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Encyclopedia > Xochimilco
Xochimilco within the Federal District
Xochimilco within the Federal District
Chalupa boats at the floating gardens of Xochimilco.
Chalupa boats at the floating gardens of Xochimilco.
Historic Centre of Mexico City and Xochimilcoa
UNESCO World Heritage Site
State Party Flag of Mexico Mexico
Type Cultural
Criteria ii, iii, iv, v
Identification #412
Regionb Latin America and the Caribbean

Inscription History Image File history File links Xochimilco,_México_DF.png Location of Xochimilco Borough within the Mexican Federal District. ... Image File history File links Xochimilco,_México_DF.png Location of Xochimilco Borough within the Mexican Federal District. ... The Mexican Federal District, known in Spanish as Distrito Federal (D.F.), is an area within Mexico that is not part of any of the Mexican states, but an independent self-governing city-state and the seat of the Federal Government. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1279x875, 256 KB) Tipical boats in Xochimilco, México D.F. Mexico. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1279x875, 256 KB) Tipical boats in Xochimilco, México D.F. Mexico. ... Chalupa boats at Xochimilco. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in North America, South America, and the Caribbean. ...

Formal Inscription: 1987
11th Session

a Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
b As classified officially by UNESCO
A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

Xochimilco IPA: [so.tʃi.ˈmil.ko] (Nahuatl xóchitl = flower; milli = cultivated field) is one of the sixteen delegaciones within Mexican Federal District. It is located south from Mexico City. To the north it has borders with Coyoacán, Tlalpan and Iztapalapa; to the west with Tláhuac; and to the southeast with Milpa Alta. It covers an area of 122 km^2; it is the third biggest delegación. Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Nahuatl is a native language of central Mexico. ... The Mexican Federal District is divided into 16 boroughs (delegaciones) for local government and administrative purposes. ... The Mexican Federal District, known in Spanish as Distrito Federal (D.F.), is an area within Mexico that is not part of any of the Mexican states, but an independent self-governing city-state and the seat of the Federal Government. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... Location of Coyoacán within the Mexican Federal District Jardín Centenario Plaza Hidalgo Coyoacán (Place of the coyotes in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... The Ajusco Mountains in Tlalpan, Mexico City Tlalpan is the largest of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District (Mexico City) is divided. ... Iztapalapa is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Tláhuac is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Milpa Alta is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... The Mexican Federal District is divided into 16 boroughs (delegaciones) for local government and administrative purposes. ...


Xochimilco is better known for its extended series of canals — all that remains of the ancient Lake Xochimilco. Xochimilco has kept its ancient traditions, even though its proximity to Mexico City influence that area to urbanize. Movies like Maria Candelaria (1940), have given that area a romantic reputation where all inhabitants travel in colourful trajineras (Xochimilco boats) between chinampas covered with flowers. Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ...


Today, agriculture is an important but minor activity -- the canals represent only a small fraction of their former extent. Chinamperia (chinampa-related activities) was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1987. Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Precolonial

First settlements are dated around the late Pre-Classic period (B.C.200-A.D.250). This suggests that their culture was related to that of Cuicuilco, one of the first urban settlements in the southern Valley of Mexico. Cuicuilco was an ancient Mexica city (circa 700 B.C. to A.D. 150) and is a significant archaeological site in the central Mexican highlands, near the southeastern portion of the valley of Mexico. ... The Valley of Mexico is a highlands plateau in central Mexico roughly coterminous with the present-day Distrito Federal and the eastern half of Estado de Mexico. ...


However, just as with the rest of the valley, during the Classical period most of the population concentrated in the city of Teotihuacan, northeast of Texcoco Lake. Most of the Xochimilco territory was abandoned and subject to the city of the gods (Teotihuacan). After the falling of Teotihuacan, the Xochimilco area welcomed some of their inhabitants along with other Chichimec tribes from the north of Mesoamerica. Chichimecs abandoned their original places because of a severe drought at the end of the Classical period. Also, Chichimecs had recently received an increased number of immigrants from northern Mesoamerican tribes, whose culture was nomadic and bellicose. Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... Lake Texcoco, detail from 1847 Bruff/Disturnell map. ... Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ... Chichimeca was the name that the Aztecs generically gave to a wide range of nomadic groups that inhabited the north of modern-day Mexico. ... The cultural areas of Mesoamerica Mesoamerica or Meso-America (Spanish: Mesoamérica) was a geographical culture area extending from central Honduras and northwestern Costa Rica on the south, and, in Mexico, from the Soto la Marina River in Tamaulipas and the Rio Fuerte in Sinaloa on the north. ... Chichimeca was the name that the Aztecs generically gave to a wide range of nomadic groups that inhabited the north of modern-day Mexico. ... Chichimeca was the name that the Aztecs generically gave to a wide range of nomadic groups that inhabited the north of modern-day Mexico. ... Mesoamerica is the region extending from central Mexico south to the northwestern border of Costa Rica that gave rise to a group of stratified, culturally related agrarian civilizations spanning an approximately 3,000-year period before the European discovery of the New World by Columbus. ...


One of the migrant tribes that arrived to Xochimilco was the Xochimilcas, who penetrated into the heart of Mesoamerica between the 10th and 14th century. They founded the ceremonial centre of Cuailama in the 10th century (today Santa Cruz Acalpixca). A number of prehispanic hieroglyphs in the nearby mountain range have been found, which are believed to be related to ceremonial rituals. Xochimilcas extended along Xochimilco lakeshore and the isles of Tláhuac and Mixquic towards the mountain range of Ajusco-Chichinauhtzin. The cultural areas of Mesoamerica Mesoamerica or Meso-America (Spanish: Mesoamérica) was a geographical culture area extending from central Honduras and northwestern Costa Rica on the south, and, in Mexico, from the Soto la Marina River in Tamaulipas and the Rio Fuerte in Sinaloa on the north. ... Prehispanic describes the period of time before Spanish explorers discovered and conquered Mesoamerica and South America. ... Mesoamerica is one of the relatively few places in the world where writing has developed independently throughout history. ... Tláhuac is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... San Andrés Mixquic is a small town located in the Tláhuac borough of the Mexican Federal District, on the south-eastern fringes of Mexico City. ...


It is believed that the Xochimilcas invented the chinampa and founded the city of Xochimilco. It has also been suggested that it was just an improvement to a technique previously introduced; the technological peak was achieved during the 11th and 14th century thanks to Nahuatlacas tribes. Chinampa is an agricultural practice originally from lake regions in the center of Mexico. They were built by accumulating mud at them bottom of the lake during low tides. Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ... Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ...


Mexicas considered the Xochimilcas distant relatives like many of the neighbouring towns of the Valley of Mexico lakes, sharing the same mythic origin (Chicomoztoc). Legend has it, that after leaving Aztlán, Mexicas were accompanied by a tribe whose glyph identifies Xochimilco. However, when the Mexicas arrived to the Valley of Mexico, Xochimilcas were already established in the south. Mexicas declared war on the chinampa towns of Xochimilco and Tláhuac because they were mercenaries of Coxcox, culhuacan's tlatoani (Nowadays Iztapalapa). In 1323 Mexicas defeated Xochimilco’s tlatoani, Acatonalli, and joined Culhuacan politics; they were now free from Culhua control. Ilancueitl, Coxcox's daughter, was given as a bride to Mexicas ruler as an alliance symbol. However, Mexicas gave her in sacrifice to Xipe Totec, and this renewed hostilities with Culhuacan, which allied with Tecpanecas from Azcapotzalco and defeated Mexicas in 1367. For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... The Valley of Mexico is a highlands plateau in central Mexico roughly coterminous with the present-day Distrito Federal and the eastern half of Estado de Mexico. ... The seven caves of Chicomoztoc, from Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca. ... The seven caves of Chicomoztoc, from Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca Aztlán (, from Nahuatl Aztlan ) is the legendary ancestral home of the Nahua peoples, one of the main cultural groups in Mesoamerica. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... variant glyphs representing the character a (allographs of a) in the Zapfino typeface. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... The Valley of Mexico is a highlands plateau in central Mexico roughly coterminous with the present-day Distrito Federal and the eastern half of Estado de Mexico. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ... Tláhuac is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... In Aztec mythology, Coxcox was the only male survivor of the Deluge. ... Culhuacan or Colhuacan was one of the Nahuatl-speaking pre-Columbian city-states of the Valley of Mexico. ... A tlatoani was a member of the Aztec nobility. ... Iztapalapa is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... A tlatoani was a member of the Aztec nobility. ... Culhuacan or Colhuacan was one of the Nahuatl-speaking pre-Columbian city-states of the Valley of Mexico. ... In Aztec mythology, Coxcox was the only male survivor of the Deluge. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Xipe Totec ias depicted in the Codex Borgia, notice the bloody weapon and the flayed human skin he wears as a suit with the hands hanging down. ... Culhuacan or Colhuacan was one of the Nahuatl-speaking pre-Columbian city-states of the Valley of Mexico. ... Azcapotzalco (Place of the ants in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ...


In 1376, the Mexicas conquered Xochimilco again — once they were established in Tenochtitlan under tecpanecas rule —, however this time Xochimilco was annexed to the Azcapotzalco territory. Despite their alliance with Tecpanecas, Mexicas allied with Texcoco in order to start a war with the usurper Maxtla from Azcapotzalco; they succeeded in 1428. Two years later, Xochimilco was under attacked for the third time by Mexicas, this time was definitive and they were annexed to Tenochtitlan government. Consequently, Xochimilcas were forced to provide labour workers for the construction of Mexica's capital city and other urban projects, particularly Chapultepec’s aqueduct, Iztapalapa's avenue and the Nezahualcoyotl's albarradon (canal avenue). For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Azcapotzalco (Place of the ants in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Texcoco was a major site and city-state in the central Mexican plateau region of Mesoamerica during the Late Postclassic period of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican chronology. ... Maxtla was a Tepanec ruler of Azcapotzalco from 1426 to his death in 1428. ... Azcapotzalco (Place of the ants in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... For other uses, see Aztec (disambiguation). ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... The word Aztec is usually used as a historical term, although some contemporary Nahuatl speakers would consider themselves Aztecs. ... Chapultepec Park with Polanco at the right, as seen from Torre Mayor observation deck. ... Iztapalapa is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... This article is about the Texcocan philosopher-king. ...


Mexico Conquest and Colonial Period

According to legends, Cuauhtémoc travelled to Xochimilco requesting help for Tenochtitlan's defence. On its way, it is said that he planted an ahuehuete, which is now in the Barrio de San Juan. Hernán Cortés and allied armies conquered Xochimilco on April 16, 1521 and thereafter occupied Churubusco, Coyoacán, Oaxtepec and Cuernavaca. Cuauhtémoc tortured by Hernán Cortéz This article is about the Aztec Emperor named Cuauhtémoc. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Binomial name Taxodium mucronatum Tenore Taxodium mucronatum, also known as Montezuma Cypress or Ahuehuete (in the Nahuatl language), is a species of Taxodium native to much of Mexico (south to the highlands of southern Mexico), and also southernmost Texas, USA (just entering the state in the lower Rio Grande valley). ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Churubusco is a neighbourhood of Mexico City. ... Location of Coyoacán within the Mexican Federal District Jardín Centenario Plaza Hidalgo Coyoacán (Place of the coyotes in Nahuatl) is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Oaxtepec or Huaxtepec is a town in the municipality of Yautepec in Morelos state, Mexico. ... Cuernavaca is the capital city of the state of Morelos in Mexico. ...


Once Tenochtitlan conquest had finished, Apochquiyauhtzin tlatoani, the last Xochimilco ruler, became a Christian. It is not known if this was voluntary or forced. He was baptised as Luís Cortés Cerón de Alvarado on June 6, 1522; he took the surnames of conquerors Cortés and Alvarado. This tlatoani was allowed to govern Xochimilco as a conqueror's puppet. In fact, Hernán Cortés gave Xochimilco, lands and people, to Pedro de Alvarado immediately after the military conquest and remained in power until his death on 1541. Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... A tlatoani was a member of the Aztec nobility. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 1 day remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... Pedro de Alvarado y Contreras (Badajoz, c. ... A tlatoani was a member of the Aztec nobility. ... Hernán(do) Cortés Pizarro, 1st Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca (1485–December 2, 1547) was the conquistador who became famous for leading the military expedition that initiated the Spanish Conquest of Mexico. ... Pedro de Alvarado y Contreras (Badajoz, c. ...


Evangelisation of Xochimilco inhabitants and neighbouring towns was supervised by Franciscan missioners, among them, Martín de Valencia, Alfonso Paz, Juan de Nozarmendia and Bernardino de Sahagún. Between 1534 and 1579 a Franciscan convent was built, and it is currently associated to Xochimilco's cathedral. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


Philip II of Spain, increased Xochimilco status to city. In this way, Xochimilco was named the 'Noble City of Xochimilco'. Philip II (Spanish: Felipe II de Habsburgo; Portuguese: Filipe I) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was the first official King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, King of England (as King-consort of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, King...


The lack of attention from colonial administration to engineering projects that allowed the flourishing of chinampa activity in Xochimilco Lake caused flooding of cement factories in 1609. In 1576 Xochimilco had a smallpox epidemic, known as hueycololiztli; this happened again in 1777 in the context of the demographic crisis of the 18th century in the New Spain. Chinampas is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a highly contagious disease unique to humans. ...


Xochimilco kept an intensive commercial relationship with Mexico City via the lake system. It was also the route for trajineras (boats) coming from towns on the east to the capital city. By the middle of the 16th century, lakes on the south were isolated; the only aquatic route between Xochimilco and the capital was the Viga canal. Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ...


19th and 20th Century

After the Mexican independence, Xochimilco became part of Mexico State. Its main activity was still agriculture, whose production was transported by trajineras from the chinampas to the main markets in Mexico City, like La Merced and Jamaica. In 1850 the first steam railroad line between Mexico City and Xochimilco was inaugurated, increasing commerce between the cities. The main transport were trajineras until the first electric interurban tram was introduced in 1908, this tram service continues today as the Xochimilco Light Rail (popularly known as el tren ligero, "Light Train") service of Mexico City's STE electric surface transport system. The Mexican War of Independence, which lasted from 1810 to 1821, was Mexicos struggle for independence against Spanish colonial rule. ... The United Mexican States, or Mexico, is a federal republic, comprising 31 states. ... Chinampa is an Aztec term referring to a method of ancient Mesoamerican agriculture through floating gardens—small, rectangle-shaped areas of fertile arable land used for agriculture in the Xochimilco region of the Basin of Mexico. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... An interurban, also called a radial railway in parts of Canada, is a streetcar line running between urban areas or from urban to rural areas. ... A CLRV Streetcar in the City of Toronto. ... The Xochimilco Light Rail (locally known as el tren ligero) is a light rail line that services the south of Mexico City, Mexico. ...


During the Mexican revolution, all groups involved in the war settled in Xochimilco at some point. In 1911 Zapatists from Morelos broke into the Federal District (Mexico). Although they established their command post in Milpa Alta, soon they moved into Xochimilco delegacion's towns, including Xochimilco city, which was set on fire. In 1913 some cadets from the H. Colegio Militar (Militar College) were assassin by Victoriano Huerta's followers in the town of San Lucas Xochimanca. The next year, Emiliano Zapata and Francisco Villa signed the Plan de Xochimilco treaty, in a house in front of the main market (today a shoe store). This article is about the Mexican Revolution of 1910. ... Emiliano Zapata Salazar (August 8, 1879 – April 10, 1919) was a leading figure in the Mexican Revolution, which broke out in 1910, and which was initially directed against the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. ... Morelos is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ... Other Mexican States Capital Mexico City Area 1,479 km² Ranked 32nd Population (2000 census) 8,591,300 Ranked 2nd Head of Govt Andrés Manuel López Obrador PRD Federal Deputies (30) PRD = 27 PAN = 3 Federal Senators PAN = 1 PVEM = 1 PRD = 1 ISO 3166_2 Postal abbr. ... Milpa Alta is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... The Mexican Federal District is divided into 16 boroughs (delegaciones) for local government and administrative purposes. ... A graphical timeline is available here: Timeline of the Mexican Revolution José Victoriano Huerta Márquez (December 23, 1850 – January 13, 1916) was a Mexican military officer and President of Mexico. ... Emiliano Zapata Salazar (August 8, 1879 – April 10, 1919) was a leading figure in the Mexican Revolution, which broke out in 1910, and which was initially directed against the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz. ... For information about the boxer, see Pancho Villa (boxer). ...


In 1938 fluvial communication between Mexico City was cut with the closing of the Viga canal. Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ...


In 1968 constructions were carried out in the area in preparations for the Olympic games. The Cuemanco canal was partially converted into the canoe Olympic track Virgilio Uribe. On the outskirts of the delegation the Anillo Periferico (city bypass) was built. Conurbation with Mexico City happened during the last three decades of the 20th century. Delegation is handing a task over to a subordinate. ...


Wildlife

Lake Xochimilco is the only habitat for the critically endangered Axolotl salamander. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Xochimilco canals

The Xochimilco canals, all that's left of the extensive chinampas, are now a popular tourist attraction whose shores are crowded with houses and docks. The canals are particularly popular on the weekends and during public holidays, when many Mexican families and tourists rent boats complete with musicians and food. Tourists on Oʻahu, Hawaii Tourism is travel for predominantly recreational or leisure purposes, and also refers to the provision of services in support of this act. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Xochimilco. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Xochimilco Gardens | Planeta (1262 words)
In the Náhuatl language of the Aztecs, the name Xochimilco means "garden of flowers." The flowers that lined the streets of the city and its rooftop gardens took root here.
Xochimilco became recognized as a tourist attraction in its own right in the 1920s.
South of Xochimilco is the town of Milpa Alta, which holds a fair in May and June commemorating the noble nopal (prickly pear cactus).
Xochimilco - Aztecs and axolotls (262 words)
Xochimilco lies some 28km south of the centre of Mexico City, one of the largest and most populous urban places on earth - with a population of as many as 25 million people occupying some 900 square kilometres.
The Xochimilco wetland system is a remnant of the large lake in which Mexico City was first built.
Xochimilco has 47 kindergarden, primary and secondary schools in the private sector and 173 in the public sector.
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