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History of Japan ImageMetadata File history File links Satsuma-samurai-during-boshin-war-period. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ...

Glossary The Japanese Paleolithic ) covers a period from around 100,000 [citation needed] to 30,000 BCE, when the earliest stone tool implements have been found, to around 12,000 BCE, at the end of the last Ice-age, which corresponds to the beginning of the Mesolithic Jomon Period. ... Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ... The Heian period (Japanese: 平安時代, Heian-jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185. ... The Kamakura period (Japanese: 鎌倉時代, Kamakura-jidai; 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance of the Kamakura Shogunate; officially established in 1192 by the first Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. ... The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD. It marks the three year period between the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate, when Emperor Go-Daigo attempted to re-established Imperial control (but... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... The Nanboku-cho period (Japanese: 南北朝時代, nanbokuchō-jidai, South and North courts period), also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period, spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the early years of the Muromachi period of Japans history. ... The Sengoku period (Japanese: 戦国時代, Sengoku-jidai) or Warring States period, was a period of civil war in the history of Japan that spans from the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries. ... The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... The Nanban Trade Period (Jp:南蛮貿易時代, Lit. ... The Edo period (Japanese: 江戸時代, Edo-jidai), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1867. ... 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To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At the end of the Second World War, Japan was occupied by the Allied Powers. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Following the end of the Allied occupation in 1952... It has been suggested that Updated Japan News be merged into this article or section. ... The Economic history of Japan is one of the most studied for its spectacular growth, first in the period from the late nineteenth century that saw Japan become a world power and then again after the devastation of the Second World War when the island nation rose to become the... The history of education in Japan dates back at least to the sixth century, when Chinese learning was introduced at the Yamato court. ... The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of feudal wars, followed by domestic stability, and then foreign conquest. ... The naval history of Japan traces back to early interactions with states on the Asian continent at the beginning of the medieval period, and reached a peak of activity during the 16th and 17th century at a time of cultural exchange with European powers during the Nanban trade period. ... This is the glossary of Japanese history including historical figures, events, places, policies and others. ...

The Yayoi period (弥生時代 Yayoi-jidai?) is an era in the history of Japan from about 300 BC to 250 AD. It is named after the section of Tokyo where archaeological findings first uncovered artifacts from that era. Depending upon the source, the Yayoi period is marked by the start of the practice of growing rice in a paddy field or a new style of pottery. Following the Jomon period (10,000 BC to 300 BC), Yayoi culture flourished from southern Kyushu to northern Honshu. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 350s BC 340s BC 330s BC 320s BC 310s BC - 300s BC - 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC Years: 305 BC 304 BC 303 BC 302 BC 301 BC - 300 BC - 299 BC 298 BC... Events By Place Roman Empire A group of Franks penetrate as far as Tarragona in Spain (approximate date). ... Tokyo , literally eastern capital) is the capital of Japan and one of the 47 prefectures of Japan. ... The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the islands with the mainland. ... (Redirected from 10000 BC) (Pleistocene, Paleolithic – 10th millennium BC – 9th millennium BC – other millennia) Beginning of the Mesolithic, or Epipaleolithic time period, which is the first part of the Holocene epoch. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyÅ«shÅ«) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... todo mal de [ [ Shikoku ] ] a través del [ [ mar interior ] ], y noreste de [ [ Kyushu ] ] a través del [ [ estrecho de Kanmon ] ]. Es la séptima isla más grande, y la segunda isla populosa en el mundo después de [ [ Java (isla)|Java ] ] (véase [ [ lista de las islas de...


Recent discoveries, however, suggest that the Yayoi period may have started as early as 900 BC. Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 950s BC 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC - 900s BC - 890s BC 880s BC 870s BC 860s BC 850s BC Events and Trends 909 BC - Zhou xiao wang becomes King of the Zhou Dynasty of China. ...

Contents


Features of Yayoi Culture

A Yayoi jar, 1st-3rd century, excavated in Kugahara, Ōta-ku, Tokyo, Tokyo National Museum.
A Yayoi jar, 1st-3rd century, excavated in Kugahara, Ōta-ku, Tokyo, Tokyo National Museum.

The earliest Yayoi people are believed to have first emerged in northern Kyushu, later moving on to the main island of Honshu, where they largely displaced the native Jōmon, though there was some mixing of the two distinct genetic stocks. Although Yayoi pottery was technologically advanced compared to that of the Jōmon (being produced on a potter's wheel), it was more simply decorated. The Yayoi also made bronze ceremonial bells, mirrors, and weapons. By the 1st century A.D., they began using iron agricultural tools and weapons. Yayoi Jar (1-3rd century), Tokyo national Museum. ... Yayoi Jar (1-3rd century), Tokyo national Museum. ... ÅŒta (Japanese: 大田区 -ku) is one of the 23 special wards of Tokyo, Japan. ... The Tokyo National Museum. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Classic potters kick-wheel at Erfurt, Germany The potters wheel, also known as the potters lathe, is a machine used in the shaping of round ceramic wares. ... Assorted ancient bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Atomic mass 55. ...


The Yayoi population increased and their society became more complex. They wove cloth, lived in permanent farming villages, constructed buildings of wood and stone, accumulated wealth through land ownership and the storage of grain, and developed distinct social classes. This was possible due to the introduction of an irrigated, wet-rice culture from the Yangtze estuary in southern China. Until recent it used to be insisted that rice came from Korea, which was denied as DNA of the Japanese rice spieces was found labor, which led to the development and eventual growth of a sedentary, agrarian society in Japan. However, unlike in Korea or China, local political and social developments in Japan were more important than the activities of the central authority with a stratified society. Afternoon light on the jagged grey mountains rising from the Yangtze River gorge The Yangtze River or Chang Jiang is the longest river in Asia and the third longest in the world after the Nile in Africa and the Amazon in South America. ...


Yayoi in Chinese History

The earliest written records about people in Japan are from Chinese sources from this period. Wa (倭), the Japanese pronunciation of an early Chinese name for Japan, was mentioned in 57 CE; the Na state of Wa received a golden seal from the Emperor of the Later Han Dynasty. This was recorded in the Book of Later Han (Hou-Han Shu). The seal itself was discovered in northern Kyushu in the 18th century.[1] Wa was also mentioned in 257 in the Wei zhi (The Records of Wei), a section of the San Guo Zhi, a Chinese historical record. Ideogram for Wa, formed by the radical for person (on the left), and the phonetic element Wa on the right (itself represented by a rice plant in the upper part and a woman in the lower part). ... For other uses, see number 57. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... The Book of Later Han (Chinese:后汉书) is one of the official Chinese historical works which was compiled by Fan Ye in the 5th century, using a number of earlier histories and documents as sources. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyÅ«shÅ«) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Events Pope Sixtus II succeeds Pope Stephen I Births Saint Gregory the Illuminator, founder and patron saint of the Armenian Church (approximate date) Deaths Pope Stephen I Categories: 257 ... The Sānguó Zhì (Chinese 三國志, or 三國誌), variously translated as Chronicle of the Three Kingdoms, Records of the Three States and Records of the Three Kingdoms was the official and authoritative historical text compiled by Chen Shou during the Chinese Jin Dynasty (265-420... The history of China is detailed by historical records dating as far back as 16th century BC. China is one of the worlds oldest continuous civilizations. ...


Early Chinese historians described Wa as a land of hundreds of scattered tribal communities, not the unified land with a 700-year tradition as laid out in the 8th-century work Nihongi, a part-mythical, part-historical account of Japan which dates the foundation of the country at 660 BC. Third century Chinese sources reported that the Wa people lived on raw fish, vegetables, and rice served on bamboo and wooden trays, clapped their hands in worship (something still done in Shinto shrines today), and built earthen grave mounds. They also maintained vassal-master relations, collected taxes, had provincial granaries and markets, and observed mourning. Society was characterized by violent struggles. Nihonshoki (日本書紀) is the second oldest history book about the ancient history of Japan. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC Events and Trends 668 BC - Egypt revolts against Assyria 668 BC - Assurbanipal succeeds Esarhaddon as king of... A torii is a gate leading to a jinja. ...


A woman, known as Himiko in Japanese, ruled an early political federation known as Yamatai, which flourished during the 3rd century. While Himiko reigned as spiritual leader, her younger brother carried out affairs of state, which included diplomatic relations with the court of the Chinese Kingdom of Wei (220265). Himiko (jp: 卑弥呼; c. ... Yamataikoku (邪馬台国) was an ancient country in Japan, recorded in an old Chinese history book, Gishiwajinden. ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... The Kingdom of Wei (ch. ... Events Han Xiandi abdicates his throne to Cao Pi, symbolizing the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Events Wei Yuandi abdicates, end of the China. ...


When asked of their origins by the Wei embassy, the people of Wa claimed to be descendants of King Taibo of Wu, a historic figure who founded the first Wu Kingdom (吳國) around the Yangtze Delta of China. (Original Chinese from the Records of Wei: 「倭人自謂太伯之後」.) but then his butt melted. Wu (吳) is a region in the Jiang Nan area (the south of Yangtze River), surrounding Suzhou, in Jiangsu province of China. ... Wu was a state during the Spring and Autumn Period in China. ... The Yangzi Delta generally comprises the triangular-shaped territory of Shanghai, southern Jiangsu province and northern Zhejiang province. ...


The Origin of Yayoi Culture

The Origin of Yayoi Culture has long been debated and there are several major theories as shown below.


Yayoi culture was brought to Japan by migrants from Korean peninsula

A theory publicized in the early Meiji period argued that the Yayoi culture was brought to Japan by migrants from Korean peninsula . Some, however, contest whether these migrants constitute modern day Koreans. Nevertheless, many Western and Japanese scholars have concluded that archaeological findings from the Yayoi period "clearly derive from Korean peninsula". These include "bunded paddy fields, new types of polished stone tools, wooden farming implements, iron tools, weaving technology, ceramic storage jars, exterior bonding of clay coils in pottery fabrication, ditched settlements, domesticated pigs, jawbone rituals, and megalithic (keyhole) tombs."- Mark J. Hudson (1999). Ruins of Identity Ethnogenesis in the Japanese Islands. University Hawai'i Press. 0-8248-2156-4.


This theory also gains strength due to the fact that Yayoi culture began on the north coast of Kyushu, where Japan is closest to Korean peninsula. Yayoi pottery, burial mounds, food preservation was discovered to be very similar to the pottery of southern Korea. In addition, there was a significant Japanese population in southern Korea (Gaya) around 300 A.D., with both nations today claiming the other was a vassal. In addition, "[m]any other elements of the new Yayoi culture were unmistakably Korean peninsula and previously foreign to Japan, including bronze objects, weaving, glass beads, and styles of tools and houses." [2] Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyūshū) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms that existed in the Nakdong River valley of Korea during the Three Kingdoms era. ...


However, some argue that the increase of roughly 4 million people in Japan between the Jōmon and Yayoi periods cannot be explained by migration alone. They attribute the increase primarily to a shift from a hunter-gatherer to an agricultural diet on the islands, with the introduction of rice. It is quite likely that rice cultivation and its subsequent deification (see Inari) allowed for mass population increase. The name may refer to one of the folloing. ...


Regardless, archaeological evidence supports a mass influx of farmers from Korean peninsula to Japan, overwhelming the native hunter-gatherer population. Direct comparisons between Jomon and Yayoi skeletons show that the two peoples are noticeably distinguishable. The Jomon tended to be shorter, with relatively longer forearms and lower legs, more wide-set eyes, shorter and wider faces, and much more pronounced facial topography. They also have strikingly raised browridges, noses, and nose bridges. Yayoi people, on the other hand, averaged an inch or two taller, with close-set eyes, high and narrow faces, and flat browridges and noses. By the Kofun period, almost all skeletons excavated in Japan, except those of the Ainu and Okinawans, resemble those of modern day Japanese and Koreans. [3]. Daisenryo Kofun,the tomb of Emperor Nintoku,Osaka,5th century. ...


Genetic evidence also supports this theory. The Ainu are believed to be descendants of the Jomon people, with some intermingling of genes from Yayoi colonists.


Yayoi culture was brought to Japan by migrants from China

The emergence of the Yayoi culture was sudden. The Yayoi culture was very advanced compared to the Jomon-period culture it replaced. It introduced skills to Japan such as the manufacturing of bronze and copper weapons, bronze mirrors, bells, as well as irrigated paddy rice cultivation. The most notable fact that lends evidence to this claim is that three major symbols of the Yayoi Culture - the bronze mirror, the sword, and the royal seal stone - are exactly the same symbols used by Qin dynasty China. [4] Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ... The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: 秦朝; Pinyin: Qín Cháo; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded by the Zhou Dynasty and followed by the Han Dynasty in China. ...


In recent years, more archaelogical and genetic evidence have been found in both eastern China and western Japan to lend credibility to this argument. Between 1996 and 1999, a team led by Satoshi Yamaguchi, a researcher at Japan's National Science Museum, compared Yayoi remains found in Japan's Yamaguchi and Fukuoka prefectures with those from early Han Dynasty (202 B.C.-8) in China's coastal Jiangsu province, and found many similarities between the skulls and limbs of Yayoi people and the Jiangsu remains. Two Jiangsu skulls showed spots where the front teeth had been pulled, a practice common in Japan in the Yayoi and preceding Jomon period. The genetic samples from three of the 36 Jiangsu skeletons also matched part of the DNA base arrangements of samples from the Yayoi remains. This finding, according to the Japanese team of scientists, suggests that some of the first wet-rice farmers in Japan might have migrated from the lower basin of China's Yangtze River more than 2,000 years ago. [5] 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Steam locomotive in front of the National Science Museum. ... Yamaguchi Prefecture (山口県 Yamaguchi-ken) is located in the Chugoku region on Honshu island, Japan. ... Fukuoka Prefecture ) is located on Kyushu Island, Japan. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 3rd century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC - 200s BC - 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 207 BC 206 BC 205 BC 204 BC 203 BC - 202 BC - 201 BC 200 BC 199 BC 198 BC 197 BC Events October...   This article is about the year 8. ... Jiangsu (Simplified Chinese: 江苏; Traditional Chinese: 江蘇; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang-su; Postal System Pinyin: Kiangsu) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the east coast of the country. ... Afternoon light on the jagged grey mountains rising from the Yangtze River gorge The Yangtze River or Chang Jiang is the longest river in Asia and the third longest in the world after the Nile in Africa and the Amazon in South America. ...


This information appears to confirm historical Chinese accounts that when the Wei Dynasty sent an embassy to Yayoi Japan, the people there claimed to be descendants of King Taibo (太伯) of Wu (呉), a coastal region on the Yangtze Delta that includes present-day Jiangsu, Shanghai and Zhejiang. The Northern Wei Dynasty (北魏 386-534) is most noted for the unification of northern China in 440, it was also heavily involved in funding the arts and many antiques and art works from this period have survived. ... Wu was a state during the Spring and Autumn Period in China. ... The Yangzi Delta generally comprises the triangular-shaped territory of Shanghai, southern Jiangsu province and northern Zhejiang province. ... Jiangsu (Simplified Chinese: 江苏; Traditional Chinese: 江蘇; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chiang-su; Postal System Pinyin: Kiangsu) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China, located along the east coast of the country. ... Shanghai (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Shanghainese: ), stuated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta in East China, is the largest city of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Zhejiang (Chinese: 浙江; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Che-chiang; Postal System Pinyin: Chehkiang or Chekiang) is an eastern coastal province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Yayoi culture was created by the mixing of the native Jomon and immigrants from China and/or Korea

Some pieces of Yayoi pottery clearly show the influence of Jomon ceramics. In addition, the Yayoi lived in the same kind of pit-type or circular dwellings as that of the Jomon. Other examples of commonality are chipped stone tools for hunting, bone tools for fishing, bracelets made from shells, and lacquer skills for vessels and accessories. The National Science Museum of Japan once held an exhibition named "Long Journey to Prehistorical Japan" which theorized that the Yayoi came from southern China because bones resembling theirs were discovered there. [6]


Yayoi culture emerged out of the Jomon culture with only limited immigration from China and/or Korea

Building at a Yayoi settlement (reconstructed)
Building at a Yayoi settlement (reconstructed)

The practice of rice farming that was once believed to have been passed on from China through Korea is instead thought to have been passed from southern China by way of Okinawa, continuing into southern Korea. The different physical types of people living in Japan today can be explained by changes in diet and way of life. The fact that the Japanese are a relatively homogenous people (with the exception of the Ainu and Okinawans) suggests that the bulk of Japanese did not originate from China. Although this last theory is comforting for the undoubtedly large numbers of Japanese who would prefer not to believe that they share significant genetic material with their Asian neighbors, it is the theory least ascribed to by modern day professional anthropologists specializing in Japanese anthropology. [7]. This photo shows buildings reconstructed on the site of the Yoshinogari remains of the Yayoi period of Japanese history. ... This photo shows buildings reconstructed on the site of the Yoshinogari remains of the Yayoi period of Japanese history. ... This article is about the prefecture. ... The Ainu IPA: /ˈajnu/) are an ethnic group indigenous to Hokkaido and north of Honshu in Northern Japan, the Kuril Islands, much of Sakhalin, and the southernmost third of the Kamchatka peninsula. ... Ryukyuan people (Japanese: 琉球民族, of which Okinawans, Miyako people, and Yaeyama people are subgroups), are the indigenous people of the Ryukyu Islands of southern Japan, located between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan. ...


End and legacy

The next archeological period in Japan is called the Kofun period, which is the first part of the Yamato period. Yayoi society developed into a society with a dominant military aristocracy and patriarchally-led clans, characteristic of the Kofun era. This change was quite possibly facilitated by immigration from the mainland. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ...


A recent study

A new study used the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry method to analyze carbonized remains on pottery and wooden stakes, and discovered that these were dated back to 900800 BC, nearly 500 years earlier than previously believed. These artifacts came from the northern region of Kyushu, and to further confirm this finding, artifacts from Korea and Jomon earthenware from the Tohoku region of the same time period as the initial study were compared with the same results. Another researcher used other artifacts from similar Yayoi period sites and found that these were dated back to 400500 BC. Mass spectrometry is a technique for separating ions by their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios. ... Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 950s BC 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC - 900s BC - 890s BC 880s BC 870s BC 860s BC 850s BC Events and Trends 909 BC - Zhou xiao wang becomes King of the Zhou Dynasty of China. ... Centuries: 10th century BC - 9th century BC - 8th century BC Decades: 850s BC 840s BC 830s BC 820s BC 810s BC - 800s BC - 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC 750s BC Events and Trends 804 BC - Hadad-nirari IV of Assyria conquers Damascus. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyūshū) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... Tohoku region, Japan The Tōhoku region (東北地方; Tōhoku-chihō) is a geographical area of Japan. ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 405 BC 404 BC 403 BC 402 BC 401 BC - 400 BC - 399 BC 398 BC... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created...


See also

The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Mumun Pottery Period (Hanja: 無文土器時代, Hangeul: 무문토기시대 Mumun togi sidae) is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory that dates to approximately 1500-300 B.C. (Ahn 2000; Bale 2001; Crawford and Lee 2003). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

< Jomon | History of Japan | Kofun period > Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the islands with the mainland. ... The written history of Japan began with brief appearances in Chinese history texts from the first century CE. However, archaeological research indicates that people were living on the islands of Japan as early as the upper paleolithic period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Yayoi (394 words)
Yayoi (弥生時代) is an era in Japan from 300 BC to A.D. It is named after the section of Tokyo where archaeological investigations uncovered its trace.
The Yayoi made bronze ceremonial nonfunctional bells, mirrors, and weapons and, by the 1st century A.D., iron agricultural tools and weapons.
Wa (the Japanese pronunciation of an early Chinese name for Japan) was first mentioned in A.D. Early Chinese historians described Wa as a land of hundreds of scattered tribal communities, not the unified land with a 700-year tradition as laid out in the Nihongi[?], which puts the foundation of Japan at 660 BC.
Ancient Japan (4157 words)
The appearance of large settlements from the middle period onward has been interpreted by some scholars as implying the cultivation of certain types of crop--a hypothesis seemingly supported by the fact that the chipped-stone axes of this period are not sharp but seem to have been used for digging soil.
The new Yayoi culture that arose in Kyushu, while the Jomon culture was still undergoing development elsewhere, spread gradually eastward, overwhelming the Jomon culture as it went, until it reached the northern districts of Honshu (the largest island of Japan).
Yayoi culture undoubtedly represents an admixture of new sanguineous elements, but it seems likely that the chief strain of proto-Japanese found throughout the country during the Jomon period was not disrupted but was carried over into later ages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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