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Encyclopedia > Wynton Marsalis
Wynton Marsalis

Background information
Birth name Wynton Learson Marsalis
Born October 18, 1961 (1961-10-18) (age 45)
Flag of United States New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Genre(s) Classical, jazz, post-bop
Occupation(s) Composer, pedagogue, trumpeter
Instrument(s) Trumpet
Years active 1980–present
Label(s) Columbia, Sony
Associated
acts
English Chamber Orchestra, Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra
Website www.WyntonMarsalis.com

Wynton Learson Marsalis (b. October 18, 1961) is an American trumpeter and composer. He is among the most prominent jazz musicians of the modern era and is also a well-known instrumentalist in classical music. He is also the Musical Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. A compilation of his series of inspirational letters to a young jazz musical student, named Anthony, has been published as To a Young Jazz Musician. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area  - City  350. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article discusses classical music in the first sense (see below). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Post-bop is a term for a form of small-combo jazz music that evolved in the early-to-mid sixties. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the French horn, trombone, baritone, euphonium, and tuba. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sony Classical is the successor to the Columbia and CBS Masterworks labels, assuming its new identity after the purchase of CBS Records by Sony Corporation. ... The English Chamber Orchestra is a small (hence chamber) orchestra based in London. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ...


Marsalis has made his reputation with a combination of skill in jazz performance and composition; a sophisticated, yet earthy and hip personal style; an impressive knowledge of jazz and jazz history; and virtuoso classical trumpeter. As of 2006, he has made sixteen classical and more than thirty jazz recordings, has been awarded nine Grammys, between the genres and the Pulitzer Prize for Music, the first time it has been awarded for a jazz recording. Hip is a slang term, an adjective meaning fashionably current, referring to someone who is conversant with or deeply involved in a particular trend or subject. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Pulitzer Prize for Music was first awarded in 1943. ...

Contents

Biography

Wynton Marsalis (pronounced: mär-SAHL-ĭs) was born on October 18, 1961, to Dolores Ferdinand and Ellis Marsalis, Jr.[1] He was the second among six sons: Branford, Wynton, Ellis, III (1964), Delfeayo, Mboya Kinyatta (1971), and Jason. Branford, Delfeayo, and Jason are also jazz musicians. Ellis is a poet, photographer, & network engineer based in Baltimore. Mboya has autism. is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ellis Marsalis (born 1934, New Orleans, LA) is an American musician. ... Branford Marsalis. ... Delfeayo Marsalis (Born July 28, 1965 in New Orleans, LA) is an American jazz tombonist and record producer. ... Jason Marsalis (b. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United...


His dad Ellis, a music teacher and pianist, was a longtime fixture on the New Orleans jazz scene, and several of Wynton's brothers, particularly saxophonist Branford Marsalis, trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis, and drummer Jason Marsalis, are also notable musicians. Branford Marsalis. ... Delfeayo Marsalis (Born July 28, 1965 in New Orleans, LA) is an American jazz tombonist and record producer. ... Jason Marsalis (b. ...


At an early age, Marsalis exhibited a keen interest and aptitude in music, coupled with a strong desire to contribute to American culture. At age six, Marsalis was given his first trumpet by a friend of his father, the legendary Al Hirt. At age eight he performed traditional New Orleans music in the Fairview Baptist Church band led by legendary banjoist, Danny Barker. At fourteen he was invited to perform with the New Orleans Philharmonic. During high school Marsalis was a member of the New Orleans Symphony Brass Quintet, New Orleans Community Concert Band, New Orleans Youth Orchestra, New Orleans Symphony and on weekends he performed in a jazz band as well as in the popular local funk band, the Creators. Al Hirt (November 7, 1922 – April 27, 1999) was a popular U.S. trumpeter and bandleader. ... Danny Barker (1909 - 1994) was a jazz guitarist and banjoist from New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Funk is an African American musical style. ...


He moved to New York City to attend the Juilliard School of Music in 1978 and quickly garnered a lot of attention. The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ...


Two years later in 1980, he joined the Jazz Messengers to study under master drummer and bandleader, Art Blakey. It was from Blakey that Marsalis acquired his concept for bandleading and for bringing intensity to each and every performance. In 1981, Marsalis toured with the Herbie Hancock quartet throughout the USA and Japan, as well as performing at the Newport Jazz Festival with Herbie. In the years to follow, Marsalis was invited to perform with Sarah Vaughan, Dizzy Gillespie, Harry Edison, Clark Terry, Sonny Rollins, and many other jazz legends. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Sarah Lois Vaughan (nicknamed Sassy and The Divine One), (March 27, 1924 – April 3, 1990) was an American jazz singer, described as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century [1]. // Sarah Vaughan was born in Newark, New Jersey in 1924. ... John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Harry (Sweets) Edison (1915–1999) was an American jazz trumpeter. ... Clark Terry performs with the Great Lakes Navy Band Jazz Ensemble Clark Terry (born December 14, 1920) is an American swing and bop trumpeter and flugelhorn player. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ...


Marsalis eventually assembled his own band and hit the road, performing over 120 concerts every year for ten consecutive years. His objective was to learn how to play, and to comprehend how best to give to his audience. Through an exhaustive series of performances, lectures, and music workshops, Marsalis rekindled widespread interest in an art form that had been largely abandoned and redefined out of what he saw as its artistic substance. Marsalis invested his creative energy as an advocate for a relatively small era in the history of jazz. He garnered recognition for the older generation of jazz musicians and prompted the re-issuance of jazz catalog by record companies worldwide. A quick glance at the better known jazz musicians today reveals many students of Marsalis's workshops and members of his formations: James Carter, Christian McBride, Roy Hargrove, Harry Connick Jr., Nicholas Payton, Eric Reed and Eric Lewis. James Carter (b. ... Christian McBride (born May 31, 1972, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a jazz bassist. ... Roy Hargrove, born in 1969 in Waco, Texas, has gone from a child prodigy to become an established young jazz trumpeter, with several albums as a leader under his belt. ... Harry Connick, Jr. ... Nicholas Payton is a jazz trumpet player. ... Eric Reed, (b. ... Eric Lewis, born May 13, 1973 in Camden, New Jersey, is an American jazz pianist. ...


Not content to focus solely on his musicianship, Marsalis devoted equal time to developing his compositional skills. The dance community quickly embraced his works, and he received commissions to create major compositions for Garth Fagan Dance, Peter Martins at the New York City Ballet, Twyla Tharp for the American Ballet Theatre, and for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. A musical composition is a piece of original music designed for repeated performance (as opposed to strictly improvisational music, in which each performance is unique). ... Dance (from French danser, perhaps from Frankish) generally refers to movement used as a form of expression, social interaction or presented in a spiritual or performance setting. ... Garth Fagan (1940 -) Modern dance choreographer. ... Peter Martins (October 27, 1946 - ) is a Danish ballet dancer and choreographer. ... Logo of the New York City Ballet The New York City Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein originally known as the American Ballet. ... Twyla Tharp (born July 1, 1941) is an American dancer and choreographer. ... Angel Corella as Aminta in the 2006 production of Ashtons ballet Sylvia. ... Alvin Ailey, Jr. ...


Marsalis collaborated with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center in 1995 to compose the string quartet, At The Octoroon Balls, and again in 1998 to create a response to the Stravinsky: A Soldier's Tale with his composition, A Fiddler's Tale. The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center (CMS) is an American organization dedicated to the performance and promotion of chamber music. ... An octoroon or mustee is the offspring of a quadroon and a European parent, having ancestry that is one-eighth Negroid. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... Histoire du soldat (sometimes written Lhistoire du soldat; translated as The Soldiers Tale or A Soldiers Tale) is a 1918 theatrical work to be read, played, and danced (lue, jouée et dansée) set to music by Igor Stravinsky. ...


In 1997 he became the first jazz musician to win the Pulitzer Prize in music, for his epic oratorio, Blood on the Fields, on the subject of slavery. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Blood on the Fields is a three and half hour jazz oratorio, although he did not use this term, by Wynton Marsalis. ... Slave redirects here. ...


In 2006, Marsalis' US$833,686 annual salary as Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center drew negative attention in an article published by Reader's Digest magazine regarding overspending by non-profit organizations.[2][3] Marsalis has never been married but has two sons with Candace Stanley and another son with actress Victoria Rowell. This implies that Wynton has 2 so-called "baby mama's". The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ...


Musical accomplishments

As a composer and performer, Marsalis is also represented on a quartet of Sony Classical releases, At the Octoroon Balls: String Quartet No. 1, A Fiddler's Tale, Reel Time and Sweet Release and Ghost Story: Two More Ballets by Wynton Marsalis. All are volumes of an eight-CD series, titled Swinging Into The 21st, that is an unprecedented set of albums released in the past year featuring a remarkable scope of original compositions and standards, from jazz to classical to ballet, by composers from Jelly Roll Morton to Igor Stravinsky to Monk, in addition to Marsalis. Morton in the 1920s Ferdinand Jelly Roll Morton September 20, 1890 - July 10, 1941) was an American virtuoso pianist, bandleader and composer who some call the first true composer of jazz music. ... Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky (Russian: Игорь Фёдорович Стравинский, Igor Fëdorovič Stravinskij) (June 17, 1882 – April 6, 1971) was a Russian composer, considered by many in both the West and his native land to be the most influential composer of 20th-century music. ... St. ...


At the Octoroon Balls features the world-premiere recording of Marsalis's first string quartet, performed by the Orion Quartet. The work was commissioned by Lincoln Center, and its premiere by the Orion Quartet in 1995 was presented in conjunction with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. A Fiddler's Tale, also commissioned by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for Marsalis/Stravinsky, a joint project of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Jazz At Lincoln Center, is work with narration about a musician who sells her soul to a record producer. It was premiered on April 23, 1998, at Hill Auditorium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. A version without narration was included on the album At the Octoroon Balls: String Quartet No. 1. Reeltime is Marsalis's score for the acclaimed John Singleton film Rosewood. This original music, featuring vocal performances by best-selling artists Cassandra Wilson and Shirley Caesar, was never used in the film. Marsalis also provided the score for the 1990 film Tune in Tomorrow, in which he also makes a cameo appearance as a New Orleans trumpeter with his band. Sweet Release and Ghost Story offers another world premiere recording of two original ballet scores by Marsalis, written for and premiered by the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and the Zhong Mei Dance Company, both in New York City. April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Rosewood refers to a number of richly hued timbers, brownish with darker veining. ... Cassandra Wilson (born December 4, 1955) is an American jazz singer and songwriter from Jackson, Mississippi. ... Shirley Caesar (b. ... Tune in Tomorrow is a film directed by Jon Amiel released in 1990 starring Barbara Hershey. ...


As an exclusive classical artist for Sony Classical, Marsalis has won critical acclaim for the recording In Gabriel's Garden (SK/ST 66244), featuring Baroque music for trumpet and orchestra. It includes performances of the Bach: Brandenburg Concerto no. 2 and Mouret: Rondeau, a video of which has been adopted as the new theme for PBS Masterpiece Theatre. The San Francisco Examiner wrote, "Marsalis continues to define great music making…[the pieces] are all articulated with dazzling clarity and enthusiasm."[citation needed] The album features the English Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Anthony Newman, and was produced by Steven Epstein. The English Chamber Orchestra is a small (hence chamber) orchestra based in London. ... Anthony Newman (born November 21, 1965 in Bellingham, Washington) is a retired defensive back for the NFL. Newman played for the Los Angeles Rams from 1988-1994, New Orleans Saints from 1995-1997, and the Oakland Raiders from 1998-1999. ...


Controversy

Marsalis's strongly held views regarding the roots of jazz and its development have generated some negative appraisals from jazz critics and fellow musicians. Down Beat magazine's online website says of Marsalis: Down Beat is an American magazine devoted to jazz. ...

For many, Wynton Marsalis saved pure jazz from a morass of pop fusion and noise. Others contend that the trumpeter instilled a regressive notion of the jazz tradition. This debate, not to mention his instrumental proficiency and compositional ambition, has made him one of the most prominent and controversial jazz musicians of the 1980s and 1990s.

Critic Scott Yanow praises Marsalis's talent, but has questioned his "selective knowledge of jazz history considering post-1965 avant-garde playing to be outside of jazz and 1970s fusion to be barren."[4] Trumpeter Lester Bowie opined of Marsalis's traditionalism, "If you retread what's gone before, even if it sounds like jazz, it could be anathema to the spirit of jazz."[5] In his 1997 book Blue: The Murder of Jazz Eric Nisenson argues that Marsalis's focus on a narrow portion of jazz's past is stifling the music's growth and preventing any further innovation.[6] Scott Yanow is a jazz commentator who has written for many magazines and websites including: Allmusic, JAZZIZ, CODA and The LA Jazz Scene. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Bitches Brew (1970) by Miles Davis is considered the most influential early fusion album. ... Lester Bowie (11 October 1941–8 November 1999) was a jazz trumpet player and composer. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Eric Nisenson (February 12, 1946 - August 15, 2003) was an American author and jazz historian. ...


Pierre Sprey, president of jazz record company Mapleshade Records, declares that "When Marsalis was nineteen, he was a fine jazz trumpeter ... But he was getting his tail beat off every night in Art Blakey's band. I don't think he could keep up. And finally he retreated to safe waters. He's a good classical trumpeter and thus he sees jazz as being a classical Music. He has no clue what's going on now."[7]


Miles Davis stated that Marsalis was "a nice young man, only confused." Davis was also bothered by what he saw as Columbia Records' promotion of Marsalis's music rather than his own, and this was a factor in Davis's departure from Columbia after several decades. Miles Dewey Davis III (26 May 1926 – 28 September 1991) was one of the most influential musicians of the latter half of the 20th century. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


Marsalis has also been criticized for his role in the Ken Burns documentary Jazz, which promoted a classicist view of jazz similar to the views of Marsalis himself. The documentary focused primarily on Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong among others, while failing to mention jazz artists from the period Marsalis views as barren (roughly 1965-the present, with the notable exception of the careers of Marsalis and his protégés). The documentary also angered many with subjective statements, often from Marsalis, about the comparative complexity, popularity, and general worth of the music of a wide variety of artists. As artistic director and co-producer of the project, Marsalis bore the brunt of the criticism of the nonetheless highly acclaimed series, which to many embodied the exclusive, classicist view of jazz for which Marsalis is known. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Jazz: A Film By Ken Burns is the last documentary in a trilogy by Ken Burns, following The Civil War and Baseball. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Hurricane Katrina

Marsalis emerged as one of the most notable New Orleans civic leaders in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In a number of public speeches and television ads, he tried to increase public awareness of the importance of rebuilding New Orleans. Marsalis also urged people to visit Louisiana as soon as possible. Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W...


Marsalis organized a large benefit at Jazz at Lincoln Center for musicians and other New Orleaneans affected by Hurrican Katrina. The benefit, called Higher Ground, featured many famous musicians, both traditional and contemporary, such as Cassandra Wilson, Diana Krall, Dianne Reeves, Norah Jones, Victor Goines, Herbie Hancock, and McCoy Tyner. Jazz at Lincoln Center is a new addition to the Lincoln Center performing arts complex, located at 60th Street and Broadway in New York City, slightly south of the main Lincoln Center campus and directly adjacent to Columbus Circle. ... Cassandra Wilson (born December 4, 1955) is an American jazz singer and songwriter from Jackson, Mississippi. ... Diana Jean Krall, OC, OBC (born November 16, 1964) is a Grammy award-winning Canadian jazz pianist and singer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and occasional actress. ... Herbert Jeffrey Hancock (born April 12, 1940) is an Academy Award and multiple Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and composer from Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Hancock is one of jazz musics most important and influential pianists and composers. ... Alfred McCoy Tyner (born December 11, 1938) is a jazz pianist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, best known for his work with the John Coltrane Quartet. ...


Marsalis was one of the participants in Movie Director Spike Lee's documentary When The Levees Broke: A Requiem In Four Acts. Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ...


Local politics

In the New Orleans mayoral campaign of 2006, Marsalis endorsed Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu over mayor Ray Nagin. Both candidates were Democratic party members. Nagin was reelected on the second ballot runoff. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources. ... Clarence Ray Nagin, Jr. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ...


International politics

Marsalis has helped raise awareness of Aung San Suu Kyi and human rights violations in Burma through concerts working with the Freedom Campaign and the US Campaign for Burma. Past music events have also included R.E.M., Damien Rice, and the the Black Eyed Peas. Aung San Suu Kyi (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ; IPA: ); born 19 June 1945 in Yangon (Rangoon), is a nonviolent pro-democracy activist and leader of the National League for Democracy in Myanmar (Burma), and a noted prisoner of conscience. ... . The Freedom Campaign is a joint venture of the Human Rights Action Center and US Campaign for Burma non-profit organizations. ... The United States Campaign for Burma (USCB) is a U.S.-based membership organization dedicated to empowering grassroots activists around the world to bring about an end to the military dictatorship in Burma. ... This article is about the band. ... Damien Rice (born December 7, 1973) is an Irish folk singer, famous for his two albums O and 9. ... The Black Eyed Peas is an American hip-hop group from Los Angeles, California, who have enjoyed worldwide pop success. ...


Awards and recognitions

Marsalis is an Eagle Scout and his brother Branford is a Life Scout in the Boy Scouts of America.[8] Marsalis has been awarded the 2005 National Medal of Arts of the United States, the Grand Prix du Disque of the Charles Cros Academy and the Edison Award of the Netherlands, and was elected an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Music in Britain. He has received several honorary doctoral degrees, and a variety of other recognitions from Brandeis University, Brown University, Columbia University, Denison University, Johns Hopkins University, the Manhattan School of Music, Princeton University, the University of Miami and Yale University.[9] An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) is a United States Scouting organization, with some presence in other countries. ... // Becks Futures - Christina Mackie Caldecott Medal for childrens book illustration - Kevin Henkes, Kittens First Full Moon Schock Prize in Visual Arts - Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa Wynne prize - Jenny Sages, The Road to Utopia The Gates, an installation by Christo and Jeanne-Claude that was up from... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... LAcadémie Charles Cros, the French equivalent of the US Recording Academy, is named in honor of Charles Cros. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... Denison University is a private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, Ohio, approximately 30 miles (50 km) east of Columbus. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ... “Yale” redirects here. ...


Marsalis has toured 30 countries on every continent except Antarctica, and nearly five million copies of his recordings have been sold worldwide. As of 2006, United Artists is considering releasing a feature film biopic on Marsalis, with Will Smith widely purported to be in consideration for the role. The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... “W. S.” redirects here. ...


Accolades

The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The George Peabody Medal is the highest honour the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University bestows. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... Teachers College, Columbia University (sometimes referred to simply as Teachers College; also referred to as Teachers College of Columbia University or the Columbia University Graduate School of Education) is the top ranked graduate school of education in the United States. ...

Doctor honoris causa

Doctor of Philosophy in Arts - Ph.D. Art

  • Academy of Southern Arts and Letters - 1994

Doctor of Arts - D.Art

Doctor of Music - D.Mus. Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ...

Doctor of Humane Letters - LH.D. Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... Howard University is a Carnegie Doctoral/Research extensive historically black university in [[Washington, D.C.] Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named after Oliver O. Howard. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... The Southern University at New Orleans is a University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... It has been suggested that The Poetry Collection be merged into this article or section. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... “Yale” redirects here. ...

Doctor of Fine Arts - D.F.Art Usen Castle, the most recognized building on campus Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Clark Atlanta University (CAU) is a private institution of higher education in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Facts Governors State University (GSU) is located in University Park, Illinois. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ...

For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Connecticut College is a coeducational, highly selective private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... Denison University is a private liberal arts and sciences college in Granville, Ohio, approximately 30 miles (50 km) east of Columbus. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, or RPI, is a nonsectarian, coeducational private research university in Troy, New York, a city lying just outside the state capital of Albany. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ...

Music Awards

Pulitzer Prize for Music The Pulitzer Prize for Music was first awarded in 1943. ...

Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album, Individual or Group Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... An oratorio is a large musical composition for orchestra, vocal soloists and chorus. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Jazz Album, Individual or Group has been presented since 1959. ...

  • 1985 Black Codes From the Underground
  • 1985 J Mood
  • 1985 Marsalis Standard Time - Volume I

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) The 27th Grammy Awards were held February 26, 1985, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 27th Grammy Awards were held February 26, 1985, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 29th Grammy Awards were held in 1987. ... The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with orchestra) has been awarded since 1959. ...

Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo The 25th Grammy Awards were held in 1983. ... Raymond John Leppard (born August 1, 1927) is a well-known British conductor and harpsichordist. ... The National Philharmonic Orchestra is a British orchestra created exclusively for recording purposes. ... Portrait by Thomas Hardy, 1792 Franz Joseph Haydn[1] (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was one of the most prominent composers of the Classical period, and is called by some the Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. A life-long resident of Austria, Haydn spent... Leopold Mozart Johann Georg Leopold Mozart (November 14, 1719 – May 28, 1787) was a composer, music teacher and violinist. ... Johann Nepomuk Hummel Johann Nepomuk Hummel or Jan Nepomuk Hummel (14 November 1778 – 17 October 1837) was a composer and virtuoso pianist of Austrian origin who was born in Pressburg (present-day Bratislava, Slovakia). ... The 26th Grammy Awards were held in 1984, and were broadcast live on American television. ... Raymond John Leppard (born August 1, 1927) is a well-known British conductor and harpsichordist. ... The English Chamber Orchestra is a small (hence chamber) orchestra based in London. ... George Frideric Handel, 1733 George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-born British Baroque composer who was a leading composer of concerti grossi, operas and oratorios. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ... Giuseppe Torelli Giuseppe Torelli (Verona, April 22, 1658 - Bologna, February 8, 1709) was an Italian violinist, pedagogue and composer. ... Johann Friedrich Fasch (April 15, 1688 – December 5, 1758) was a German composer. ... Johann Melchior Molter Johann Melchior Molter (born at Tiefenort, near Eisenach, 10 February 1696; died at Karlsruhe, 12 January 1765) was a German baroque composer and violinist. ... The Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Solo has been awarded since 1959. ...

  • 1983 Think of One
  • 1984 Hot House Flowers
  • 1985 Black Codes From the Underground

Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children The 25th Grammy Awards were held in 1983. ... The 26th Grammy Awards were held in 1984, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The 27th Grammy Awards were held February 26, 1985, and were broadcast live on American television. ... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children has been awarded since 1994. ...

  • 2000 Listen to the Storyteller

The 42nd Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 2000. ...

Discography

  • 1981 Wynton Marsalis
  • 1982 Fathers and Sons Columbia Records #FC 37972.
  • 1983 Trumpet Concertos (Haydn, Leopold Mozart, Hummel) Think of One
  • 1984 Haydn: Three Favorite Concertos (with Yo-Yo Ma and Cho-Liang Lin) Baroque Music for Trumpet (Purcell, Handel, Torelli, etc.) Hot House Flowers
  • 1985 Black Codes (From the Underground), J Mood
  • 1986 Marsalis Standard Time, Vol. I Live at Blues Alley Tomasi: Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra (Tomasi, Jolivet)
  • 1987 Carnaval
  • 1988 The Majesty of the Blues
  • 1988 Best of Wynton Marsalis Portrait of Wynton Marsalis Baroque Music for Trumpets
  • 1989 Copland/Vaughan Williams/Hindemith (Eastman Wind Ensemble) Crescent City Christmas Card The Majesty of the Blues
  • 1990 Tune In Tomorrow... The Original Soundtrack Standard Time Vol. 3: The Resolution of Romance
  • 1991 Thick In The South: Soul Gestures In Southern Blue, Vol. 1 Uptown Ruler: Soul Gestures In Southern Blue, Vol. 2 Levee Low Moan: Soul Gestures In Southern Blue, Vol. 3 Standard Time Vol. 2: Intimacy Calling
  • 1992 Concert for Planet Earth Blue Interlude Baroque Duet - A film by Susan Froemke * Peter Gelb * Albert Maysles * Pat Jaffe
  • 1992 Baroque Duet - with Kathleen Battle
  • 1992 Citi Movement
  • 1993 On the Twentieth Century…: Hindemith, Poulenc, Bernstein, Ravel
  • 1994 In This House, On This Morning Greatest Hits: Handel
  • 1995 Why Toes Tap: Marsalis on Rhythm Listening for Clues: Marsalis on Form Tackling the Monster: Marsalis on Practice (VHS) Sousa to Satchmo: Marsalis on the Jazz Band Greatest Hits: Baroque Joe Cool's Blues (with Ellis Marsalis)
  • 1996 In Gabriel's Garden
  • 1997 Liberty! Jump Start and Jazz Blood On The Fields
  • 1998 Classic Wynton The Midnight Blues: Standard Time, Vol. 5
  • 1999 Reeltime Mr. Jelly Lord: Standard Time, Vol. 6 Listen to the Storyteller Sweet Release and Ghost Story: Two More Ballets by Wynton Marsalis At the Octoroon Balls - String Quartet No. 1; A Fiddler's Tale Suite Franz Joseph Haydn Los Elefantes (with Arturo Sandoval) Big Train (The Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra) Marsalis Plays Monk: Standard Time, Vol. 4
  • 2000 The London Concert The Marciac Suite
  • 2001 Classical Hits Popular Songs: The Best Of Wynton Marsalis
  • 2002 All Rise Trumpet Concertos Classic Kathleen Battle: A Portrait
  • 2003 Mark O'Connor's Hot Swing Trio: In Full Swing
  • 2004 The Magic Hour Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson
  • 2005 Live at the House of Tribes
  • 2007 From the Plantation to the Penitentiary

Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... (Franz) Joseph Haydn (in German, Josef; he never used the Franz) (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was a leading composer of the classical period. ... Leopold Mozart Johann Georg Leopold Mozart (November 14, 1719 – May 28, 1787) was a composer, music teacher and violinist. ... Johann Nepomuk Hummel was an Austrian composer and pianist. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... (Franz) Joseph Haydn (in German, Josef; he never used the Franz) (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was a leading composer of the classical period. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ma Yo-Yo Ma (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (b. ... Cho-Liang Lin (Chinese: 林昭亮, born 1960) is a Taiwanese-American violinist who is renowned for his appearances as a soloist with major orchestras. ... Purcell is a family name in English. ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Giuseppe Torelli (Verona, April 22, 1658 - Bologna, February 8, 1709) was an Italian violinist, pedagogue and composer. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Black Codes (From the Underground) is a 1985 post-bop jazz album by trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Henri Tomasi (August 17, 1901 to January 13, 1971) was a French classical composer and conductor. ... André Jolivet (August 8, 1905 – December 20, 1974) was a French composer. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music. ... Ralph Vaughan Williams (October 12, 1872 – August 26, 1958) was an influential British composer. ... Paul Hindemith (November 16, 1895 – December 28, 1963) was a German classical composer, violist, teacher, theorist and conductor. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Blue Interlude is an album by the Wynton Marsalis Septet, released in 1992, produced by Steve Epstein Brother Veal Monologue For Sugar Cane and Sweetie Pie Blue Interlude And The Band Played On The Jubilee Suite Sometimes It Goes Like That Reginald Veal - bass Herlin Riley - drums Marcus Roberts - piano... David and Albert Maysles Brothers Albert and David Maysles were a documentary filmmaking team whose films include Salesman, Gimme Shelter and Grey Gardens. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Kathleen Battle (b. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Citi Movement is a 1992 jazz album by Wynton Marsalis. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Paul Hindemith aged 28. ... Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc (IPA: ) (January 7, 1899 - January 30, 1963) was a French composer and a member of the French group Les Six. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Maurice Ravel in 1912. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... John Philip Sousa John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 - March 6, 1932), is probably the most famous marching band conductor (although his band rarely marched) and composer in history. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (August 4, 19011 – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nickname Satchmo) was an African American jazz musician. ... Ellis Marsalis (born 1934, New Orleans, LA) is an American musician. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Portrait by Thomas Hardy, 1792 Franz Joseph Haydn[1] (March 31, 1732 – May 31, 1809) was one of the most prominent composers of the Classical period, and is called by some the Father of the Symphony and Father of the String Quartet. A life-long resident of Austria, Haydn spent... Arturo Sandoval (born November 6, 1949) is a jazz trumpeter and pianist. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Kathleen Battle (b. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark OConnor (born August 5, 1961 in Seattle, Washington) is widely considered to be the most prominent fiddler of his generation. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Live at the House of Tribes is an album by Wynton Marsalis. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... From the Plantation to the Penitentiary is 2007 jazz album by Wynton Marsalis. ...

With Irvin Mayfield

Released Album Artist Label
2003-01-25
"Half Past Autumn Suite"
Irvin Mayfield
Basin Street Records

Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Half Past Autumn Suite is a 2001 jazz recording, released in 2003, by Irvin Mayfield. ... Irvin Mayfield, Jr. ...

Quotes

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wynton Marsalis
  • "You have the conception of New Orleans jazz: group improvisation, cooperative ensemble playing, which functions exactly like a democracy. Which means each person has the right to play what they want to play, but the responsibility to play something that makes everybody else sound good."
  • "I wanted to make somebody feel like Coltrane made me feel listening to it."

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

See also

  • Wikimedia of "A Wheel Within a Wheel" from Wynton

References

  1. ^ Robert Battle. Ancestry of Wynton Marsalis. wargs.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  2. ^ "Jazz at Lincoln Center", Charity Navigator. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  3. ^ Michael Crowley (2006). That's Outrageous-Charity Chiselers. Reader's Digest. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  4. ^ Scott Yanow. Wynton Marsalis Biography. allmusic. Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  5. ^ "Blowing up a storm", The Guardian, 25 Jan 2003. Retrieved on 2007-05-20. 
  6. ^ Nisenson, Eric (1997). Blue: The Murder of Jazz. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 0312167857. 
  7. ^ Jeffrey St. Clair (28 February 2001). Now, That's Not Jazz. Gerry Hemingway. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  8. ^ Marsalis Family. SBG Making Music (2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  9. ^ Contemporary Black Biography Wynton Marsalis, Jazz Musician. Pomona College Hart Institute. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  • The Music of Black Americans: A History. Eileen Southern. W. W. Norton & Company; 3rd edition. ISBN 0-393-97141-4

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Eileen Jackson Southern (born 1920 in Minneapolis - died October 13, 2002 in Port Charlotte, Florida) was an African American musicologist, reasearcher, author and teacher. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wynton Marsalis - Music Downloads - Online (887 words)
Marsalis' sometimes inaccurate statements about jazz of the 1970s and the avant-garde in general made some observers angry, and his rather derivative tone at the time made it seem as if there was always going to have to be an asterisk by his name when evaluating his talents.
The son of pianist Ellis Marsalis, the younger brother of Branford and the older brother of Delfeayo and Jason (the Marsalis clan as a whole can be accurately called "The First Family of Jazz"), Wynton (who was named after pianist Wynton Kelly) received his first trumpet at age six from Ellis' employer, Al Hirt.
Marsalis really developed his writing during this era (being influenced by Duke Ellington) and the septet proved to be a perfect outlet for his arranging.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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