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Encyclopedia > Yarmulke
This article is part of the
hats and headgear series:
Overview of headgear
Hats; Bonnets; Caps
Hoods; Helmets; Wigs
Masks; Veils; Scarves
Tiaras; Papal tiaras
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List of hats and headgear

A yarmulke (also yarmulka, yarmelke) (Yiddish יאַרמלקע yarmlke) or Kippah (Hebrew "כִּפָּה" kippāh, plural kippot) is a thin, usually slightly rounded cloth cap worn by Jews. Yarmulkes range in size from 4" in diameter to 9 1/2" (100 mm to 240 mm) or larger. Headgear, headwear or headdress is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on ones head. ... For the H.A.T. TLAs, see HAT. There are many different styles of hats A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head – a kind of headgear. ... A bonnet is a kind of headgear which is usually brimless. ... The initialism CAP, when used by itself, can refer to: the Canadian Action Party the Civil Air Patrol Carrierless Amplitude Phase Modulation Catabolite Activator Protein Central Arizona Project Aqueduct Central Atlanta Progress ChildCare Action Project College of American Pathologists Combat Air Patrol Common Agricultural Policy, the European Unions agricultural... A hood is a kind of headgear. ... Pith helmet of Harry S. Truman A helmet is a form of protective clothing worn on the head and usually made of metal or some other hard substance, typically for protection from falling objects or high-speed collisions. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Masks in a Guatemalan Market Teen reading a book, while wearing a dinosaur mask A mask is a piece of material or kit worn on the face. ... Frances Perkins wearing a veil after the death of president Roosevelt Veils are articles of clothing, worn almost exclusively by women, which cover some part of the head or face. ... A woman wearing a knitted scarf A scarf is a piece of fabric, often long and narrow, usually worn on or near the head, for warmth, fashion, cleanliness, or religious purposes. ... Beauty pageant tiara A tiara (from Persian تاره tara borrowed by Latin as tiara) is a form of crown. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, in Latin as the Triregnum, or in Italian as the Triregno,[1] is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown of Byzantine and Persian origin that is the symbol of the papacy. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... Three distinct categories of crowns exist in those monarchies that use crowns or state regalia. ... This is an incomplete list of hats and headgear (that is, anything worn on the head), both modern and historical. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... A variety of fabric. ... The initialism CAP, when used by itself, can refer to: the Canadian Action Party the Civil Air Patrol Carrierless Amplitude Phase Modulation Catabolite Activator Protein Central Arizona Project Aqueduct Central Atlanta Progress ChildCare Action Project College of American Pathologists Combat Air Patrol Common Agricultural Policy, the European Unions agricultural...

Contents


Traditions

Traditionally the yarmulke was worn only by men (women covered their heads more completely with scarves, hats, or wigs), but in modern times the push for equality between the sexes in the practice of Judaism has led some non-Orthodox women to also wear yarmulkes. Some Jews wear yarmulkes only while praying, making blessings, or studying Jewish religious texts; more traditional Jews wear yarmulkes the entire day, making sure not to walk more than four cubits (about 2 metres) without a head covering, especially outside. A woman wearing a knitted scarf A scarf is a piece of fabric, often long and narrow, usually worn on or near the head, for warmth, fashion, cleanliness, or religious purposes. ... For the H.A.T. TLAs, see HAT. There are many different styles of hats A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head – a kind of headgear. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Judaism is the religious culture of the Jewish people. ... Orthodox Judaism is the oldest form of Judaism practiced by Jews. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with a God, or to some deity or deities, either to offer praise to the deity, to make a request of the deity, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions to the deity. ... Cubit is the name for any one of many units of measure used by various ancient peoples, based on the distance between the tip of the middle finger and the elbow on an average person or a similar forearm-based measurement. ...


Often, the color and fabric of the yarmulke can be a sign of adherence to a specific religious movement. The Israeli Religious Zionist community is often referred to by the name kippot srugot (Hebrew כיפות סרוגות), literally "woven yarmulkes," though they are typically crocheted. Similarly, some Haredi sects are referred to by the name kipot shkhorot (Hebrew כיפות שחורות), literally "black yarmulkes". Kippot shkhorot are usually sewn of black fabric and often made larger than kippot srugot, particularly those worn outside Israel. The Religious Zionist Movement, or Religious Zionism is an ideology combining Zionism and Judaism, which offers Zionism based on the principles of Jewish religion and heritage. ... The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... The word crochet is derived from the Middle French word croc or croche, meaning It describes the process of creating fabric from a length of cord, yarn, or thread with a hooked tool. ... Haredi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Judaism. ...


Etymology

Yarmulkes on sale in Jerusalem, June 2004
Yarmulkes on sale in Jerusalem, June 2004

The etymology of yarmulke is unclear. Some linguists (e.g. Max Vasmer) maintain that the Yiddish word is derived (via Ukrainian or Polish) from the Turkic yağmurluk, meaning 'rainwear'. Other linguists (e.g. Herbert Zeiden) regard this hypothesis as untenable but still believe a Turkic origin is likely, suggesting that the first part of the word may come from yarim, a Turkic adjective meaning 'half', while the second part may come from qap, a Turkic word for 'cap', 'shell', 'enclosure', or 'container'. Kippot on sale in the Jerusalem shuq, June 2004. ... Kippot on sale in the Jerusalem shuq, June 2004. ... Max Vasmer (1886 – 1962), German linguist. ... Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... The Turkic languages are a group of closely related languages that are spoken by a variety of people distributed across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China. ...


Traditionally, yarmulke is considered to have originated from the Aramaic phrase "yarei mei-elokah" (in awe of the Lord), or perhaps, "yira malkah" (fear of the King), in keeping with the principle that the yarmulke is supposed to reflect someone's fear of heaven. Aramaic is a Semitic language with a four-thousand year history. ...


In Hebrew, the word kippah means dome. The Modern Hebrew language is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family. ... St Peters Basilica, Rome A dome is a common structural element of architecture that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. ...


Purpose

Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik (1903-1993) of Yeshiva University (N.Y., USA) wearing a typical black cloth yarmulke on his head
Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik (1903-1993) of Yeshiva University (N.Y., USA) wearing a typical black cloth yarmulke on his head

The sources for wearing a yarmulke are found in the Talmud. In tractate Shabbat 156b it states Cover your head in order that the fear of heaven may be upon you. As well, in tractate Kiddushin 32a it states Rabbi Huna the son of Rabbi Joshua never walked 4 cubits (2 meters) with his head uncovered. He explained: "Because the Divine Presence (Shekhina) is always over my head." While there is a minority opinion that wearing a yarmulke is a Torah commandment, most halakhic decisors agree that it is merely a custom, though one that has taken on the force of law. This is codified in the Shulkhan Arukh Orach Chayim 2:6. A public photo of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... A public photo of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbÄ«; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbÄ«) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished,. In the ancient Judean schools the sages were addressed as רִבִּי (Ribbi or Rebbi... Joseph Ber (Yosef Dov) Soloveitchik (1903-1993) was an Orthodox rabbi, Talmudist and modern Jewish philosopher. ... Yeshiva University Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Shekinah (שכינה - alternative transliterations Shechinah, Shekhina, Shechina) is the English spelling of the Hebrew language word that means the glory or radiance of God, or God resting in his house or Tabernacle amongst his people. ... Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially law. It primarily refers to the first section of the Tanakh–the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, or the Five Books of Moses, but can also be used in the general sense to also include both the... Halakha (הלכה or Halakhah, Halacha, Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish rabbinic law, custom and tradition. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ...


Reasons given for wearing a kippah today include:

  • recognition that God is "above" us,
  • "acceptance" of the 613 mitzvot (commandments),
  • "identification" with the Jewish people.

Some have a custom of wearing two head coverings, typically a yarmulke and a hat on top, for Kabbalistic reasons; the two coverings correspond to two levels of intellect, or two levels in the fear of God. The High Priest of the Temple in Jerusalem, the Kohen Gadol, also used to wear a woolen kippa under his priestly hat.(B.T. Chulin 138a)[1] In Judaism there is a tradition that the Torah contains 613 mitzvot (Hebrew for commandments, from mitzvah - מצוה - precept, plural mitzvot; from צוה, tzavah- command). ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The tree of life. ... The position of a Kohens hands when he raises them to bless a Jewish congregation A Kohen (or Cohen, Hebrew priest, pl. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or the Holy Temple (Beit HaMikdash בית המקדש in Hebrew) was built in ancient Jerusalem and was the center of Israelite and Jewish worship, primarily for the offering of sacrifices known as the korbanot. ...


External links


Jewish life topics
Birth: Brit milah | Zeved habat (Simchat Bat) | Hebrew name | Redemption of First-born (Pidyon Haben)
Teenage: B'nai Mitzvah
Adult: Ablution in Judaism | Prayers and blessings
Marriage: Matchmaking | Jewish view of marriage | Role of women in Judaism | Niddah | Mikvah | Tzeniut
Judaism: Religious life | Observing the commandments | Torah study (Weekly Torah portion) | Talmud study (Daf Yomi) | Jewish holidays
Cultural: Israel | Immigration into Israel | Charity
Items of religious significance: Tzitzit | Tallit | Tefillin | Yarmulke-Kippa | Menorah
Death: Chevra kadisha | Shiv'ah | Kaddish | Yahrzeit edit

  Results from FactBites:
 
Yarmulke - Kippot - Judaica Guide (181 words)
A Yarmulke or Kippah (plural Kippot) is a thin, usually slightly rounded cloth cap worn by religious Jews on their heads.
The Yarmulke is the most commonly known and recognized piece of Jewish garb, but it is actually the one with the least religious significance.
The source for wearing a Yarmulke is found in the Talmud, where it is states "Cover your head in order that the fear of heaven may be upon you."
Yarmulke (599 words)
Satin kippah, suede kippah, moire kipah, velvet yarmulke and specialized yarmulke available for Wedding, Bar Mitzvah, Bat Mitzvah, Bris, 50th Wedding Anniversary, or any Simcha.
Moire yarmulke will provide an elegance to your celebration.
Please enter your inscription information in the box when ordering yarmulke.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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