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Encyclopedia > Yale school (deconstruction)

The "Yale school" is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s.


During the period between the late 1960s and the early 1980s many thinkers influenced by deconstruction, including Jacques Derrida, Paul de Man, Geoffrey Hartman, and J. Hillis Miller, worked at Yale University. This group came to be known as the Yale school and was especially influential in literary criticism, as de Man, Miller, and Hartman were all primarily literary critics. Several of these theorists were subsequently affiliated with the University of California Irvine.


References

See also: deconstruction -- literary criticism -- literary theory -- Yale University


  Results from FactBites:
 
Yale University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3854 words)
The rivalry between Yale and Harvard University is long and storied, by far the oldest in the Ivy League; from academics to rowing to college football, their historic competition is similar to that of Oxford and Cambridge.
Yale traces its beginnings to "An Act for Liberty to Erect a Collegiate School" passed by the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut and dated October 9, 1701.
Yale, like other Ivy League schools, instituted policies in the early twentieth century designed to artificially increase the proportion of upper-class white Christians of notable families in the student body (see Numerus clausus), and was one of the last of the Ivies to eliminate such preferences, beginning with the class of 1970.
Yale school (deconstruction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (143 words)
The "Yale school" is a colloquial name for an influential group of literary critics, theorists, and philosophers, all influenced by deconstruction, who were together at Yale University in the 1970s.
During the period between the late 1960s and the early 1980s many thinkers influenced by deconstruction, including Jacques Derrida, Paul de Man, Geoffrey Hartman, and J.
This group came to be known as the Yale school and was especially influential in literary criticism, as de Man, Miller, and Hartman were all primarily literary critics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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