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Encyclopedia > Yacht
A modern yacht
A modern yacht

A yacht (from Dutch Jacht meaning "hunt") pron. [iat] (pronounced ya't) was originally defined as a light, fast sailing vessel used by the Dutch navy to pursue pirates and other transgressors around and into the shallow waters of the Low Countries. After its selection by Charles II of England as the vessel of choice to return to Britain from the Netherlands for his restoration, it came to be used to convey important persons (see under History below). Image File history File links Information_icon. ... Jona Bechtolt is an electronic musician from Portland, Oregon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1232x1840, 1438 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1232x1840, 1438 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... Diagram of Sailboat, in this case a typical monohull sloop with a bermuda or marconi rig. ... Royal Netherlands Navy Jack The Koninklijke Marine (Royal Netherlands Navy ) is the navy of the Netherlands. ... The flag of 18th-century pirate Calico Jack Piracy is robbery committed at sea, or sometimes on the shore, by an agent without a commission from a sovereign nation. ... The Low Countries, the historical region of de Nederlanden, are the countries (see Country) on low-lying land around the delta of the Rhine, Scheldt, and Meuse (Maas) rivers. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ...


Later, the word came to designate a wider range of vessels, almost always in private use (i.e., not used for commercial carriage of cargo or passengers), propelled by sail, power, or both, and used for pleasure cruising or racing. Often, powered yachts are referred to as motor yachts, to differentiate them from yachts with sail power. A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ... A cruising sailboat anchored in the San Blas Islands, in Panama. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ...

Contents

Modern use of yacht

Motor Yachts
Motor Yachts

In modern use, the term yacht applies to two rather different classes of vessels, sailing yachts and power yachts. Traditionally yachts were differentiated from working ships mainly by purpose—yachts were swift and comfortable conveyances of the wealthy and powerful. It was not until the ascendancy of the steamboat and other types of powerboat that sailing vessels came to be seen as luxury items. Modern use of the term applies to nearly all sailing vessels, other than sailing dinghies, that are used for yacht racing or for pleasure cruising. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 1. ... Paddle steamers — Lucerne, Switzerland. ... Categories: Stub | Boat types ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ...


Motor yachts, on the other hand, retain more of the original sense of power and luxury. Much larger and generally far more expensive than the average sailing yacht, the motor yacht contains sufficient living space for at least several days at sea. Lengths generally start at 30 feet (9 m) and go up to well over a hundred feet (30 m). Mega yachts, Luxury yachts, such as the ones owned by Larry Ellison, Bill Gates and most of the royalties, can reach over 525 feet (160 m) (Still Under Construction for the Emir of Dubai—the yacht has its own submarine bay, helipad and hanger, garage for jet skis and four-wheel-drive vehicles, hospital, gym, squash court and theatre) and is longer than a destroyer. The 412-ft (125 m) Royal Yacht Britannia (a steam yacht) has been retired from service and is now on permanent exhibit at Leith. Saint-Tropez is famous for its luxury yachts. ... The term luxury yacht refers to a very expensive privately owned yacht which is professionally crewed. ... Lawrence Joseph Ellison (born August 17, 1944) is the co-founder and CEO of Oracle Corporation, a major database software company. ... William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American entrepreneur and the co-founder, chairman, former chief software architect, and former CEO of Microsoft, the worlds largest software company. ... Her Majestys Yacht Britannia was the 83rd Royal Yacht since the restoration of King Charles II in 1660. ... Formerly a municipal burgh,[1] Leith is a town at the mouth of the Water of Leith and is the port of Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


Sailing yachts

CS30, a sailing yacht
CS30, a sailing yacht

Sailing yachts crange in overall length (Length Over All - LOA, in yachting parlance) from about 6 m (20 feet) to well over 30 m (98 ft), where the distinction between a yacht and a ship becomes blurred. However, most privately owned yachts fall in the range of about 7 m to 14 m (about 23-46 ft); the cost of building and keeping a yacht rises quickly as length increases. In the US, sailors tend to refer to smaller yachts as sailboats, while referring to the general sport of sailing as yachting. (Note: within the limited context of sailboat racing, a yacht is any sailing vessel partaking in a race, regardless of size) Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 385 KB) PIC: CS 30 sailboat I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 385 KB) PIC: CS 30 sailboat I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Traditional wooden cutter beating. ...


Monohull yachts are typically fitted with a fixed keel or a centerboard (adjustable keel) below the waterline to counterbalance the overturning force of wind on the vessel's sails. By contrast, multihull yachts (a catamaran is an example of this type of vessel) use two or more hulls widely separated from each other to provide a stable base that resists overturning. A monohull is a type of boat having only one hull, unlike multihulled boats which can have two or more individual hulls connected to one another. ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ... A multihull is a ship or boat with more than one hull. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ...


Until the 1950s almost all yachts were made of wood, or in a larger yacht, steel, but nowadays there is a much wider range of materials. Most common is fibreglass, but steel, aluminium and much less often because of insurance difficulties, ferrocement are used as well. Wood is still used (traditional board-based methods as well as modern technologies based on plywood, veneers and epoxy-glues etc.), but wood is mostly used when building an individual boat by a hobbyist or wooden boat purist. At the other extreme, high-performance yachts such as those used in the Volvo Ocean Race and the America's Cup are often constructed from carbon fibre. There is a disputed proposal to merge this article with glass-reinforced plastic. ... Ferrocement is both a method and a material used in building or sculpture with cement, sand, water and wire or mesh material - often called the thin shell. ... Toy constructed from plywood. ... Veneer, in woodworking, refers to thin slices of wood, usually thinner than 3 millimetres (1/8 inch). ... Epoxy or polyepoxide is a thermosetting epoxide polymer that cures (polymerizes and crosslinks) when mixed with a catalyzing agent or hardener. Most common epoxy resins are produced from a reaction between epichlorohydrin and bisphenol-A. The first commercial attempts to prepare resins from epichlorohydrin occurred in 1927 in the United... Volvo Ocean Race 2005 - 2006 logo Volvo Ocean Race (formerly the Whitbread Round the World Race) is a yacht race around the world, held every four years. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Carbon fiber composite is a strong, light and very expensive material. ...


Modern yachts have efficient sail-plans that allow them to sail into the wind. This capability is the result of a sail plan and hull design (typically a sloop rig) that utilizes Bernoulli's principle to generate lift. A sail-plan is a formal set of drawings, usually prepared by a marine architect. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat A sloop (From Dutch sloep) in sailing, is a vessel with a fore-and-aft rig. ... Bernoullis Principle states that in an ideal fluid (low speed air is a good approximation), with no work being performed on the fluid, an increase in velocity occurs simultaneously with decrease in pressure or gravitational energy. ... The lift force, lifting force or simply lift is a mechanical force generated by a solid object moving through a fluid. ...


Classification of sailing yachts

Sailing yachts fall into four basic categories: 'Day Sailing', 'Weekender', 'Cruiser' and 'Racer'.


Day sailing yachts

Day sailing yachts are usually small sub-6-metre (20 ft) vessels. Sometimes called dinghies, they often have a retractable keel, centerboard, or daggerboard. Day sailing yachts do not have a cabin as they are designed for hourly or daily use and not for overnight journeys. Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... A daggerboard is a type of centreboard used by various sailing craft. ...


Weekender yachts

Weekender yachts are small, sub-9.5 metre (30 foot) vessels. They often have twin-keels or lifting keels. This allows them to operate in shallow waters, and if needed 'dry out' – become beached as the tide falls, the hull shape (or twin-keel layout) allows the boat to sit upright when there is no water. Such boats are designed to undertake short journeys, rarely lasting more than 2 to 3 days (hence their name). Of course, in coastal areas long trips may be undertaken in a series of short hops. Weekenders usually only have a simple cabin, often consisting of a single 'saloon', with bedspace for 2-3 people, and clever use of ergonomics to allow both galley (kitchen) space, seating and space for navigation equipment. There is limited space for large stores of water/food. Weekenders tend to be slower vessels due to their small sail area, and due to their small size they can be overwhelmed by heavy seas. Most are single-mast 'Bermudan sloop' rigged vessels, with a single foresail (of the 'jib' or 'genoa') type and a single mainsail. Some are gaff rigged. The smallest of this type, generally called pocket yachts or pocket cruisers, can be transported on special trailers. A foresail refers to one of several types of sail set on the foremost mast (foremast) of a sailing vessel: Any triangular sail set forward of the foremast, such as a jib. ... A typical jib on a small yacht A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ... A genoa (pronounced like the city, or as jenny) is a type of large jib-sail used on bermuda rigged craft, commonly the single-masted sloop and twin-masted boats such as yawl and ketch. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... A pocket cruiser, microcruiser or pocket yacht is a small, often lightweight sailboat with a cabin, which is intended for recreational cruising (either overnight or for extended periods) of the owners chosen waterways. ...


Cruising yachts

Cruisers are by the far the most common in private usage, making up most of the 7 m to 14 m (23 to 46 ft) range. These vessels can be quite complex in design, as designers try to find a balance between docile handling qualities, interior space, good light-wind performance and on-board comfort. The huge range of such craft, from dozens of builders worldwide make it hard to give a single illustrative description. However, most favour a teardrop-planform hull, with a wide, flat bottom and deep single-fin keel to give good stability. Most are single-mast 'Bermudan sloop' rigged vessels, with a single fore-sail (of the 'jib' or 'Genoa') type and a single mainsail. Spinnaker sails, with huge areas, are often supplied for light wind use. These types are often chosen as family vessels, especially those in the 8 to 12 metre (32 to 40 ft) range. Such a vessel will usually have many rooms below deck. Typically there will be 3 double-berth cabins, a single large saloon (galley, seating and navigation area) and a 'head' (toilet/shower-room). The interior will be finished in wood panelling, with plenty of storage space. Cruisers are quite capable of taking on long-range passages of many thousands of miles, so have large freshwater tanks. Such boats have a cruising speed of around 10 km/h. This basic design is typical of the standard types produced by the major yacht-builders. Most large luxury yachts (15m+, 50 feet+) are also cruisers, but their design varies greatly as they are usually 'one off' designs to the specific needs of the buyer. A typical jib on a small yacht A jib is a triangular staysail set ahead of the foremost mast of a sailing boat. ... A genoa (pronounced like the city, or as jenny) is a type of large jib-sail used on bermuda rigged craft, commonly the single-masted sloop and twin-masted boats such as yawl and ketch. ... A mainsail is the most important sail raised from the main (or only) mast of a sailing vessel. ... It has been suggested that gennaker be merged into this article or section. ... The head is a ships water closet (toilet). ...


Racing yachts

Main article: Yacht racing
Inshore yacht racing in Sydney Harbour, Australia

Racing yachts try to reduce the wetted surface area (which creates drag) by keeping the hull light whilst having a deep and heavy bulb keel, allowing them to support a tall mast with a great sail area. Modern designs tend to have a very wide beam, with a flat bottom, to provide buoyancy preventing an excessive heel angle. Speeds of up to 40 mph can be obtained in good conditions. Dedicated racing yachts sacrifice crew comfort for speed, having basic accommodation to reduce weight. Depending on the type of race, such a yacht may be crewed by as many as 15 people. At the other extreme there are 'single handed' races, where one person alone must control the yacht. Yacht races may be over a simple course of only a few miles, as in the harbour racing of the International One Design, long-distance, open-ocean races, like the Bermuda Race, or epic trans-global contests such as the Global Challenge and Clipper Round the World Race. Ocean racing yachts have very good sea-handling qualities, as they must be able to maintain good speeds in all but the heaviest conditions. Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 157 KB)J-24 yacht racing, Sydney Harbour, Australia Location: Sydney Harbour, Australia Date: 30 October 2004 Photographer: Richard Ling <[email protected] ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 157 KB)J-24 yacht racing, Sydney Harbour, Australia Location: Sydney Harbour, Australia Date: 30 October 2004 Photographer: Richard Ling <[email protected] ... For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... An IOD racer on a mooring in Hamilton Harbour, Bermuda, in 2006. ... The Bermuda Race, or Newport Bermuda Race, is a biennial yacht race from Newport, Rhode Island to the island of Bermuda, a distance of 635 nautical miles (1175 km) across open ocean. ... The Global Challenge is a round the world yacht race run by Challenge Business, the company started by Sir Chay Blyth in 1989. ... The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race was conceived in 1995 by well-known yachsman Sir Robin Knox-Johnston and the first race set off a year later on 16 October 1996. ...


Propulsion

The motive force being the wind, sailing is more economical and environmentally friendly than any other means of propulsion. Motor yachts depend upon mechanical means for propulsion, typically an internal combustion engine that burns fossil fuels. These are more expensive to operate than sailing vessels due to fuel costs and the large engines typically used. A more economical hybrid type of vessel is a motor sailing yacht that can use either sail or motor propulsion (or both) as conditions dictate. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... // Fossil fuels are hydrocarbons, primarily coal, fuel oil or natural gas, formed from the remains of dead plants and animals. ...


Many 'pure' sailing yachts are also equipped with a low-power internal-combustion engine for use in conditions of calm and for when entering or leaving difficult anchorages. Vessels less than 25ft in length generally carry a petrol outboard-motor of between 5 and 40 horsepower (3.5 and 30 kW). Larger vessels have in-board diesel engines, of between 20 and 100 horsepower (15 and 75 kW) depending on size. In the common 14 m to 24 m (23 to 46 ft) class, engines of 20 to 40 horsepower are the most common.


Modern sailing yachts

In recent years, small/medium-sized private yachts have evolved from fairly simple vessels with basic accommodation to sophisticated and luxurious boats. This is largely due to reduced hull-building costs brought about by the introduction of fibre-glass hulls, and increased automation and 'production line' techniques to yacht building, especially in Europe. In recent years the amount of electric equipment used on yachts has increased greatly. Even 20 years ago, it was not common for a 7 m (25 ft) yacht to have electric lighting. Now all but the smallest, most basic yachts have electric lighting, radio and navigation aids such as GPS (Global Positioning System). Yachts around 10 m (33 ft) bring in comforts such as hot water, pressurised water systems, refrigerators etc. Aids such as radar, echo-sounding and autopilot are common. This means that the auxiliary engine now also performs the vital function of powering an alternator to provide electrical power and to recharge the yacht's on-board batteries. For yachts engaged on long-range cruising wind- and solar-powered generators can perform the same function. On the biggest, 40m+ (130 ft) luxury yachts, every modern convenience, from air conditioning to television systems is found. Sailing yachts of this size are often highly automated, with computer-controlled electric winches controlling the sails. Such complexity requires dedicated power-generation systems. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is currently the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). ... This long range radar antenna, known as ALTAIR, is used to detect and track space objects in conjunction with ABM testing at the Ronald Reagan Test Site on the Kwajalein atoll. ... Early 20th century Alternator made in Budapest, Hungary, in the power generating hall of a hydroelectric station. ...


History

A yacht (From Dutch Jacht meaning "hunt" or "big ship") was originally defined as a light, fast sailing vessel used by the Dutch navy to pursue pirates and other transgressors around and into the shallow waters of the Low Countries.


The use of the yacht as a pleasure boat began with Charles II of Britain. Yachts have been around for 3,000 years as is mentioned in the introduction to this article. The origin of pleasure-boating, including royal pleasure-boating, is lost in prehistory. Many ancient monarchs are said by the sources to have had pleasure boats, some quite spectacular. Before Charles II, the Jachtschip was a pursuit ship used by the Dutch to overtake pirates. Charles' preference for a vessel of this type for his return combined with his later patronage of pleasure-boating gave the sport the specific cast that we call "yachting".


Yachting for pleasure was formerly the province of the wealthy due to expense and the manpower required (because the boats were big), but today has become the pastime of many worldwide. King Charles II is mentioned as enjoying the sport in the diaries of Samuel Pepys. In Britain, the sport of yachting became widely popular in the late Victorian (1837-1901) period. Queen Victoria and her family maintained a fleet of sail- and steam-yachts at her residence on the Isle of Wight. The town of Cowes on the island is still seen by many as the world home of yachting, hosting the famous Cowes Week sailing festival in the summer. Like most other yachting festivals, this consists mainly of organised yacht racing by both dedicated racing yachts and a series of 'class' events catering for the wide variety of non-dedicated yachts. Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, famous chiefly for his comprehensive diary. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... Cowes Week is the longest-running regular regatta in the world. ...


References

  • Origin of the yacht
  • Fraser, Antonia,"Royal Charles". A number of editions exist.
  • Partridge, Eric, "Origins, A Short Etymological Dictionary of Modern English", Greenwich House, 1983, ISBN 0-517-41425-2
  • International Sailing Federation Racing Rules of Sailing

    The International Sailing Federation is the world governing body for the sport of sailing, particularly yacht and dinghy racing. ...

    External links

    • Couach - Luxurious Yacht manufacturer, Patrol boats
    • Most complete Superyacht Information Source
    • Mega Yacht Building Company in Turkey
    • VH1's The World's Most Insane Mega Yachts
    • 289.1 ft / 88 m Maltese Falcon - The World's Biggest Sailing Yacht
    • Yacht Finder at East Mediteranean
    • The Largest source for Motor Yacht Charter
    • Classical Wooden Yachts

    See also

    Look up yacht in
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    Yachts
    Types of sailing vessels and rigs
    Barque | Barquentine | Bermuda rig | Bilander | Brig | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Dutch Clipper | Cog | Corvette | Cutter | Dhow | Fifie | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Frigate | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galiot | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Jackass-barque | Junk | Ketch | Longship | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pink | Pocket Cruiser | Polacca | Pram | Proa | Sailing hydrofoil | Schooner | Ship of the Line | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall Ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Vinta | Wherry | Windjammer | Windsurfer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl


    Sir Peter James Blake KBE (October 1, 1948–December 6, 2001) was a New Zealand yachtsman who led his country to two successive America’s Cup victories. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Blue Cruise (Mavi Yolculuk in Turkish) is the term used for recreational boating tours along Turkeys spectacular southwestern coasts. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... 2 GP14s, a Topper and a Graduate Dinghy sailing is the activity of sailing small boats by using (1) the sails and (2) underwater foils (centreboard and rudder). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This is a list of the worlds longest motor luxury yachts in order of their length. ... Saint-Tropez is famous for its luxury yachts. ... A small marina at Brixham, Devon, England. ... Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... Rona at ICY Regatta, Auckland 2003 Rona was designed in Scotland by one of the world’s greatest yacht designers, G.L Watson, and was constructed in 1892 in Auckland, New Zealand, by master craftsman and designer, Robert Logan (Senior) for Wellington merchant and benefactor, Alexander Horsburgh Turnbull, whose collection... Yacht chartering is the practice of renting, or chartering, a sailboat or motor yacht and traveling to various coastal or island destinations. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ... A yacht broker is a specialist agent who acts as a representative for the sale of a yacht or boat. ... Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (from wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A barc is a type of sailing vessel. ... This article is about the ship. ... In sailing, a bermuda rig is: A rig of mainsail or course that consists of a triangular sail set aft of the mast, with its head raised to the top of the mast, its luff running down the mast and normally attached to it for all its length, its tack... A Bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... Description In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, two or three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... A model of a vessel of the clipper type, the four-masted barque named Belle Étoile A clipper was a very fast multiple-masted sailing ship of the 19th century. ... While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more then a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. ... Excavated cog from 1380 Cogs or rather cog-built vessels came into existence around 12th century AD. They were cheracterized by flush-laid flat bottom at midships but gradually shifted to overlapped strakes near the posts. ... French steam corvette Dupleix (1856-1887) Canadian corvettes on antisubmarine convoy escort duty during World War II. A corvette is a small, maneuverable, lightly armed warship, smaller than a frigate but larger than a coastal patrol craft. ... An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... A Dhow near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... A postcard showing the St. ... Dutch fluyts of 17th Century A fluyt or a flute (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel originally designed as a dedicated cargo vessel. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... Galiot in Willaumezs Dictionnaire de la Marine Galiots (or galliots) were types of ships from the Age of Sail. ... A Spanish galleon A galleon was a large, multi-decked sailing ship used primarily by the nations of Europe from the 16th to 18th centuries. ... In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... A jackass-barque, sometimes spelled jackass bark, is a sailing ship with 3 (or more masts), of which the foremast is square-rigged and the main is partially square-rigged (topsail, topgallant, etc. ... A junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... The Oseberg longship (Viking Ship Museum, Norway) Oseberg longship from the front, one of the most stunning expressions of Norse art and craftsmanship A longship tacking in the wind Longships were ships primarily used by the Scandinavian Vikings and the Saxons to raid coastal and inland settlements during the European... A Mersey flat is a two masted, doubled-ended barge with rounded bilges, carvel build and fully decked. ... A multihull is a ship or boat with more than one hull. ... The Santa Maria at anchor by Andries van Eertvelt, painted c. ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... There are two classifications of Pink. ... A pocket cruiser, microcruiser or pocket yacht is a small, often lightweight sailboat with a cabin, which is intended for recreational cruising (either overnight or for extended periods) of the owners chosen waterways. ... A polacca is a type of seventeenth-century sailing vessel, similar to the xebec. ... A pram or pramm was a type of shallow-draught flat-bottomed ship used in Europe during the 18th century, particularly in the Baltic Sea during the Great Northern War and Napoleonic Wars, as the prams shallow draught allowed it to approach the shore. ... R. M. Munroes 1898 proa A Proa is a multihull vessel consisting of two (usually) unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... A sailing hydrofoil is a sailboat with wing-like foils mounted under the hull. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat A sloop (From Dutch sloep) in sailing, is a vessel with a fore-and-aft rig. ... The Smack was a English sailing vessel that was used to bring the fish to Market for most of the 19th Century and even in small numbers up to the Second World War. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ... Main-mast of a square-rigged ship, with all square sails set except the course. ... The USCGC Eagle. ... The distinctive sailing barges that were once a common sight on Londons River Thames, were commercial craft relying on sail power alone. ... Polynesian (Hawaiian navigators) sailing trimaran, ca 1781 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A traditional boat found in the southern Philippine island of Mindanao characterized by a colorful sail of assorted vertical colors. ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... A windjammer is a type of sailing ship with a large iron hull, usually used for cargo in the nineteenth century. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing gybe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii, one of the popular destinations for windsurfing. ... XEBEC is a subsidiary of the anime studio Production I.G. that specialises in the production of television anime. ... Yawl sailing vessel. ...

    List of ISAF international keelboat classes

    11 mR | 12 mR | 2.4 mR | 5.5 metre | 6 mR | 8 mR | Access 2.3 | Dragon | Etchells | Flying Fifteen | H-boat | J/22 | J/24 | J/105 | Melges 24 | Open 60 Monohull | Soling | Sonar | Star | Tempest | Yngling The International Sailing Federation is the world governing body for the sport of sailing, particularly yacht and dinghy racing. ... The 11:Metre is a sloop-rigged yacht with One Design rules that specify every hardware and rope. ... The 12-metre class sailing vessels replaced the huge and expensive J-class yachts that were raced in the 1930s. ... Paralympic Class 2. ... The International 5. ... spanker ... Former Olympic Class The Dragon is a keelboat designed by Johan Anker in 1929. ... Etchells are a one design class of sailing boat. ... The Flying Fifteen is a keelboat designed by Uffa Fox in 1947. ... The H-Boat is a keelboat designed by Hans Groop of Finland in 1967, with some minor modifications by Paul Elvström in 1971. ... The International J/22 is a popular fixed keel one design racing sailboat normally raced with a crew of three or four people (total crew weight is restricted to 275 kg/605 lb). ... The International J/24 is one of the worlds most popular one-design keelboats. ... The International J/105 is a fixed keel one design racing sailboat. ... The Melges 24 is a one-design class of sailboat commonly used for racing. ... The International Monohull Open Classes Association (IMOCA) is an international assocation within the sport of sailing which administers the monohull Open 50 and Open 60 classes of sailboats. ... A soling is a small class of keelboat that was used as the Olympic keelboat from 1972-2000. ... A Sonar start The Sonar is a 7 m (23 ft) one-design keelboat for three to five people. ... A Star (or Starboat) is a 6. ... The Tempest is a keelboat designed by Ian Procter. ... Yngling (keelboat) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


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    OLYMPOS YACHTING TURKEY :: YACHT CHARTERS GULET CHARTER BOAT CRUISES BLUE CRUISES CABIN CHARTERS IN TURKEY (818 words)
    Olympos Yachting Türkei veranstaltet Yacht Charter und blaue Reisen, Kabinen Charter und Kojen Charter, Boots-Reisen, Mitsegeln zwischen Antalya, Kemer, Olympos, Finike, Demre, Kekova, Kas, Kalkan, Fethiye, Goecek, Marmaris und Bodrum in der Türkei.
    Olympos Yachting Turkije verstrekt Jacht Handvest en blauwe cruises, blauwe reizen, boot cruises tussen Fethiye, Kas en Olympos, cabine handvest, cabinecruises, die tussen Antalya, Kemer, Olympos, Finike, Demre, verzonken Stad Kekova, Kas, Kalkan, Fethiye, Gocek, Marmaris en Bodrum in Turkije varen.
    Olympos Yachting Turchia provvede dei yacht charter e crociere azzurre, viaggi azzurri, crociere in barca fra Fethiye, Kas e Olympos, charter cabine, crociere cabine, fra Antalya, Kemer, Olympos, Finike, Demre, Sunken City Kekova, Kas, Kalkan, Fethiye, Gocek, Marmaris e Bodrum in Turchia.
    Yachting, Turkey-Adiyamanli.org (5001 words)
    Yacht owners or captains must surrender their transit to the harbour-master when the cruise is completed.
    Foreigners may leave their yachts in Turkey at a licensed yacht harbour or yacht docking area for the purpose of storage, maintenance or repair, for a period of 2 years, and may leave the country using any form of transportation they choose.
    Yacht owners may leave their yachts for longer periods, up to 5 years, provided that the yacht sails from the harbour at least once every 2 years.
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