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Encyclopedia > Yazd

Yazd or Yezd (In Persian: یزد), is the capital of Yazd province, one of the most ancient and historic cities in Iran and a centre of Zoroastrian culture. The city is located some 175 miles southeast of Isfahan, at 31.92° North, 54.37° East. In 2005 it had an estimated population of 433,836 people.[1] In 2006 it had an estimated population of 505,037. [2]. Because of generations of adaptations to its desert surroundings, Yazd is an architecturally unique city. It is also known in Iran for the high quality handicrafts, especially silk weaving, and its sweets shops. This map was generated using GMT software (The Generic Mapping Tools). ... It has been suggested that Scripts used for Persian be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... Part of Shah Abbas large urban project in his new capital, the Chahār Bāgh Four Gardens, is a four-kilometer avenue in the city of Isfahan. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Silk dresses Silk is a natural protein fiber, some forms of which can be woven into textiles. ... Candy Store is a television commercial for MasterCard first airing in July 2005 and tied in with the 2005 film Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. ...

Contents

Geography and Climate

Yazd is situated at an oasis where the Dasht-e Kavir desert and the Dasht-e Lut desert meet (the city is sometimes called "the bride of the Kavir" because of its location), in a valley between Shir Kuh, the tallest mountain in the region at 4075 m. above sea level, and Kharaneq. The city itself is located at 1203 m. above sea-level, and covers 16,000 km². ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Dasht-e Kavir desert: satellite photograph Dasht-e Kavir (دشت كوير in Persian), also known as Kavir-e Namak or Great Salt Desert is a large desert lying in the middle of the Iranian Plateau. ... As seen from space Dasht-e Lut is a large salt desert in southeastern Iran. ... Shir Kuh or Shirkuh (in Persian: شيركوه) (literaly: The lion mountain) is a 4075m high mountain in central Iran, in Yazd province, beside the city of Yazd. ...


According to the administrative division rules, the Yazd province is divided into 10 districts, each includes at least one town and a number of villages. These districts are: Abarkuh, Ardakan, Bafq, Khatam, Maybod, Mehriz, Tabas, Sadough, Taft and Yazd.


The climate is generally very dry, with cold winters and hot summers. The temperature tends to fluctuate dramatically, even between night and day, but especially summer to winter. Temperatures of 40 °C in the summer and -20 °C in the winter have been recorded.


History

The city has a 3000 year long history, dating back to the time of the Median empire, when it was known as Ysatis (or Issatis). The present city name, however, may have been derived from Yazdegerd I, a Sassanid ruler. The city was definitely a Zoroastrian centre during Sassanid times. After the Islamic conquest of Persia, many Zoroastrians fled to Yazd from neighbouring provinces. The city remained Zoroastrian even after the conquest by paying a levy, and only gradually did Islam come to be the dominant religion in the city This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Yazdegerd I (made by God Izdigerdes), king of Persia, son of Shapur III, 399-420, called the sinner by the Persians. ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Islamic conquest of Afghanistan. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ...

Because of its remote desert location and the difficulty of approach, Yazd had remained largely immune to large battles and the destruction and ravages of war. For instance, it was a haven for those fleeing from destruction in other parts of Persia during the invasion of Genghis Khan. It was visited by Marco Polo in 1272 who remarked on the city's fine silk weaving industry. It briefly served as the capital of the Muzaffarid Dynasty in the 14th century, and was sieged unsuccessfully in 1350–1351 by the Injuids under Shaikh Abu Ishaq. The Friday (or Congregation) Mosque, arguably the city's greatest architectural landmark, as well as other important buildings date to this period. During the Qajar dynasty (18th Century AD) it was ruled by the Bakhtiari Khans. The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... For other uses, see Genghis Khan (disambiguation). ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254 – January 8, 1324) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... The Muzaffarids were a Sunni Arab family that came to power in Iran following the breakup of the Ilkhanate in the 14th century. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... The House of Inju (Injuids or Injuids) was a Sunni dynasty that came to rule over Shiraz and Isfahan during the 14th century. ... The Qajar dynasty ( ) (Persian: ‎ - or دودمان قاجار - Qâjâr) was the ruling family of Persia from 1781 to 1925. ... The Bakhtiari (or Bakhtiyari) are a group of southwestern Iranian people. ...


Architecture and Heritage

Yazd has some of the finest examples of traditional desert Persian residential architecture.
Yazd has some of the finest examples of traditional desert Persian residential architecture.

Yazd is of foremost importance as a centre of Persian architecture. Because of its climate, it has one of the largest networks of qanats in the world, and Yazdi qanat makers are considered the most skilled in Iran. To deal with the extremely hot summers, many old buildings in Yazd have magnificent windcatchers, and large underground areas. The city is also home to prime examples of yakhchals, the latter of which were used to store ice retrieved from glaciers the nearby mountains. Yazd is also one of the largest cities built almost entirely out of adobe. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1392 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yazd Traditional Persian residential architecture Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Asia/Iran/Iran/Culture/Architecture Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1392 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Yazd Traditional Persian residential architecture Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Asia/Iran/Iran/Culture/Architecture Metadata This file... Traditional Persian residential architecture, is the architecture employed by builders and craftsmen in the cultural Greater Iran and the surrounding regions to construct vernacular houses. ... The Baháí House of Worship by Fariborz Sahba, also known as the Lotus Temple. ... A qanat (from Persian: ‎) or kareez (from Persian: ‎) is a water management system used to provide a reliable supply of water to human settlements or for irrigation in hot, arid and semi-arid climates. ... A windcatcher (Badgir; بادگیر) is a traditional Persian architectural device used for many centuries to create natural ventilation in buildings. ... Yakh-chal A yakh-chāl is an ancient natural refrigerator. ... Renewal of the surface coating of an adobe wall in Chamisal, New Mexico Adobe is a natural building material composed of sand, sandy clay and straw or other organic materials, which is shaped into bricks using wooden frames and dried in the sun. ...


Yazd's heritage as a centre of Zoroastrianism is also important. There is a Tower of Silence on the outskirts, and the city itself has a Fire Temple, which holds a fire that has been kept alight continuously since 470 AD. Presently, Zoroastrians make up a significant minority of the population, around 20 - 40,000 or 5 to 10%. One of the two Towers of Silence no longer in use on the outskirts of the city of Yazd, Iran. ... The Yazd Atash Behram A Fire Temple (also Dar-e Mihr, or Atash Kadeh in Iran, Agiary in India, and various names in North America) is a place of worship for Zoroastrians. ...


Yazd today

Always known for the quality of its silk and carpets, Yazd today is one of Iran's industrial centers for textiles. There is also a considerable ceramics and construction materials industry and unique confectionery and jewelry industries. A significant portion of the population is also employed in other industries including agriculture, dairy, metal works and machine manufacturing. There are a number of companies involved in the growing information technology industry, mainly manufacturing primary materials such as cables and connectors. Currently Yazd is the home of the largest manufacturer of fibre optics in Iran.


Yazd's confectioneries have a tremendous following throughout Iran, which has been a source of tourism for the city. Workshops (experts or khalifehs) keep their recipes a guarded secret and there are many that have remained a private family business for many generations. Baghlava, ghotab and pashmak are the most popular sweets made in the city. Baklava is prepared on large trays and cut into a variety of shapes Baklava or Baklawa is a rich, sweet pastry featured in many cuisines of the Middle East and the Balkans (i. ... Ghotab is a Persian pastry made of flour, almond, powdered sugar, vegetable oil, and cardamom. ... Pashmak is a type of Persian candy floss / cotton candy made from sesame oil and sugar. ...


In 2000 the Yazd Water Museum opened;[3] it features exhibits of water storage vessels and historical technologies related to water.


Famous people from Yazd

The medieval Takyeh Amir Chakhmagh, Yazd.
The medieval Takyeh Amir Chakhmagh, Yazd.

he is husband of khatami's sister and Imam Jum'a in Yazd Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1151 KB) Tekiyeh Amir Chagh magh in Yazd, Iran. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1151 KB) Tekiyeh Amir Chagh magh in Yazd, Iran. ... Mohammad Khatami (Persian : سید محمد خاتمی Seyyed Moḥammad KhātamÄ«), born on September 29, 1943, in Ardakan city of Yazd province, is an Iranian intellectual, philosopher and political figure. ... Mohammad Reza Aref (محمدرضا عارف) (born 1941 in Yazd) is an Iranian (Persian) politician and university professor. ... Mirza Mohammad Farrokhi Yazdi (1887-1939) was a Persian/Iranian poet and senior politician of the Reza Pahlavi era. ... Saeed Mortazavi (سعید مرتضوی in Persian) is as of 2003 the general prosecutor of Tehran. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Seyed Mehdi K. Ezzabady ,Scientist,Researcher,Inventor.
  • Mohammad Jafar Pouyandeh, Iranian dissident murdered in 1998.
  • Farhad Mortaz, Iranian social activist.
  • Mohammad Ali Riazi Yazdi, contemporary poet.sarah azhar
  • Moshe Katsav, former president of Israel, was originally from Yazd.

Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Moshe Katsav (Hebrew: , originally Mussa Ghassäb Persian: ; born December 5, 1945) is the eighth and current President of Israel (since 2000). ...

Higher education in Yazd

The University of Yazd was established in 1988. It has a college of Architecture specializing in traditional Persian Art and Architecture. Yazd and its nearby towns contain the following institutes of higher education: University of Yazd is an Iranian university in the city of Yazd in Yazd Province of Iran. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...

University of Yazd is an Iranian university in the city of Yazd in Yazd Province of Iran. ... Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, is a medical school in Yazd Province of Iran. ...

Sister cities

Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... The main church in the center of Jaszberény The horn of Lehel kept in Jászberény Jászberény is a city and market centre in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok county in Hungary. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Yazd

Coordinates: 31°54′N, 54°22′E Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Iranian Cities: Yazd (711 words)
Yazd was visited by Marco Polo in 1272, who described it as a good and noble city and remarked its silk production.
For a brief period, Yazd was the capital of Atabakan and Mozaffarid dynasties (14th Century A.D.).
The city of Yazd is located in the eastern part of central Iran situated on the high, desert plateau that forms much of the country.
Yazd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (942 words)
Yazd or Yezd (In Persian: یزد), is the capital of Yazd province, one of the most ancient and historic cities in Iran and a centre of Zoroastrian culture.
Yazd is of foremost importance as a centre of Persian architecture.
The University of Yazd was established in 1988.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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