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Encyclopedia > Yakhchal
Yakh-chal
Yakh-chal

A yakh-chāl is an ancient natural refrigerator. Download high resolution version (600x652, 304 KB)A yakhchal, built near Kerman, Iran, several centuries ago, was used for storing ice during summers. ... Download high resolution version (600x652, 304 KB)A yakhchal, built near Kerman, Iran, several centuries ago, was used for storing ice during summers. ...


The subterranean domed structure often stored ice in it, but sometimes was known to keep food material in it as well.


Ice from nearby mountains was brought in during the cold seasons, and stored there for use during the summer months. This ice was from the ancient times used for the making of the traditional Persian ice cream. The acronym ICE can refer to: InterCity Express, a German high-speed train InterCity Express (CityTrain), an interurban train used by QR CityTrain in South East Queensland, Australia Internal combustion engine, a fuel engine In-circuit emulator, a computer hardware device In case of emergency, emergency number in mobile phones... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ...


The subterranean space coupled with the thick heat resistant constructing material kept the outside heat from reaching the interior space year round.


These stuctures were mainly built and used in Iran. Many remain standing that were built hundreds of years ago.


In 400 BC Iran, Persian engineers had already mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert. The ice was brought in during the winters from nearby mountains in bulk amounts, and stored in specially designed, naturally cooled refrigerators, called yakhchal (meaning ice storage). This was a large underground space (up to 5000 m³) that had thick walls (at least two meters at the base) made out of a special mortar called sārooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash in specific proportions, and which was resistant to heat transfer. This mixture was thought to be completely water impenetrable. The space often had access to a Qanat, and often contained a system of windcatchers that could easily bring temperatures inside the space down to frigid levels in summer days. The ice was then used to chill treats for royalty during hot summer days. Some 3,000 years ago the Persians learned how to dig underground aqueducts that would bring mountain ground water to the plains. ... Qajari era architecture of Hormozgan province. ...


See also

The Yakchal in Kerman is located about a mile from the center of the city. This cone shaped building is about sixty-feet high. The massive insulation and the continuous cooling waters that spiral down its side keep the winter ice stored here until summer. These Ice Houses used in desert towns from antiquity have a trench at the bottom to catch the spiraling waters where on cold desert nights it freezes. The ice is broken up and moved to caverns deep in the ground. As more water runs into the trench the process is repeated. Often seen around the ice houses and many of the homes in the desert are towers called badqirs or wind traps. Built of mud or mud brick, these badqirs, mentioned by Marco Polo, are square or round, but the operating principal is the same: to catch the slightest breeze in the vents at the top and to funnel the cooling air down through internal, vertically placed wooded slats to the water or dwelling below. More details about these ice houses can be found in "In the Footsteps of Marco Polo" by Harry Rutstein and Joanne Kroll and published by Viking in 1980. Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, is the second largest square in the world and arguably the gem of Persian architectural masterpieces. ... A mobile structure used in ice fishing may also be known as an icehouse Categories: Buildings and structures stubs ... Most rivers in Iran are seasonal and have traditionally not been able to supply the needs of urban settlements. ... Some 3,000 years ago the Persians learned how to dig underground aqueducts that would bring mountain ground water to the plains. ... In traditional Persian architecture, a Kariz (کاریز) is a small Qanat, usually within a network inside an urban setting. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
SummitPost - Yakhchal -- Climbing, Hiking & Mountaineering (783 words)
Yakhchal is one of the many 4000 meter plus peaks that form the Middle Wall of Central Alborz (see intro to Alborz Mountains above).
To the west, Yakhchal is connected to the 4165 m Sarmahoo and the 4234 m Kaman Kooh Peaks and to the east, it is connected to the 4082 m Koheno Peak.
Yakhchal and its nearby peaks are located in a remote portion of the Central Alborz Mountains.
Yakhchal Information (260 words)
In 400 BC Iran, Persian engineers had already mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert.
The ice was brought in during the winters from nearby mountains in bulk amounts, and stored in specially designed, naturally cooled refrigerators, called yakhchal (meaning ice storage).
This was a large underground space (up to 5000 m³) that had thick walls (at least two meters at the base) made out of a special mortar called sārooj, composed of sand, clay, egg whites, lime, goat hair, and ash in specific proportions, and which was resistant to heat transfer.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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