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Encyclopedia > Yamato period

History of Japan ImageMetadata File history File links Satsuma-samurai-during-boshin-war-period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#History. ...

Glossary The Japanese Paleolithic ) covers a period from around 100,000 [citation needed] to 30,000 BCE, when the earliest stone tool implements have been found, to around 12,000 BCE, at the end of the last Ice-age, which corresponds to the beginning of the Mesolithic Jomon Period. ... Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Yayoi (弥生時代) is an era in... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ... The Heian period (Japanese: 平安時代, Heian-jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185. ... The Kamakura period (Japanese: 鎌倉時代, Kamakura-jidai; 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance of the Kamakura Shogunate; officially established in 1192 by the first Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. ... The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD. It marks the three year period between the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate, when Emperor Go-Daigo attempted to re-established Imperial control (but... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... The Nanboku-cho period (Japanese: 南北朝時代, nanbokuchō-jidai, South and North courts period), also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period, spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the early years of the Muromachi period of Japans history. ... The Sengoku period (Japanese: 戦国時代, Sengoku-jidai) or Warring States period, was a period of civil war in the history of Japan that spans from the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries. ... The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... The Nanban Trade Period (Jp:南蛮貿易時代, Lit. ... The Edo period (Japanese: 江戸時代, Edo-jidai), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1867. ... The Late Tokugawa Shogunate (Japanese: Bakumatsu) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. ... The Meiji period ) denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running from 8 September 1868 (in the Gregorian calendar, 23 October 1868) to 30 July 1912. ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... The Taishō period (Japanese: 大正時代, Taishō-jidai, period of great righteousness) is a period in the history of Japan dating from 30 July 1912 to 25 December 1926. ... Japan entered World War I in 1914, seizing the opportunity of Germanys distraction with the European War and wanting to expand its sphere of influence in China. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At the end of the Second World War, Japan was occupied by the Allied Powers. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Following the end of the Allied occupation in 1952... It has been suggested that Updated Japan News be merged into this article or section. ... The Economic history of Japan is one of the most studied for its spectacular growth, first in the period from the late nineteenth century that saw Japan become a world power and then again after the devastation of the Second World War when the island nation rose to become the... The history of education in Japan dates back at least to the sixth century, when Chinese learning was introduced at the Yamato court. ... The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of feudal wars, followed by domestic stability, and then foreign conquest. ... The naval history of Japan traces back to early interactions with states on the Asian continent at the beginning of the medieval period, and reached a peak of activity during the 16th and 17th century at a time of cultural exchange with European powers during the Nanban trade period. ... This is the glossary of Japanese history including historical figures, events, places, policies and others. ...

The Yamato period (大和時代 Yamato-jidai?) is the period of Japanese history when the Japanese Imperial court ruled from modern-day Nara Prefecture, then known as Yamato Province. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#History. ... Nara Prefecture (奈良県; Nara-ken) is part of the Kinki region on Honshu Island, Japan. ... Yamato (大和) is a province of Japan, which covers area of present Nara Prefecture. ...


While conventionally assigned to the period 250710 (Kofun period c 250-538, Asuka period 538-710), the actual start of Yamato rule is disputed. The Yamato court's supremacy was challenged throughout the Kofun period at least by another polity centred in the later Bizen and Bitchū provinces in what is now known as Okayama prefecture, and it was only into the 6th century that the Yamato clans could be said to have any major advantage over their neighbouring clans. Events Diophantus writes Arithmetica the first systematic treatise on algebra. ... // Events End of the Asuka period, the second and last part of the Yamato period and beginning of the Nara period in Japan. ... Events End of the Kofun era and beginning of the Asuka period, the second part of the Yamato period in Japan. ... Bizen (備前国 -no kuni) was a province of Japan on the Inland Sea side of Honshu, in what is today the southeastern part of Okayama Prefecture. ... Bitchu (備中国 -no kuni) was a province of Japan on the Inland Sea side of western Honshu, in what is today western Okayama Prefecture. ... Okayama Prefecture (岡山県; Okayama-ken) is located in the Chugoku region on Honshu island, Japan. ... The Yamato (大和) were the dominant peoples of ancient Japan, and the ancestors of most modern Japanese people. ...


This period is further divided, by the introduction of Buddhism, into Kofun and Asuka periods, a division that roughly corresponds also with the change of Yamato as one local chiefdom into the most important Japanese polity which directly dominated most Central Japan. Kofun period (Japanese: 古墳時代, Kofun-jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around AD 250 to 538. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ...


After the fall of Baekje (660 CE), the Yamato government sent envoys directly to the Chinese court, from which they obtained a great wealth of philosophical and social structure, also already in earlier centuries of the period. In addition to ethics of government, they also adopted the Chinese calendar and many of its religious practices, including Confucianism and Taoism (Japanese: Onmyo). Prince Shotoku prescribed a new constitution for Japan based on the Chinese model. Events Childeric II proclaimed king of Austrasia. ... The Chinese calendar (Traditional Chinese: 農曆; Simplified Chinese: 农历; pinyin: nónglì) is a lunisolar calendar incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... Confucianist temple Thian Hock Keng in Singapore Confucianism (Traditional Chinese: 儒學, Simplified Chinese: 儒学; pinyin: Rúxué [ ], literally The School of the Scholars; or, less accurately, 孔教 Kŏng jiào, The Religion of Confucius) is a Chinese ethical and philosophical system originally developed from the teachings of the early Chinese sage Confucius. ... Taoism (sometimes written as Daoism) is the English name for: (a) a philosophical school based on the texts the Tao Te Ching (ascribed to Laozi and alternately spelled Dào Dé Jīng) and the Zhuangzi. ... Onmyōdō (陰陽道, also Onyōdō) is a Chinese-influenced traditional Japanese cosmology, a mixture of natural science and occultism. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ...

Contents


Background of Yamato society and culture

A millennium earlier, the Japanese Archipelago had been inhabited by the hunter-gatherer Jomon people mostly or solely consisting of ancestors of Ainu (presumably Malayo-Polynesian peoples). In centuries prior to the beginning of the Yamato period, elements of the Northeast Asian, Chinese, and Korean civilization had been introduced to the Japanese Archipelago in waves of migration, these becoming the dominant population and driving the Malayo-Polynesian culture(s) to more remote parts of the archipelago. Rather certainly, they were the main ancestors of Yamato clans and culture. This view was popularized in Japan by Egami Namio's theory of a powerful horse-riding race from the north who brought about the dramatic change from Jomon to Yayoi culture (Yayoi period being the era that immediately preceded Kofun period). Archaeological evidence indicates contacts between the China, Korea, and Japan from a very early period, and its continuation also at least in the Kofun period. The Japanese Archipelago which forms the country of Japan extends from north to south along the eastern coast of the Eurasian Continent, the western shore of the Pacific Ocean. ... The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the islands with the mainland. ... The Ainu IPA: /ˈajnu/) are an ethnic group indigenous to Hokkaido and north of Honshu in Northern Japan, the Kuril Islands, much of Sakhalin, and the southernmost third of the Kamchatka peninsula. ... Manchuria (Manchu: Manju; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; Simplified Chinese: 满洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu, Russian: ) is a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ... The Japanese Archipelago which forms the country of Japan extends from north to south along the eastern coast of the Eurasian Continent, the western shore of the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about a Japanese historical era. ...


The rice-growing, politically fragmented Yayoi culture evolved to more centralized, patriarchal, militaristic Kofun period and Yamato society.


Kofun period

Main article: Kofun period

The Kofun period (古墳時代 Kofun-jidai?) is an era in the history of Japan from around 250 to 538. The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from this era. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... Centuries: 2nd century - 3rd century - 4th century Decades: 200s - 210s - 220s - 230s - 240s - 250s - 260s - 270s - 280s - 290s - 300s Years: 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 Events Crisis of the Third Century End of Yayoi era and beginning of Kofun period, the first part of the... Events End of the Kofun era and beginning of the Asuka period, the second part of the Yamato period in Japan. ... Burial of Oleg of Novgorod in a tumulus in 912. ...


During the Kofun period, elements of Northeast Asian, Chinese civilization, and Korean civilization continued to influence the culture in the Japanese archipelago, both through waves of migration and through trade, travel and cultural change. Archaeological evidence indicates contacts between the mainland and Japan also during this period. Most scholars believe that there were massive transmissions of technology and culture from China via Korea to Japan which is evidenced by material artifacts in tombs of both states in the Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea and Kofun eras, and the later wave of Baekje immigrants to Yamato. Manchuria (Manchu: Manju; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; Simplified Chinese: 满洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu, Russian: ) is a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ... This article is on the geographic and cultural entity. ... Korea (Korean: (조선 or 한국, see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... The Japanese Archipelago which forms the country of Japan extends from north to south along the eastern coast of the Eurasian Continent, the western shore of the Pacific Ocean. ... Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea (원삼국시대, 原三國時代) refers to the period after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms. ... Daisenryo Kofun,the tomb of Emperor Nintoku,Osaka,5th century. ...


The archaeological record and ancient Chinese and Korean sources indicate that the various tribes and chiefdoms of the Japanese Archipelago did not begin to coalesce into more centralized and hierarchical polities until 300 (well into the Kofun period), when large tombs begin to appear while there were no contacts between the Wa and China. Some describe the "mysterious century" as a time of internecine warfare as various local monarchies competed for hegemony on Kyushu and Honshu. Events Romano-Celtic temple-mausoleum complex is constructed in Lullingstone, and also in Anderida (approximate date). ... Ideogram for Wa, formed by the radical for person (on the left), and the phonetic element Wa on the right (itself represented by a rice plant in the upper part and a woman in the lower part). ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyÅ«shÅ«) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... todo mal de [ [ Shikoku ] ] a través del [ [ mar interior ] ], y noreste de [ [ Kyushu ] ] a través del [ [ estrecho de Kanmon ] ]. Es la séptima isla más grande, y la segunda isla populosa en el mundo después de [ [ Java (isla)|Java ] ] (véase [ [ lista de las islas de...


Japan of the Kofun age was positive in the introduction of Chinese culture. Several kinds of apparatus were imported. Books from China were one of the most important trade goods. Chinese philosophy that had been introduced in this era, had a big influence on the history of Japan. Decorated bronze mirrors (神獣鏡) were imported from China. Japan was importing iron from China via Korea until the latter half of the 6th century.


Kofun tombs

Daisenryo Kofun, the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, Osaka, 5th century.
Daisenryo Kofun, the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, Osaka, 5th century.

Kofun (古墳, "old tomb") are burial mounds which were built for the people of the ruling class during the 4th to 7th centuries. The Kofun period takes its name from these distinctive earthen mounds which are associated with the rich funerary rituals of the time. The mounds contained large stone burial chambers. Some are surrounded by moats. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x800, 514 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Emperor Nintoku ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x800, 514 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Emperor Nintoku ... Daisen-Kofun, the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, Osaka Emperor Nintoku (仁徳天皇 Nintoku Tennō) was the 16th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Osaka ) is the capital of Osaka Prefecture and the third-largest city in Japan, with a population of 2. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... The moated manor house of Baddesley Clinton in Warwickshire, England Moats (also known as a Fosse) were deep and wide water-filled trenches, excavated to provide a barrier against attack upon castle ramparts or other fortifications. ...


Kofun came in many shapes, with round and square being the simplest. A distinct style is the keyhole kofun (前方後円墳 zenpō kōen fun), with its square front and round back. Many kofun were natural hills, which might have been sculpted to their final shape. Kofun range in size from several meters to over 400 meters in length. The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ...


By the late Kofun period, the distinctive burial chambers, originally used by the ruling elite, also were built for commoners.


The biggest kofun are believed to be the tombs of emperors like Emperor Ōjin (応神天皇 Ōjin Tennō) and Emperor Nintoku (仁徳天皇 Nintoku Tennō). Kofun are also classified according to whether the entrance to the stone burial chamber is vertical (縦穴 tate-ana) or horizontal (横穴 yoko-ana). Emperor ÅŒjin (応神天皇 ÅŒjin Tennō) was the 15th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Daisen-Kofun, the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, Osaka Emperor Nintoku (仁徳天皇 Nintoku Tennō) was the 16th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...


Immigrants in early Japan

"Japan of the Kofun Period was very positive towards the introduction of Chinese culture." [1] According to the Book of Song. A Chinese emperor appointed five kings of Wa to the ruler of Baekje and silla in 421. [2] Yamato links to the mainland and the Liu Sung Dynasty in 425 and 478 were facilitated by the maritime knowledge and diplomatic connections of Baekje. [3] Kofun period (Japanese: 古墳時代, Kofun-jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around AD 250 to 538. ... The Book of Song (Chinese: 宋書/宋书; Wade-Giles: Sungshu), is a the historical writing for the Chinese Song of Southern Dynasties covering the history from 420 to 479, and is one of the traditional Twenty-Four Histories. ... The five kings of Wa are kings of Japan who sent envoys to China during the 5th century to strengthen the legitimacy of their claims to power by gaining the recognition of the Chinese emperor. ... Baekje (18 BC (legendary) – AD 660) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. ... Silla (also spelled Shilla, traditional dates 57 BCE - 935 CE) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Events February 8 - Constantius III becomes Co_Emperor of the Western Roman Empire June 7 - Roman Emperor Theodosius II marries Aelia Eudocia, formerly known as Athenais. ... Events October 23 -Valentinian III becomes western Roman emperor. ... Events First Shinto shrines built in Japan. ... Baekje (18 BC (legendary) – AD 660) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. ...


According to Shoku Nihongi, Emperor Temmu requested the introduction of a strict political system, Ritsuryo, based on that of Tang dynasty China. Two of the 19 members of the committee drafting the Taiho Code were Chinese priests while none were from Korean immigrant families.[5][6] Their names are Shoku-Shugen and Satsu-Koukaku. They took an active part as a Chinese specialist, and received the reward of two times from the Empress Jito. the system of local administrative districts and the tribute tax were both based on Chinese models. Though Ritsu (Criminal law) was adopted from the Chinese system, Ryō (system of local administrative districts and the tribute tax) was arranged in a native Japanese way. The Shoku Nihongi(続日本紀)is an imperially commissioned history of Japan written in the early Heian period. ... Emperor Temmu (天武天皇 Temmu Tennō) (c. ... Ritsuryo (律令) is the historical law system based on the philosophies of Confucianism and Chinese Legalism in Japan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Taihō Code or Code of Taihō ) was an administrative reorganization enacted in 702 in Japan, at the end of the Asuka period. ... Jito Tenno (From Ogura Hyakunin Isshu) Tomb of Emperor Temmu and Empress Jitō Empress Jitō (持統天皇 Jitō Tennō) (645 – December 22, 7021) was the 41st imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...


However, Korean influence on Japanese laws is seen in the placement of Korean immigrants on committees that drew up other legal codes. Though it is not written in the history record of Japan, eight of the 19 members of the committee drafting the Taiho Code were from Korean immigrant families while none were from China proper. Further, the system of local administrative districts and the tribute tax were both based on Korean models. [4]


Many important figures were immigrants from East Asia. The "Shinsen-Joujouroku" (新撰姓氏録), which was used as a directory of aristocrats, lists a number of clans from the Han China, Silla, Baekche, and Goguryeo.[5] Yamato Imperial Court had officially edited the directory in 815, and 163 Chinese clans were registered. [citation needed] East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese: 漢朝; Simplified Chinese: 汉朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Han Chau; 206 BC–AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ...


Kofun society

The Kofun period was a critical stage in Japan's evolution toward a more cohesive and recognized state. This society was most developed in the Kinai Region and the easternmost part of the Inland Sea. Japan's rulers of the time even petitioned the Chinese court for confirmation of royal titles. The Inland Sea and its major straits with the bay of Osaka (dashed) The torii of Itsukushima Shrine is one of the most popular tourist spots of the Inland Sea. ...

Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century.
Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century.

The Yamato polity, which emerged by the late 5th century, was distinguished by powerful great clans or extended families, including their dependants. Each clan was headed by a patriarch who performed sacred rites to the clan's kami to ensure the long-term welfare of the clan. Clan members were the aristocracy, and the kingly line that controlled the Yamato court was at its pinnacle. The Kofun period of Japanese culture is also sometimes called the Yamato period by some Western scholars, since this local chieftainship arose to become the Imperial dynasty at the end of the Kofun period. Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan. ... Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan. ... Tack is any of the various accessories worn by horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. ... Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan. ... Polity is a general term that refers to political organization of a group. ... Originally a patriarch was a man who exercised autocratic authority as a pater familias over an extended family. ... Amaterasu, one of the central kami in the Shinto faith Look up Kami in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Asuka period

Main article: Asuka period

The Asuka period (飛鳥時代 Asuka-jidai?) is generally defined as from 538710. The arrival of Buddhism is utilized to mark a change in Japanese society and affected the Yamato government. The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... Events End of the Kofun era and beginning of the Asuka period, the second part of the Yamato period in Japan. ... // Events End of the Asuka period, the second and last part of the Yamato period and beginning of the Nara period in Japan. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found from Sarnath, near Varanasi. ...


The Yamato state evolved much during the Asuka period, which is named after the Asuka region, south of modern Nara, the site of numerous temporary imperial capitals established during the period. The Asuka period is known for its significant artistic, social, and political transformations, which had their origins in the late Kofun period. Ishibutai Kofun, believed to be burial site of Soga no Umako Asuka (明日香村; -mura) is a village located in Takaichi District, Nara, Japan. ... Nara Prefecture (奈良県; Nara-ken) is part of the Kinki region on Honshu Island, Japan. ... Kofun period (Japanese: 古墳時代, Kofun-jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around AD 250 to 538. ...


Artistically, the term Tori Style is often used for the Asuka period. This is from the sculptor Kuratsukuri Tori, grandson of Chinese immigrant Shiba Tatto. Tori Style inherits Chinese Northern Wei style. The Shaka image of Asukadera, 606 Tori Busshi (止利仏師) was a Japanese sculptor active in the late 6th and early 7th century. ... Northern Wei Buddha Maitreya, 443 AD. A Buddhist stela from the Northern Wei period, build in the early 6th century. ...


The arts during the Asuka and Nara periods are similar to contemporaneous art in China and Korea. One example of this is Tori Busshi's Shaka triad which reflects the style of early to mid-sixth century Chinese style. Asuka is the name of the old Japanese capital of the 6th century, Asuka ). The capital gave the Asuka period its name. ... Nara can refer to: The city of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan The Nara Period of the History of Japan Nara prefecture, part of the Kansai region of central Honshu, Japan Nara is a major Manchu clan. ... The Shaka image of Asukadera, 606 CE Tori Busshi was a Japanese sculptor. ... Image:KingShaka. ...


Introduction of Buddhism

Mahāyāna Buddhism officially introduced to Japan in 538.
Mahāyāna Buddhism officially introduced to Japan in 538.
See also Buddhism in Japan

According to Nihon Shoki, Mahāyāna Buddhism (大乗仏教 Daijō Bukkyō?) was officially introduced to the Yamato court through Baekje in 552, while it is widely recognized Buddhism was introduced in 538 based on the biography of Prince Shōtoku (Jōgū Shōtoku Houō Teisetsu, kanji:上宮聖徳法王帝説) and the record of Gangō-ji (Gangō-ji Garan Engi, kanji:元興寺伽藍縁起). Download high resolution version (958x659, 20 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (958x659, 20 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ... The Buddha in Kamakura (1252). ... Nihonshoki (日本書紀) is the second oldest history book about the ancient history of Japan. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ... A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found from Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... Baekje (18 BC (legendary) – AD 660) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Gangoji Gokurakubo Gangō-ji (元興寺) is an ancient Buddhist temple in Nara, Japan. ...


Initial uptake of Buddhism was slow. Nihon Shoki records that when Emperor Kimmei discussed about the acceptance of this new foreign religion, Soga no Iname expressed his support while Mononobe no Okoshi and Nakatomi no Kamako (later the Fujiwara clan) opposed not on religious grounds, but more so as the results of feelings of nationalism and a degree of xenophobia. Nihonshoki (日本書紀) is the second oldest history book about the ancient history of Japan. ... Emperor Kimmei (欽明天皇 Kinmei Tennō) (509-571) was the 29th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession, and the first to whom contemporary historiography assigns clear dates. ... Soga no Iname (蘇我稲目, died 570). ... Mononobe clan (物部氏; mononobe-shi) was an old Japanese clan of Yamato period. ... The Fujiwara clan (藤原氏 Fujiwara-shi) was a clan of regents who had sort of monopoly to the Sekkan positions, Sesshō and Kampaku. ...


With the dawn of the Asuka period the use of elaborate kofun tombs by the imperial family and other elite fell out of use because of prevailing new Buddhist beliefs, which put greater emphasis on the transience of human life. Commoners and the elite in outlying regions, however, continued to use kofun until the late seventh century, and simpler but distinctive tombs continued in use throughout the following period. Daisenryo Kofun,the tomb of Emperor Nintoku,Osaka,5th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Buddhism only started to spread after Mononobe no Moriya lost in the Battle of Shigisen in 587 where the Mononobe clan was defeated and crushed, and Empress Suiko openly encouraged the acceptance of Buddhism among all Japanese people. In 607, in order to obtain copies of Sutras, an imperial embassy was dispatched to Sui dynasty China. Mononobe no Moriya (物部守屋)(d. ... Mononobe clan (物部氏; mononobe-shi) was an old Japanese clan of Yamato period. ... Empress Suiko (推古天皇) (554-628) was the 33rd imperial ruler of Japan and the first woman to hold this position. ... To suck the phallus or penis of another. ... Sutra (सूत्र) in Sanskrit is derived from the verb √siv, meaning to sew. ... Imperial embassies to China were missions to China for importing the technologies and culture of China to Japan. ... SUI can be the IOC country code or the FIFA country code for Switzerland SUI can be an acronym for sonic user interface (similar to GUI for graphical user interface). ...


The Yamato state

The Yamato state (ヤマト王権 Yamato-Ōken?) evolved still further during the Asuka period, which is named after the Asuka region, south of modern Nara, the site of numerous temporary imperial capitals established during the period. The Asuka period is known for its significant artistic, social, and political transformations, which had their origins in the late Kofun period. Ishibutai Kofun, believed to be burial site of Soga no Umako Asuka (明日香村; -mura) is a village located in Takaichi District, Nara, Japan. ... , Nara ) is the capital city of Nara Prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan, near Kyoto. ...


The Yamato court, concentrated in the Asuka region, exercised power over clans in Kyushu and Honshu, bestowing titles, some hereditary, on clan chieftains. The Yamato name became synonymous with all of Japan as the Yamato rulers suppressed the clans and acquired agricultural lands. Based on Chinese models (including the adoption of the Chinese written language), they developed a central administration and an imperial court attended by subordinate clan chieftains but with no permanent capital. By the mid-seventh century, the agricultural lands had grown to a substantial public domain, subject to central policy. The basic administrative unit of the Gokishichido system was the county, and society was organized into occupation groups. Most people were farmers; other were fishers, weavers, potters, artisans, armorers, and ritual specialists. Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州 kyÅ«shÅ«) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... todo mal de [ [ Shikoku ] ] a través del [ [ mar interior ] ], y noreste de [ [ Kyushu ] ] a través del [ [ estrecho de Kanmon ] ]. Es la séptima isla más grande, y la segunda isla populosa en el mundo después de [ [ Java (isla)|Java ] ] (véase [ [ lista de las islas de... Various styles of Chinese calligraphy. ... Provincial Map of Japan in the 8th Century AD Gokishichido lit. ...


Events

  • 538: The Korean kingdom of Baekje dispatches a delegation to introduce Buddhism to the Japanese emperor
  • 593: Prince Shotoku of the Soga clan rules Japan and promotes Buddhism
  • 600: Prince Shotoku sends the first official Japanese mission to China
  • 604: Prince Shotoku issues a Chinese-style constitution (Kenpo Jushichijo), based on Confucian principles, which de facto inaugurates the Japanese empire
  • 605: Prince Shotoku declares Buddhism and Confucianism the state religions of Japan
  • 607: Prince Shotoku builds the Buddhist temple Horyuji in the Asuka valley
  • 645: Prince Shotoku is succeeded by Kotoku Tenno, who strengthens imperial power over aristocratic clans (Taika Reform), turning their states into provinces

Baekje (18 BC (legendary) – AD 660) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... Sculpture of Prince Shotoku in Asuka Dera, Asuka, Nara Prince Shōtoku (聖徳太子 574-622) was a regent and a politician of the Imperial Court in Japan. ... The Taika Reforms ) were a set of doctrines established by Emperor Kōtoku in the year 646. ...

References

  1. ^ Keiji Imamura, Prehistoric Japan: New Perspectives on Insular East Asia, University of Hawaii Press, 1996. ISBN 0-8248-1852-0. [1].
  2. ^ Book of Song [[2]]
  3. ^ W.G. Beasley, The Japanese Experience: A Short History of Japan, University of California Press, 2000. [3]
  4. ^ William Wayne Farris, Sacred Texts and Buried Treasures: Issues on the Historical Archaeology of Ancient Japan, University of Hawaii Press, 1998. [4].
  5. ^ 『新撰姓氏録』氏族一覧, transcribed by Kazuhide Kitagawa. http://homepage1.nifty.com/k-kitagawa/data/shoji.html


The Book of Song (Chinese: 宋書/宋书; Wade-Giles: Sungshu), is a the historical writing for the Chinese Song of Southern Dynasties covering the history from 420 to 479, and is one of the traditional Twenty-Four Histories. ...


[ Kofun | Asuka ]
< Yayoi | History of Japan | Nara period > Kofun period (Japanese: 古墳時代, Kofun-jidai) is an era in the history of Japan from around AD 250 to 538. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... This article is about a Japanese historical era. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#History. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Yamato period (0 words)
The Yamato court's supremacy was challenged throughout the Kofun period at least by another polity centred in the later Bizen and Bitchū provinces in what is now known as Okayama prefecture, and it was only into the 6th century that the Yamato clans could be said to have any major advantage over their neighbouring clans.
The hereditary lands of the Yamato clan are on a peninsula on the southwest coast of Ise Bay.
Yamato was most closely associated with the southeastern kingdom of Paekche, whence came the "seven-pronged sword." Contact with the mainland, although involving conflict, also encouraged a marked rise in standards of living in the archipelago, as many of the fruits of advanced Chinese civilization reached Japan via people from the peninsula.
Japanese history: Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun (451 words)
During the Jomon Period (13000 BC to 300 BC), the inhabitants of the Japanese islands were gatherers, fishers and hunters.
By the beginning of the Kofun Period (300 - 538), a center of power had developed in the fertile Kinai plain, and by about 400 AD the country was united as Yamato Japan with its political center in and around the province of Yamato (about today's Nara prefecture).
The emperor was ruler of Yamato Japan and resided in a capital that was moved frequently from one city to another.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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