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Encyclopedia > Yamato (people)

The Yamato (大和) were the dominant peoples of ancient Japan, and the ancestors of most modern Japanese people. By the Nara period, they had for the most part subdued all non-Yamato peoples of the 3 main islands Honshu, Shikoku, and Kyushu (the Ainu of northern Honshu and Hokkaido were not subdued until much later). Most of the non-Yamato peoples of the 3 main islands were fully integrated by the Kamakura period, though some people believe small populations remained until even the early 20th century in the Japanese Alps and rural Kyushu. The Japanese (日本人, Nihon-jin) are the Yamato, Ainu, Ryukyuans, Uilta and Nivkhs of the Japanese Archipelago. ... The Nara period (Japanese: 奈良時代, Nara-jidai) of the History of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ... todo mal de [ [ Shikoku ] ] a través del [ [ mar interior ] ], y noreste de [ [ Kyushu ] ] a través del [ [ estrecho de Kanmon ] ]. Es la séptima isla más grande, y la segunda isla populosa en el mundo después de [ [ Java (isla)|Java ] ] (véase [ [ lista de las islas de la población ] ]). < style=float del div... Shikoku (四国, four provinces) is the smallest and least populous of the four main islands of Japan. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ... The Ainu (pronounced , eye-noo, アイヌ) are an ethnic group indigenous to Hokkaido, the northern part of Honshu in Northern Japan, the Kuril Islands, much of Sakhalin, and the southernmost third of the Kamchatka peninsula. ... Hokkaido   listen? (北海道 Hokkaidō, literal meaning: North Sea Route, Ainu: Mosir), formerly known as Ezo, is the second largest island of Japan. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Kamakura period 1185 to 1333 is a period... The Japanese Alps is a mountain range in Japan, consisting of Hida Mountains, Kiso Mountains, and Akashi Mountains. ... Kyushu region, Japan Kyushu (九州) is the third largest island of Japan and most southerly and westerly of the four main islands. ...


Bronze and iron implements were probably introduced from Korean peninsula around 300 B.C. [1] In the following centuries, due to relations with Baekje on the Korean peninsula, mainland influence increased. [2]


Beginning in 300 A.D., the Yamato in the south of Honshu departed from the previous Yayoi regime by building immense tomb mounds for their aristocracy. One such tomb mound built in Nintoku and still extant is over five football fields long, and has more mass than the Egyptian Pyramid of Cheops. This type of kofun was spreaded to South Korean nations in 500 A.D. [3]


The Yamato's expansion was aided by the economic and military support of be, or occupational groups attached to the court. In the fifth century, the be produced weapons, armour, and mirrors and constructed irrigation systems. Many of them were composed of recent migrants from Baekje who specialized in raising horses or ironworking; in fact, the term be itself is of Korean origin. [4]


The Baekje court sent to Japan Korean potters, metal workers, artists, and other craftspeople, and the Koreans imported Chinese writing into Japan. In 513, the Baekje court sent a Confucian scholar to the Yamato court, and later sent an image of Buddha, some Buddhist scriptures, and a Buddhist representative. Baekje monks traveled to Japan to build temples and bronze Buddha images. As a result of this early contact, Buddhism, Chinese characters, and other Chinese influences affected Japan. [5]


Chinese influence during the early periods of Japanese development was quite extensive, and the first Japanese state of Yamato was an inheritor to many overseas traditions. In the reign of Empress Suiko (592-628), relations with Baekje broke down in the later 6th century and another wave of Koreans migrated to Japan. [5] By extension of traditions they had already imported from Baekje, China became a direct model.


China, the Constitution, and Prince Shotoku

Following the death of the Emperor Yomei, who was a practitioner and supporter of Buddhist ideals in Japan, his sister the Empress Suiko came to power. Empress Suiko's nephew, the regent Prince Shotoku, is perhaps the most important figure of his time. The Yamato government was suffering from three major problems. First, the Yamato aristocracy itself was feuding. Secondly, an incredible number of Korea refugees were fleeing to Japan seeking sanctuary from troubles at home. Thirdly, because the Korean-Japanese treaties had been broken, Japan was suddenly without a stable ally, which placed a great amount of weight on the government's shoulders. Emperor Yōmei (用明天皇) (died 587) was the 31st imperial ruler of Japan. ... Empress Suiko (推古天皇) (554-628) was the 33rd imperial ruler of Japan and the first woman to hold this position. ... Empress Suiko (推古天皇) (554-628) was the 33rd imperial ruler of Japan and the first woman to hold this position. ... Shotoku can refer to: Empress Shotoku, the 48th imperial ruler of Japan. ...


To stabilise matters, the Yamato government sent envoys to the Chinese court, from which they obtained a great wealth of philosophical and social structure. In addition to ethics of government, they also adopted the Chinese calendar and many of its religious practices, including Chinese Buddhism and Taoism (Jp: Onmyo). All these changes were instituted by Prince Shotoku, who also proscribed a new constitution for Japan based on the Chinese model. This came to be known as the Kenpo Jushichijo and is the earliest piece of formal Japanese writing known today. A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... The Chinese character Tao. ... Shotoku can refer to: Empress Shotoku, the 48th imperial ruler of Japan. ...


The constitution removed power from the clans (Jp: Uji) and gave it directly to the Emperor, whose power was then stated to come from Heaven itself. In addition, prince Shotoku also built up the Buddhist Tenno-ji, an institutional complex which included libraries, hospitals, schools, colleges, and dispensaries. Throughout this entire period then, Shotoku, despite being called Prince, was in fact the de-facto ruler of Japan, and continued to be so for three decades. Uji (Japanese: 宇治市; -shi) is a city on the southern outskirts of the city of Kyoto, on the Keihan line or the JR Nara Line towards Osaka. ... Shotoku can refer to: Empress Shotoku, the 48th imperial ruler of Japan. ... Shotoku can refer to: Empress Shotoku, the 48th imperial ruler of Japan. ...


The Constitution Shotoku had drafted was deeply Confucian, stating that harmony and moral integrity were necessary to running the state. It additionally included that the Emperor must place great value on the Three Treasures of Buddhism - Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha - and that it was the responsibility of the Emperor, given Heavenly appointment, to look after the welfare of his people. The Constitution in fact was not written in the spirit of applying the law, but rather became a treatise on moral and spiritual conduct. The Triratna or Three Jewels symbol, on a Buddha footprint. ... A stone image of the Buddha. ... Dharma (sanskrit, roughly law or way) is the way of the higher Truths. ... Sangha is a word in Indian languages that can be translated roughly as association or assembly. It is commonly used in several senses to refer to Buddhist or Jain groups. ...


After prince Shotoku's death in 662, the Soga clan's ambitious nature eventually lead to a coup against their stewardship of Imperial affairs. Following the Soga's execution of Shotoku's heir, the Yamato court had the Soga leadership executed, followed by the succession of Emperor Kotoku. Emperor Kotoku was, like Shotoku, a devout Buddhist, and removed the exclusive control of sponsorship from the Soga clan, placing it then under government sponsorship directly. This and other such reformations came to be known as the Taika Reform Edicts of 645 AD. It was during this period that the Emperor's power and ideals of Heavenly Appointment became wholly consolidated, and ensured Japan's imperial heritage. Shotoku can refer to: Empress Shotoku, the 48th imperial ruler of Japan. ... The Soga clan was one of the most powerful clans in Yamato Japan. ... Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇) (597-654) was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan. ... Emperor Kōtoku (孝徳天皇) (597-654) was the 36th imperial ruler of Japan. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Taika Reforms. ... Events End of the reign of Empress Kogyoku of Japan Emperor Kotoku ascends to the throne of Japan Byzantines recapture Alexandria from the Arabs Births Empress Jito of Japan Categories: 645 ...


See also

Gokishichido (five provinces and seven outer areas 五畿七道) was the name for ancient administrative units in Japan controlled by the Yamato court and borrowed from China. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Yamato (people) (1670 words)
Most of the non-Yamato peoples of the 3 main islands were fully integrated by the Kamakura period, though some people believe small populations remained until even the early 20th century in the Japanese Alps and rural Kyushu.
There is a controversy on whether to include the Okinawans in the Yamato, or identify them as an independent ethnic group, or as a sub-group that constitutes Japanese ethnicity together with the Yamato because of close similarities suggested by genetics and linguistics.
Yamato was thus able to mingle with the women of the Kumaso borthers, and was allowed to sit with them during a feast that night.
Yamato people - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (169 words)
The Yamato people (Japanese: 大和民族) are the dominant native ethnic group of Japan.
There is a controversy on whether to include the Okinawans in the Yamato, or identify them as an independent ethnic group, or as a sub-group that constitutes Japanese ethnicity together with the Yamato because of close similarities suggested by genetics and linguistics.
The use of the term "Yamato people" is becoming less common in Japan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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