FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Yellow Turban Rebellion
Yellow Turban Rebellion
Date 184 - 205
Location China
Result Han victory
Combatants
Yellow Turbans Han Dynasty
Commanders
Zhang Jiao
Zhang Bao
Zhang Liang
He Jin
Huangfu Song
Lu Zhi
Zhu Jun
Dong Zhuo
Cao Cao
Strength
360,000 Various
Casualties
Unknown Unknown
Wars of the Three Kingdoms
Yellow Turban RebellionCampaign against Dong ZhuoJieqiaoWanchengXiapiYijingGuanduBowangChangbanRed CliffsTong PassHefeiMount DingjunFanchengXiaotingSouthern CampaignNorthern Expeditions (Jieting)Shiting(Wuzhang Plains)

The Yellow Turban Rebellion, sometimes also translated as the Yellow Scarves Rebellion, (Traditional Chinese: 黃巾之亂; Simplified Chinese: 黄巾之乱; pinyin: Huáng Jīn Zhī Luàn) was a 184 AD peasant rebellion against Emperor Lingdi of the Han Dynasty of China. It is named for the color of the scarves which the rebels wore around their heads. The rebels were associated with secret Taiping Taoist societies and the rebellion marked an important point in the history of Taoism. The rebellion is the opening event in the Chinese literary classic Romance of the Three Kingdoms. Events The Yellow Turban Rebellion breaks out in China. ... Events Births Plotinus, according to his student Porphyry. ... The Yellow Turban Rebellion (simplified Chinese: 黄巾之乱, traditional Chinese: 黃巾之亂) was an AD 184 peasant rebellion against Emperor Lingdi of the Han Dynasty of China. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Zhang Jiao or Zhang Jue(?-184) (Simplified Chinese: 张角; Traditional Chinese: 張角; Pinyin: Zhāng JiÇŽo or Zhāng Jué) was the leader of the Yellow Turbans during the period of the late Eastern Han Dynasty in China. ... It has been suggested that Zhang Ba be merged into this article or section. ... Zhang Liang 張梁 Was the brother to Zhang Jiao, leader of the Yellow Turban Rebellion against the Han Dynasty. ... He Jin (? – 189) was the elder half-brother of Empress He, consort to Emperor Ling of the late Eastern Han Dynasty. ... Huangfu Song (皇甫嵩) was a well known minister of the late Han Dynasty. ... Puli (甫里) was the ancient name of the water town Luzhi township (甪直镇). Luzhi is located in the Wuzhong District, 18 km east of Suzhou, Jiangsu province, China. ... Zhu Jun (149-195) In the Historic novel, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, by Luo Guanzhong, Zhu Jun, an officer under the Han Dynasty, campaigned with other famous people against the Yellow Turbans (scarves). ... Dong Zhuo (董卓; Pinyin: DÇ’ng Zhuō) (139 – 192) was a warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms Period in ancient China. ... For other uses, see Cao Cao (disambiguation). ... The Three Kingdoms in 262, on the eve of the conquest of Shu. ... Combatants Anti-Dong Zhuo Coalition Dong Zhuo Commanders Yuan Shao Dong Zhuo The Campaign against Dong Zhuo (董卓討伐戰) in 190 was initiated by a coalition of regional officials hoping to end Chancellor Dong Zhuos influence in the ailing Han court in China. ... The Battle of Jie Bridge (Chinese: 界橋之戰, pinyin: Jièqiáo zhi zhàn) was a military engagement fought between Yuan Shao and Gongsun Zan in 191, at the beginning of the civil wars in China leading up to the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Combatants Zhang Xiu Cao Cao Commanders Zhang Xiu Cao Cao The Battle of Wancheng (宛城之戰) was a historical battle fought in the later years of the Han Dynasty between the warlords Cao Cao and Zhang Xiu in 197. ... Combatants Cao Cao, Liu Bei Lü Bu Commanders Cao Cao, Liu Bei Lü Bu The Battle of Xiapi (下邳之戰) occurred in the winter of 198 between the forces of Lü Bu against the forces of Liu Bei and Cao Cao in the prelude to the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... Combatants Yuan Shao Gongsun Zan Heishan bandits Commanders Yuan Shao Gongsun Zan† Zhang Yan The Battle of Yijing (易京之戰) took part shortly before the fall of the Han Empire in China, which began the era known as the Three Kingdoms. ... The Battle of Guandu (官渡之戰) was a battle in Chinese history. ... Combatants Liu Bei Cao Cao Commanders Liu Bei Xiahou Dun The Battle of Bowang (博望之戰), more famously known as the Battle of Bowang Slope (博望坡之戰), was a battle fought near Fangcheng, Henan between the forces of Cao Cao and Liu Bei during the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Cao Cao Ma Chao Commanders Cao Cao Ma Chao Strength  ? 100,000 Casualties  ?  ? {{{notes}}} The Battle of Tong Gate (潼關之戰) was a battle between Ma Chao and the warlord Cao Cao during the Three Kingdoms Era in China. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Cao Wei Shu Han Commanders Xiahou Yuan† Liu Bei The Battle of Mount Dingjun (定軍山之戰) took place in year 219, during the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Between 225 and 230, the Kingdom of Shu (a Chinese state that existed during the Three Kingdoms period) undertook a military campaign in its southern territories after incidents of rebellion by local governors (Zhu Bao, Gao Ding and Yong Kai) and intrusions by the Nanman (southern barbarians). Nanman was located... The Northern Expeditions (北伐) were a series of five military campaigns launched by the state of Shu against the northern state of Wei from A.D. 228 to 234. ... The Battle of Jieting was a battle fought during the First Northern Expedition led by Zhuge Liang. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... Combatants Shu Han Cao Wei Commanders Zhuge Liang† Yang Yi, Fei Yi Sima Yi Strength 100,000 200,000 The Battle of Wuzhang Plains (五丈原之戰) is a famous standoff between the kingdoms of Wei and Shu in 234 A.D. during the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; also Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) refer to one of two standard Chinese character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language, officially simplified by the government of the Peoples Republic of China in an attempt to promote literacy. ... It has been suggested that Pinyin_method be merged into this article or section. ... Events The Yellow Turban Rebellion breaks out in China. ... Format of naming convention in English is under discussion at Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese). ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... The Four Great Classical Novels (四大名著) of Chinese literature, not to be confused with the Four Books of Confucianism, in order of publication, are: Romance of the Three Kingdoms (三國演義) (1330) Water Margin (水滸傳) (also known as Outlaws of the Marsh) (1573?) Journey to the West (西遊記) (1590) Dream of the Red Chamber (紅樓夢)(1792... An illustration of the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: sānguó yÇŽnyì), written by Luó Guànzhōng in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the...

Contents

Causes

A major cause of the Yellow Turban Rebellion was an agrarian crisis, in which famine forced many farmers and former military settlers in the north to seek employment in the south, where large landowners took advantage of the labor surplus and amassed large fortunes. The situation was further aggravated by smaller floods along the lower course of the Yellow River. Further pressure was added on the peasants by high taxes imposed on them in order to build fortifications along the Silk Road and garrisons against foreign infiltrations and invasions. From 170 CE on, landlords and peasants formed irregular armed bands, setting the stage for class conflict. For other Yellow Rivers, see Yellow River (disambiguation). ... The Silk Road  â€“ Armenian: ; Georgian: აბრეშუმის დიდი გზა; Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: sÄ«chóu zhÄ« lù; Persian: ‎; Râh-e Abrisham; Turkish: ; Kyrgyz: (Äžibek ÄŸolu); Kazakh: ; Azerbaijani: ; Hungarian: ; Polish: ; Russian: (VÄ›lkij Å jolkovyj Put ) â€“ or Silk Route is an interconnected series of routes through Southern Asia traversed by caravan and ocean... For other uses, see number 170. ...


At the same time, the Han Dynasty showed internal weakness. The power of the landowners had been a problem for a long time already (s. Wang Mang), but in the run-up to the Yellow Turban Rebellion, the court eunuchs in particular gained considerably in influence on the emperor, which they abused to enrich themselves. Ten of the most powerful eunuchs formed a group known as The Ten Regular Attendants and the emperor referred to one of them (Zhang Rang) as his "foster father". Consequently, the government was widely regarded as corrupt and incapable and against this backdrop, the famines and floods were seen as an indication that a decadent emperor had lost his mandate of heaven. The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Wang Mang (王莽, pinyin: Wáng Măng) (45 BC–October 6, 23), courtesy name Jujun (巨君), was a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded Xin (or Hsin) Dynasty (新朝, meaning new dynasty), ruling AD 8–23. ... A eunuch is a castrated man; the term usually refers to those castrated in order to perform a specific social function, as was common in many societies of the past. ... The Ten Attendents (Also known as the Ten Eunuchs) was a group of eunuchs from the Eunuch Faction of the Han Imperial Court in China. ... Zhang Rang (張讓) (d. ... The Mandate of Heaven (天命 Pīnyīn: Tiānmìng) was a traditional Chinese concept of legitimacy used to support the rule of the kings of the Zhou Dynasty and later the Emperors of China. ...


The rebels

Founders

The Yellow Turban Rebellion was led by Zhang Jiao (who is referred to as Zhang Jue in the Moss Roberts' English translation of the Romance of the Three Kingdoms) and his two younger brothers Zhang Bao and Zhang Liang, who were born in the Ju Lu district of the Ye Prefecture. The brothers had founded a taoist religious sect in Shandong Province. They were healers, usually taking patients for free because they were too poor to pay. They saw the harshness of the world from seeing the peasants — they were often abused by the local government, or too hungry from the heavy taxes. Zhang Jiao or Zhang Jue(?-184) (Simplified Chinese: 张角; Traditional Chinese: 張角; Pinyin: Zhāng JiÇŽo or Zhāng Jué) was the leader of the Yellow Turbans during the period of the late Eastern Han Dynasty in China. ... An illustration of the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: sānguó yÇŽnyì), written by Luó Guànzhōng in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the... It has been suggested that Zhang Ba be merged into this article or section. ... Zhang Liang 張梁 Was the brother to Zhang Jiao, leader of the Yellow Turban Rebellion against the Han Dynasty. ... The two letter acronym YE can refer to: Young Entrepreneur, an entrepreneur who generally started young Yemen, the Republic of Yemen This page expands and disambiguates a two-letter combination which might be an abbreviation, an English word, a word in another language, any or all of these. ... Taoism (sometimes written as and actually pronounced as Daoism (dow-ism)) is the English name for: Dao Jia [philosophical tao] philosophical school based on the texts the Tao Te Ching (ascribed to Laozi and alternately spelled Dào Dé JÄ«ng) and the Zhuangzi; a family of organized Chinese religious...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Shāndōng; Wade-Giles: Shan-tung) is a coastal province of eastern Peoples Republic of China. ...


Taoist Sect

The Yellow Turbans considered themselves followers of the "Way of Supreme Peace" (Tai Ping Dao) and venerated the deity Huang-lao, who according to Zhang Jiao had given him a sacred book called the Crucial Keys to the Way of Peace (Tai Ping Yao Shu). Zhang Jiao was said to be a sorcerer and styled himself as the "Great Teacher". The sect propagated the principles of equal rights of all peoples and equal distribution of land; when the rebellion was proclaimed, the sixteen-word slogan was created by Zhang Jiao: 蒼天已死,黄天當立,歳在甲子,天下大吉 ("The Blue Sky (ie. the Han Dynasty) has perished, the Yellow Sky (ie. the rebellion) will soon rise; in this year of Jia Zi, let there be prosperity in the world!") Since all three of the brothers were healers, they spread it easily by telling their patients to spread it amongst the peasants. It has been suggested that mage: be merged into this article or section. ... The Chinese calendar (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: nónglì) is a lunisolar calendar, akin to the Hebrew calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ...


Religious practices

Nearly all of the religious practices of the sect were communal activities (collective trances, fasts) that would usually end in sexual orgies (he qi) involving both men and women.[1]


Military action

In 184 AD, the Yellow Turban Rebellion started in the provinces Shandong and Henan. At this time the rebel force consisted of approximately 360,000 fighters. He Jin, the half-brother of the empress, was placed in charge of putting the rebellion down. The rebels were defeated in February 185 AD, but only two months later, the rebellion broke out again. In 185 AD, it spread to the Taihang Mountains on the western border of Hebei Province and in 186 it reached Shaanxi, Hebei, and Liaoning, in 188 it reached Shanxi. In the same year, a second independent uprising took place in Sichuan, but it was not coordinated with the Yellow Turban Rebellion in other parts of the country. In December 188 and early in 189, the rebels threatened Luoyang, which was the capital city of the Han Dynasty at the time. As a reaction, imperial troops were sent both west and south to confront the rebels. Although the southern detachment was able to score a victory, its commander, Lu Zhi, was arrested for not keeping on the offensive against the rebels. In 192, Cao Cao was able to defeat the rebels again after they marched into Yanzhou, who eventually ceased to pose a military challenge by the year 205. Events The Yellow Turban Rebellion breaks out in China. ... Henan (Chinese: 河南; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-nan), is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located in the central part of the country. ... He Jin (? – 189) was the elder half-brother of Empress He, consort to Emperor Ling of the late Eastern Han Dynasty. ... For other uses, see number 185. ... For other uses, see number 185. ... The Taihang Mountains (太行山) are a mountain range running down the eastern edge of the Loess Plateau. ... Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Events Births April 4 - Caracalla, Roman emperor (+ 217) Deaths Categories: 186 ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the... Hebei (Chinese: 河北; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ho-pei; Postal System Pinyin: Hopeh) is a northern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Liáoníng) is a northeastern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Events Himiko is said to have begun her reign in Japan. ... Shanxi (Chinese: 山西; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shansi) is a province in the northern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: SzÅ­4-chuan1; Postal map spelling: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in the central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Events Himiko is said to have begun her reign in Japan. ... Events Pope Victor I succeeds Pope Eleuterus The Prince of Hongnong succeeds Han Lingdi as Chinese emperor of Han Dynasty Dong Zhuo has the Prince of Hongnong poisoned and installs Han Xiandi as emperor. ... Luoyang (Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Luòyáng) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Puli (甫里) was the ancient name of the water town Luzhi township (甪直镇). Luzhi is located in the Wuzhong District, 18 km east of Suzhou, Jiangsu province, China. ... Events The kingdom of Champa begins to control south and central Vietnam (approximate date). ... For other uses, see Cao Cao (disambiguation). ... Events Births Plotinus, according to his student Porphyry. ...


Aftermath

While the Yellow Turban rebellion was defeated eventually, the military leaders and local administrators gained self-governing powers in the process. This hastened the collapse of the Han Dynasty in 220 AD. After emperor Lingdi died in 189 AD, a power struggle between He Jin and the eunuchs ensued in which He Jin was assassinated on September 22, 189. He Jin's chief ally Yuan Shao retaliated by setting the emperor's palace on fire and slaughtering the eunuchs. Finally, the warlord Dong Zhuo was able to gain control over the underaged heir to the throne which he used as a legitimation for occupying the capital, which was ransacked on the occasion. Because of his cruelty, Dong Zhuo was murdered in 192, which set the stage for Cao Cao's rise to power. Events Han Xiandi abdicates his throne to Cao Pi, symbolizing the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Events Pope Victor I succeeds Pope Eleuterus The Prince of Hongnong succeeds Han Lingdi as Chinese emperor of Han Dynasty Dong Zhuo has the Prince of Hongnong poisoned and installs Han Xiandi as emperor. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... Events Pope Victor I succeeds Pope Eleuterus The Prince of Hongnong succeeds Han Lingdi as Chinese emperor of Han Dynasty Dong Zhuo has the Prince of Hongnong poisoned and installs Han Xiandi as emperor. ... Yuan Shao (? – 202) was a major warlord occupying the north of ancient China during the massive civil war towards the end of the Eastern Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms era. ... Dong Zhuo (董卓; Pinyin: Dǒng Zhuō) (139 – 192) was a warlord during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms Period in ancient China. ... Events The kingdom of Champa begins to control south and central Vietnam (approximate date). ... For other uses, see Cao Cao (disambiguation). ...


Literary impact

The Yellow Scarves Rebellion is the opening event in the Chinese literary classic "Romance of the Three Kingdoms". Two Koei video game series, Romance of the Three Kingdoms and Dynasty Warriors, are loosely based on the Romance of the Three Kingdoms and also contain the Yellow Turban Rebellion. Earlier version of the video game used the name Yellow Scarves Rebellion, but in later versions this was changed to Yellow Turban Rebellion. The Four Great Classical Novels (四大名著) of Chinese literature, not to be confused with the Four Books of Confucianism, in order of publication, are: Romance of the Three Kingdoms (三國演義) (1330) Water Margin (水滸傳) (also known as Outlaws of the Marsh) (1573?) Journey to the West (西遊記) (1590) Dream of the Red Chamber (紅樓夢)(1792... An illustration of the book Romance of the Three Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: , Simplified Chinese: , pinyin: sānguó yǎnyì), written by Luó Guànzhōng in the 14th century, is a Chinese historical novel based upon events in the turbulent years near the end of the Han Dynasty, and the... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Romance of the Three Kingdoms for the Nintendo Entertainment System Sangokushi, the Japanese transliteration of Sanguo Zhi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms) is a computer and video game that originated from Japan, a series of turn-based computerized wargames by Koei. ... The Logo of Shin Sangoku Musou 4 (Dynasty Warriors 5) Dynasty Warriors ( 真・三國無双:Shin Sangokumusou in Japan; literally meaning True - Unrivaled (in the) Three Kingdoms) is a series of video games created by Koei based loosely around the Romance of the Three Kingdoms epic, and is a spinoff series of another...


References

  1. ^ W.Scott Morton. China: "Its History and Culture". ISBN 0-07-043424-7.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Yellow Turban Rebellion: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com (379 words)
Called the yellow turbans or yellow scarves for the scarves they wore around their heads,...gained self-governing powers, leading to the collapse of the dynasty in AD 220.
Called the yellow turbans or yellow scarves for the scarves they wore around their heads, the rebels were associated with secret Taiping Taoist societies.
The emperor was able to put down the rebellion, but in the process his generals and local adminstrators gained self-governing powers, leading to the collapse of the dynasty in AD The Yellow Turban Rebellion is the opening event in the Chinese literary classic Romance of the Three Kingdoms.
Yellow Turban Rebellion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1080 words)
The Yellow Turban Rebellion, sometimes also translated as the Yellow Scarves Rebellion, (Traditional Chinese: 黃巾之亂; Simplified Chinese: 黄巾之乱, pinyin: Huáng Jīn Zhī Luàn) was a 184 AD peasant rebellion against Emperor Lingdi of the Han Dynasty of China.
A major cause of the Yellow Turban Rebellion was an agrarian crisis, in which famine forced many farmers and former military settlers in the north to seek employment in the south, where large landowners took advantage of the labor surplus and amassed large fortunes.
The Yellow Turban Rebellion was led by Zhang Jiao (who is referred to as Zhang Jue in the Moss Roberts' English translation of the Romance of the Three Kingdoms) and his two younger brothers Zhang Bao and Zhang Liang, who were born in the Ju Lu district of the Ye Prefecture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m