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Encyclopedia > Yat (New Orleans)

Yat refers to a unique collection of dialects of English spoken in New Orleans, Louisiana. The term also refers to those people who speak with a Yat accent. The name comes from the common use amongst said people of the greeting, "Where y'at?" (Where you at?), which is a way of asking, "How are you?" The Yat dialect sounds similar to that of Brooklyn, New York, natives, with influences from Louisiana Creole French and Southern American English, particularly Older Southern American English. While the term Yat is usually reserved specifically for the strongest varieties of the New Orleans dialect within the city, the term often refers specifically to speakers of Yat, outside of the city proper, and around the rest of Louisiana, it is often used as a colloquial demonym for any person from New Orleans. A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... NOLA redirects here. ... The variety of the English language spoken in the New York City and North Jersey region is often considered to be one of the most recognizable accents within American English (Newman 2005). ... “NY” redirects here. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Southern American English as defined by the monophthongization of to before obstruents (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006:126). ... Southern American English as defined by the monophthongization of to before obstruents (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006:126). ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ...

Contents

History

The origins of the accent are described in A. J. Liebling's book, The Earl of Louisiana, in a passage that was used as a forward to John Kennedy Toole's well-known posthumous novel about New Orleans, A Confederacy of Dunces:[1] Abbott Joseph Liebling (October 18, 1904 – December 28, 1963) was an American journalist who was closely associated with The New Yorker from 1935 until his death. ... John Kennedy Toole (December 17, 1937 – March 26, 1969) was an American novelist, from New Orleans, Louisiana, best known for his novel A Confederacy of Dunces. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... A Confederacy of Dunces is a novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the authors suicide. ...

There is a New Orleans city accent . . . associated with downtown New Orleans, particularly with the German and Irish Third Ward, that is hard to distinguish from the accent of Hoboken, Jersey City, and Astoria, Long Island, where the Al Smith inflection, extinct in Manhattan, has taken refuge. The reason, as you might expect, is that the same stocks that brought the accent to Manhattan imposed it on New Orleans.[2]

Historically, New Orleans was home to people of French, Spanish, and African heritage, which led to the creation of the Louisiana Creole language. The city came under U.S. rule in the Louisiana Purchase, and over the course of the 19th century, the dominant language of New Orleans gradually became non-rhotic English. An influx of Irish, Italian, particularly Sicilian, and German immigrants during the 19th century, along with the city's geographic isolation, led to the creation of a new local dialect. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Map of New Jersey highlighting Hoboken Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ... The skyline of Jersey City, as seen from Lower New York Bay. ... Aerial view of the Triborough Bridge (left) and the Hell Gate Bridge (right) spanning Astoria Park and the Astoria Pool Astoria is a neighborhood in the northwestern corner of the borough of Queens in New York City. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Inflection of the Spanish lexeme for cat, with blue representing the masculine gender, pink representing the feminine gender, grey representing the form used for mixed-gender, and green representing the plural number. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... English pronunciation is divided into two main accent groups, the rhotic and non-rhotic, depending on when the phoneme (the letter r) is pronounced. ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ...


It is a common misconception that that the local dialect of New Orleans is Cajun. While certain Cajun words, such as jambalaya, have been incorporated into the vocabulary of Southern Louisiana, Cajun culture has had relatively little influence upon Yat. The confusion of the Cajun culture of Southern Louisiana with the Creole culture of New Orleans is largely due to the merging of these French cultures by the tourism industry. Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... Improvised looking bowl of jambalaya This article is about the food. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ...


A Yat accent is considered an identity marker of a person born and raised in the New Orleans Area. Speakers with a New Orleans Accent often find a sense of pride in having a local accent. When locals meet other locals with a noticeable accent, it is often paired by the seemingly personal questions of "What school did you go to?" (referring to High School) and "Are you Catholic?", as New Orleanians strongly identify with other speakers of this unique American dialect.


This distinctive accent is dying out generation by generation in the city but remains very strong in the surrounding Parishes. However, Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, and its resultant mass evacuation of New Orleans and other areas along the Mexican Gulf has further endangered the preservation of these dialects.[citation needed] This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active Atlantic hurricane season in recorded history, shattering previous records on repeated occasions. ...


Local Variance

The Yat dialect is the most pronounced version of the New Orleans Accent. Natives often speak with varying degrees of the Brooklyn-esque accent, ranging from a slight intonation to what is considered full Yat. As with all dialects, there is variance by local speakers due to geographic, ethnic, racial, and social factors. This results in many different levels of Yat throughout the city, marking distinct differences between higher-income people, lower-income whites, lower-income African-Americans, and Creoles. African-American varieties of the New Orleans accent have been significantly influenced by African American Vernacular English and Louisiana Creole French. Yat tends to differ in strength and intonation from neighborhood to neighborhood, regardless of race. The type, strength, and lexicon of the accent vary from section to section of the city and surrounding Parishes. Longtime New Orleans residents can often tell what New Orleans neighborhoods other residents are from by their accent. The term white American (often used interchangeably with Caucasian American[3] and within the United States simply white[4]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European, Middle Eastern, and North African descent residing in the United States. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... This article is about an ethnic culture in Louisiana, USA. For uses of the term Creole in other countries and cultures, see Creole (disambiguation). ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Speakers of this dialect originated in the Ninth Ward, as well as the Irish Channel and Mid-City. While some remain there, most have moved to the suburbs of St. Bernard Parish, such as Arabi, Chalmette, Meraux, and Violet, as well as to the suburbs of Jefferson Parish, such as Gretna, Marrero, and Westwego. Slighter intonations of the dialect can be heard throughout the city, and the suburbs of Metairie and Kenner. As with many sociolinguistic artifacts, the dialect is usually more distinct among older members of the population. The Ninth Ward or 9th Ward is a distinctive region of New Orleans, Louisiana that is located in the easternmost downriver portion of the city. ... Irish Channel is a neighborhood located in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Mid-City is a city-designated neighborhood in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. By this designation, it is roughly bounded by Broad Street, Interstate 10, Metairie Road, and Orleans Avenue. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... St. ... Arabi is an unincorporated community located in St. ... , The unincorporated community of Chalmette is the parish seat of St. ... Meraux, a census-designated place located in St. ... Violet is an unincorporated community located in St. ... Jefferson Parish is a parish in Louisiana that includes most of the suburbs of New Orleans. ... , Metairie (local pronunciations , ) is a suburb of New Orleans. ... Kenner is a suburb of New Orleans that has a population of 70,517 (census 2000). ... Sociolinguistics is the study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context, on the way language is used. ...


Linguistic features

Pronunciation

There are also numerous phonological differences between words pronounced in the dialect and their standard equivalents. This most often occurs in the form a stress-shift towards the front of a word (i.e. 'insurance', 'ambulance' as ['inʃuɻəns], ['æmbjə'læns]), or in the form of a change in vowel quality. Some of the most distinct features are:

  • the rounding and lowering in some cases of /a/ and /ɔ/ to [ɔʷ] (i.e., 'God,' 'on,' 'talk', become [gɔʷd], [ɔʷn], [tɔʷk])
  • the loss of rhoticization on syllables ending in /ɻ/ (i.e. 'heart,' fire' become [hɔʷt], ['fajə])
  • the full rhotacization of a syllable-internal /ɔj/ (i.e. 'toilet,' 'point' become ['tɝlɪt], [pɝnt]). This feature is more typical in men than in women.
  • the loss of frication in the interdental fricatives /θ/ and /ð/ (i.e. 'the,' 'there,' 'strength' become [də], ['dæə], [ʃtɻejnt])
  • the substitution of /ɪn/ or /ən/ (spelled -in, -en) for /ɪŋ/ (spelled -ing)
  • the split of the historic short-a class into tense [eə] and lax [æ] versions, as well as pronunciation of cot and caught as [kɑt] and [kɔt]
  • the coil-curl merger of the phonemes /ɔɪ/ and /ɝ/, creating the diphthong [ɜɪ], before a consonant, in words such as boil, oil, and spoil, although this feature has mostly receded, except in the 7th Ward and St. Bernard Parish

And then there are words which can be pronounced differently, yet according to no particular pattern: 'lunch' [lɝntʃ], 'corner' ['kɔʷndə], 'sink' [zink], 'orange' [ɝndʒ], 'room' [ɻʊm], 'mayonnaise' ['mejnæz], 'museum' [mju'zæm], 'ask' [æks], just to name a few examples.   In phonetics, an r-colored vowel or rhotacized vowel is a vowel either with the tip or blade of the tongue turned up during at least part of the articulation of the vowel (a retroflex articulation) or with the tip of the tongue down and the back of the tongue... Fricatives (or spirants) are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together. ... Note: This article deals sound changes involving English-language diphthongs. ...


New Orleans is pronounced [nə'wɔʷlɪnz], [nə'wɔʷlijənz] or with the /ɻ/ still intact. The 'Nawlins' [nɔlɪnz] of the tourist industry and the common [nuwɔɻ'linz] are not to be heard among natives. Louisiana is pronounced as the standard [lu'wiziænə] or a slightly reduced [lə'wiziænə], but never as ['luziænə]. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W...


Lexicon

  • Algerine or Algereen - a person from Algiers, New Orleans (Still common in Algiers, but now less common in other sections of the city except with older speakers)
  • Alligator Pear - an avocado
  • anyways - and, so; and, then
  • Arabian - a person from Arabi in St. Bernard Parish
  • Backatown - a section of the city of New Orleans located from the River River to North Claiborne Avenue
  • banquette - the sidewalk (by now rarely heard except from some elderly)
  • beignet - (IPA:['bɛnjej]) a type of French doughnut, it is fried and has a lot in common with the sopaipilla. Typically served with coffee or café-au-lait, they can be found at Cafe du Monde and other cafés throughout the city.
  • brake tag - an inspection sticker on your car
  • brah or bruh - common form of address for men, as in "Say brah," or "How ya do bruh?"
  • bobo - a wound or bruise
  • boo - A term of endearment, often used by parents and grandparents.
  • by [location] - to be at or in someplace; a replacement for "at" or "to" when referring to a destination or location
  • cap - "sir"; a form of address between men who are usually unacquainted; from "captain"
  • Chalmatian - someone from Chalmette in St. Bernard Parish
  • charmer - a female Yat
  • chief - a term of address used among men
  • cold drink - a soft drink
  • creole - this has come to be less of a specifically ethnic or linguistic term, but now is more of a general term applied to an item of New Orleans culture or cooking, such as creole tomatoes or creole seasoning
  • dawlin - a term used by women as a form of address, or by men towards women. Differs from the Deep South 'dahlin' in that the vowel is very rounded.
  • doubloon - a coin thrown out by Mardi Gras krewes
  • down da road - typically used in St. Bernard Parish, the term is used as travel direction for someone traveling to lower St. Bernard Parish on St. Bernard Highway (US Highway 46)
  • dressed - to have condiments on a Po-boy, burger, or any other sandwich; typically lettuce, tomatoes, mayonnaise, and sometimes pickles
  • esplanade - (IPA:['ɛsplənejd]) a walkway; also, the name of a major avenue (Esplanade Avenue])
  • faubourg - (IPA:['fabɔʷg]) a suburb or neighborhood, used in context of a particular area such as Faubourg Bouligny (This is no longer used as a common noun, but refers to neighborhoods, such as the Faubourg Marigny)
  • flying horses - a merry-go-round, or specifically the merry-go-round in City Park
  • fa sho or f'sure- for sure, a statement of agreement
  • fa true or f'true- for true, a statement of truth
  • for - used instead of the prepositions at or by when referring to time
  • Frontatown - the section of New Orleans from North Claiborne Avenue to North Broad St. to Bayou St. John
  • go cup - a paper or plastic cup for consuming alcoholic beverages on the go, usually in public
  • gout - French for "taste", usually in the context of coffee
  • grip - a small overnight bag, schoolbag, or suitcase
  • grippe - the flu
  • gris-gris - a Voodoo spell, either malicious or for protection (now rare other than in tourism pamphlets and some people who actually practice certain types of voodoo)
  • heart - identical in meaning and usage to dawlin', and also pronounced with a severely rounded vowel
  • hickey - a knot or bump on one's head
  • house coat 'n' curlas - many middle to lower class yat women wear a robe and have their hair in curlers while out shopping, especially for groceries
  • huck-a-bucks or huckle-bucks or cold cups - Frozen Kool-Aid in a Dixie cup
  • indicator - a turning signal on a car, also called a 'blinker'
  • inkpen - a ball-point or any type of pen
  • jambalaya - a rice-based Cajun dish
  • K&B Purple - the distinctive shade of purple used by the defunct New Orleans-based drug store, K&B
  • lagniappe - (IPA:['lænjæp]) a little something extra
  • locker - a closet
  • looka - imperative form of the verb "to look"
  • lookit da T.V. - to watch television
  • make dodo - sleep, or go to sleep; from the Cajun French "fais do do"
  • make groceries or makin' groceries - to go grocery shopping; this phrase probably originated from the French expression for grocery shopping, "faire le marché"
  • Mardi Gras - a city wide pre-Lenten celebration, literally "Fat Tuesday"
  • marraine - (IPA: [mə'ræn]) one's godmother
  • maw-maw - one's grandmother
  • mirliton - a chayote
  • mosquito hawk - a dragonfly
  • muffuletta - (IPA: [mʊfə'laɾə]) a famous Italian New Orleans sandwich, invented at Central Grocery
  • nanny or nannain - one's godmother, same a marraine
  • neutral ground - a street median
  • over by [location] - to be at or in someplace; a replacement for "at" or "to" when referring to a destination or location
  • paran - one's Godfather
  • parish - a state administrative district equivalent to a County (United States) in the rest of the United States; da parish usually refers specifically to St. Bernard Parish. Formerly in Uptown, "da parish" referred to Jefferson Parish.
  • parraine or parran - (IPA:[pə'ræn]) one's godfather
  • passion mark - a hickey
  • po-boy - (IPA:['pɔʷbɔj], ['poʷbɔj]) a New Orleans submarine sandwich, made on French bread in many varieties; some of the most popular are hot roast beef and fried shrimp
  • praline - (IPA:['prɔʷlin], ['pralin], never ['prejlin]) a New Orleans confection made with pecans, sugar syrup, and cream
  • regular coffee - coffee with sugar and milk; not black coffee
  • Schwegmann's bag or Schwegmann bag - a unit of measurement; refers to the large brown paper bags which extinct local New Orleans grocery chain Schwegmann Brothers Giant Supermarkets packed groceries
  • the show - the movies
  • snowball - a frozen treat similar to a sno-cone, but made of 'shaved ice' and not crushed ice. A snowball stand will have 30 or more flavors, not counting 'cream' flavors (contains evaporated milk mixed in).
  • to pass by - to stop and visit someplace, such as a person's house
  • shotgun house - a style of architecture found all over the city. In the French style of planning, plots of land along a river are long and thin, so the houses also came to be long and thin. A shotgun house typically has a living room followed by a bedroom followed by a kitchen followed by another bedroom.
  • suck the head, squeeze the tip or suck the head, squeeze the tail - a phrase that describes the local technique for eating crawfish
  • throw me somethin', mista! - the traditional phrase yelled out to passing floats during Mardi Gras
  • valise - a suitcase (used only by a few elderly people)
  • Violation - a person from Violet, Louisiana in St. Bernard Parish (not used in practice)
  • Where Y'at - the traditional New Orleans greeting; equivalent to "what's up?" or "how are you?"
  • Up da road - typically used in St. Bernard Parish, the term is used as travel direction for someone traveling to upper St. Bernard Parish on St. Bernard Highway (US Highway 46)
  • Wutzapnin - another New Orleans greeting derived from "What is happening?"
  • y'all - "you" (plural)
  • ya' boy / ya' girl - used to identify someone (any random person)
  • ya'mom'n'em* - "your mom and them" meaning your family
  • yeah, you right - New Orleans equivalent to "yes, I see your point"

Algiers is a community within the city of New Orleans. ... Binomial name Mill. ... Arabi is an unincorporated community located in St. ... St. ... A sopapilla is a kind of fried pastry or quick bread. ... Café au lait, literally coffee with milk, is a French coffee drink prepared by mixing coffee and scalded (not steamed) milk. ... The Caf du Monde is open 24 hours a day Caf du Monde is a famous coffee shop on Decatur Street in the French Quarter in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... , The unincorporated community of Chalmette is the parish seat of St. ... St. ... The term doubloon (from Spanish doblón, meaning double) refers to a gold coin minted in Spain, Mexico, Peru, or Nueva Granada. ... Esplanade Avenue is an important street in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Improvised looking bowl of jambalaya This article is about the food. ... K&B (Katz and Besthoff) was a local drug store chain in the New Orleans area. ... Binomial name (Jacq. ... Central Grocery, origin of the muffuletta. ... Central Grocery is a small grocery store with a sandwich counter located at 932 Decatur Street, in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The second proper album of Beth Orton, Central Reservation helped Orton build on the success of her debut Trailer Park. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A crawfish poboy. ... French-Bread (known as Watanabe Seisakujo prior to 2003) is a dojin soft company that specializes in 2D fighting games. ... The shotgun house is a type of house that was the most popular style in the American South from just after the Civil War until the 1920s. ... Violet is an unincorporated community located in St. ... St. ...

New Orleans accent in popular conception

The characters "Vic & Nat'ly" by local cartoonist Bunny Matthews are stereotypical Yats.
The characters "Vic & Nat'ly" by local cartoonist Bunny Matthews are stereotypical Yats.

The distinct New Orleans dialect has been depicted in many ways throughout the city and America. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1398, 1443 KB) New Orleans: Truck for local bakery, a locally well known supplier of po-boy bread, with advertising cartoon featuring the characters Vic & Natly by cartoonist Bunny Mathews. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1398, 1443 KB) New Orleans: Truck for local bakery, a locally well known supplier of po-boy bread, with advertising cartoon featuring the characters Vic & Natly by cartoonist Bunny Mathews. ...


The main character of the cartoon strip Krazy Kat spoke in a slightly exaggerated phonetically-rendered version of early-20th Century Yat; friends of the New Orleans-born cartoonist George Herriman recalled that he spoke with many of the same distinctive pronunciations. The protagonist is the central figure of a story, and is often referred to as a storys main character. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Krazy Kat is a comic strip created by George Herriman that appeared in U.S. newspapers between 1913 and 1944. ... Phonetic (pho-NET-ic) is a nationwide voicemail-to-text messaging service available for most digital mobile phones in which a subscriber is provided a custom voice mailbox for the purpose of receiving all incoming voice messages as actual transcribed text for reading via short messaging (also known as SMS... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... George Herriman and some of his fans. ... Look up pronunciation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Benny Grunch and the Bunch recorded an album known as the 12 Yats of Christmas, which is one of the truest expressions of Yat language and culture. The songs explain much of the local customs and traditions of New Orleans and the surrounding areas, but perhaps raise as many questions as they answer for outsiders, due to the fact that the lyrics are mostly in Yat. The local CBS affiliate, WWL-TV Channel 4 usually broadcasts videos of the songs during the Christmas holidays during their evening newscasts and via the station's website. An album or record album is a collection of related audio or music tracks distributed to the public. ... Culture (Culture from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate,) generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Custom has a number of meanings: A custom is a common practice among a group of people, especially depending on country, culture, time, and religion. ... A tradition is a story or a custom that is memorized and passed down from generation to generation, originally without the need for a writing system. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... It has been suggested that NewsWatch 15 be merged into this article or section. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... A newscast typically consists of the coverage of various news events and other information, either produced locally by a radio or television station, or by a broadcast network. ...


Actual New Orleans accents were long seldom heard nationally (New Orleanians who attained national prominence in the media often made an effort to tone down or eliminate the most distinctive local pronunciations). Movies and television shows set in New Orleans generally make the mistake of imbuing the characters with a generic "Southern" accent, a "Gone With the Wind" accent, or a Cajun accent (primarily heard in Southwest Louisiana, not in the city), much to the amusement or annoyance of New Orleanians. The national attention the city received from the disaster of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 gave many people from elsewhere in the nation a chance to hear people speaking with New Orleans accents for the first time. Cajuns are an ethnic group mainly living in Louisiana, consisting of the descendants of Acadian exiles and peoples of other ethnicities with whom the Acadians eventually intermarried on the semitropical frontier. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Toole, John Kennedy (1980). A Confederacy of Dunces. Baton Rouge: LSU.
  2. ^ Liebling, A. J. (1970). The Earl of Louisiana. Baton Rouge: LSU.

References

Abbott Joseph Liebling (October 18, 1904 – December 28, 1963) was an American journalist who was closely associated with The New Yorker from 1935 until his death. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Kennedy Toole (December 17, 1937 – March 26, 1969) was an American novelist, from New Orleans, Louisiana, best known for his novel A Confederacy of Dunces. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Orleans, Louisiana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7044 words)
New Orleans was founded by the French in 1718 and has played an important role in the history of the United States.
New Orleans is well known for its Creole culture and the persistence of Voodoo practice by a few of its residents, as well as for its music, food, architecture, and spirit of celebration.
The New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal is the central rail depot, and it is served by three trains: the Crescent to New York City, the City of New Orleans to Chicago, Illinois, and the Sunset Limited from Orlando to Los Angeles.
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The Port of New Orleans handles about 145 million short tons (132 tonnes) of cargo a year and is the largest faction of the Port of South Louisiana, the latter being the largest and busiest shipping port in the western hemisphere and the 4th busiest in the world.
New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal is the passenger rail center for the city, and it is served by three trains operated by Amtrak : the Crescent to New York City, the City of New Orleans to Chicago, and the Sunset Limited from Jacksonville to Los Angeles.
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