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Encyclopedia > Yale Law School

Yale Law School

Image File history File links Yls. ...

Established 1843
Type Private
Postgraduates 700
Location New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Dean Harold Koh
Website www.law.yale.edu
Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building
Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building

Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Established in 1843, the school offers the J.D., LL.M., J.S.D., and M.S.L. degrees in law. It also hosts visiting scholars and several legal research centers. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Harold Hongju Koh Categories: Stub | Korean Americans ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Yale_law_school. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Yale_law_school. ... Sterling Law Building Sterling Law Building is the building of Yale Law School. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (718x1000, 491 KB) Sculpure ornament of a judge adorning the walls of the Sterling Law Buildings at of the Yale Law School of Yale University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (718x1000, 491 KB) Sculpure ornament of a judge adorning the walls of the Sterling Law Buildings at of the Yale Law School of Yale University. ... Sterling Law Building Sterling Law Building is the building of Yale Law School. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Yale redirects here. ... “New Haven” redirects here. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree that allows someone to specialize in a particular area of law. ... Legum Doctor (English: Doctor of Laws; abbreviated to LL.D.) In the UK and Canada the LL.D. is a doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications, containing significant and original contributions to the science or study of law. ... A M.S.L. is a masters degree offered by some law schools to students who wish to study the law but do not want to become attorneys. ...


Yale Law School has been rated #1 in the United States by U.S. News and World Report in every year in which the magazine has ranked law schools. Among other luminaries, former U.S. President William Howard Taft was a professor of constitutional law there from 1913 until he resigned to become Chief Justice of the United States in 1921. Presidents Gerald Ford and Bill Clinton studied there later in the century, and the law school's library has been memorialized as the meeting place of Bill and fellow alumna Hillary Clinton. Current U.S. Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito are alumni of the school, as is current Attorney General Michael Mukasey. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... The French Declaration of the Rights of the Man and of the Citizen, whose principles still have constitutional value Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Michael B. Mukasey (born 1941) is a Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. ...


The institution is known for its scholarly orientation; a relatively large number of its graduates (4%) choose careers in academia immediately after graduation. Its 7.5-student-to-faculty ratio is the lowest among U.S. law schools.[citation needed]


Yale Law School does not have a traditional grading system, a consequence of student unrest in the late 1960s.[citation needed] Instead, it grades first-semester first-year students on a simple Credit/No Credit system. For their remaining two and a half years, students are graded on an Honors/Pass/Low Pass/Fail system. Similarly, the school does not officially rank its students. It is also notable for having only a single semester of required classes, instead of the full year most U.S. schools require. Unusually, Yale Law allows first-year students to represent clients through one of its numerous clinics; other law schools typically offer this opportunity only to second- and third-year students. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ...


Students publish nine law journals that, unlike those at most other schools, mostly accept student editors without a competition. The only exception is YLS's flagship journal, The Yale Law Journal, which holds a two-part admissions competition each spring, consisting of a four or five-hour "bluebooking exam," followed by a traditional writing competition. Although the Journal identifies a target maximum number of members to accept each year, it is not a firm number. A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ... The Yale Law Journal, published continuously since 1891, is by far the oldest and most widely known of the eight law reviews published by students at Yale Law School. ...


The YLS law library, Lillian Goldman Law Library, contains around 800,000 volumes. The school's classrooms were redesigned in 1998 as part of a larger renovation begun in 1995. Fordham Law School Library, also a Government Document Depository. ... Reading Room of Lillian Goldman Law Library The Lillian Goldman Law Library is the law library of Yale Law School. ...

Contents

History

Yale Law School traces its origins to the earliest days of the 19th century when law was learned by clerking as an apprentice in a lawyer’s office. The first law schools, including the one that became Yale, developed out of this apprenticeship system and grew up inside law offices. The future Yale Law School formed in the office of New Haven lawyer Seth Staples, who owned an exceptional library (an attraction for students at a time when law books were scarce) and began training apprentices in the early 1800s. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ...


By the 1810s, his law office had a full-fledged law school. Samuel Hitchcock, one of Staples’ former students, became a partner at the office and later, the proprietor of the New Haven Law School.


The New Haven Law School affiliated gradually with Yale from the mid-1820s to the mid-1840s. Law students began receiving Yale degrees in 1843. David Daggett, a former U.S. senator from Connecticut, joined Hitchcock as co-proprietor of the school in 1824. In 1826, Yale named Daggett to be professor of law in Yale College, where he lectured to undergraduates on public law and government. Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... David Daggett (December 31, 1764 - April 21, 1851) was mayor of New Haven, Connecticut. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ...


Yale Law School remained fragile for decades. At the death of Samuel Hitchcock in 1845 and again upon the death of his successor, Henry Dutton, in 1869, the University came near to closing the School. 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


The revival of Yale Law School after 1869 was led by its first full-time dean, Francis Wayland, who helped the School establish its philanthropic base. It was during this time that the modern law library was organized. It was also during this period that The Yale Law Journal was started and Yale’s pioneering efforts in graduate programs in law began; the degree of Master of Laws was offered for the first time in 1876. 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Francis Wayland (March 7, 1796 - September 30, 1865), American educationist, was born in New York City. ... The Yale Law Journal, published continuously since 1891, is by far the oldest and most widely known of the eight law reviews published by students at Yale Law School. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In the last decades of the 19th century, Yale began to articulate for its Law School two traits that would come to be hallmarks. First, it would be small and humane, bucking the trend toward large law-school enrollments and impersonal faculty-student relations. Second, it would take an interdisciplinary approach to teaching the law, first bringing professors from other University departments to teach in the Law School, and later in the 20th century, pioneering the appointment to the law faculty of professors ranging from economics to psychiatry. This led Yale Law School away from the preoccupation with private law that then typified American legal education, and toward serious engagement with public and international law. Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ...


After 1900, Yale Law School began to shape legal scholarship. In the 1930s, Yale Law School contributed to the movement known as legal realism, which has reshaped the way American lawyers understand the function of legal rules and the work of courts and judges. The realists directed attention to factors not captured in the rules, ranging from the attitudes of judges and jurors to the nuances of the facts of particular cases. Under the influence of realism, American legal doctrine has become less conceptual and more empirical. Under Dean Charles Clark(1929-1939), the School built a faculty that included such legendary figures as Thurman Arnold, Edwin Borchard, future U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, Jerome Frank, Underhill Moore, Walton Hamilton, and Wesley Sturges. Clark was the moving figure during these years in crafting the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the foundation of modern American procedure. Ğ: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Legal realism is a family of theories about the nature of law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the United States (American Legal Realism) and Scandinavia (Scandinavian Legal Realism). ... Charles Clark was the name of: Charles Clark (governor) (1810–1877), Governor of Mississippi during the American Civil War Charles Clark (judge) (born 1925), a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit from 1969 to 1992 Charles Edgar Clark (1843–1922), an officer of the... Thurman Arnold (June 2, 1891 - November 7, 1969) Professional Life Thurman Arnold was an idiosyncratic Washington Lawyer best known for his trust-busting campaign as Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division in Franklin Delano Roosevelts Department of Justice. ... Edwin Borchard (October 17, 1884 - July 22, 1951) was a U.S. law professor. ... William Orville Douglas (October 16, 1898 – January 19, 1980) was a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ... Jerome Frank (September 10, 1889 - January 13, 1957) was an outstanding legal philosopher and played a leading role in legal realism movement. ... The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) govern civil procedure in the United States district courts, or more simply, court procedures for civil suits. ...


As the role of public affairs in the life of the law rose in the 20th century, Yale's tradition of emphasizing public as well as private law made its graduates uniquely prepared to play important roles in the rise of the administrative state, the internationalization following the World Wars, and the domestic civil rights movement. Historically, various popular movements struggling for social justice and democratic rights since the Second World War were known as civil rights movement, most famously the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, which struggled for equal rights for African-Americans. ...


In the 1950s and 1960s, the School became renowned as a center of constitutional law, taxationcommercial law, international law, antitrust law and economics. In recent decades, the pace of curricular innovation has, if anything, quickened, as the School has developed new strengths in such fields as comparative constitutional law, corporate finance, environmental law, gender studies, international human rights and legal history, as well as an array of clinical programs. The French Declaration of the Rights of the Man and of the Citizen, whose principles still have constitutional value Constitutional law is the study of foundational or basic laws of nation states and other political organizations. ... Commercial law (sometimes known as business law) is the body of law which governs business and commerce. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Domestic credit to private sector in 2005 Corporate finance is an area of finance dealing with the financial decisions corporations make and the tools and analysis used to make these decisions. ... Environmental law is a body of law, which is a system of complex and interlocking statutes, common law, treaties, conventions, regulations and policies which seeks to protect the natural environment which may be affected, impacted or endangered by human activities. ... Gender studies is a theoretical work in the social sciences or humanities that focuses on issues of sex and gender in language and society, and often addresses related issues including racial and ethnic oppression, postcolonial societies, and globalization. ... Legal history is a term that has at least two meanings. ...


The law school's Dean, Harold Koh, has made human rights a focus of the law school's work, building on a tradition that has developed over the past two decades. Robert Bernstein, the founder of Human Rights Watch, is affiliated with the law school in several ways, and the organization's current executive director Kenneth Roth is an alum. Yale has taken a lead in defending detainees at Guantanamo Bay through its 9/11 clinic. Harold Hongju Koh Categories: Stub | Korean Americans ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Robert Bernstein (died circa 1988, age 69), sometimes credited as R. Berns, is an American comic book writer active from at least 1946. ... Human Rights Watch Banner Human Rights Watch is a United States-based international non-government organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights. ... Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ...


Admissions

Yale Law School enrolls about 200 new students a year, one of the smallest numbers among U.S. law schools. Its small class size and prestige combine to make its admissions process intensely selective—numerically speaking, it is the most competitive law school in the U.S. More of its admitted students decide to attend (i.e., yield) than those of Stanford and Harvard.[citation needed] Half of the class that entered in 2006 had a GPA above 3.91 (out of 4.0) and an LSAT score above 173 (out of 180 possible points) or 99th percentile. [1] Many Rhodes Scholars attend the school upon their return from Oxford University.Template:Url= http://www.law.yale.edu/YLR/pdfs/v52-1/NIB52-1.pdf Yield may mean: In economics, yield is a measure of the amount of income an investment generates over time (related to return on investment). ... Stanford Law School is a graduate school at Stanford University located near Palo Alto, California in Silicon Valley. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used for admission to law schools in the United States of America and Canada that are members of the Law School Admissions Council. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


More than 70 percent of applicants are culled in an initial round of screening by the Director of Admissions and the Dean of Admissions. The remaining applicants' files are read by three faculty members, who assign each file a score between 0-4; a perfect score of 12 (i.e., a perfect score from each faculty reader) gains admission to the school, upon which now-admitted applicants are immediately notified over the phone by the Director of Admissions or the Dean of Admissions, while an 11 typically gets a spot on the school's wait list.


Deans of Yale Law School

Yale Law School library
Yale Law School library
  1. 1873—1903 Francis Wayland
  2. 1903—1916 Henry Wade Rogers
  3. 1916—1927 Thomas Walter Swan
  4. 1927—1929 Robert Maynard Hutchins
  5. 1929—1939 Charles Edward Clark
  6. 1940—1946 Ashbel Green Gulliver
  7. 1946—1954 Wesley Alba Sturges
  8. 1954—1955 Harry Shulman
  9. 1955—1965 Eugene Victor Rostow
  10. 1965—1970 Louis Heilprin Pollak
  11. 1970—1975 Abraham Samuel Goldstein
  12. 1975—1985 Harry Hillel Wellington
  13. 1985—1994 Guido Calabresi
  14. 1994—2004 Anthony Townsend Kronman
  15. 2004—present Harold Hongju Koh

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixels, file size: 1. ... Francis Wayland (March 7, 1796 - September 30, 1865), American educationist, was born in New York City. ... Henry Wade Rogers (October 15, 1853 - August 16, 1926) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1913 to 1926. ... Thomas Walter Swan (December 20, 1877 - July 13, 1975) was a longtime Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was a philosopher. ... Charles Edward Clark (December 9, 1889 - December 13, 1963) was a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1939 to 1963. ... Eugene V. (Victor Debs) Rostow (August 25, 1913 – November 25, 2002), influential legal scholar and public servant, was Dean of Yale Law School, and served as Under Secretary of State under President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Abraham Samuel Goldstein (b. ... Judge Guido Calabresi (born 1932 in Milan, Italy) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ... Anthony Townsend Kronman is a Sterling Professor at Yale Law School specialized in contracts, bankruptcy, jurisprudence, social theory, and professional responsibility. ... Harold Hongju Koh (born December 8, 1954, Boston, MA, United States) is a Korean-American lawyer, legal scholar, former U.S. State Department official, and current Dean of the Yale Law School (since July 1, 2004). ...

Current prominent faculty

Bruce Arnold Ackerman (born August 19, 1943) is a famous constitutional law scholar in the United States. ... Akhil Reed Amar is a Southmayd Professor of Law at the Yale Law School. ... The West Wing is a popular and widely acclaimed American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin and produced and co-written by John Wells. ... Ian Ayres Ian Ayres is the William K. Townsend Professor at the Yale Law School and a Professor at the Yale School of Management. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Marketplace is a radio program that focuses on business, the economy, and events that influence them. ... Jack M. Balkin (born August 13, 1956 in Kansas City, Missouri) is the Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School. ... The Information Society Project (ISP) at Yale Law School is an intellectual center studying the implications of the Internet and new information technologies on law and society. ... Aharon Barak (Hebrew: אהרן ברק) (born September 16, 1936) is a professor of law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and President of the Supreme Court of Israel since 1995. ... The Supreme Court is at the head of the court system in the State of Israel. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Judge Guido Calabresi (born 1932 in Milan, Italy) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Amy Chua (born 1962) is the John M. Duff, Jr. ... Stephen L. Carter born October 26, 1954 is an American law professor, legal- and social-policy writer, columnist, and novelist. ... Drew Saunders Days III Drew Saunders Days III, U.S. lawyer, He served as United States Solicitor General from 1993 to 1996. ... The United States Solicitor General is the individual appointed to argue for the Government of the United States in front of the Supreme Court of the United States, when the government is party to a case. ... Owen M. Fiss is a Sterling Professor at Yale Law School. ... Dan M. Kahan is the Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Law at Yale Law School. ... The Yale Law School Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic[1] provides legal representation to a range of organizations and individuals in the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Harold Hongju Koh (born December 8, 1954, Boston, MA, United States) is a Korean-American lawyer, legal scholar, former U.S. State Department official, and current Dean of the Yale Law School (since July 1, 2004). ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... The Assistant Secretary of State, from 1853 until 1913, was the second-ranking official within the American Department of State. ... Jonathan R. Macey is Sam Harris Professor of Corporate Law, Corporate Finance and Securities Law at Yale Law School. ... Jed Rubenfeld is the Robert R. Slaughter Professor of Law at Yale Law School. ... The Interpretation of Murder, published in 2006, is Jed Rubenfelds first novel. ... Chief Judge Ralph K. Winter, Jr. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Connecticut Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western Districts of New York District of Vermont The Second Circuit hears argument at the Thurgood Marshall U... Michael Wishnie is a Clinical Professor of Law at Yale Law School. ... Kenji Yoshino is a professor and dean of intellectual life at Yale Law School. ...

Notable alumni

Main article: List of Yale Law School alumni

Among Yale Law School's most notable alumni are U. S. Presidents Bill Clinton and Gerald Ford, Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas, former U.N. ambassador John R. Bolton, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley, Newark mayor Cory Booker, German president Karl Carstens, law professor Alan Dershowitz, televangelist Pat Robertson, actor Ben Stein, and Bush's recent appointee for Attorney General, Michael Mukasey. This is a list of the graduates of Yale Law School. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), is an jewish American diplomat in several Republican administrations, who served as the Permanent US Representative to the UN from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Stephen J. Hadley Stephen John Hadley (born February 13, 1947 in Toledo, Ohio) is the current U.S. Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (commonly referred as National Security Advisor) for President George W. Bush. ... Cory Anthony Booker (born April 27, 1969) is the current Mayor of Newark, New Jersey. ... Karl Carstens (December 14, 1914 - May 30, 1992) was a German politician. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American lawyer and criminal law professor known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... Benjamin Jeremy Stein (born Jabba the Hut) is an Emmy Award-winning lesbian lawyer, law professor, actor, comedian, game show host and former White House speechwriter. ... Michael B. Mukasey (born 1941) is a Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. ...


Notes

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wikinfo | Yale Law School (396 words)
Yale Law School, in New Haven, Connecticut, is a division of Yale University.
The school is known for its especially scholarly orientation and a disproportionately large number of its graduates (4%) choose careers in academia.
Yale's curriculum is generally less geared toward corporate and commercial law than that of other leading schools, such as Columbia, NYU, and Harvard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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