Mickey Dugan, better known as The Yellow Kid, was the lead fictional character in Hogans Alley, one of the first comic strips and the very first to be printed in color. ...

Contents

Origins: Pulitzer v. Hearst

Joseph Pulitzer purchased the World in 1883 after making the St. Louis Post-Dispatch the dominant daily in that city. The publisher had gotten his start editing a German-language publication in St. Louis, and saw a great untapped market in the nation's immigrant classes. Pulitzer strove to make The World an entertaining read, and filled his paper with pictures, games and contests that drew in readers, particularly those who used English as a second language. Crime stories filled many of the pages, with headlines like "Was He A Suicide?" and "Screaming for Mercy."[3] In addition, Pulitzer only charged readers two cents per issue but gave readers eight and sometimes 12 pages of information (the only other two-cent paper in the city never exceeded four pages).[4] Joseph Pulitzer Joseph Pulitzer (April 18, 1847 – October 29, 1911) was a Hungarian-American publisher best known for posthumously establishing the Pulitzer Prizes and (along with William Randolph Hearst) for originating yellow journalism. ... The St. ... The New York World was a newspaper published in New York from 1860 until 1931. ...


While there were many sensational stories in the World, they were by no means the only pieces, or even the dominant ones. Pulitzer believed that newspapers were public institutions with a duty to improve society, and he put the World in the service of social reform. During a heat wave in 1883, World reporters went into the Manhattan's tenements, writing stories about the appalling living conditions of immigrants and the toll the heat took on the children. Stories headlined "How Babies Are Baked", "Burning Babies Fall From The Roof" and "Lines of Little Hearses" spurred reform and drove up the World's circulation.[5]


Just two years after Pulitzer took it over, the World became the highest circulation newspaper in New York, aided in part by its strong ties to the Democratic Party.[6] Older publishers, envious of Pulitzer's success, began criticizing the World, harping on its crime stories and stunts while ignoring its more serious reporting — trends which influenced the popular perception of yellow journalism, both then and now. Charles Dana, editor of the New York Sun, attacked The World and said Pulitzer was "deficient in judgment and in staying power."[7] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Charles Dana Charles Anderson Dana (August 8, 1819 – October 17, 1897) was an American journalist, author, and government official, best known for his association with Ulysses S. Grant during the American Civil War and his aggressive political advocacy after the war. ... The modern New York Sun is a daily newspaper published in New York City. ...


Pulitzer's approach made an impression on William Randolph Hearst, a mining heir who acquired the San Francisco Examiner from his father in 1887. Hearst read the World while studying at Harvard University and resolved to make the Examiner as bright as Pulitzer's paper.[8]. Under his leadership, the Examiner devoted 24 percent of its space to crime, presenting the stories as morality plays, and sprinkled adultery and "nudity" (by 19th century standards) on the front page.[9] A month after taking over the paper, the Examiner ran this headline about a hotel fire: For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The San Francisco Examiner is a daily newspaper in San Francisco, California, where it has been published continuously since the late 19th Century. ... Harvard redirects here. ... This article is about publication entitled Examiner The Examiner The Examiner was a weekly paper founded by Leigh and John Hunt in 1808. ... Morality plays are a type of theatrical allegory in which the protagonist is met by personifications of various moral attributes who try to prompt him to choose a godly life over one of evil. ...

HUNGRY, FRANTIC FLAMES. They Leap Madly Upon the Splendid Pleasure Palace by the Bay of Monterey, Encircling Del Monte in Their Ravenous Embrace From Pinnacle to Foundation. Leaping Higher, Higher, Higher, With Desperate Desire. Running Madly Riotous Through Cornice, Archway and Facade. Rushing in Upon the Trembling Guests with Savage Fury. Appalled and Panic-Striken the Breathless Fugitives Gaze Upon the Scene of Terror. The Magnificent Hotel and Its Rich Adornments Now a Smoldering heap of Ashes. The "Examiner" Sends a Special Train to Monterey to Gather Full Details of the Terrible Disaster. Arrival of the Unfortunate Victims on the Morning's Train — A History of Hotel del Monte — The Plans for Rebuilding the Celebrated Hostelry — Pariculars and Supposed Origin of the Fire.[10]

Hearst could go overboard in his crime coverage; one of his early pieces, regarding a "band of murderers," attacked the police for forcing Examiner reporters to do their work for them. But while indulging in these stunts, the Examiner also increased its space for international news, and sent reporters out to uncover municipal corruption and inefficiency. In one celebrated story, Examiner reporter Winifred Black was admitted into a San Francisco hospital and discovered that indigent women were treated with "gross cruelty." The entire hospital staff was fired the morning the piece appeared.[11]


New York

With the Examiner's success established by the early 1890s, Hearst began shopping for a New York newspaper. Hearst purchased the New York Journal in 1895, a penny paper which Pulitzer's brother Albert had sold to a Cincinnati publisher the year before. The New York Journal American was a newspaper purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895 (at the time called the New York Morning Journal, then the New York Journal). ...


Metropolitan newspapers started going after department store advertising in the 1890s, and discovered the larger the circulation base, the better. This drove Hearst; following Pulitzer's earlier strategy, he kept the Journal's price at one cent (compared to The World's two cent price) while providing as much information as rival newspapers.[12] The approach worked, and as the Journal's circulation jumped to 150,000, Pulitzer cut his price to a penny, hoping to drive his young competitor (who was subsidized by his family's fortune) into bankruptcy. In a counterattack, Hearst raided the staff of the World in 1896. While most sources say that Hearst simply offered more money, Pulitzer — who had grown increasingly abusive to his employees — had become an extremely difficult man to work for, and many World employees were willing to jump for the sake of getting away from him.[13]


Although the competition between the World and the Journal was fierce, the papers were temperamentally alike. Both were Democratic, both were sympathetic to labor and immigrants (a sharp contrast to publishers like the New York Tribune's Whitelaw Reid, who blamed their poverty on moral defects[14]), and both invested enormous resources in their Sunday publications, which functioned like weekly magazines, going beyond the normal scope of daily journalism.[15] The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ...


Their Sunday entertainment features included the first color comic strip pages, and some theorize that the term yellow journalism originated there, while as noted above the New York Press left the term it invented undefined. Hogan's Alley, a comic strip revolving around a bald child in a yellow nightshirt (nicknamed the Yellow Kid), became exceptionally popular when cartoonist Richard Outcault began drawing it in the World in early 1896. When Hearst predictably hired Outcault away, Pulitzer asked artist George Luks to continue the strip with his characters, giving the city two Yellow Kids.[16] The use of "yellow journalism" as a synonym for over-the-top sensationalism in the U.S. apparently started with more serious newspapers commenting on the excesses of "the Yellow Kid papers." This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... New York Press is a free alternative weekly in New York City. ... Hogans Alley may refer to Hogans Alley, an 1890s comic strip that featured the character The Yellow Kid. ... Richard Felton Outcault (January 14, 1863-September 25, 1928) was an American comic strip scriptwriter, sketcher and painter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Spanish-American War

Male Spanish officials strip search an American woman tourist in Cuba looking for messages from rebels; front page "yellow journalism" from Hearst (artist: Remington)

Pulitzer and Hearst are often credited (or blamed) for drawing the nation into the Spanish-American War with sensationalist stories or outright lying. In fact, the vast majority of Americans did not live in New York City, and the decision makers who did live there probably relied more on staid newspapers like the Times, The Sun or the Post. The most famous example of the exaggeration is the apocryphal story that artist Frederic Remington telegrammed Hearst to tell him all was quiet in Cuba and "There will be no war." Hearst responded "Please remain. You furnish the pictures and I'll furnish the war." The story (a version of which appears in the Hearst-inspired Orson Welles film Citizen Kane) first appeared in the memoirs of reporter James Creelman in 1901, and there is no other source for it. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1213x1142, 418 KB) Summary US newspaper illustration 1898 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1213x1142, 418 KB) Summary US newspaper illustration 1898 Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... James Creelman (November 12, 1859 – February 12, 1915), was a bum during the height of yellow journalism. ...


But Hearst was a war hawk after a rebellion broke out in Cuba in 1895. Stories of Cuban virtue and Spanish brutality soon dominated his front page. While the accounts were of dubious accuracy, the newspaper readers of the 19th century did not need, or necessarily want, his stories to be pure nonfiction. Historian Michael Robertson has said that "Newspaper reporters and readers of the 1890s were much less concerned with distinguishing among fact-based reporting, opinion and literature."[17] War Hawk is a term originally used to describe a member of the House of Representatives of the Twelfth Congress of the United States (usually from the south & southwest) who advocated going to war against Great Britain in the War of 1812. ...

Pulitzer's treatment in the World emphasizes horrible explosion
Pulitzer's treatment in the World emphasizes horrible explosion
Hearst's treatment was more effective and focused on the enemy who set the bomb—and offered a huge reward to readers

Pulitzer, though lacking Hearst's resources, kept the story on his front page. The yellow press covered the revolution extensively and often inaccurately, but conditions on Cuba were horrific enough. The island was in a terrible economic depression, and Spanish general Valeriano Weyler, sent to crush the rebellion, herded Cuban peasants into concentration camps and caused hundreds of thousands of deaths. Having clamored for a fight for two years, Hearst took credit for the conflict when it came: A week after the United States declared war on Spain, he ran "How do you like the Journal's war?" on his front page.[18] In fact, President William McKinley never read the Journal, and newspapers like the Tribune and the New York Evening Post, both staunchly Republican, demanded restraint. Moreover, journalism historians have noted that yellow journalism was largely confined to New York City, and that newspapers in the rest of the country did not follow their lead. The Journal and the World were not among the top ten sources of news in regional papers, and the stories simply did not make a splash outside Gotham. [19] War came because public opinion was sickened by the bloodshed, and because conservative leaders like McKinley realized that Spain had lost control of Cuba. These factors weighed more on the president's mind than the melodramas in the New York Journal.[20] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x657, 76 KB) Summary 1898 NY WORLD headline Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x657, 76 KB) Summary 1898 NY WORLD headline Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (541x615, 103 KB) Summary 1898 NY JOURNAL headline Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (541x615, 103 KB) Summary 1898 NY JOURNAL headline Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... General Valeriano Weyler Valeriano Weyler y Nicolau, marqués de Tenerife (17 September 1838 - 20 October 1930) was a Spanish soldier. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Look up Gotham in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Hearst sailed directly to Cuba, when the invasion began, as a war correspondent, providing sober and accurate accounts of the fighting. [21] Creelman later praised the work of the reporters for exposing the horrors of Spanish misrule, arguing, " no true history of the war . . . can be written without an acknowledgment that whatever of justice and freedom and progress was accomplished by the Spanish-American war was due to the enterprise and tenacity of yellow journalists, many of whom lie in unremembered graves."[22]


After the war

Hearst placed his newspapers at the service of the Democrats during the 1900 presidential election. He later campaigned for his party's presidential nomination, but lost much of his personal prestige when columnist Ambrose Bierce and editor Arthur Brisbane published separate columns months apart that called for the assassination of McKinley. When McKinley was shot on September 6, 1901, the Republican press went livid, accusing Hearst of driving Leon Czolgosz to the deed. Hearst did not know of Bierce's column and claimed to have pulled Brisbane's after it ran in a first edition, but the incident would haunt him for the rest of his life and all but destroyed his presidential ambitions.[23] Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ... Arthur Brisbane (1864-1936) was an American newspaper editor, born in Buffalo, N. Y., and educated in the public schools of the United States and Europe. ... Leon Frank Czolgosz (choll-gosh), (1873 – October 29, 1901) (often anglicized to , also used his mothers maiden name Nieman and variations thereof[1]) was the assassin of U.S. President William McKinley. ...


Pulitzer, haunted by his "yellow sins,"[24] returned the World to its crusading roots as the new century dawned. By the time of his death in 1911, the World was a widely-respected publication, and would remain a leading progressive paper until its demise in 1931.


In popular culture

In movies, sitcoms and other works of fiction, reporters often use yellow journalism against the main character, which works to set up the reporter character as an antagonist. This article is about motion pictures. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ...


In the Spider-Man franchise, publisher J. Jonah Jameson smears the titular superhero in his Daily Bugle with headlines such as "Spider-Man: Threat or Menace?" despite having his suspicions repeatedly proven wrong. Likewise, in the 1997 James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, an evil media magnate tries to start a war between Great Britain and China via sensationalized news stories; the villain alludes to Hearst's role in the Spanish-American War, using the apocryphal quote "You provide the pictures and I'll provide the war." (A paraphrase of this quotation -- substituting "prose poems" for "pictures" -- is also in Orson Welles' classic film "Citizen Kane.") Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... J. Jonah Jameson (also known as J.J., Jolly Jonah Jameson , or J.J.J.) is a fictional supporting character featured in Marvel Comics’s Spider-Man series. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Layout of the Bugle The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City newspaper that is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man and its derivative media. ... 007 redirects here. ... Tomorrow Never Dies, released in 1997, is the eighteenth spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Pierce Brosnan as MI6 agent James Bond. ... In Judeo-Christian theologies, apocrypha refers to religious Sacred text that have questionable authenticity or are otherwise disputed. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ...


In Thomas Harris's novel Red Dragon, from the Hannibal Lecter series, a yellow journalist named Freddy Lounds, who writes for the National Tattler tabloid, is tortured and set aflame for penning a negative article about serial killer Francis Dolarhyde. In the movie Bob Roberts, Senator Roberts characterises media investigations into his business dealings as "yellow journalism". In Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire, Rita Skeeter acts as a yellow journalist. This article is about the novel. ... Hannibal Lecter is a fictional character in a series of novels by author Thomas Harris. ... Freddy Lounds is a fictional character in the novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, and its film adaptations. ... Francis Dolarhyde is a fictional character featured in Thomas Harris novel Red Dragon. ... Bob Roberts is a 1992 film written and directed by Tim Robbins. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Currency

The gentler pejorative "infotainment" was coined more recently to refer to generally inoffensive news programming that shuns serious issues, but blends "soft" journalism and entertainment rather than emphasizing more important news values. When infotainment involves celebrity sex scandals, dramatic (or dramatized) "true crime" stories and similar trivia, it borders on the tricks of old-fashioned yellow journalism. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Infotainment (a portmanteau of information and entertainment) refers to a general type of media broadcast program which provides a combination of current events news and feature news, or features stories. Infotainment also refers to the segments of programming in television news programs which overall consist of both hard news segments... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... News values determine how much prominence a news story is given by a media outlet. ...


Corporate media is another recent pejorative, when applied to news conglomerates whose business interests critics see as counter to the public interest. For example, such media may avoid incisive reporting on influential corporations or limit public information about proposed government regulation of media industries. Collusion between political, business and media worlds sometimes brings allegations of illegal or unethical practices ranging from fraud to antitrust violations. Corporate media is a term used by some political progressives which refers to a system of media production, distribution, ownership, and funding which is dominated by corporations, and is governed by the capitalist imperatives of maximizing profits for the investors, stockholders, and advertisers. ... This article is about anti-competitive business behavior. ...


While bland infotainment and unethical corporate media practices may be considered "yellow" in the sense of "cowardly," the term yellow journalism traditionally refers to news organizations for whom some combination of sensationalism, profiteering, propaganda, journalistic bias or jingoism takes dominance over factual reporting and the profession's public trust. If one may construe gradations of bias, then Yellow journalism may be considered less subtle and coarser in content and execution than media bias, though bias is indeed evident. Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... The act of price gouging in an undersupplied market. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ... Media bias is a real or perceived tendency of journalists and news producers within the mass media to approach both the presentation of particular stories, and the selection of which stories to cover, with an unbalanced perspective. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... The concept of the public trust relates back to the origins of democratic government, and its seminal idea that; within the public, lies the true power and future of a society, therefore, whatever trust the public places in its officials must be respected. ... For other senses of this word, see bias (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


A current perceived rift is therefore more akin to a segmentation according to definitions of "news." The public still attaches to "news" the connotations of "journalism." Because of these developments, the common definition of "news" no longer belongs in the domain of journalists, but to wider television and internet media outlets over a vast spectrum of target issues and audiences. The proliferation of web media has in a certain sense re-validated journalistic ethics: reports that conform best tend to be treated as more authoritative. "Pseudo-news" organizations draw general audiences, who tend to fall into market demographics that each favor particular blends of issues-based entertainment along with their "news." Connotation is a subjective cultural and/or emotional coloration in addition to the explicit or denotative meaning of any specific word or phrase in a language, i. ... For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... A demographic or demographic profile is a term used in marketing and broadcasting, to describe a demographic grouping or a market segment. ...


See also

Journalism Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Parachute journalism refers to the practice of reporting stories by journalists inexperienced with the context or cultures of a story, often resulting in inaccurate or distorted news reports. ... Supermarket tabloids are national weekly magazines in the United States, printed on newsprint in tabloid format, specalizing in celebrity news, gossip, astrology, and bizarre (some would say apocryphal) stories about ordinary people. ... Culture of fear is a term proposed in a variety of sociological theses, which argue that feelings of fear and anxiety predominate in contemporary public discourse and relationships, changing how we relate to one another as individuals and as democratic agents. ... Moral panic is a sociological term, coined by Stanley Cohen, meaning a reaction by a group of people based on the false or exaggerated perception that some cultural behavior or group, frequently a minority group or a subculture, is dangerously deviant and poses a menace to society. ... James Creelman (November 12, 1859 – February 12, 1915), was a bum during the height of yellow journalism. ...

References

  1. ^ Origins of the Kid
  2. ^ Campbell, W. Joseph, The Spanish-American War: American Wars and the Media in Primary Documents, Introduction
  3. ^ Swanberg, 1967, pp. 74-75
  4. ^ Nasaw, David, The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. Boston; Houghton Mifflin, 2000, 100
  5. ^ Emory, Edwin and Michael. The Press and America. 4th ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ; Prentice Hall, 1984, 257
  6. ^ Swanberg, 91
  7. ^ Swanberg, 79
  8. ^ Nasaw, 54-63
  9. ^ Nasaw, 75-77
  10. ^ Nasaw, 75
  11. ^ Nasaw, 69-77
  12. ^ Nasaw, 100
  13. ^ Nasaw, 105
  14. ^ Swanberg, 79
  15. ^ Nasaw, 107
  16. ^ Nasaw, 108
  17. ^ quoted in Nasaw, 79
  18. ^ Nasaw, 132
  19. ^ Sloan & Startt, 191
  20. ^ Nasaw, 133
  21. ^ Nasaw, 138
  22. ^ Sloan & Startt 191
  23. ^ Nasaw, 156-158
  24. ^ Emery, 295
  • George W. Auxier, "Middle Western Newspapers and the Spanish American War, 1895-1898," Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 26 (March 1940):
  • Procter, Ben. William Randolph Hearst: The Early Years, 1863-1910 (1998)
  • Emory, Edwin and Michael. The Press and America. 4th ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ; Prentice Hall, 1984
  • Joyce Milton, The Yellow Kids: Foreign correspondents in the heyday of yellow journalism." New York: Harper & Row, 1989).
  • Nasaw, David, The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst. Boston; Houghton Mifflin, 2000
  • Morton M. Rosenberg and Thomas P. Ruff, Indiana and the Coming of the Spanish-American War, Ball State Monograph, No. 26, Publications in History, No. 4 (Muncie: Ball State University, 1976) who say Indiana papers were "more moderate, more cautious, less imperialistic and less jingoistic than their eastern counterparts."
  • Ted Curtis Smythe, The Gilded Age Press, 1865-1900 (2003)
  • Harold J. Sylvester, “The Kansas Press and the Coming of the Spanish-American War, ” The Historian, 31 (February 1969) finds no Yellow journalism influence on the newspapers in Kansas.
  • Swanberg, W.A. Pulitzer. New York; Charles Scribner's Sons, 1967.
  • Mark M. Welter, "The 1895-1898 Cuban Crisis in Minnesota Newspapers: Testing the 'Yellow Journalism' Theory," Journalism Quarterly, 47 (Winter 1970): 719—24.

External links

  • Not likely sent: The Remington-Hearst 'telegrams'

  Results from FactBites:
 
Yellow journalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2600 words)
Yellow journalism is a pejorative reference to journalism that features scandal-mongering, sensationalism, jingoism or other unethical or unprofessional practices by news media organizations or individual journalists.
The New York Press coined the term "Yellow Journalism" in early 1897 to describe the papers of Pulitzer and Hearst.
Moreover, journalism historians have noted that yellow journalism was largely confined to New York City, and that newspapers in the rest of the country did not follow their lead.
Journalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3098 words)
News-oriented journalism is sometimes described as the "first rough draft of history" (attributed to Phil Graham), because journalists often record important events, producing news articles on short deadlines.
Journalism has as its main activity the reporting of events — stating who, what, when, where, why and how, and explaining the significance and effect of events or trends.
The subject matter of journalism can be anything and everything, and journalists report and write on a wide variety of subjects: politics on the international, national, provincial and local levels, economics and business on the same four levels, health and medicine, education, sports, hobbies and recreation, lifestyles, clothing, food, pets, sex and relationships....
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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